History Main / OneBulletClips

14th Feb '17 7:00:09 PM dlchen145
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** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots'' eliminated the instant reloads (largely because of how easy they'd made ''VideoGame/{{Metal Gear Solid 3|SnakeEater}}''[='=]s [[HumongousMecha Shagohod]] boss) and required the actual reload animation play out; this showed him taking out the old magazine and tucking it away for later. However, almost all weapons have a DramaticGunCock which usually ejects an unspent round, which is never deducted from the player's total, and all weapons that aren't single-shot follow this trope to the letter. Moreover, the abundance of usable weapons compared to previous games meant the ammo system had to be switched out from dedicated ammo pickups for each weapon to [[UniversalAmmunition identifying by caliber and having weapons draw from the same ammo pools]], allowing you to instantly reload an empty M14 EBR by picking up a bad guy's SCAR without actually having to go through the process of unloading the ammo from it.

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** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots'' eliminated the instant reloads (largely because of how easy they'd made ''VideoGame/{{Metal Gear Solid 3|SnakeEater}}''[='=]s [[HumongousMecha Shagohod]] boss) and required the actual reload animation play out; this showed him taking out the old magazine and tucking it away for later. However, almost all weapons have a DramaticGunCock which usually ejects an unspent round, which is never deducted from round (explaining why you don't have an extra round in the player's total, chamber) and all weapons that aren't single-shot follow this trope to the letter. Moreover, the abundance of usable weapons compared to previous games meant the ammo system had to be switched out from dedicated ammo pickups for each weapon to [[UniversalAmmunition identifying by caliber and having weapons draw from the same ammo pools]], allowing you to instantly reload an empty M14 EBR by picking up a bad guy's SCAR without actually having to go through the process of unloading the ammo from it.
31st Jan '17 9:34:18 AM garthvader
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** All of the games do have the transforming ammo / magazines issue caused by having ammo in classes: most ridiculously, in ''Far Cry 2'' "flame" ammo is shown as a gas can, which can somehow morph into ammunition for a flaregun. '''Far Cry 4'' has the same ammo pickups feed sniper rifles chambered for [=7.62x54mmR=], .308 Winchester, .50 BMG, and a ''.700 Nitro Express hunting rifle''.
31st Jan '17 9:32:43 AM garthvader
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* The ''VideoGame/FarCry'' series plays the trope straight at all times, bar the double-barreled shotguns in ''VideoGame/FarCry2''[='=]s DLC and ''VideoGame/FarCry4''. These weapons replace both shells with every reload, but only because the character ''fires'' both shells at once (something shotguns of that type are indeed capable of doing in real life, as they generally have two separate triggers), making it a literal example in practice.

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* The ''VideoGame/FarCry'' series plays the trope straight at all times, bar the double-barreled shotguns in ''VideoGame/FarCry2''[='=]s DLC and ''VideoGame/FarCry4''. These weapons replace both shells with every reload, but only because the character ''fires'' both shells at once (something shotguns of that type are indeed capable of doing in real life, as they generally have two separate triggers), making it a literal example in practice. The double-barrel rifle in ''Far Cry 4'', however, ''does'' get a different reload animation if only one round has been fired.
**All of the games do have the transforming ammo / magazines issue caused by having ammo in classes: most ridiculously, in ''Far Cry 2'' "flame" ammo is shown as a gas can, which can somehow morph into ammunition for a flaregun. '''Far Cry 4'' has the same ammo pickups feed sniper rifles chambered for [=7.62x54mmR=], .308 Winchester, .50 BMG, and a ''.700 Nitro Express hunting rifle''.
4th Dec '16 2:16:27 PM Kadorhal
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* ''VideoGame/SWAT4'' averts this as a game mechanic. For all weapons that have detachable magazines, the player has a set number of mags and the game keeps track of how many rounds are in each one. Reloading while your gun still has ammo in it will result in a "tactical reload" in which a fresh mag will be inserted, while the old mag will be kept with however many rounds are still remaining for later use. Reloading when you gun is empty will result in the empty mag being discarded (a so-called "emergency reload").
4th Dec '16 1:55:10 PM Kadorhal
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** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' switched from the MSX games' classic "can fire as long as you have bullets" to actually requiring a reload after every certain number of shots from a gun, but the trope is still played perfectly straight. In particular, Snake can reload instantly simply by un-equipping and re-equipping his current weapon, and keeps all his ammo. In a rare example of the entire magazine teleporting back into the player's inventory, if the player actually finishes a magazine, it's stored in their inventory despite being discarded on the ground during the reload animation. Moreover, Snake loads three tracers at the base of each FAMAS mag, yet never encounters an entire magazine of consolidated tracers. (TruthInTelevision once again: It is standard practice in the French military to load tracers at the end of their magazines to signal that they are running low and will need to reload soon.)

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** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' switched from the MSX games' classic "can fire as long as you have bullets" to actually requiring a reload after every certain number of shots from a gun, but the trope is still played perfectly straight. In particular, Snake can reload instantly simply by un-equipping and re-equipping his current weapon, and keeps all his ammo. In a rare example of the entire magazine teleporting back into the player's inventory, if the player actually finishes a magazine, it's stored in their inventory despite being discarded on the ground during the reload animation. Moreover, Snake loads three tracers at the base of each FAMAS mag, mag (which is [[TruthInTelevision standard practice in the French military]]), yet never encounters an entire magazine of consolidated tracers. (TruthInTelevision once again: It is standard practice in the French military to load tracers at the end of their magazines to signal that they are running low and will need to reload soon.)tracers.
19th Nov '16 1:44:32 PM Kadorhal
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Another thing that is rarely simulated is chambered rounds; usually when a magazine-fed closed-bolt weapon is reloaded without being empty, a round will remain in the chamber from the previous magazine. This will mean after reloading you'll have a full magazine plus an "extra" round in the chamber; generally in a game the chambered round is ignored to allow for a DramaticGunCock which would be pointless in reality since save for empty reloads the gun will never have ''stopped'' being cocked.[[note]]Note that in RealLife, loading a full magazine into a weapon with a round in the chamber can potentially damage the weapon and/or magazine, and as such is usually not advised. Then again, military forces typically do this anyway; every extra bullet counts. Pulling the slide/handle/what have you after a reload every time is also a real-world technique, which sacrifices the possibility of an extra round for insurance that there always ''is'' a round in the chamber.[[/note]]

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Another thing that is rarely simulated is chambered rounds; usually when a magazine-fed closed-bolt weapon is reloaded without being empty, a round will remain in the chamber from the previous magazine. This will mean after reloading you'll have a full magazine plus an "extra" round in the chamber; generally in a game the chambered round is ignored to allow for a DramaticGunCock which would be pointless in reality since save for empty reloads the gun will never have ''stopped'' being cocked.[[note]]Note that in RealLife, loading a full magazine into a weapon with a round in the chamber can potentially damage the weapon and/or magazine, and as such is usually not advised. Then again, military forces typically do this anyway; every extra bullet counts. Pulling Re-cocking the slide/handle/what have you weapon after a every reload every time is also a an alternative real-world technique, which sacrifices the possibility of an extra round for insurance that there always ''is'' a round in the chamber.[[/note]]



* Every gun in the ''Film/QuantumOfSolace'' video game adaptation follows this trope except for the Golden Gun, which you don't get reloads for, and any weapon fed with loose ammo, such as the pump-action shotgun, the LTK revolver, and the Revolver Grenade Launcher. Interestingly, the last two examples will have you eject ''all'' the rounds in the weapon (spent ones get dumped, unfired ones go back to ammo pool) and then reload the chambers individually. Interestingly enough, guns picked up from [=NPCs=] will always have a random number of rounds missing from the magazine, completely regardless of whether or not they have actually fired any shots, implying that enemies just walk around with half-loaded guns all the time.

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* Every gun in the ''Film/QuantumOfSolace'' video game adaptation follows this trope except for the Golden Gun, which you don't get reloads for, and any weapon fed with loose ammo, such as the pump-action shotgun, the LTK revolver, and the Revolver Grenade Launcher. Interestingly, the last two examples will have you eject ''all'' the rounds in the weapon (spent ones get dumped, unfired ones go back to ammo pool) and then reload the chambers individually. Interestingly enough, guns picked up from [=NPCs=] will always have a random number of rounds missing from the magazine, completely regardless of whether or not they have actually fired any shots, implying that enemies just walk around with half-loaded guns all the time.time - apparently Bond isn't the only super-spy trying to break in that day.



* ''VideoGame/RainbowSix: Vegas'' is similar to ''Crysis'' in this regard. Reloading an empty weapon requires the protagonist to cock the gun to put the first round into the chamber. In addition, the game tracked chambered rounds after reloading a magazine, letting the player fire one more round (excluding belt-fed [=LMGs=], which are always re-cocked no matter how many rounds you had left - in return, you can see their belts visibly get smaller as you run through the last few rounds in them). However, despite the HUD only showing an amount of magazines equivalent to the remaining ammunition you have remaining, they're not actually individually tracked (this bit was excised from the later ''Siege'', which just outright tells you how many bullets you have in reserve, and otherwise plays reloading the same as ''Vegas''). This was also implemented rather weirdly with ''Vegas 2''[='=]s {{revolver|sAreJustBetter}}, which due to being a revolver doesn't get chambered rounds, but still gets a slower reloading animation when reloading from empty, just because.

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* ''VideoGame/RainbowSix: Vegas'' is similar to ''Crysis'' in this regard. Reloading an empty weapon requires the protagonist to cock the gun to put the first round into the chamber. In addition, the game tracked chambered rounds after reloading a magazine, letting the player fire one more round (excluding belt-fed [=LMGs=], which are always re-cocked no matter how many rounds you had left - in return, you can see their belts visibly get smaller as you run through the last few rounds in them). However, despite the HUD only showing an amount of magazines equivalent to the remaining ammunition you have remaining, they're not actually individually tracked (this bit was excised from the later ''Siege'', which just outright tells you how many bullets you have in reserve, and otherwise plays reloading the same as ''Vegas'').tracked. This was also implemented rather weirdly with ''Vegas 2''[='=]s {{revolver|sAreJustBetter}}, which due to being a revolver doesn't get chambered rounds, but still gets a slower reloading animation when reloading from empty, just because. ''Siege'' excised the bit about trying to pretend it still tracked magazines and just outright tells you how many more bullets you have in reserve, and takes the chambered-round bit to an extreme by even letting open-bolt and belt-fed weapons keep a round from the previous magazine or belt - even though, by virtue of being open-bolt, they never actually ''have'' a live round in the chamber until the trigger has been pulled.



* ''VideoGame/KillingFloor'' does this - the majority of weapons have a fixed-length reload capped by a DramaticGunCock at the end of it, no matter how many rounds you fired before reloading. The bullpup, meanwhile, skips chambering a new round entirely. Averted for some other weapons, though: the crossbow and M99 are single-shot weapons, the lever-action rifle reloads with loose bullets, and the pump and combat shotguns do the same with the addition of pumping or pulling back the charging handle at the end of an empty reload if the player doesn't interrupt it at any point. Weapons added in patches and DLC take it to a bit of an extreme, where even if you only fired one round from a magazine before reloading, it will appear completely empty when you remove it, before loading in a new magazine with actual bullets in it (a side effect of the weapons being added after a point where actually modelling bullets in magazines, rather than just flat textures, started becoming commonplace but at the same time inconsistent).

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* ''VideoGame/KillingFloor'' does this - the majority of weapons have a fixed-length reload capped by a DramaticGunCock at the end of it, no matter how many rounds you fired before reloading. The bullpup, meanwhile, skips chambering a new round entirely. Averted for some other weapons, though: the crossbow and M99 are single-shot weapons, the lever-action rifle reloads with loose bullets, and the pump and combat shotguns do the same with the addition of pumping or pulling back the charging handle at the end of an empty reload if the player doesn't interrupt it at any point. Weapons added in patches and DLC take it to a bit of an extreme, where even if you only fired one round from a magazine before reloading, it will appear completely empty when you remove it, before loading in a new magazine with actual bullets in it (a side effect of the weapons being added after a point where actually modelling bullets in magazines, rather than just flat textures, started becoming commonplace but not yet consistent).
* ''VideoGame/KillingFloor2'' continues this, but has
at least five different reloading animations for any one weapon to implicitly explain it. Reloading from an empty magazine will have the same time inconsistent).player character drop it as normal and replace it with a fresh one before chambering a new round. Reloading partway through a magazine will have them tuck the old magazine away for later while inserting the fresh one. Both cases get different animations with the "Tactical Reload" perk, showing empty magazines being flicked away and having the player character grab the fresh mag and bring it up to the used one before switching them in one quick motion. Pressing reload when the weapon is full instead causes the player character to quickly pull back the handle/slide/whatever just enough to confirm that the weapon is loaded and chambered.



** ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands 2}}'' also does this, but has more exceptions. In addition to the... unorthodox weapons with magazines that look like [=CDs=], and the countless belt-fed things, there's also every Tediore weapon - they're so cheaply made that you reload them by ''throwing'' them, and after they explode your storage deck builds a new one for you, but you still lose any ammo that was in it, because that's what fueled the explosion.

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** ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands 2}}'' also does this, but has more exceptions. In addition to the... unorthodox weapons with magazines that look like [=CDs=], and the countless belt-fed things, there's also every Tediore weapon - they're so cheaply made that you reload them by ''throwing'' ''[[ThrowAwayGuns throwing]]'' them, and after they explode your storage deck builds a new one for you, but you still lose any ammo that was in it, because that's what fueled the explosion.



* The ''VideoGame/FarCry'' series plays the trope straight at all times, bar one weapon in ''VideoGame/FarCry2''. The double barrel shotgun in the DLC replaces both shells with every reload, but only because the character ''fires'' both shells at once (something shotguns of that type are indeed capable of doing in real life, as they generally have two separate triggers), making it a literal example in practice.
* The R8 Revolver in ''VideoGame/CounterStrike: Global Offensive'' has a cylinder with space for 8 rounds. You only have 8 rounds of spare ammo, but reloading while not having fired all rounds in the cylinder makes it teleport to your spare ammo counter (and makes an additional speedloader appear out of thin air on your next reload). If you empty your cylinder and reload, you'll load in a full speedloader's worth - 8 rounds - but will only be able to fire as many as you have in your ammo counter.
** The automatic CZ-75 was another example when it was first added. Like the R8, it only features one spare magazine to make it a "high-risk, high-reward" weapon, and that spare magazine is mounted as a foregrip on the front of the gun, which your character will detach and load after emptying the first mag. However, nothing is stopping you from reloading before emptying the gun, so you can switch to the fore-mounted magazine after three bullets fired - and before a patch added more animations to the weapon, reloading ''again'' after the first reload would have that magazine teleport back onto the front of the gun so you could reload with it again. A later update added a second reloading animation to the gun once the fore-mounted mag has been loaded, where the player will grab a new mag from their gear like with the other pistols.

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* The ''VideoGame/FarCry'' series plays the trope straight at all times, bar one weapon in ''VideoGame/FarCry2''. The double barrel shotgun in the double-barreled shotguns in ''VideoGame/FarCry2''[='=]s DLC replaces and ''VideoGame/FarCry4''. These weapons replace both shells with every reload, but only because the character ''fires'' both shells at once (something shotguns of that type are indeed capable of doing in real life, as they generally have two separate triggers), making it a literal example in practice.
* The R8 Revolver in ''VideoGame/CounterStrike: Global Offensive'' has a cylinder with space for 8 rounds. You only have 8 rounds of spare ammo, but reloading while not having fired all rounds in the cylinder makes it teleport to your spare ammo counter (and makes an additional speedloader full of bullets appear out of thin air on your next reload). If you empty your cylinder and reload, you'll load in a full speedloader's worth - 8 rounds - but will only be able to fire as many as you have in your ammo counter.
** The automatic CZ-75 was another example when it was first added. Like the R8, it only features one spare magazine to make it a "high-risk, high-reward" weapon, and that spare magazine is mounted as a foregrip on the front of the gun, which your character will detach and load after emptying the first mag. However, nothing is stopping you from reloading before ''before'' emptying the gun, so you can switch to the fore-mounted magazine after three bullets fired - and before a patch added more animations to the weapon, reloading ''again'' after the first reload would have that magazine teleport back onto the front of the gun so you could reload with it again. A later update added a second reloading animation to the gun once the fore-mounted mag has been loaded, where the player will grab a new mag from their gear like with the other pistols.



* ''VideoGame/BrutalDoom'', a GameMod for the classic ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'', adds a reloading mechanic to most of the weapons that plays the trope straight (going so far as to have discarded magazines/energy cells tossed on the ground and remain there, even though any ammunition that they may have had remaining stays with the player). Of note, however, is that reloading the assault rifle (the replacement for the pistol) when empty gives thirty rounds while reloading with ammunition still present gives thirty-one, and as of v20 reloading the shotgun produces a DramaticGunCock only if the shotgun was empty when the reload started.

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* ''VideoGame/BrutalDoom'', a GameMod for the classic ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'', adds a reloading mechanic to most of the weapons that plays the trope straight (going so far as to have discarded magazines/energy cells tossed on the ground and remain there, even though any ammunition that they may have had remaining stays with the player). Of note, however, is that reloading the assault rifle (the replacement for the pistol) when empty gives thirty rounds rounds, while reloading with ammunition still present gives thirty-one, and as of v20 reloading the shotgun produces a DramaticGunCock only if the shotgun was empty when the reload started.



* ''VideoGame/KillingFloor2'' averts this. Reloading from an empty magazine will play an animation where the magazine is reloaded normally. Reloading from a partially loaded magazine will play a different animation where the used magazine is stored and replaced. Attempting to reload when the magazine is full will play a third, much shorter animation, but will not affect the remaining ammunition.
13th Nov '16 4:07:52 PM Kadorhal
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* ''VideoGame/RainbowSix: Vegas'' is similar to ''Crysis'' in this regard. Reloading an empty weapon requires the protagonist to cock the gun to put the first round into the chamber. In addition, the game tracked chambered rounds after reloading a magazine, letting the player fire one more round (excluding belt-fed [=LMGs=], which are always re-cocked no matter how many rounds you had left - in return, you can see their belts visibly get smaller as you run through the last few rounds in them). However, despite the HUD only showing an amount of magazines equivalent to the remaining ammunition you have remaining, they're not actually individually tracked. This was also implemented rather weirdly with ''Vegas 2''[='=]s {{revolver|sAreJustBetter}}, which due to being a revolver doesn't get chambered rounds, but still gets a slower reloading animation when reloading from empty, just because.

to:

* ''VideoGame/RainbowSix: Vegas'' is similar to ''Crysis'' in this regard. Reloading an empty weapon requires the protagonist to cock the gun to put the first round into the chamber. In addition, the game tracked chambered rounds after reloading a magazine, letting the player fire one more round (excluding belt-fed [=LMGs=], which are always re-cocked no matter how many rounds you had left - in return, you can see their belts visibly get smaller as you run through the last few rounds in them). However, despite the HUD only showing an amount of magazines equivalent to the remaining ammunition you have remaining, they're not actually individually tracked.tracked (this bit was excised from the later ''Siege'', which just outright tells you how many bullets you have in reserve, and otherwise plays reloading the same as ''Vegas''). This was also implemented rather weirdly with ''Vegas 2''[='=]s {{revolver|sAreJustBetter}}, which due to being a revolver doesn't get chambered rounds, but still gets a slower reloading animation when reloading from empty, just because.



* The ''VideoGame/RainbowSix'' series, based off the work of Tom Clancy, is very accurate in its depiction of firearms. The ammo counter shows the number of rounds in the weapon, and the number of magazines in reserve, however in ''Vegas'' the number is not tracked internally. Instead ''Vegas'' just keeps track of the number of magazines the rounds you have left would fill. In its more tactical predecessors though, if you reload a half-full magazine, it jumps to the back of the line, and you may just put it back in later. This can lead to a player carrying six magazines with two rounds each. Rainbow Six is also very realistic with this "fast loading" by actually showing the magazine size + tracking the round in the chamber. Shotguns, on the other hand, track individual shells, and they must be reloaded one at a time.
** Unfortunately for those who prefer more firearm simulation, compared to its predecessors, later ''VideoGame/RainbowSix'' games fall prey to the RealityIsUnrealistic trope as far [[http://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/military_law/4255750.html as weapon effects are concerned]].

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* The ''VideoGame/RainbowSix'' series, based off the work of Tom Clancy, is very accurate in its depiction of firearms. The ammo counter shows the number of rounds in the weapon, and the number of magazines in reserve, however in ''Vegas'' and ''Siege'' the number is not tracked internally. Instead ''Vegas'' just keeps track of the number of magazines the rounds you have left would fill. In its more tactical predecessors though, if you reload a half-full magazine, it jumps to the back of the line, and you may just put it back in later. This can lead to a player carrying six magazines with two rounds each. Rainbow Six is also very realistic with this "fast loading" by actually showing the magazine size + tracking the round in the chamber. Shotguns, on the other hand, track individual shells, and they must be reloaded one at a time.
** Unfortunately for those who prefer more firearm simulation, compared to its predecessors, later ''VideoGame/RainbowSix'' ''Rainbow Six'' games fall prey to the RealityIsUnrealistic trope as far [[http://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/military_law/4255750.html as weapon effects are concerned]].



** Averted in ''VideoGame/CondemnedCriminalOrigins'', in which you simply can't reload guns. [[ThrowAwayGuns At all]]. Also, guns you scavenge off corpses will only be fully loaded if you managed to take their previous holder down before he could squeeze off a shot, otherwise they'll be down by the correct amount of bullets, or even empty (at this point enemies can reload their weapons, but this also means you're probably ''dead'').

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** Averted in ''VideoGame/CondemnedCriminalOrigins'', in which you simply can't reload guns. [[ThrowAwayGuns At all]]. Also, guns you scavenge off corpses will only be fully loaded if you managed to take their previous holder down before he could squeeze off a shot, otherwise they'll be down by the correct amount of bullets, or even empty (at this point some enemies can reload their weapons, but this also means you're probably ''dead'').
14th Oct '16 2:28:34 PM Medinoc
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* In a break from its predecessors, ''VideoGame/XCOMEnemyUnknown'' does not track magazines as separate items, instead allowing soldiers to reload their weapons at will.

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* In a break from its predecessors, ''VideoGame/XCOMEnemyUnknown'' does not track magazines as separate items, instead allowing soldiers to reload their weapons at will.
will. ''VideoGame/XCOM2'' is similar, but keeps track of a up to three speedloaders that make reloading a free action. Once the character is out, they must reload manually, which takes more time.
5th Oct '16 12:57:44 PM Kadorhal
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** Also particularly ridiculous in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' and [[VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2 its sequel]], as when reloading the Python and Raging Judge revolvers or the M32 GrenadeLauncher, your character is clearly shown taking every empty casing/shell/grenade out of the cylinder at the same time, regardless of how many shots were fired, and then ''only'' loading as many as had been fired since the last reload - and in the case of the Raging Judge and M32, you can actually ''see'' the clearly-empty chambers magically regrow new rounds as soon as it's time to put the cylinder back in place. Every other revolver in the series partially avoids this by using speedloaders, which the Python and Raging Judge can also use with the correct attachment, but then this brings up the issue of loading more ammunition than you actually have when you have less than a full cylinder's worth remaining.
** The first two games are actually somewhat mercurial about this trope. The bolt-action weapons all follow these rules ''except'' for the Lee-Enfield, which can only be manually reloaded if there are five or less rounds left in it (which makes sense to a degree, as stripper clips for the Lee-Enfield hold 5 rounds). The M1 Garand takes it a step further, where, in a nod to how real soldiers were trained in its use, the player cannot reload it ''at all'' except from empty; in ''World at War'', the only game in the series where the player actually can reload it mid-clip, the gun inverts the usual rules for this and still reloads much faster from empty. Additionally, the BAR in ''1'', along with the Bren, Gewehr 43, and SVT-40 in ''2'', do not have alternate animations for reloading with an empty magazine. The SVT-40 and Gewehr 43, when they were first added in ''United Offensive'', also inverted this, where for some reason reloading mid-magazine would have your character pull and lock the bolt handle back first and ''then'' replace the magazine, while reloading from empty would skip that step since the handle had already locked back from firing the last round.

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** Also particularly ridiculous in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' and [[VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2 its sequel]], as when reloading the Python and Raging Judge revolvers or the M32 GrenadeLauncher, your character is clearly shown taking every empty casing/shell/grenade out of the cylinder at the same time, regardless of how many shots were fired, and then ''only'' loading as many as had been fired since the last reload - and in the case of the Raging Judge and M32, you can actually ''see'' the clearly-empty chambers magically regrow new rounds as soon as it's time to put the cylinder back in place. Every Most other revolver revolvers in the series partially avoids avoid this by using speedloaders, which the Python and Raging Judge can also use with the correct attachment, but then this brings up the issue of loading more ammunition than you actually have when you have less than a full cylinder's worth remaining.
remaining. The Annihilator from ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps3 Black Ops III]]'' avoids this entirely - in singleplayer it is simply pulled off to the side then brought back up loaded, and in multiplayer it doesn't get reloads, being a specialist weapon - once all six loaded shots are fired, it's done until the game lets you use it again.
** The first two games are actually somewhat mercurial about this trope. The bolt-action weapons all follow these rules ''except'' for the Lee-Enfield, which can only be manually reloaded if there are five or less rounds left in it (which makes sense to a degree, as stripper clips for the Lee-Enfield hold 5 rounds). rounds, but so do those for all the other bolt-action rifles in the game; it may have been for balance since the Enfield holds ten rounds at a time). The M1 Garand takes it a step further, where, in a nod to how real soldiers were trained in its use, the player cannot reload it ''at all'' except from empty; in ''World at War'', the only game in the series where the player actually can reload it mid-clip, the gun inverts the usual rules for this and still reloads much faster from empty.empty (since a mid-clip reload requires manually ejecting the clip before inserting a new one - an empty reload will have already had the clip eject when the last bullet was fired). Additionally, the BAR in ''1'', along with the Bren, Gewehr 43, and SVT-40 in ''2'', do not have alternate animations for reloading with an empty magazine. The SVT-40 and Gewehr 43, when they were first added in ''United Offensive'', also inverted this, where for some reason reloading mid-magazine would have your character pull and lock the bolt handle back first and ''then'' replace the magazine, while reloading from empty would skip that step since the handle had already locked back from firing the last round.
3rd Oct '16 2:59:33 AM Ion288
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** The first two games are actually somewhat schizophrenic about this trope. The bolt-action weapons all follow these rules ''except'' for the Lee-Enfield, which can only be manually reloaded if there are five or less rounds left in it (which makes sense to a degree, as stripper clips for the Lee-Enfield hold 5 rounds). The M1 Garand takes it a step further, where, in a nod to how real soldiers were trained in its use, the player cannot reload it ''at all'' except from empty; in ''World at War'', the only game in the series where the player actually can reload it mid-clip, the gun inverts the usual rules for this and still reloads much faster from empty. Additionally, the BAR in ''1'', along with the Bren, Gewehr 43, and SVT-40 in ''2'', do not have alternate animations for reloading with an empty magazine. The SVT-40 and Gewehr 43, when they were first added in ''United Offensive'', also inverted this, where for some reason reloading mid-magazine would have your character pull and lock the bolt handle back first and ''then'' replace the magazine, while reloading from empty would skip that step since the handle had already locked back from firing the last round.

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** The first two games are actually somewhat schizophrenic mercurial about this trope. The bolt-action weapons all follow these rules ''except'' for the Lee-Enfield, which can only be manually reloaded if there are five or less rounds left in it (which makes sense to a degree, as stripper clips for the Lee-Enfield hold 5 rounds). The M1 Garand takes it a step further, where, in a nod to how real soldiers were trained in its use, the player cannot reload it ''at all'' except from empty; in ''World at War'', the only game in the series where the player actually can reload it mid-clip, the gun inverts the usual rules for this and still reloads much faster from empty. Additionally, the BAR in ''1'', along with the Bren, Gewehr 43, and SVT-40 in ''2'', do not have alternate animations for reloading with an empty magazine. The SVT-40 and Gewehr 43, when they were first added in ''United Offensive'', also inverted this, where for some reason reloading mid-magazine would have your character pull and lock the bolt handle back first and ''then'' replace the magazine, while reloading from empty would skip that step since the handle had already locked back from firing the last round.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.OneBulletClips