History Main / OneHourWorkWeek

13th Oct '17 7:25:06 PM SirVancelot131
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* ''Series/{{iCarly}}'': Spencer is a sculpture artist. He manages to repeatedly sell his sculptures for huge piles of cash in very short spaces of time, even after rebuilding them 2 or 3 times when they catch on fire.

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* ''Series/{{iCarly}}'': Spencer is a sculpture artist. He manages to repeatedly sell his sculptures for huge piles of cash in very short spaces of time, even after rebuilding them 2 or 3 times when they catch on fire. It is implied in the finale that he also gets assistance from his and Carly's father, who is military colonel.
20th Sep '17 11:40:06 AM AndIntroducingALeg
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* A curious fact about inventions and discoveries in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries is the remarkable amount of it that was done by Anglican vicars. This was due to three factors. Firstly, the Church of England had a rule that all vicars must have a university degree, although it didn't matter what in. Secondly, vicars enjoyed good incomes, partly through tithing, but mostly rent, through the Church's status as a landowner. Thirdly, and reason for this entry, their actual duty as vicars required them to deliver one sermon a week, and nothing else. They didn't even have to write them as compendiums of pre-written sermons were easily available. This combination of brains, money and time meant they could devote their energies to all sorts of other things.
17th Sep '17 11:17:03 AM CaptainCrawdad
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** Justified, since he's living off his army pension until he marries Mary Morstan, and his work with Holmes becomes more sporadic, and even then it's mentioned his medical practice is never really profitable. When Holmes returns in "The Empty House" and with no wife to support, since Mary passed away, he sells it off and moves back to Baker Street.
** ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' shows John working as a GP about twice (he shares a practice with Sarah in "The Blind Banker" and "The Empty Hearse" features a lengthy scene of him working, the point of which is that he ''should'' be having exciting adventures with Sherlock instead). The rest of the time he's Sherlock's full-time sidekick. He also has a very popular blog, which he is often shown working on.
** The 2009 Film/SherlockHolmes starts just as Watson is moving out and reducing his involvement with Holmes to get married. He is still a respected enough doctor to be called upon to confirm Blackwood's death when he is hanged.



* ''Literature/ReadyPlayerOne'' has Wade putting in one day at his technical support job, as a way to explain how he's paying for his fairly expensive immersion rig and in game costs. The reader sees him putting in one day, and it's not mentioned again.

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* ''Literature/ReadyPlayerOne'' has Wade putting in one day at his technical support job, as a way to explain how he's paying for his fairly expensive immersion rig and in game in-game costs. The reader sees him putting in one day, and it's not mentioned again.
17th Sep '17 11:12:12 AM CaptainCrawdad
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** Justified with [[LethallyStupid Dougal]], since the one time he did [[TheFunInFuneral a funeral ended with a Royce in the casket,]] as well as the NoodleIncident that got him sent to Craggy Island apparently got a lot of nuns killed.



** Catalina also gets her old job at the strip club back as the "bouncing girl" (she doesn't strip but just jumps to a song).



** When Sam's brother shapeshifts into him by accident, he fires Sookie for once again being late, not having his brother's patience.
* ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' plays with it. Both Prue and Piper had full time jobs early on, Prue in an auction house and Piper in a restaurant and many episodes have them rushing out of work to fight demons, making "family emergency" excuses. Some demons do come to their work though. In later seasons Prue is a photographer, Piper owns a club (and therefore doesn't have to be there all the time; she has people to help her run it) and Phoebe is an advice columnist, with some episodes showing her working on her column from home. Given that she becomes quite well known and popular in San Francisco it's likely that her boss would cut her some slack for this. Paige is initially a social worker and many season 4 episodes have her dealing with demonic problems at work, but then she leaves her job in season 5 and doesn't work full time again except when she runs Magic School (and nobody is going to question a Charmed One having to leave to take care of demons).
** Lampshaded in one episode where Phoebe goes for a job interview and says she'll need a flexible work schedule. She doesn't get the job.

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** When Sam's brother shapeshifts into him by accident, he fires Sookie for once again being late, not having his brother's patience.
* ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' plays with it. Both Prue and Piper had full time jobs early on, Prue in an auction house and Piper in a restaurant and many episodes have them rushing out of work to fight demons, making "family emergency" excuses. Some demons do come to their work though. In later seasons Prue is a photographer, Piper owns a club (and therefore doesn't have to be there all the time; she has people to help her run it) and Phoebe is an advice columnist, with some episodes showing her working on her column from home. Given that she becomes quite well known and popular in San Francisco it's likely that her boss would cut her some slack for this. Paige is initially a social worker and many season 4 episodes have her dealing with demonic problems at work, but then she leaves her job in season 5 and doesn't work full time again except when she runs Magic School (and nobody is going to question a Charmed One having to leave to take care of demons).
**
demons). Lampshaded in one episode where Phoebe goes for a job interview and says she'll need a flexible work schedule. She doesn't get the job.



* Zig-Zagged on ''Series/{{Chuck}}''. As part of the Nerd Herd, Chuck can skip out on work hours relatively easily on spy missions by logging the time as "being on an install." It's also helped in the first three seasons by Big Mike being one of the worst slackers at the store, and it's not until Emmett comes aboard in season 2 that anyone ''actually'' takes a look at Chuck's work forms.
** However Casey is a Green Shirt at the store, so doesn't have Chuck's excuse for skipping work on his cover job.
*** Once Morgan is brought into the loop in season 3 this becomes less of a problem since they now have someone of authority to cover for them. By season 4, the Buy More is now owned by the CIA and with Morgan assigned as store manager, completely eliminating this problem. Ironically, it comes ''back'' as a problem to an extent in season 5 after Chuck and Sarah buy the store, since they initially neglect their jobs as owners.

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* Zig-Zagged on ''Series/{{Chuck}}''. ''Series/{{Chuck}}''.
**
As part of the Nerd Herd, Chuck can skip out on work hours relatively easily on spy missions by logging the time as "being on an install." It's also helped in the first three seasons by Big Mike being one of the worst slackers at the store, and it's not until Emmett comes aboard in season 2 that anyone ''actually'' takes a look at Chuck's work forms.
** However Casey is a Green Shirt at the store, so doesn't have Chuck's excuse for skipping work on his cover job.
*** ** Once Morgan is brought into the loop in season 3 this becomes less of a problem since they now have someone of authority to cover for them. By season 4, the Buy More is now owned by the CIA and with Morgan assigned as store manager, completely eliminating this problem. Ironically, it comes ''back'' as a problem to an extent in season 5 after Chuck and Sarah buy the store, since they initially neglect their jobs as owners.



* Rebecca from ''Series/CrazyExGirlfriend'' does go to work, and her job does occasionally factor in to the plot of the episode, but also takes looong breaks from the office. Justified somewhat in the fact that she is apparently the best real estate lawyer ever, and so is constantly impressing both her boss and their clients even if she doesn't actually ''work'' much.
** Lampshaded twice in Season 2 Episode 3, "All Signs Point to Josh...or is it Josh's Friend?". Rebecca leaves work to take a walk in the middle of the day due to her latest crisis with Josh and Paula leaves because she realizes [[spoiler:she might be pregnant]]. Darryl chases after them meekly protesting that they can't just leave work all the time. Rebecca runs into Greg in a park and during their conversation, she remarks "Alright, I should get back to work...I'm literally never there. It's a miracle I'm not fired." However, she does not return to work.

to:

* Rebecca from ''Series/CrazyExGirlfriend'' does go to work, and her job does occasionally factor in to the plot of the episode, but also takes looong breaks from the office. Justified somewhat in the fact that she is apparently the best real estate lawyer ever, and so is constantly impressing both her boss and their clients even if she doesn't actually ''work'' much.
**
much. Lampshaded twice in Season 2 Episode 3, "All Signs Point to Josh...or is it Josh's Friend?". Rebecca leaves work to take a walk in the middle of the day due to her latest crisis with Josh and Paula leaves because she realizes [[spoiler:she might be pregnant]]. Darryl chases after them meekly protesting that they can't just leave work all the time. Rebecca runs into Greg in a park and during their conversation, she remarks "Alright, I should get back to work...I'm literally never there. It's a miracle I'm not fired." However, she does not return to work.
17th Sep '17 11:08:24 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''Series/ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphia'': the gang's occupation as bar-owners was specifically selected to free them up for hijinks during the day. In the original pilot, the characters are struggling actors, selected for the same reason. However, the gang is still seen off the job at night, and even during the regular business hours of other bars around town. The show lampshaded this in one episode where the bar's patrons are described as simply serving themselves. It's a RunningGag that Paddy's Pub is considered anywhere between "dive bar" and "''Series/KitchenNightmares'' episode in the making", since the gang spends so much time on {{Zany Scheme}}s and so little on maintaining the bar, which is mostly propped up by Frank's ArbitrarilyLargeBankAccount.

to:

* ''Series/ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphia'': the gang's occupation as bar-owners was specifically selected to free them up for hijinks during the day. In the original pilot, the characters are struggling actors, selected for the same reason. However, the gang is still seen off the job at night, and even during the regular business hours of other bars around town. The show lampshaded this in one episode where the bar's patrons are described as simply serving themselves. It's While the bar has always been portrayed as a RunningGag dive, later seasons increasingly imply that Paddy's Pub is considered anywhere between "dive bar" and "''Series/KitchenNightmares'' episode in the making", since the gang spends so much time on {{Zany Scheme}}s and so little on maintaining the bar, which is mostly propped up by Frank's ArbitrarilyLargeBankAccount.ArbitrarilyLargeBankAccount is the only thing propping it up.
17th Sep '17 11:04:23 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* Before getting sold to WME-IMG, the [[MixedMartialArts Ultimate Fighting Championship]] tends to hire its most famous and loyal retired fighters to cushy executive positions in the company with murky responsibilities, mostly to bank on their continuing popularity and respect in the sport. In one behind-the-scenes video, UFC President Dana White jokes with "Vice President of Athlete Development and Government Relations" Matt Hughes about how the retired champion actually showed up for a day of work this year. After the sale, many of these positions, including Hughes', were dissolved.

to:

* Before getting sold to WME-IMG, the [[MixedMartialArts Ultimate Fighting Championship]] tends tended to hire its most famous and loyal retired fighters to cushy executive positions in the company with murky responsibilities, mostly to bank on their continuing popularity and respect in the sport. In one behind-the-scenes video, UFC President Dana White jokes with "Vice President of Athlete Development and Government Relations" Matt Hughes about how the retired champion actually showed up for a day of work this year. After the sale, many of these positions, including Hughes', were dissolved.
17th Sep '17 11:03:14 AM CaptainCrawdad
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** Sinecures still exist in Japan in the form of "amakudari" which is pretty much the same things but involves moving high-level ex-bureaucrats to private positions.
*** "Amakudari", literally "descent from the skies", isn't entirely a sinecure, because it implies a high-level government bureaucrat getting a job within a private company somehow connected to his former department. As the bureaucrat in question fully retains his ([[AlwaysMale it is rarely "her"]]) connections, this essentially makes him a [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections dedicated lobbyist for his new company]]. In the other sense of the word, when a large private company sends off one of its middle-managers to become an executive in a subsidiary, this also doesn't automatically imply a no-show job, and the employee in question is usually expected to fulfill his responsibilities in full.
*** Closer to the traditional sinecure in a Japanese corporate world would be so-called "madogiwazoku", or "window-ledge tribe", usually the senior employees who either become useless due to their age/changing business practices, or [[KickedUpstairs screwed up badly enough to keep them out of the real work]], but who couldn't be fired because of their seniority and/or company loyalty -- this is especially prevalent in companies that still practice the lifetime employment. These guys will then be given some meaningless position with an important sounding title, but none of real responsibilities, leaving them nothing to do but gaze out of the window for the whole day. Note that in the work-centered Japanese culture this is ''not'' an honorable position, and assigning someone to madogiwazoku is basically an unstated request to the employee to quietly retire by himself.

to:

** Sinecures still exist in Japan in the form of "amakudari" which is pretty much the same things but involves moving high-level ex-bureaucrats to private positions.
*** "Amakudari", literally "descent from the skies", isn't entirely a sinecure, because it implies a high-level government bureaucrat getting a job within a private company somehow connected to his former department. As the bureaucrat in question fully retains his ([[AlwaysMale it is rarely "her"]]) connections, this essentially makes him a [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections dedicated lobbyist for his new company]].
In the other sense of the word, when a large private company sends off one of its middle-managers to become an executive in a subsidiary, this also doesn't automatically imply a no-show job, and the employee in question is usually expected to fulfill his responsibilities in full.
*** Closer to the traditional sinecure in a
Japanese corporate world would be so-called "madogiwazoku", or "window-ledge tribe", usually the senior employees who either become useless due to their age/changing business practices, or [[KickedUpstairs screwed up badly enough to keep them out of the real work]], but who couldn't be fired because of their seniority and/or company loyalty -- this is especially prevalent in companies that still practice the lifetime employment. These guys will then be given some meaningless position with an important sounding title, but none of real responsibilities, leaving them nothing to do but gaze out of the window for the whole day. Note that in the work-centered Japanese culture this is ''not'' an honorable position, and assigning someone to madogiwazoku is basically an unstated request to the employee to quietly retire by himself.



** In some areas, retail and service industry employees may appear like this as well, thanks to the recession and certain laws that give employers incentive to hire only part time workers. And depending on your view of unemployment, it may qualify as well.
** Service workers may also work strange shift patterns that give this impression (though in RealLife they have to squeeze sleep into their day somewhere)
* The increasing trend of both work-from-home and "Flex hours" results in people who work in otherwise normal 9-5 jobs look this way; being able to have off every Friday afternoon (or whole day) seems like an unwarranted vacation, until you find out that instead of working 9-5 (or 9-6 with an hour lunch), it's 8:30-6:30 with only a 30 minute lunch. Or the jealousy of "always being home" without realizing that you still need to punch in an eight hour day instead of spending all your time lazing around the house.
** Workers at remote mines in Canada usually have a two-week in/two-week out work schedule. While some people jump at the job thinking having two solid weeks off is great, they often fail to note that the "two-weeks in" is a ''solid'' two weeks: 14 straight days, no days off. And those are often 12 hour work days, so over a 14 day period they'll work roughly the same amount of time in that two weeks as they would in a normal 8.5 hour job/5 days week over in a month. Many people end up not being able to deal with it, while others thrive and even have a second job in their two weeks out.
* Many people think clergy fall under this trope, not realizing that many are required to have attended a school of preaching, and must study throughout the week in order to plan their weekly sermon, and would have other responsibilities at their house of worship as well. And if the congregation isn't very large, they might also work a regular job in addition.
** And even ones who don't have a secular job still tend to have other responsibilities during the week such as running charities or other church functions and tending to the pastoral needs of their congregation.
** There was some truth in this historically, in the days of near-universal tithes, before they were mostly abolished late 19th century. It was acceptable in times of low literacy for clergymen simply to read out from a book of sermons, or delegate the whole business to their curate.
*** Many of these men actually made good use of the time it freed up: a lot of important research in natural sciences done in Britain throughout the 19th century was carried out at home by clergymen.

to:

** In some areas, retail and service industry employees may appear like this as well, thanks to the recession and certain laws that give employers incentive to hire only part time workers. And depending on your view of unemployment, it may qualify as well.
** Service workers may also work strange shift patterns that give this impression (though in RealLife they have to squeeze sleep into their day somewhere)
* The increasing trend of both work-from-home and "Flex hours" results in people who work in otherwise normal 9-5 jobs look this way; being able to have off every Friday afternoon (or whole day) seems like an unwarranted vacation, until you find out that instead of working 9-5 (or 9-6 with an hour lunch), it's 8:30-6:30 with only a 30 minute lunch. Or the jealousy of "always being home" without realizing that you still need to punch in an eight hour day instead of spending all your time lazing around the house.
**
Workers at remote mines in Canada usually have a two-week in/two-week out work schedule. While some people jump at the job thinking having two solid weeks off is great, they often fail to note that the "two-weeks in" is a ''solid'' two weeks: 14 straight days, no days off. And those are often 12 hour work days, so over a 14 day period they'll work roughly the same amount of time in that two weeks as they would in a normal 8.5 hour job/5 days week over in a month. Many people end up not being able to deal with it, while others thrive and even have a second job in their two weeks out.
* Many people think clergy fall under this trope, not realizing that many are required to have attended a school of preaching, and must study throughout the week in order to plan their weekly sermon, and would have other responsibilities at their house of worship as well. And if the congregation isn't very large, they might also work a regular job in addition.
** And even ones who don't have a secular job still tend to have other responsibilities during the week such as running charities or other church functions and tending to the pastoral needs of their congregation.
** There was some truth in this historically, in the days of near-universal tithes, before they were mostly abolished late 19th century. It was acceptable in times of low literacy for clergymen simply to read out from a book of sermons, or delegate the whole business to their curate.
*** Many of these men actually made good use of the time it freed up: a lot of important research in natural sciences done in Britain throughout the 19th century was carried out at home by clergymen.
out.



* While technically not work, unschool education is a school where there are no test, no assignments, no report cards and best of all no grades. There is no punishment for not going to school so children spend their free time either independently learning or doing whatever they want.
** In fact, probably the second most common misconception that the general populace has about homeschooling (the first being that homeschoolers don't get socialized) is that all homeschoolers have one. In fact, it's more of a spectrum, with unschoolers at one end, super rigid homeschoolers (the type that have desks and uniforms in their own homes) at the other, and most homeschoolers in-between.



** The same pay-to-work ratio is granted professional speakers who retired with some prestige from their job title alone. All they need to do is show up and regurgitate old speeches or ramble at will to take away bundles of money. In this regard, ex-Presidents, former CEO's, and Dan Rather are more like porn stars than actors.

to:

** The same pay-to-work ratio is granted professional * Professional speakers who retired with some prestige from their job title alone. All they need to do is show up and regurgitate old speeches or ramble at will to take away bundles of money. In this regard, ex-Presidents, former CEO's, and Dan Rather are more like porn stars than actors.



* The [[MixedMartialArts Ultimate Fighting Championship]] tends to hire its most famous and loyal retired fighters to cushy executive positions in the company with murky responsibilities, mostly to bank on their continuing popularity and respect in the sport. In one behind-the-scenes video, UFC President Dana White jokes with "Vice President of Athlete Development and Government Relations" Matt Hughes about how the retired champion actually showed up for a day of work this year.

to:

* The Before getting sold to WME-IMG, the [[MixedMartialArts Ultimate Fighting Championship]] tends to hire its most famous and loyal retired fighters to cushy executive positions in the company with murky responsibilities, mostly to bank on their continuing popularity and respect in the sport. In one behind-the-scenes video, UFC President Dana White jokes with "Vice President of Athlete Development and Government Relations" Matt Hughes about how the retired champion actually showed up for a day of work this year. After the sale, many of these positions, including Hughes', were dissolved.
17th Sep '17 10:56:26 AM CaptainCrawdad
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** Daphne's supposedly "full time" duties as Martin's physical therapist are also somewhat vague, and can easily allow one to reach the conclusion that Frasier is essentially paying her just to hang out in his home. A theory verified in the ArrivalEpisode: Frasier didn't actually mean to hire a full-time therapist for Martin (who certainly doesn't need full-time care), but Daphne was mis-informed by her agency, and needed a live-in job... and Martin somehow persuaded Frasier to make it one rather continue their search for the perfect therapist.

to:

** Daphne's supposedly "full time" duties as Martin's physical therapist are also somewhat vague, and can easily allow one to reach the conclusion that Frasier is essentially paying her just to hang out in his home. A theory verified It's established in her first episode that the ArrivalEpisode: Frasier didn't actually mean to hire a full-time therapist for Martin (who certainly doesn't Cranes don't need full-time care), a live-in therapist, but Daphne was mis-informed by her agency, and needed a live-in job... job, and the Cranes were otherwise completely unable to find a therapist Martin somehow persuaded Frasier to make it one rather continue their search for the perfect therapist.approved of.
8th Sep '17 3:19:22 PM MBG159
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* ''Series/ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphia'': the gang's occupation as bar-owners was specifically selected to free them up for hijinks during the day. In the original pilot, the characters are struggling actors, selected for the same reason. However, the gang is still seen off the job at night, and even during the regular business hours of other bars around town. The show lampshaded this in one episode where the bar's patrons are described as simply serving themselves.

to:

* ''Series/ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphia'': the gang's occupation as bar-owners was specifically selected to free them up for hijinks during the day. In the original pilot, the characters are struggling actors, selected for the same reason. However, the gang is still seen off the job at night, and even during the regular business hours of other bars around town. The show lampshaded this in one episode where the bar's patrons are described as simply serving themselves. It's a RunningGag that Paddy's Pub is considered anywhere between "dive bar" and "''Series/KitchenNightmares'' episode in the making", since the gang spends so much time on {{Zany Scheme}}s and so little on maintaining the bar, which is mostly propped up by Frank's ArbitrarilyLargeBankAccount.
31st Aug '17 8:28:36 AM HalcyonDayz
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* [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/TabletopGame/Shadowrun Shadowrun]] characters can actually take a disadvantage of having a job they have to attend and that pays them. You can get points for having to turn up for as little as 10 hours a week and get a regular income. This being Shadowrun most PCs don't even try hard to pretend to have a legal job.

to:

* [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/TabletopGame/Shadowrun Shadowrun]] characters can actually take a disadvantage of having a job they have to attend and that pays them. You can get points for having to turn up for as little as 10 hours a week and get a regular income. This being Shadowrun most PCs [=PCs=] don't even try hard to pretend to have a legal job.
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