History Main / OneBulletClips

27th Apr '17 5:01:45 PM Kadorhal
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** The first two games are actually somewhat mercurial about this trope. The bolt-action weapons all follow these rules ''except'' for the Lee-Enfield, which can only be manually reloaded if there are five or less rounds left in it (which makes sense to a degree, as stripper clips for the Lee-Enfield hold 5 rounds, but so do those for all the other bolt-action rifles in the game; it may have been for balance since the Enfield holds ten rounds at a time). The M1 Garand takes it a step further, where, in a nod to how real soldiers were trained in its use, the player cannot reload it ''at all'' except from empty; in ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyWorldAtWar World at War]]'', the only game in the series where the player actually can reload it mid-clip, the gun inverts the usual rules for this and still reloads much faster from empty (since a mid-clip reload requires manually ejecting the clip before inserting a new one - an empty reload will have already had the clip eject when the last bullet was fired). Additionally, the BAR in ''1'', along with the Bren, Gewehr 43, and SVT-40 in ''2'', do not have alternate animations for reloading with an empty magazine. The SVT-40 and Gewehr 43, when they were first added in ''United Offensive'', also inverted this, where for some reason reloading mid-magazine would have your character pull and lock the bolt handle back first and ''then'' replace the magazine, while reloading from empty would skip that step since the handle had already locked back from firing the last round.
** ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyWorldAtWar World at War]]'' mostly follows this, with one exception. When using the Double-Barreled Shotgun, you may reload after firing only one shell. If you do, the reloading animation will show your character blocking the other shell with their thumb while shaking the spent shell out. Oddly, while its actual sequels in the ''Black Ops'' games had similar slightly-different animations for the Olympia over/under shotgun, ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyModernWarfare2''[='=]s SawedOffShotgun has only one reload animation, with your character dumping and replacing both shells even if you only fired one.

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** The first two games are actually somewhat mercurial about this trope. The bolt-action weapons all follow these rules ''except'' for the Lee-Enfield, which can only be manually reloaded if there are five or less rounds left in it (which makes sense to a degree, as stripper clips for the Lee-Enfield hold 5 rounds, but so do those for all the other bolt-action rifles in the game; it may have been for balance since the Enfield holds ten rounds at a time). The M1 Garand takes it a step further, where, in a nod to how real soldiers were trained in its use, the player cannot reload it ''at all'' except from empty; in ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyWorldAtWar World ''World at War]]'', War'', the only game in the series where the player actually can reload it mid-clip, the gun inverts the usual rules for this and still reloads much faster from empty (since a mid-clip reload requires manually ejecting the clip before inserting a new one - an empty reload will have already had the clip eject when the last bullet was fired). Additionally, the BAR in ''1'', along with the Bren, Gewehr 43, and SVT-40 in ''2'', do not have alternate animations for reloading with an empty magazine. The SVT-40 and Gewehr 43, when they were first added in ''United Offensive'', also inverted this, where for some reason reloading mid-magazine would have your character pull and lock the bolt handle back first and ''then'' replace the magazine, while reloading from empty would skip that step since the handle had already locked back from firing the last round.
** ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyWorldAtWar World ''World at War]]'' War'' mostly follows this, with one exception. When using the Double-Barreled Shotgun, you may reload after firing only one shell. If you do, the reloading animation will show your character blocking the other shell with their thumb while shaking the spent shell out. Oddly, while its actual sequels in the ''Black Ops'' games had similar slightly-different animations for the Olympia over/under shotgun, ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyModernWarfare2''[='=]s ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare 2''[='=]s SawedOffShotgun has only one reload animation, with your character dumping and replacing both shells even if you only fired one.



** ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyModernWarfare3'' has one assault rifle where the usual rule for empty reloads isn't quite followed. While a reload from empty does take slightly longer than a mid-mag reload, the added length is just from the player character smacking the new mag a second time after inserting it - he never touches any charging handle.

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** ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyModernWarfare3'' ''Modern Warfare 3'' has one assault rifle where the usual rule for empty reloads isn't quite followed. While a reload from empty does take slightly longer than a mid-mag reload, the added length is just from the player character smacking the new mag a second time after inserting it - he never touches any charging handle.



* The ''Firearms'' GameMod for ''Half-Life'' (and its ''Source'' successor, ''Firearms: Source'') [[AvertedTrope avert this]] ''very thoroughly.''

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* The ''Firearms'' GameMod for ''Half-Life'' (and its ''Source'' successor, ''Firearms: Source'') [[AvertedTrope avert this]] ''very thoroughly.'''' The mod's motto, after all, was that ''it's all about the guns''.



** Most guns retain a round in the chamber if reloaded while there is still one round in the magazine; exceptions are programmed in specifically in the cases where the weapon's real-world counterpart would not behave that way, such as revolvers or open-bolt firearms like the Sterling submachine gun.

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** Most guns retain a round in the chamber if reloaded while there is still at least one round in the magazine; exceptions are programmed in specifically in the cases where the weapon's real-world counterpart would not behave that way, such as revolvers or open-bolt firearms like the Sterling submachine gun.



** The mod's motto, after all, was that ''it's all about the guns''.



* ''VideoGame/CombatArms'' allows this trope with reloads in that you retain all ammunition, but each weapon's ammunition is tied to the (instance of the) weapon itself; if you drop your weapon in favor of another weapon or another instance of the same weapon, you get as much ammunition as that other instance had. If it's empty...

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* ''VideoGame/CombatArms'' allows this trope with reloads in that you retain all ammunition, but each weapon's ammunition is tied to the (instance of the) weapon itself; if you drop your weapon in favor of another weapon or another instance of the same weapon, you get as much ammunition as that other instance had. If it's empty... Same for ''Line of Sight'', spun off from ''Combat Arms''.



* ''VideoGame/{{ARMA}}: Armed Assault'' keeps track of the amount of ammunition in each magazine in your inventory, only throwing away magazines if they are completely depleted. If you have multiple semi-depleted magazines, they are sorted in decreasing order ; most full magazine first, least full magazines last.
** The sequel ''ARMA 2'' and its expansion ''Operation Arrowhead'' continue this behavior, militantly so. However, it should be noted that the U.S. M1014 shotgun and clip-fed weapons are some of the few that do NOT work "properly" as identified in the trope definition. In the real world these weapons use integral magazines, loaded one round at a time or with stripper clips. Tactical doctrine for the M1014 calls for the soldier to load additional shells at any opportunity. ''ARMA 2'' breaks this, where you are never able to load single rounds, and instead mime reloading with an invisible magazine, which somehow replaces every round currently in the weapon with a fresh one. The game's other shotguns are more correct in this regard, since they actually do use magazines. In addition, chambered rounds were not tracked.

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* ''VideoGame/{{ARMA}}: Armed Assault'' keeps track of the amount of ammunition in each magazine in your inventory, only throwing away magazines if they are completely depleted. If you have multiple semi-depleted magazines, they are sorted in decreasing order ; order; most full magazine first, least full magazines last.
** The sequel ''ARMA 2'' and its expansion ''Operation Arrowhead'' continue this behavior, militantly so. However, it should be noted that the U.S. M1014 shotgun and clip-fed weapons are some of the few that do NOT work "properly" as identified in the trope definition. In the real world these weapons use integral magazines, loaded one round at a time or with stripper clips. Tactical doctrine for the M1014 calls for the soldier to load additional shells at any opportunity. ''ARMA 2'' breaks this, where you are never able to load single rounds, and instead mime reloading with an invisible magazine, which somehow replaces every round currently in the weapon with a fresh one. The game's other shotguns are more correct in this regard, since they actually do use magazines. In addition, chambered rounds were not tracked.tracked - an issue continued with ''ARMA III'', which at least tries to explain it by [[DramaticGunCock always having the player character rechamber the weapon after a reload]].



** Ammo Boxes contain a certain number of charges before they're used up. The autogun and minigun require a full box to get one magazine. There are also scattered ammo boxes that are exclusive for one type of weapon, which is a godsend for auto/minigun users since they no longer have to use up a whole box (whereas one box can fill up for at least two other assault rifle players) and for Flamethrowers, since they get more ammo overall.

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** Ammo Boxes contain a certain number of charges before they're used up. The autogun and minigun require a full box to get one magazine. There are also scattered ammo boxes that are exclusive for one type of weapon, which is a godsend for auto/minigun users since (since they no longer have to use up hog a whole box (whereas one box that can fill up for at least two other players' assault rifle players) rifles) and for Flamethrowers, since they get more ammo overall.



* ''VideoGame/JaggedAlliance 2'' works similarly, except that when the squad isn't in contact with the enemy, reloading a partially full weapon transfers rounds from the new magazine until the weapon is full. This allows partial magazines to be refilled between battles.

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* In ''VideoGame/JaggedAlliance 2'' works similarly, except that 2'', when the squad isn't in contact with the enemy, reloading a partially full weapon transfers rounds from the new magazine until the weapon is full. This allows partial magazines to be refilled between battles.



* Likewise the first two ''[[{{VideoGame/XCOM}} X-COM]]'' games (''[[VideoGame/XCOMUFODefense UFO Defense]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/XCOMTerrorFromTheDeep Terror From the Deep]]''), in which every magazine is a separate inventory item, and the number of bullets in each is tracked realistically.

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* Likewise the first two ''[[{{VideoGame/XCOM}} X-COM]]'' ''VideoGame/XCom'' games (''[[VideoGame/XCOMUFODefense UFO Defense]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/XCOMTerrorFromTheDeep Terror From the Deep]]''), in which every magazine is a separate inventory item, and the number of bullets in each is tracked realistically.
27th Apr '17 4:40:43 PM Kadorhal
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** Also particularly ridiculous in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' and [[VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2 its sequel]], as when reloading the Python and Raging Judge revolvers or the M32 GrenadeLauncher, your character is clearly shown taking every empty casing/shell/grenade out of the cylinder at the same time, regardless of how many shots were fired, and then ''only'' loading as many as had been fired since the last reload - and in the case of the Raging Judge and M32, you can actually ''see'' the clearly-empty chambers magically regrow new rounds as soon as it's time to put the cylinder back in place. Most other revolvers in the series partially avoid this by using speedloaders, which the Python and Raging Judge can also use with the correct attachment, but then this brings up the issue of loading more ammunition than you actually have when you have less than a full cylinder's worth remaining. The Annihilator from ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps3 Black Ops III]]'' avoids this entirely - in singleplayer it is simply pulled off to the side then brought back up loaded, and in multiplayer it doesn't get reloads, being a specialist weapon - once all six loaded shots are fired, it's done until the game lets you use it again.

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** Also particularly ridiculous in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' and [[VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2 its sequel]], as when reloading the Python and Raging Judge revolvers or the M32 GrenadeLauncher, your character is clearly shown taking every empty casing/shell/grenade out of the cylinder at the same time, regardless of how many shots were fired, and then ''only'' loading as many as had been fired since the last reload - and in the case of the Raging Judge and M32, you can actually ''see'' the clearly-empty chambers magically regrow new rounds as soon as it's time to put the cylinder back in place. Most other revolvers in the series partially avoid this by using speedloaders, which the Python and Raging Judge can also use with the correct attachment, but then this brings up the issue of loading more ammunition than you actually have when you have less than a full cylinder's worth remaining. The Annihilator from ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps3 Black Ops III]]'' avoids this entirely - in singleplayer it is simply pulled off to the side then brought back up loaded, and in multiplayer it doesn't get reloads, being a specialist weapon - once all six loaded shots are fired, it's done until the game lets you use it again.again, which is highly unlikely to be without at least one death between then and the last time you used it.
23rd Mar '17 10:54:12 PM Kadorhal
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* ''Franchise/MetalGear'':

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* ''Franchise/MetalGear'':''VideoGame/MetalGear'':



* The first three ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' games account for chambered rounds when reloading - do a quick reload and your weapon will be able to fire an extra round. ''VideoGame/{{Metal Gear Solid 4|GunsOfThePatriots}}'' mostly does away with this, due to the DramaticGunCock at the end of every reload - pistols keep a round in the chamber, and the M870 Custom has the first round from an empty reload breech-loaded, but that's it.

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* The first three ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' games play this straight for total ammo counts, but do account for chambered rounds when reloading - do a quick reload and your weapon will be able to fire an extra round. ''VideoGame/{{Metal Gear Solid 4|GunsOfThePatriots}}'' mostly does away with this, due to the DramaticGunCock at the end of every reload - pistols keep a round in the chamber, and the M870 Custom has the first round from an empty reload breech-loaded, but that's it.



** The chambered round is in fact {{Lampshaded}} in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater'', when Ocelot attempts to [[SubvertedTrope load the first round of every new magazine by hand]], whether or not there was a round in the chamber. Of course, [[DoubleSubversion it backfires horribly on him when the gun jams]].
** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidVThePhantomPain'' accounts for chambered rounds again; although quick-reloads are no longer a mechanic, reloading before depleting the magazine will still result in an extra round. Additionally, reloading when there should be no chambered round results in a different animation, where you will load a single round by hand into the chamber, in a possible CallBack to Ocelot's technique. As a result, players who are aware of this mechanic will usually load an extra round into all of their guns during the chopper ride at the start of a mission.


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** The chambered round is in fact {{Lampshaded}} {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater'', when Ocelot attempts to [[SubvertedTrope load the first round of every new magazine by hand]], whether or not there was a round in the chamber. Of course, [[DoubleSubversion it backfires horribly on him when he lets go of the slide too early and the gun jams]].
** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidVThePhantomPain'' accounts for chambered rounds again; although quick-reloads are no longer a mechanic, reloading before depleting the magazine will still result in an extra round. Additionally, reloading when there should be no chambered round Reloading from empty results in a different animation, animation where you Snake will load a single chamber the first round by hand into of the chamber, in a possible CallBack to Ocelot's technique.new magazine. As a result, players who are aware of this mechanic will usually load an extra round into all of their guns during the chopper ride at the start of a mission.

12th Mar '17 12:42:49 PM Kadorhal
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** Also averted in previous ''Rainbow Six'' games, where you start each level with X magazines, each holding Y rounds - all tracked individually. You never just drop a mag unless it's empty (this includes reloading with a single round left, at least in ''Raven Shield''; that single round would be kept in the chamber and fired along with those in the next mag), instead you put it back in your pockets. Whenever you reload, any non-empty magazine you're holding is kept, and put at the bottom of your loading queue. Meaning that if you're the kind of person who reloads when half of your magazine is gone, then more often than not by the middle of the level you'll be reloading with half-empty mags.

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** Also averted in previous ''Rainbow Six'' games, games and in the later-added "Tactical Realism" mode for ''Siege'', where you start each level with X magazines, each holding Y rounds - all tracked individually. You never just drop a mag unless it's empty (this includes reloading with a single round left, at least in ''Raven Shield''; that single round would be kept in the chamber and fired along with those in the next mag), instead you put it back in your pockets. Whenever you reload, any non-empty magazine you're holding is kept, and put at the bottom of your loading queue. Meaning that if you're the kind of person who reloads when half of your magazine is gone, then more often than not by the middle of the level you'll be reloading with half-empty mags.



* ''VideoGame/KillingFloor2'' continues this, but has at least five different reloading animations for any one weapon to implicitly explain it. Reloading from an empty magazine will have the player character drop it as normal and replace it with a fresh one before chambering a new round. Reloading partway through a magazine will have them tuck the old magazine away for later while inserting the fresh one. Both cases get different animations with the "Tactical Reload" perk, showing empty magazines being flicked away and having the player character grab the fresh mag and bring it up to the used one before switching them in one quick motion. Pressing reload when the weapon is full instead causes the player character to quickly pull back the handle/slide/whatever just enough to confirm that the weapon is loaded and chambered.

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* ''VideoGame/KillingFloor2'' continues this, but has at least five different reloading animations for any one weapon to implicitly explain it. Reloading from an empty magazine will have the player character drop it as normal and replace it with a fresh one before chambering a new round. Reloading partway through a magazine will have them tuck the old magazine away for later while inserting the fresh one. Both cases get different animations with the "Tactical Reload" perk, showing empty magazines being flicked away rather than pulled and having the player character grab the fresh mag and bring it up to the used one before switching them in one quick motion. Pressing reload when the weapon is full instead causes the player character to quickly pull back the handle/slide/whatever just enough to confirm that the weapon is loaded and chambered.
10th Mar '17 2:35:07 PM erforce
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* Almost all {{FPS}} games except the ones near the classic end of [[FacklerScaleOfFPSRealism FPS realism scale]] (with no reloading) and a handful near the realistic end of the scale. ''VideoGame/HalfLife'', ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Doom}} 3'', ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'', the ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor'' series, ''[[VideoGame/FirstEncounterAssaultRecon FEAR]]'', the list goes on. The classic exception is any game featuring the M1 Garand; this is TruthInTelevision to an extent, as the weapon is tricky to unload while under fire and typically US soldiers were instructed to fire off the rest of the en-bloc clip rather than do so.

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* Almost all {{FPS}} games except the ones near the classic end of [[FacklerScaleOfFPSRealism FPS realism scale]] (with no reloading) and a handful near the realistic end of the scale. ''VideoGame/HalfLife'', ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Doom}} 3'', ''VideoGame/Doom3'', ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'', the ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor'' series, ''[[VideoGame/FirstEncounterAssaultRecon FEAR]]'', the list goes on. The classic exception is any game featuring the M1 Garand; this is TruthInTelevision to an extent, as the weapon is tricky to unload while under fire and typically US soldiers were instructed to fire off the rest of the en-bloc clip rather than do so.



** The first two games are actually somewhat mercurial about this trope. The bolt-action weapons all follow these rules ''except'' for the Lee-Enfield, which can only be manually reloaded if there are five or less rounds left in it (which makes sense to a degree, as stripper clips for the Lee-Enfield hold 5 rounds, but so do those for all the other bolt-action rifles in the game; it may have been for balance since the Enfield holds ten rounds at a time). The M1 Garand takes it a step further, where, in a nod to how real soldiers were trained in its use, the player cannot reload it ''at all'' except from empty; in ''World at War'', the only game in the series where the player actually can reload it mid-clip, the gun inverts the usual rules for this and still reloads much faster from empty (since a mid-clip reload requires manually ejecting the clip before inserting a new one - an empty reload will have already had the clip eject when the last bullet was fired). Additionally, the BAR in ''1'', along with the Bren, Gewehr 43, and SVT-40 in ''2'', do not have alternate animations for reloading with an empty magazine. The SVT-40 and Gewehr 43, when they were first added in ''United Offensive'', also inverted this, where for some reason reloading mid-magazine would have your character pull and lock the bolt handle back first and ''then'' replace the magazine, while reloading from empty would skip that step since the handle had already locked back from firing the last round.
** ''World at War'' mostly follows this, with one exception. When using the Double-Barreled Shotgun, you may reload after firing only one shell. If you do, the reloading animation will show your character blocking the other shell with their thumb while shaking the spent shell out. Oddly, while its actual sequels in the ''Black Ops'' games had similar slightly-different animations for the Olympia over/under shotgun, ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare 2''[='=]s SawedOffShotgun has only one reload animation, with your character dumping and replacing both shells even if you only fired one.

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** The first two games are actually somewhat mercurial about this trope. The bolt-action weapons all follow these rules ''except'' for the Lee-Enfield, which can only be manually reloaded if there are five or less rounds left in it (which makes sense to a degree, as stripper clips for the Lee-Enfield hold 5 rounds, but so do those for all the other bolt-action rifles in the game; it may have been for balance since the Enfield holds ten rounds at a time). The M1 Garand takes it a step further, where, in a nod to how real soldiers were trained in its use, the player cannot reload it ''at all'' except from empty; in ''World ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyWorldAtWar World at War'', War]]'', the only game in the series where the player actually can reload it mid-clip, the gun inverts the usual rules for this and still reloads much faster from empty (since a mid-clip reload requires manually ejecting the clip before inserting a new one - an empty reload will have already had the clip eject when the last bullet was fired). Additionally, the BAR in ''1'', along with the Bren, Gewehr 43, and SVT-40 in ''2'', do not have alternate animations for reloading with an empty magazine. The SVT-40 and Gewehr 43, when they were first added in ''United Offensive'', also inverted this, where for some reason reloading mid-magazine would have your character pull and lock the bolt handle back first and ''then'' replace the magazine, while reloading from empty would skip that step since the handle had already locked back from firing the last round.
** ''World ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyWorldAtWar World at War'' War]]'' mostly follows this, with one exception. When using the Double-Barreled Shotgun, you may reload after firing only one shell. If you do, the reloading animation will show your character blocking the other shell with their thumb while shaking the spent shell out. Oddly, while its actual sequels in the ''Black Ops'' games had similar slightly-different animations for the Olympia over/under shotgun, ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare 2''[='=]s ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyModernWarfare2''[='=]s SawedOffShotgun has only one reload animation, with your character dumping and replacing both shells even if you only fired one.



** ''Modern Warfare 3'' has one assault rifle where the usual rule for empty reloads isn't quite followed. While a reload from empty does take slightly longer than a mid-mag reload, the added length is just from the player character smacking the new mag a second time after inserting it - he never touches any charging handle.

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** ''Modern Warfare 3'' ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyModernWarfare3'' has one assault rifle where the usual rule for empty reloads isn't quite followed. While a reload from empty does take slightly longer than a mid-mag reload, the added length is just from the player character smacking the new mag a second time after inserting it - he never touches any charging handle.
10th Mar '17 2:28:33 PM jormis29
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* ''VideoGame/RainbowSix: Vegas'' is similar to ''Crysis'' in this regard. Reloading an empty weapon requires the protagonist to cock the gun to put the first round into the chamber. In addition, the game tracked chambered rounds after reloading a magazine, letting the player fire one more round (excluding belt-fed [=LMGs=], which are always re-cocked no matter how many rounds you had left - in return, you can see their belts visibly get smaller as you run through the last few rounds in them). However, despite the HUD only showing an amount of magazines equivalent to the remaining ammunition you have remaining, they're not actually individually tracked. This was also implemented rather weirdly with ''Vegas 2''[='=]s {{revolver|sAreJustBetter}}, which due to being a revolver doesn't get chambered rounds, but still gets a slower reloading animation when reloading from empty, just because. ''Siege'' excised the bit about trying to pretend it still tracked magazines and just outright tells you how many more bullets you have in reserve, and takes the chambered-round bit to an extreme by even letting open-bolt and belt-fed weapons keep a round from the previous magazine or belt - even though, by virtue of being open-bolt, they never actually ''have'' a live round in the chamber until the trigger has been pulled.

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* ''VideoGame/RainbowSix: Vegas'' is similar to ''Crysis'' in this regard. Reloading an empty weapon requires the protagonist to cock the gun to put the first round into the chamber. In addition, the game tracked chambered rounds after reloading a magazine, letting the player fire one more round (excluding belt-fed [=LMGs=], which are always re-cocked no matter how many rounds you had left - in return, you can see their belts visibly get smaller as you run through the last few rounds in them). However, despite the HUD only showing an amount of magazines equivalent to the remaining ammunition you have remaining, they're not actually individually tracked. This was also implemented rather weirdly with ''Vegas 2''[='=]s {{revolver|sAreJustBetter}}, which due to being a revolver doesn't get chambered rounds, but still gets a slower reloading animation when reloading from empty, just because. ''Siege'' ''[[VideoGame/RainbowSixSiege Siege]]'' excised the bit about trying to pretend it still tracked magazines and just outright tells you how many more bullets you have in reserve, and takes the chambered-round bit to an extreme by even letting open-bolt and belt-fed weapons keep a round from the previous magazine or belt - even though, by virtue of being open-bolt, they never actually ''have'' a live round in the chamber until the trigger has been pulled.



* The ''VideoGame/RainbowSix'' series, based off the work of Tom Clancy, is very accurate in its depiction of firearms. The ammo counter shows the number of rounds in the weapon, and the number of magazines in reserve, however in ''Vegas'' and ''Siege'' the number is not tracked internally. Instead ''Vegas'' just keeps track of the number of magazines the rounds you have left would fill. In its more tactical predecessors though, if you reload a half-full magazine, it jumps to the back of the line, and you may just put it back in later. This can lead to a player carrying six magazines with two rounds each. Rainbow Six is also very realistic with this "fast loading" by actually showing the magazine size + tracking the round in the chamber. Shotguns, on the other hand, track individual shells, and they must be reloaded one at a time.

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* The ''VideoGame/RainbowSix'' series, based off the work of Tom Clancy, is very accurate in its depiction of firearms. The ammo counter shows the number of rounds in the weapon, and the number of magazines in reserve, however in ''Vegas'' and ''Siege'' ''[[VideoGame/RainbowSixSiege Siege]]'' the number is not tracked internally. Instead ''Vegas'' just keeps track of the number of magazines the rounds you have left would fill. In its more tactical predecessors though, if you reload a half-full magazine, it jumps to the back of the line, and you may just put it back in later. This can lead to a player carrying six magazines with two rounds each. Rainbow Six is also very realistic with this "fast loading" by actually showing the magazine size + tracking the round in the chamber. Shotguns, on the other hand, track individual shells, and they must be reloaded one at a time.
6th Mar '17 10:04:56 PM XenMon2
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* ''VideoGame/SystemShock'' averts this trope. You discard the old magazine when you reload, ammo and all.
2nd Mar '17 6:38:59 PM CountDorku
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*** Gearbox's ''VideoGame/{{Battleborn}}'' has some characters with passive effects that have fun with the players' tendencies with regards to this trope - Oscar Mike's first half of his assault rifle's magazine do extra damage, encouraging the player to act regularly and reload often. Meanwhile, Mellka expels an energy blast when she reloads that does more damage based off how much ammunition was fired off and Ghalt's last 4 rounds in his magazine do extra damage to make the player think about not reloading immediately when they get a break.

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*** Gaige the Mechromancer is well-advised to pretend this trope is not in effect, since accidentally reloading will wipe out all of her stacks if she's been building up Anarchy. It's better to empty a clip into nothing than to reload, since losing a 350% damage bonus at 200 stacks is enough to make you weep.
**
Gearbox's ''VideoGame/{{Battleborn}}'' has some characters with passive effects that have fun with the players' tendencies with regards to this trope - Oscar Mike's first half of his assault rifle's magazine do extra damage, encouraging the player to act regularly and reload often. Meanwhile, Mellka expels an energy blast when she reloads that does more damage based off how much ammunition was fired off and Ghalt's last 4 rounds in his magazine do extra damage to make the player think about not reloading immediately when they get a break.
14th Feb '17 7:00:09 PM dlchen145
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** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots'' eliminated the instant reloads (largely because of how easy they'd made ''VideoGame/{{Metal Gear Solid 3|SnakeEater}}''[='=]s [[HumongousMecha Shagohod]] boss) and required the actual reload animation play out; this showed him taking out the old magazine and tucking it away for later. However, almost all weapons have a DramaticGunCock which usually ejects an unspent round, which is never deducted from the player's total, and all weapons that aren't single-shot follow this trope to the letter. Moreover, the abundance of usable weapons compared to previous games meant the ammo system had to be switched out from dedicated ammo pickups for each weapon to [[UniversalAmmunition identifying by caliber and having weapons draw from the same ammo pools]], allowing you to instantly reload an empty M14 EBR by picking up a bad guy's SCAR without actually having to go through the process of unloading the ammo from it.

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** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots'' eliminated the instant reloads (largely because of how easy they'd made ''VideoGame/{{Metal Gear Solid 3|SnakeEater}}''[='=]s [[HumongousMecha Shagohod]] boss) and required the actual reload animation play out; this showed him taking out the old magazine and tucking it away for later. However, almost all weapons have a DramaticGunCock which usually ejects an unspent round, which is never deducted from round (explaining why you don't have an extra round in the player's total, chamber) and all weapons that aren't single-shot follow this trope to the letter. Moreover, the abundance of usable weapons compared to previous games meant the ammo system had to be switched out from dedicated ammo pickups for each weapon to [[UniversalAmmunition identifying by caliber and having weapons draw from the same ammo pools]], allowing you to instantly reload an empty M14 EBR by picking up a bad guy's SCAR without actually having to go through the process of unloading the ammo from it.
31st Jan '17 9:34:18 AM garthvader
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** All of the games do have the transforming ammo / magazines issue caused by having ammo in classes: most ridiculously, in ''Far Cry 2'' "flame" ammo is shown as a gas can, which can somehow morph into ammunition for a flaregun. '''Far Cry 4'' has the same ammo pickups feed sniper rifles chambered for [=7.62x54mmR=], .308 Winchester, .50 BMG, and a ''.700 Nitro Express hunting rifle''.
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