History Main / OneBulletClips

16th Aug '16 10:34:03 AM Kadorhal
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Another thing that is rarely simulated is chambered rounds; usually when a magazine-fed closed-bolt weapon is reloaded without being empty, a round will remain in the chamber from the previous magazine. This will mean after reloading you'll have a full magazine plus an "extra" round in the chamber; generally in a game the chambered round is ignored to allow for a DramaticGunCock which would be pointless in reality since save for empty reloads the gun will never have ''stopped'' being cocked.[[note]]Note that in RealLife, loading a full magazine into a weapon with a round in the chamber can potentially damage the weapon and/or magazine, and as such is usually not advised. Then again, military forces typically do this anyway; every extra bullet counts. Pulling the slide/handle/what have you after a reload every time is also a real-world technique, which sacrifices the possibility of an extra round to ensure that there always ''is'' a round in the chamber.[[/note]]

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Another thing that is rarely simulated is chambered rounds; usually when a magazine-fed closed-bolt weapon is reloaded without being empty, a round will remain in the chamber from the previous magazine. This will mean after reloading you'll have a full magazine plus an "extra" round in the chamber; generally in a game the chambered round is ignored to allow for a DramaticGunCock which would be pointless in reality since save for empty reloads the gun will never have ''stopped'' being cocked.[[note]]Note that in RealLife, loading a full magazine into a weapon with a round in the chamber can potentially damage the weapon and/or magazine, and as such is usually not advised. Then again, military forces typically do this anyway; every extra bullet counts. Pulling the slide/handle/what have you after a reload every time is also a real-world technique, which sacrifices the possibility of an extra round to ensure for insurance that there always ''is'' a round in the chamber.[[/note]]



** One of the more common examples are pistols with what are known as "magic slides" - contrary to most real-world pistols, where the slide only locks back when the final round from a magazine has been chambered and fired, most games with pistols whose slides move on their own ''at all'' will magically lock back at the start of a reload, even if you had only fired a single bullet from the previous magazine. Some may then get extra-silly and have the player character pull the slide to chamber a round - even though releasing it in the first place already accomplished that.

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** One of the more common examples are pistols with what are known as "magic slides" - contrary to most real-world pistols, where the slide only locks back when the final round from a magazine has been chambered and fired, most games with pistols whose slides are animated to move on their own ''at all'' will magically lock back at the start of a reload, even if you had only fired a single bullet from the previous magazine. Some may then get extra-silly and have the player character hit the slide release to chamber the first round - then pull the slide to again, which in reality would eject that first bullet and chamber a round - even though releasing it in the first place already accomplished that.second one.



** The first two games are actually somewhat schizophrenic about this trope. The bolt-action weapons all follow these rules ''except'' for the Lee-Enfield, which can only be manually reloaded if there are five or less rounds left in it (which makes sense to a degree, as stripper clips for the Lee-Enfield hold 5 rounds). The M1 Garand takes it a step further, where, in a nod to how real soldiers were trained in its use, the player cannot reload it ''at all'' except from empty; in ''World at War'', where the player actually can reload it mid-clip, the gun inverts the usual rules for this and still reloads much faster from empty. Additionally, the BAR in ''1'', along with the Bren, Gewehr 43, and SVT-40 in ''2'', do not have alternate animations for reloading with an empty magazine. The SVT-40 and Gewehr 43, when they were first added in ''United Offensive'', also inverted this, where for some reason reloading mid-magazine would have your character pull and lock the bolt handle back first and ''then'' replace the magazine, while reloading from empty would skip that step since the handle had already locked back from firing the last round.

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** The first two games are actually somewhat schizophrenic about this trope. The bolt-action weapons all follow these rules ''except'' for the Lee-Enfield, which can only be manually reloaded if there are five or less rounds left in it (which makes sense to a degree, as stripper clips for the Lee-Enfield hold 5 rounds). The M1 Garand takes it a step further, where, in a nod to how real soldiers were trained in its use, the player cannot reload it ''at all'' except from empty; in ''World at War'', the only game in the series where the player actually can reload it mid-clip, the gun inverts the usual rules for this and still reloads much faster from empty. Additionally, the BAR in ''1'', along with the Bren, Gewehr 43, and SVT-40 in ''2'', do not have alternate animations for reloading with an empty magazine. The SVT-40 and Gewehr 43, when they were first added in ''United Offensive'', also inverted this, where for some reason reloading mid-magazine would have your character pull and lock the bolt handle back first and ''then'' replace the magazine, while reloading from empty would skip that step since the handle had already locked back from firing the last round.
14th Aug '16 11:17:24 AM Kadorhal
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Another thing that is rarely simulated is chambered rounds; usually when a magazine-fed closed-bolt weapon is reloaded without being empty, a round will remain in the chamber from the previous magazine. This will mean after reloading you'll have a full magazine plus an "extra" round in the chamber; generally in a game the chambered round is ignored to allow for a DramaticGunCock which would be pointless in reality since save for empty reloads the gun will never have ''stopped'' being cocked.[[note]]Note that in RealLife, loading a full magazine into a weapon with a round in the chamber can potentially damage the weapon and/or magazine, and as such is usually not advised. Then again, military forces typically do this anyway; every extra bullet counts.[[/note]]

to:

Another thing that is rarely simulated is chambered rounds; usually when a magazine-fed closed-bolt weapon is reloaded without being empty, a round will remain in the chamber from the previous magazine. This will mean after reloading you'll have a full magazine plus an "extra" round in the chamber; generally in a game the chambered round is ignored to allow for a DramaticGunCock which would be pointless in reality since save for empty reloads the gun will never have ''stopped'' being cocked.[[note]]Note that in RealLife, loading a full magazine into a weapon with a round in the chamber can potentially damage the weapon and/or magazine, and as such is usually not advised. Then again, military forces typically do this anyway; every extra bullet counts. Pulling the slide/handle/what have you after a reload every time is also a real-world technique, which sacrifices the possibility of an extra round to ensure that there always ''is'' a round in the chamber.[[/note]]



On the other hand, if you scavenge a weapon or ammo off of the enemy, you will typically find at most one magazine of ammunition to go with it (an exception is when you just swapped it for another, when you might get a more generous starting amount). However many shots he might have fired at you, it seems he was down to his last magazine (or frequently half magazine) when he died; this is even the case if his in-game model shows him to be carrying a whole unspent belt of ammunition draped across his body or a bandolier full of spare magazines and grenades. Apparently the {{Mooks}} have BottomlessMagazines, but they only work for them.

This tends to be a RuleOfFun thing; manually consolidating ammo between half-empty magazines wouldn't exactly be entertaining, and while it potentially makes reloading a more complex decision than "press button when not shooting," having half-magazines lost completely or remembered doesn't exactly fit the style of a more arcade-y shooter. Obviously, this trope doesn't apply to weapons that are manually loaded with single shots such as [=RPGs=], and typically also doesn't apply to weapons with internal magazines that are loaded with single rounds like shotguns, though sometimes the latter use a fixed-length reload animation no matter how many rounds are actually being put into the gun (if they don't go the BottomlessMagazines route to compensate for the low rate of fire).

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On the other hand, if you scavenge a weapon or ammo off of the enemy, you will typically find at most one magazine of ammunition to go with it (an exception is when if you just swapped it for it from another, when which could possibly give you might get a more generous starting amount).amount to start with). However many shots he might have fired at you, it seems he was down to his last magazine (or frequently half magazine) when he died; this is even the case if his in-game model shows him to be carrying a whole unspent belt of ammunition draped across his body or a bandolier full of spare magazines and grenades. Apparently the {{Mooks}} have BottomlessMagazines, but they only work for them.

This tends to be a RuleOfFun thing; manually consolidating ammo between half-empty magazines wouldn't exactly be entertaining, and while it potentially makes reloading a more complex decision than "press button when not shooting," having half-magazines lost completely or remembered doesn't exactly fit the style of a more arcade-y shooter. Obviously, this trope doesn't apply to weapons that are manually loaded with single shots such as [=RPGs=], and typically also doesn't apply to weapons with internal magazines that are loaded with single rounds like shotguns, though sometimes the latter use a fixed-length reload animation no matter how many rounds are actually being put into the gun (if they don't go the BottomlessMagazines route and feed themselves directly from your reserves to compensate for the low rate of fire).



* Almost all {{FPS}} games except the ones near the classic end of [[FacklerScaleOfFPSRealism FPS realism scale]] (with no reloading) and a handful near the realistic end of the scale. ''VideoGame/{{Half-Life}}'', ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Doom}} 3'', ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'', the ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor'' series, ''[[VideoGame/FirstEncounterAssaultRecon FEAR]]'', the list goes on. The classic exception is any game featuring the M1 Garand; this is TruthInTelevision to an extent, as the weapon is tricky to unload while under fire and typically US soldiers were instructed to fire off the rest of the en-bloc clip rather than do so.
** One of the more common examples are pistols with what are known as "magic slides" - contrary to real-world pistol operation, where the slide only locks back when the final round from a magazine has been chambered and fired, most games with pistols whose slides move on their own ''at all'' will magically lock back at the start of a reload, even if you had only fired a single bullet from the previous magazine.

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* Almost all {{FPS}} games except the ones near the classic end of [[FacklerScaleOfFPSRealism FPS realism scale]] (with no reloading) and a handful near the realistic end of the scale. ''VideoGame/{{Half-Life}}'', ''VideoGame/HalfLife'', ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Doom}} 3'', ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'', the ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor'' series, ''[[VideoGame/FirstEncounterAssaultRecon FEAR]]'', the list goes on. The classic exception is any game featuring the M1 Garand; this is TruthInTelevision to an extent, as the weapon is tricky to unload while under fire and typically US soldiers were instructed to fire off the rest of the en-bloc clip rather than do so.
** One of the more common examples are pistols with what are known as "magic slides" - contrary to most real-world pistol operation, pistols, where the slide only locks back when the final round from a magazine has been chambered and fired, most games with pistols whose slides move on their own ''at all'' will magically lock back at the start of a reload, even if you had only fired a single bullet from the previous magazine.magazine. Some may then get extra-silly and have the player character pull the slide to chamber a round - even though releasing it in the first place already accomplished that.



** The first two games are actually somewhat schizophrenic about this trope. The bolt-action weapons all follow these rules ''except'' for the Lee-Enfield, which can only be manually reloaded if there are five or less rounds left in it (which makes sense to a degree, as stripper clips for the Lee-Enfield hold 5 rounds). The M1 Garand takes it a step further, where (in a nod to how real soldiers were trained in its use) the player cannot reload it ''at all'' except from empty; in ''World at War'', where the player actually can reload it mid-clip, the gun inverts the usual rules for this and still reloads much faster from empty. Additionally, the BAR in ''1'', along with the Bren, Gewehr 43, and SVT-40 in ''2'', do not have alternate animations for reloading with an empty magazine. The SVT-40 and Gewehr 43, when they were first added in ''United Offensive'', also inverted this, where for some reason reloading mid-magazine would have your character pull and lock the bolt handle back first and ''then'' replace the magazine, while reloading from empty would skip that step since the handle had already locked back from firing the last round.

to:

** The first two games are actually somewhat schizophrenic about this trope. The bolt-action weapons all follow these rules ''except'' for the Lee-Enfield, which can only be manually reloaded if there are five or less rounds left in it (which makes sense to a degree, as stripper clips for the Lee-Enfield hold 5 rounds). The M1 Garand takes it a step further, where (in where, in a nod to how real soldiers were trained in its use) use, the player cannot reload it ''at all'' except from empty; in ''World at War'', where the player actually can reload it mid-clip, the gun inverts the usual rules for this and still reloads much faster from empty. Additionally, the BAR in ''1'', along with the Bren, Gewehr 43, and SVT-40 in ''2'', do not have alternate animations for reloading with an empty magazine. The SVT-40 and Gewehr 43, when they were first added in ''United Offensive'', also inverted this, where for some reason reloading mid-magazine would have your character pull and lock the bolt handle back first and ''then'' replace the magazine, while reloading from empty would skip that step since the handle had already locked back from firing the last round.



* Similar to the Call of Duty one above, ''VideoGame/Left4Dead'' applied a similar mechanic to the pump and automatic shotguns. If you had just one round in the gun before you started to reload, you performed the standard animation. If you reloaded from empty, your character performed a slightly different animation and would need to take an extra second to chamber a round before you could start firing again. It dips back into FridgeLogic territory again in [[VideoGame/Left4Dead2 the sequel]], though, where both Tier 2 shotguns will do the cocking animation regardless of how many rounds are left in the gun, but the Tier 1 shotguns won't, and the animation can be interrupted at any point to fire the gun, eliminating the drawback.

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* Similar to the Call of Duty one above, ''VideoGame/Left4Dead'' applied a similar mechanic to the pump and automatic shotguns. If you had just one round any shells in the gun before you started to reload, you performed the standard animation. If you reloaded from empty, your character performed a slightly different animation and would need to take an extra second to chamber a round the first shell before you could start firing again. It dips back into FridgeLogic territory again in [[VideoGame/Left4Dead2 the sequel]], though, where both Tier 2 shotguns will do the cocking animation regardless of how many rounds are left in the gun, gun (and much faster than it was performed in the first game), but the Tier 1 shotguns won't, and the animation can be interrupted at any point to fire the gun, gun even if reloading from empty, thus eliminating the drawback.



** There was a common misconception that magazine-based firearms would actually lose all the ammo left in their magazine during a reload, but this was never the case. The confusion arose from the fact that the mag-ammo counter turns to zero once you start reloading; most failed to notice that the number of rounds left were re-added to the total ammo counter at the same time.

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** There was a common misconception that magazine-based firearms would actually lose all the ammo left in their magazine during a reload, but this was never the case. The confusion arose from the fact that the mag-ammo counter turns to zero once you start reloading; reloading (thus necessitating some care in when you manually reload, since once you start [[AllOrNothingReloads you have to take the time to do it before you can fire again]]); most failed to notice that the number of rounds left were re-added to the total ammo counter at the same time.



* ''VideoGame/{{Crysis}}'' can't make up its mind, the game realistically tracks chambered rounds and featured faster reloads for magazine-fed weapons, if they aren't completely empty. At the same time, magazines are filled from the reserve and not individually tracked.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Crysis}}'' can't make up its mind, the game realistically tracks chambered rounds and featured faster reloads for magazine-fed weapons, weapons if they aren't completely empty. At the same time, magazines are filled from the reserve and not individually tracked.



** [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] by some [[{{NPC}} marines]] in the game, who will occasionally shoot a few rounds into downed enemies (when there are no other obvious targets remaining) and sometimes say things like "Don't mind me, just emptying the magazine," as they do so[[note]]This may be a reference to Creator/{{Bungie}}'s previous ''VideoGame/{{Marathon}}'', which required the player to expend their remaining ammo in order to reload to a full magazine[[/note]].

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** [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] by some [[{{NPC}} marines]] in the game, who will occasionally shoot a few rounds into downed enemies (when there are no other obvious targets remaining) and sometimes say things like "Don't mind me, just emptying the magazine," as they do so[[note]]This may be a reference to Creator/{{Bungie}}'s previous ''VideoGame/{{Marathon}}'', which tracked ammo per magazine but had no command for manually reloading, and required the player to expend their remaining ammo in order to reload to a full magazine[[/note]].reload[[/note]].



** Games from ''VideoGame/HaloReach'' onward [[ZigZaggingTrope Zig-Zag]] this with the pistol. The first time you pull it out, the slide gets pulled, every subsequent time the safety gets flipped. Still no extra round on the reload though.

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** Games from ''VideoGame/HaloReach'' ''Reach'' onward [[ZigZaggingTrope Zig-Zag]] this with the pistol. The first time you pull it out, the slide gets pulled, every subsequent time the safety gets flipped. Still no extra round on the reload though.



* ''VideoGame/RainbowSix: Vegas'' is similar to ''Crysis'' in this regard. Reloading an empty weapon requires the protagonist to cock the gun to put the first round into the chamber. In addition, the game tracked chambered rounds after reloading a magazine, letting the player fire one more round (excluding belt-fed [=LMGs=], which are always re-cocked no matter how many rounds you had left - in return, you can see their belts visibly get smaller as you run through the last few rounds in them). However, despite the HUD only showing an amount of magazines equivalent to the remaining ammunition you have remaining, they're not actually individually tracked.
** Also averted in previous ''Rainbow Six'' games, where you start each level with X magazines, each holding Y rounds - all tracked individually. You never just drop a mag unless it's empty (this includes reloading with a single round left; that single round would be kept in the chamber and fired along with those in the next mag), instead you put it back in your pockets. Whenever you reload, any non-empty magazine you're holding is kept, and put at the bottom of your loading queue. Meaning that if you're the kind of person who reloads when half of your magazine is gone, then more often than not by the middle of the level you'll be reloading with half-empty mags.

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* ''VideoGame/RainbowSix: Vegas'' is similar to ''Crysis'' in this regard. Reloading an empty weapon requires the protagonist to cock the gun to put the first round into the chamber. In addition, the game tracked chambered rounds after reloading a magazine, letting the player fire one more round (excluding belt-fed [=LMGs=], which are always re-cocked no matter how many rounds you had left - in return, you can see their belts visibly get smaller as you run through the last few rounds in them). However, despite the HUD only showing an amount of magazines equivalent to the remaining ammunition you have remaining, they're not actually individually tracked.
tracked. This was also implemented rather weirdly with ''Vegas 2''[='=]s {{revolver|sAreJustBetter}}, which due to being a revolver doesn't get chambered rounds, but still gets a slower reloading animation when reloading from empty, just because.
** Also averted in previous ''Rainbow Six'' games, where you start each level with X magazines, each holding Y rounds - all tracked individually. You never just drop a mag unless it's empty (this includes reloading with a single round left; left, at least in ''Raven Shield''; that single round would be kept in the chamber and fired along with those in the next mag), instead you put it back in your pockets. Whenever you reload, any non-empty magazine you're holding is kept, and put at the bottom of your loading queue. Meaning that if you're the kind of person who reloads when half of your magazine is gone, then more often than not by the middle of the level you'll be reloading with half-empty mags.



* ''VideoGame/KillingFloor'' does this - the majority of weapons have a fixed-length reload capped by a DramaticGunCock at the end of it, no matter how many rounds you fired before reloading. The bullpup, meanwhile, skips chambering a new round entirely. Averted for some other weapons, though: the crossbow and M99 are single-shot weapons, the lever-action rifle reloads with loose bullets, and the pump and combat shotguns do the same with the addition of pumping or pulling back the charging handle at the end of an empty reload if the player doesn't interrupt it at any point.
** Weapons added in patches and DLC take it to a bit of an extreme - when you remove a magazine it will appear empty, no matter how many rounds you fired from it.
*** This may not be intentional and actually simply a developer oversight - many video games did not have rounds modeled or textured on the magazine, although it is becoming more common, as of the last few years.

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* ''VideoGame/KillingFloor'' does this - the majority of weapons have a fixed-length reload capped by a DramaticGunCock at the end of it, no matter how many rounds you fired before reloading. The bullpup, meanwhile, skips chambering a new round entirely. Averted for some other weapons, though: the crossbow and M99 are single-shot weapons, the lever-action rifle reloads with loose bullets, and the pump and combat shotguns do the same with the addition of pumping or pulling back the charging handle at the end of an empty reload if the player doesn't interrupt it at any point.
**
point. Weapons added in patches and DLC take it to a bit of an extreme - extreme, where even if you only fired one round from a magazine before reloading, it will appear completely empty when you remove it, before loading in a new magazine with actual bullets in it will appear empty, no matter how many rounds you fired from it.
*** This may not be intentional and
(a side effect of the weapons being added after a point where actually simply a developer oversight - many video games did not have rounds modeled or textured on the magazine, although it is modelling bullets in magazines, rather than just flat textures, started becoming more common, as of commonplace but at the last few years.same time inconsistent).



* ''VideoGame/BrutalDoom'', a GameMod for the classic ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'', adds a reloading mechanic to most game weapons that plays the trope straight (going so far as to have discarded magazines/energy cells tossed on the ground and remain there, even though though somehow any ammunition that they may have had remaining stays with the player). Of note, however, is that reloading the assault rifle (the replacement for the pistol) when empty gives thirty rounds while reloading with ammunition still present gives thirty-one and (at least as of v20) reloading the shotgun produces a DramaticGunCock only if the shotgun was empty when the reload started.

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** The series as a whole plays this straight, where most weapons only ever have one reloading animation and do not track individual magazines. In earlier games, cocking the gun or not was entirely dependent on the gun rather than how many bullets were left in; by ''Global Offensive'', every gun is now cocked after every reload.
* ''VideoGame/BrutalDoom'', a GameMod for the classic ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'', adds a reloading mechanic to most game of the weapons that plays the trope straight (going so far as to have discarded magazines/energy cells tossed on the ground and remain there, even though though somehow any ammunition that they may have had remaining stays with the player). Of note, however, is that reloading the assault rifle (the replacement for the pistol) when empty gives thirty rounds while reloading with ammunition still present gives thirty-one thirty-one, and (at least as of v20) v20 reloading the shotgun produces a DramaticGunCock only if the shotgun was empty when the reload started.
13th Aug '16 8:49:21 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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** ''Reach'' and ''VideoGame/{{Halo 4}}'' [[ZigZaggingTrope Zig-Zag]] this with the pistol. The first time you pull it out, the slide gets pulled, every subsequent time the safety gets flipped. Still no extra round on the reload though.

to:

** ''Reach'' and ''VideoGame/{{Halo 4}}'' Games from ''VideoGame/HaloReach'' onward [[ZigZaggingTrope Zig-Zag]] this with the pistol. The first time you pull it out, the slide gets pulled, every subsequent time the safety gets flipped. Still no extra round on the reload though.
9th Aug '16 10:02:25 AM Ripburger
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* Likewise the first two ''VideoGame/XCom'' games, in which every magazine is a separate inventory item, and the number of bullets in each is tracked realistically.

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* Likewise the first two ''VideoGame/XCom'' games, ''[[{{VideoGame/XCOM}} X-COM]]'' games (''[[VideoGame/XCOMUFODefense UFO Defense]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/XCOMTerrorFromTheDeep Terror From the Deep]]''), in which every magazine is a separate inventory item, and the number of bullets in each is tracked realistically.
8th Aug '16 5:04:09 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' follows this trope to the letter. Maybe the MC [[HyperspaceArsenal stores his magazines/grenades/reserve weapon (in H1) inside his suit]], which also contains a universal speedloader, [[FanWank it's the only logical explanation]].
** [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] by some [[{{NPC}} marines]] in the game, who will occasionally shoot a few rounds into downed enemies (when there are no other obvious targets remaining) and sometimes say things like "Don't mind me, just emptying the magazine," as they do so.
** This may be a callback to the below-mentioned ''VideoGame/{{Marathon}}'', which required the player to expend their remaining ammo in order to reload to a full magazine.
** ''VideoGame/HaloCombatEvolved'' does have separate animations for mid- and empty reloads for the pistol, sniper rifle, and shotgun, where either the slide/handle locks back and the Chief releases it once the new magazine is in or the Chief pumps the weapon once the last shell is in place; these aren't as notable as they ended up being in ''Call of Duty'' partly because of the inconsistent implementation (every other gun that needs to be reloaded at all ignores this) and they add almost no time to the length of the reloads (the pistol's in particular maybe adds milliseconds). ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}'', ''[[VideoGame/{{Halo 3}} 3]]'', and ''[[VideoGame/Halo3ODST ODST]]'' skipped this, where the DramaticGunCock or lack of one is independent of how many rounds the player had left in the magazine, then ''VideoGame/HaloReach'' went back to this for most human weapons.

to:

* ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' follows this trope to the letter. Maybe the MC [[HyperspaceArsenal stores his magazines/grenades/reserve weapon (in H1) (the last one depending on the game/scenario) inside his suit]], which also contains a universal speedloader, speedloader. [[FanWank it's It's the only logical explanation]].
** [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] by some [[{{NPC}} marines]] in the game, who will occasionally shoot a few rounds into downed enemies (when there are no other obvious targets remaining) and sometimes say things like "Don't mind me, just emptying the magazine," as they do so.
** This
so[[note]]This may be a callback reference to the below-mentioned Creator/{{Bungie}}'s previous ''VideoGame/{{Marathon}}'', which required the player to expend their remaining ammo in order to reload to a full magazine.
magazine[[/note]].
** ''VideoGame/HaloCombatEvolved'' does have separate animations for mid- and empty reloads for the pistol, sniper rifle, and shotgun, where either the slide/handle locks back and the Chief releases it once the new magazine is in in, or the Chief pumps the weapon once the last shell is in place; these aren't as notable as they ended up being in ''Call of Duty'' partly because of the inconsistent implementation (every other gun that needs to be reloaded at all ignores this) and they add almost no time to the length of the reloads (the pistol's in particular maybe adds milliseconds). ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}'', ''[[VideoGame/{{Halo 3}} 3]]'', and ''[[VideoGame/Halo3ODST ODST]]'' skipped this, where the DramaticGunCock or lack of one is independent of how many rounds the player had left in the magazine, then ''VideoGame/HaloReach'' went back to this for most human weapons.



** The ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' series does contain one notable aversion, however: in every installment of the game to date, the amount of time the shotgun's reload animation takes is proportional to how many shells you are reloading.

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** The ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' series does contain one notable aversion, however: in every installment of the game to date, the amount of time the shotgun's reload animation takes is proportional to how many shells you are reloading.
26th Jul '16 7:58:30 AM Dimensio
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* ''VideoGame/BrutalDoom'', a GameMod for the classic ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'', adds a reloading mechanic to most game weapons that plays the trope straight. Of note, however, is that reloading the assault rifle (the replacement for the pistol) when empty gives thirty rounds while reloading with ammunition still present gives thirty-one and (at least as of v20) reloading the shotgun produces a DramaticGunCock only if the shotgun was empty when the reload started.

to:

* ''VideoGame/BrutalDoom'', a GameMod for the classic ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'', adds a reloading mechanic to most game weapons that plays the trope straight.straight (going so far as to have discarded magazines/energy cells tossed on the ground and remain there, even though though somehow any ammunition that they may have had remaining stays with the player). Of note, however, is that reloading the assault rifle (the replacement for the pistol) when empty gives thirty rounds while reloading with ammunition still present gives thirty-one and (at least as of v20) reloading the shotgun produces a DramaticGunCock only if the shotgun was empty when the reload started.
26th Jul '16 7:56:35 AM Dimensio
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to:

* ''VideoGame/BrutalDoom'', a GameMod for the classic ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'', adds a reloading mechanic to most game weapons that plays the trope straight. Of note, however, is that reloading the assault rifle (the replacement for the pistol) when empty gives thirty rounds while reloading with ammunition still present gives thirty-one and (at least as of v20) reloading the shotgun produces a DramaticGunCock only if the shotgun was empty when the reload started.
24th Jul '16 4:54:09 PM TheNicestGuy
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[[AC:SimulationGame]]
* ''VideoGame/ProjectZomboid'', although not a gun-centric game, actually allows you choose how straight to play this trope. With "Easy" reloading, loose cartridges in your main inventory are deducted, and the firearm filled, when the reload key is pressed; magazines are ignored. With "Normal", magazines are separate objects (you may eventually find yourself picking up a scavenged pistol, ejecting the magazine for your stockpile, and leaving the gun behind), and the number of rounds in each is tracked. Loading them with individual rounds can be quite tedious (do it while you're waiting for a stew to cook, maybe). For a pistol, the reload key ejects your magazine if one is loaded, or loads your fullest one if it is not, so it must be pressed ''twice'' for a full cycle. For a shotgun, reload will start adding shells to the tube until it is full. The chamber is even considered: If you eject your pistol's magazine before firing your last round, you can still take one more shot without loading a new mag (or if you did load one, that first round is "free"). The info panel for your equipped weapon uses the handy "15+1" notation to make this clear. Finally, with "Hardcore", racking the action is added as a separate maneuver with a separate button (works the slide for a pistol, the pump for a shotgun). You must rack if you add a fresh magazine/shell with an empty chamber, you must rack a shotgun between each shot, and you must ''not'' rack after reloading if the chamber was loaded. Doing so will actually [[UnexpectedlyRealisticGameplay drop loose rounds]] on the ground. Not as fiddly as ''{{VideoGame/Receiver}}'', but close.
18th Jul '16 6:03:28 AM REV6Pilot
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* ''VideoGame/SevenDaysToDie'' averted this as well, but maybe a little too much. Reloading a pistol empties it of any remaining ammunition and reloads with a fresh mag. For a shotgun on the other hand, reloading ''also'' empties it of the remaining shells and refills it with a new batch.
* ''VideoGame/{{Unturned}}'' has magazines with their own ammo count, and reloading causes the magazine and whatever ammo was left in it to fall onto the ground and swaps it with another magazine. Each magazine has to be filled manually by placing whatever type of ammo the gun uses and the magazine in the crafting menu. However, refilling a magazine will use up an entire ammo box whether the mag was empty or only missing one round of twenty, meaning that while magazines can be picked back up and used again after reloading, actually putting ammo in magazines that aren't empty will result in wasted ammunition.

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* Earlier alphas of ''VideoGame/SevenDaysToDie'' averted this as well, but maybe a little too much. the trope, ''Cry of Fear'' style. Reloading a pistol empties gun emptied it of any remaining ammunition and reloads reloaded it with a fresh mag. For a shotgun on mag, and that was valid even for shotguns. Later on, the other hand, reloading ''also'' empties it game started tracking individual rounds instead of the remaining shells single "full reloads", and refills started playing it with a new batch.
straight.
* ''VideoGame/{{Unturned}}'' has magazines with their own ammo count, and reloading causes the magazine and whatever ammo was left in it to fall onto the ground and swaps it with another magazine. count. Each magazine has to be filled manually by placing whatever type of ammo the gun uses and the magazine in the crafting menu. However, refilling a magazine will use up an entire ammo box whether menu, using the mag was empty or only missing one round of twenty, meaning that while magazines can be picked back up and used again after reloading, actually putting ammo in magazines that aren't empty will result in wasted ammunition.proper ammunition (in the .



* ''VideoGame/{{Stalker}}: Shadow of Chernobyl'' follows this trope with the player's weapons, with a few exceptions; most notably, switching ammo types with the shotgun requires the player to manually unload the tube magazine in the inventory menu. Enemy weapons are a mixed bag; the player has to unload actual guns manually rather than removing and hoovering up magazines with their shoes, but the rest of an enemy's ammo is simply depicted as boxes.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Stalker}}: Shadow of Chernobyl'' ''VideoGame/{{STALKER}}'' follows this trope with the player's weapons, with a few exceptions; most notably, switching ammo types with the shotgun requires the player to manually unload the tube magazine in the inventory menu. Enemy weapons are a mixed bag; the player has to unload actual guns manually rather than removing and hoovering up magazines with their shoes, manually, but the rest of an enemy's ammo is simply depicted as boxes.
16th Jul '16 5:03:02 PM SUTempest
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* Particularly aggravating in ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' - the game actively encourages the player to abuse this trope, by increasing the reload time of every weapon in the game when empty. There is an additional step involved in reloading if the chamber is empty (you have to pull the charging handle/slide back and release it to chamber a new round); on the other hand, you aren't considered to have an extra bullet to fire since you now have a chambered round and a full magazine... many games ignore this fact and have only one animation for reloading any given weapon, typically showing the player character rack the charging handle after inserting the new magazine (even if there's still a round in the chamber, which would eject a perfectly good bullet from the gun in real life) or, worse, simply replacing the magazine and leaving the 'chamber a new round' step out entirely.
** Also particularly ridiculous in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' and [[VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2 its sequel]], as when reloading the Python and Raging Judge revolvers or the M32 revolver-esque GrenadeLauncher, your character is clearly shown taking every bullet/shell/grenade out of the cylinder at the same time, regardless of how many shots were fired, and then ''only'' loading as many as had been fired since the last reload - and in the case of the Raging Judge and M32, you can actually ''see'' the clearly-empty chambers magically regrow new rounds as soon as it's time to put the cylinder back in place. Every other revolver in the series partially avoids this by using speedloaders, which the Python and Raging Judge can also use with the correct attachment, but then this brings up the issue of loading more bullets than you actually have when you have less than a full cylinder's worth of bullets total.
** The first two games are actually somewhat schizophrenic about this trope. The bolt-action weapons all follow these rules ''except'' for the Lee-Enfield, which can only be manually reloaded if there are five or less bullets left in it. The M1 Garand takes it a step further, where (in a nod to how real soldiers were trained in its use) the player cannot reload it ''at all'' except from empty; in ''World at War'', where the player actually can reload it mid-clip, the gun inverts the usual rules for this and still reloads much faster from empty. Additionally, the BAR in ''1'', along with the Bren, Gewehr 43, and SVT-40 in ''2'', do not have alternate animations for reloading with an empty magazine. The SVT-40 and Gewehr 43, when they were first added in ''United Offensive'', also inverted this, where for some reason reloading mid-magazine would have your character pull and lock the bolt handle back first and ''then'' replace the magazine, while reloading from empty would skip that step since the handle had already locked back from firing the last round.
** ''World at War'' mostly follows this, with one exception. When using the Double-Barrelled Shotgun, you may reload after firing only one shell. If you do, the reloading animation will show your character blocking the other shell with their thumb while shaking the spent shell out. Oddly, no other ''Call of Duty'' game with a double-barrelled shotgun features this detail.
** Shotguns that are loaded one shell at a time in this series go to both extremes - the pump-action ones are always pumped at the end of a reload no matter how many shells are loaded, while the automatic ones leave the chambering step out entirely. The exceptions are the M1897 Trench Gun in the World War II-based games (only pumped after an empty reload) and ''Black Ops''' version of the SPAS-12 (firing semi-auto for once but still always pumped after a reload).

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* Particularly aggravating in ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' - the game actively encourages the player to abuse this trope, by increasing the reload time of every weapon in the game when empty. There is an additional step involved in reloading if the chamber is empty (you have to pull the charging handle/slide back and release it to chamber a new round); on the other hand, you aren't considered to have an extra bullet round to fire since you now have a chambered round and a full magazine... many games ignore this fact and have only one animation for reloading any given weapon, typically showing the player character rack the charging handle after inserting the new magazine (even if there's still a round in the chamber, which would eject a perfectly good bullet cartridge from the gun in real life) or, worse, simply replacing the magazine and leaving the 'chamber a new round' step out entirely.
** Also particularly ridiculous in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' and [[VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2 its sequel]], as when reloading the Python and Raging Judge revolvers or the M32 revolver-esque GrenadeLauncher, your character is clearly shown taking every bullet/shell/grenade empty casing/shell/grenade out of the cylinder at the same time, regardless of how many shots were fired, and then ''only'' loading as many as had been fired since the last reload - and in the case of the Raging Judge and M32, you can actually ''see'' the clearly-empty chambers magically regrow new rounds as soon as it's time to put the cylinder back in place. Every other revolver in the series partially avoids this by using speedloaders, which the Python and Raging Judge can also use with the correct attachment, but then this brings up the issue of loading more bullets ammunition than you actually have when you have less than a full cylinder's worth of bullets total.
remaining.
** The first two games are actually somewhat schizophrenic about this trope. The bolt-action weapons all follow these rules ''except'' for the Lee-Enfield, which can only be manually reloaded if there are five or less bullets rounds left in it.it (which makes sense to a degree, as stripper clips for the Lee-Enfield hold 5 rounds). The M1 Garand takes it a step further, where (in a nod to how real soldiers were trained in its use) the player cannot reload it ''at all'' except from empty; in ''World at War'', where the player actually can reload it mid-clip, the gun inverts the usual rules for this and still reloads much faster from empty. Additionally, the BAR in ''1'', along with the Bren, Gewehr 43, and SVT-40 in ''2'', do not have alternate animations for reloading with an empty magazine. The SVT-40 and Gewehr 43, when they were first added in ''United Offensive'', also inverted this, where for some reason reloading mid-magazine would have your character pull and lock the bolt handle back first and ''then'' replace the magazine, while reloading from empty would skip that step since the handle had already locked back from firing the last round.
** ''World at War'' mostly follows this, with one exception. When using the Double-Barrelled Double-Barreled Shotgun, you may reload after firing only one shell. If you do, the reloading animation will show your character blocking the other shell with their thumb while shaking the spent shell out. Oddly, no other ''Call of Duty'' game with a double-barrelled double-barreled shotgun features this detail.
** Shotguns that are loaded one shell at a time in this series go to both extremes - the pump-action ones are always pumped at the end of a reload no matter how many shells are loaded, while the automatic semi-automatic ones leave the chambering step out entirely. The exceptions are the M1897 Trench Gun in the World War II-based games (only pumped after an empty reload) and ''Black Ops''' version of the SPAS-12 (firing semi-auto for once but still always pumped after a reload).



** ''VideoGame/HalfLife1'' does accurately handle the chambered round in one case: when reloading a non-empty Glock 17, the slide does not retract, whereas it does if the gun is emptied prior to reloading it; in the ''Source'' rerelease of the game, this also results in you gaining an extra bullet after a mid-mag reload. This is not the case for the USP from ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'', however. This is reversed for the shotgun, where in the original it is pumped after every reload, but in ''2'' this will only happen if the player allows Gordon to fully reload it from empty, although in neither case are you prevented from firing between shells if you haven't let Gordon actually chamber one after emptying the gun.
** ''Opposing Force'' had a nice little detail with the M249 S.A.W. when you ran low on bullets, the end of the chain is actually seen once you're below ten rounds left and it visibly gets shorter.
* Similar to the Call of Duty one above, ''VideoGame/Left4Dead'' applied a similar mechanic to the pump and automatic shotguns. If you had just one round in the gun before you started to reload, you performed the standard animation. If you reloaded from empty, your character performed a slightly different animation and would need to take an extra second to chamber a shell before you could start firing again. It dips back into FridgeLogic territory again in [[VideoGame/Left4Dead2 the sequel]], though, where both Tier 2 shotguns will do the cocking animation regardless of how many rounds are left in the gun, but the Tier 1 shotguns won't, and the animation can be interrupted at any point to fire the gun, eliminating the drawback.

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** ''VideoGame/HalfLife1'' does accurately handle the chambered round in one case: when reloading a non-empty Glock 17, the slide does not retract, whereas it does if the gun is emptied prior to reloading it; in the ''Source'' rerelease of the game, this also results the chambered round is actually tracked, resulting in you gaining the ability to fire an extra bullet round after a mid-mag reload.reload (18, instead of 17). This is not the case for the USP from ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'', however. This is reversed for the shotgun, where in the original it is pumped after every reload, but in ''2'' this will only happen if the player allows Gordon to fully reload it from empty, although in neither case are you prevented from firing between shells if you haven't let Gordon actually chamber one after emptying the gun.
** ''Opposing Force'' had a nice little detail with the M249 S.A.W. SAW when you ran low on bullets, the end of the chain is actually seen once you're below ten rounds left and it visibly gets shorter.
* Similar to the Call of Duty one above, ''VideoGame/Left4Dead'' applied a similar mechanic to the pump and automatic shotguns. If you had just one round in the gun before you started to reload, you performed the standard animation. If you reloaded from empty, your character performed a slightly different animation and would need to take an extra second to chamber a shell round before you could start firing again. It dips back into FridgeLogic territory again in [[VideoGame/Left4Dead2 the sequel]], though, where both Tier 2 shotguns will do the cocking animation regardless of how many rounds are left in the gun, but the Tier 1 shotguns won't, and the animation can be interrupted at any point to fire the gun, eliminating the drawback.



** There was a common misconception that magazine-based firearms would actually lose all the ammo left in their magazine during a reload, but this was never the case. The confusion arose from the fact that the mag-ammo counter turns to zero once you start reloading; most failed to notice that the number of bullets left were re-added to the total ammo counter at the same time.

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** There was a common misconception that magazine-based firearms would actually lose all the ammo left in their magazine during a reload, but this was never the case. The confusion arose from the fact that the mag-ammo counter turns to zero once you start reloading; most failed to notice that the number of bullets rounds left were re-added to the total ammo counter at the same time.



* The ''Firearms'' mod for ''Half-Life'' averts this. Partially-empty magazines are still partially empty if the player reloads them. Shotgun reloads can be interrupted after each shell. Most guns retain a round in the chamber if reloaded while there is still one round in the magazine; exceptions are programmed in specifically in the cases where the weapon's real-world counterpart would not behave that way (revolvers; Sterling submachine gun). In the case of the revolvers, there is a distinct reload animation for each of the possible number of shots fired: if reloading only two bullets, the character would place a thumb over the remaining four to keep them in their chambers. The empty chambers were then reloaded one at a time, and the reload could be canceled partway through, similar to the shotgun. The mod's motto, after all, was that ''it's all about the guns''. Its successor, ''Firearms: Source'', has done away with certain features such as magazine merging which was not seen as adding anything to gameplay.
* ''VideoGame/{{Crysis}}'' can't make up its mind, magazine-fed weapons realistically have the +1 statistic and faster reloads if they aren't completely empty. At the same time, magazines are filled from the reserve and not individually tracked.

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* The ''Firearms'' mod for ''Half-Life'' averts (and its ''Source'' successor, ''Firearms: Source'') avert this. Partially-empty magazines are still partially empty if the player reloads them. Shotgun reloads can be interrupted after each shell. Most guns retain a round in the chamber if reloaded while there is still one round in the magazine; exceptions are programmed in specifically in the cases where the weapon's real-world counterpart would not behave that way (revolvers; (such as revolvers or open-bolt firearms, like the Sterling submachine gun). In the case of the revolvers, there is a distinct reload animation for each of the possible number of shots fired: if reloading only two bullets, rounds, the character would place a thumb over the remaining four ones to keep them in their chambers. The empty chambers were then reloaded one at a time, and the reload could be canceled partway through, similar to the shotgun. The mod's motto, after all, was that ''it's all about the guns''. Its successor, ''Firearms: Source'', has done away with certain features such as magazine merging which was not seen as adding anything to gameplay.
guns''.
* ''VideoGame/{{Crysis}}'' can't make up its mind, magazine-fed weapons the game realistically have the +1 statistic tracks chambered rounds and featured faster reloads for magazine-fed weapons, if they aren't completely empty. At the same time, magazines are filled from the reserve and not individually tracked.



** ''VideoGame/HaloCombatEvolved'' does have separate animations for mid- and empty reloads for the pistol, sniper rifle, and shotgun, where either the slide/handle locks back and the Chief releases it once the new magazine is in or the Chief pumps the weapon once the last shell is in place; these aren't as notable as they ended up being in ''Call of Duty'' partly because of the inconsistent implementation (every other gun that needs to be reloaded at all ignores this) and they add almost no time to the length of the reloads (the pistol's in particular maybe adds milliseconds). ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}'', ''[[VideoGame/{{Halo 3}} 3]]'', and ''[[VideoGame/Halo3ODST ODST]]'' skipped this, where the DramaticGunCock or lack of one is independent of how many bullets the player had left in the magazine, then ''VideoGame/HaloReach'' went back to this for most human weapons.
** ''Reach'' and ''VideoGame/{{Halo 4}}'' [[ZigZaggingTrope Zig-Zag]] this with the pistol. The first time you pull it out, the slide gets pulled, every subsequent time the safety gets flipped. Still no extra bullet on the reload though.
** The ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' series does contain one notable aversion, however: in every instalment of the game to date, the amount of time the shotgun's reload animation takes is proportional to how many shells you are reloading.

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** ''VideoGame/HaloCombatEvolved'' does have separate animations for mid- and empty reloads for the pistol, sniper rifle, and shotgun, where either the slide/handle locks back and the Chief releases it once the new magazine is in or the Chief pumps the weapon once the last shell is in place; these aren't as notable as they ended up being in ''Call of Duty'' partly because of the inconsistent implementation (every other gun that needs to be reloaded at all ignores this) and they add almost no time to the length of the reloads (the pistol's in particular maybe adds milliseconds). ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}'', ''[[VideoGame/{{Halo 3}} 3]]'', and ''[[VideoGame/Halo3ODST ODST]]'' skipped this, where the DramaticGunCock or lack of one is independent of how many bullets rounds the player had left in the magazine, then ''VideoGame/HaloReach'' went back to this for most human weapons.
** ''Reach'' and ''VideoGame/{{Halo 4}}'' [[ZigZaggingTrope Zig-Zag]] this with the pistol. The first time you pull it out, the slide gets pulled, every subsequent time the safety gets flipped. Still no extra bullet round on the reload though.
** The ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' series does contain one notable aversion, however: in every instalment installment of the game to date, the amount of time the shotgun's reload animation takes is proportional to how many shells you are reloading.



* The Golden Gun and Rocket Launcher in ''[[VideoGame/GoldenEye1997 Goldeneye 64]]'' are the only weapons that ''don't'' do this, both because they only have a single shot per reload. Other guns play it totally straight, especially in multiplayer: if you have an empty gun in multiplayer, and you get killed, the next person to grab that gun will find it with 10 bullets in it.

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* The Golden Gun and Rocket Launcher in ''[[VideoGame/GoldenEye1997 Goldeneye 64]]'' are the only weapons that ''don't'' do this, both because they only have a single shot per reload. Other guns play it totally straight, especially in multiplayer: if you have an empty gun in multiplayer, and you get killed, the next person to grab that gun will find it with 10 bullets rounds in it.



* ''VideoGame/{{SiN}}'' and its sequel, ''Episodes'', play this one straight, but even more maddening is the fact that the shotgun in ''[=SiN=]: Episodes'', which uses a magazine, will always be pumped after reloading no matter what (ejecting a shell). Since it is also pumped automatically after firing a shot, Blade is in essence ejecting an unused cartridge with every reload.
* ''VideoGame/RainbowSix: Vegas'' is similar to ''Crysis'' in this regard. Reloading an empty weapon requires the protagonist to cock the gun to put the first round into the chamber. In addition, reloading before a gun is empty adds one extra bullet to the next magazine (excluding belt-fed [=LMGs=], which are always re-cocked no matter how many bullets you had left - in return, you can see their belts visibly get smaller as you run through the last few rounds in them). However, despite the HUD only showing how many magazines your remaining bullets would all fit into, they're not actually tracked.
** Also averted in previous ''Rainbow Six'' games, where you start each level with X magazines, each holding Y bullets - all tracked individually. You never just drop a mag unless it's empty (this includes reloading with a single bullet left in it; that single bullet would be kept in the chamber and fired along with those in the next mag), instead you put it back in your pocket. Whenever you reload, any non-empty magazine you're holding is kept, and put at the bottom of your loading queue. Meaning that if you're the kind of person who reloads when half of your magazine is gone, then more often than not by the middle of the level you'll be reloading with half-empty mags.
* ''VideoGame/PerfectDark'' has it with all guns, but especially amusing is the sight of a full clip being loaded into a revolver no matter how many bullets are left. The Jackal sniper rifle in ''Zero'' and the shotgun in both games avoid this by being single-shot and loading one round at a time, respectively.

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* ''VideoGame/{{SiN}}'' and its sequel, ''Episodes'', play this one straight, but even more maddening is the fact that the shotgun in ''[=SiN=]: Episodes'', which uses a magazine, will always be pumped after reloading no matter what (ejecting a shell). Since it is also pumped automatically after firing a shot, Blade is in essence ejecting an unused cartridge shell with every reload.
* ''VideoGame/RainbowSix: Vegas'' is similar to ''Crysis'' in this regard. Reloading an empty weapon requires the protagonist to cock the gun to put the first round into the chamber. In addition, the game tracked chambered rounds after reloading before a gun is empty adds magazine, letting the player fire one extra bullet to the next magazine more round (excluding belt-fed [=LMGs=], which are always re-cocked no matter how many bullets rounds you had left - in return, you can see their belts visibly get smaller as you run through the last few rounds in them). However, despite the HUD only showing how many an amount of magazines your equivalent to the remaining bullets would all fit into, ammunition you have remaining, they're not actually individually tracked.
** Also averted in previous ''Rainbow Six'' games, where you start each level with X magazines, each holding Y bullets rounds - all tracked individually. You never just drop a mag unless it's empty (this includes reloading with a single bullet left in it; round left; that single bullet round would be kept in the chamber and fired along with those in the next mag), instead you put it back in your pocket.pockets. Whenever you reload, any non-empty magazine you're holding is kept, and put at the bottom of your loading queue. Meaning that if you're the kind of person who reloads when half of your magazine is gone, then more often than not by the middle of the level you'll be reloading with half-empty mags.
* ''VideoGame/PerfectDark'' has it with all guns, but especially amusing is the sight of a full clip speedloader being loaded into a revolver no matter how many bullets rounds are left. The Jackal sniper rifle in ''Zero'' and the shotgun in both games avoid this by being single-shot and loading one round at a time, respectively.



* ''VideoGame/KillingFloor'' does this - the majority of weapons have a fixed-length reload capped by a DramaticGunCock at the end of it, no matter if you had fired one bullet or every bullet from the magazine before you reload. The bullpup, meanwhile, skips chambering a new bullet entirely. Averted for some other weapons, though: the crossbow and M99 are single-shot weapons, the lever-action rifle reloads with loose bullets, and the pump and combat shotguns do the same with the addition of pumping or pulling back the charging handle at the end of an empty reload if the player doesn't interrupt it at any point.
** Weapons added in patches and DLC take it to a bit of an extreme - when you remove a magazine it will appear empty, no matter how many bullets you fired from it.

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* ''VideoGame/KillingFloor'' does this - the majority of weapons have a fixed-length reload capped by a DramaticGunCock at the end of it, no matter if how many rounds you had fired one bullet or every bullet from the magazine before you reload. reloading. The bullpup, meanwhile, skips chambering a new bullet round entirely. Averted for some other weapons, though: the crossbow and M99 are single-shot weapons, the lever-action rifle reloads with loose bullets, and the pump and combat shotguns do the same with the addition of pumping or pulling back the charging handle at the end of an empty reload if the player doesn't interrupt it at any point.
** Weapons added in patches and DLC take it to a bit of an extreme - when you remove a magazine it will appear empty, no matter how many bullets rounds you fired from it.it.
*** This may not be intentional and actually simply a developer oversight - many video games did not have rounds modeled or textured on the magazine, although it is becoming more common, as of the last few years.



** ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands 2}}'' also does this, but has more exceptions. In addition to the... unorthodox weapons with magazines that look like [=CDs=], and the countless belt fed things, there's also every Tediore weapon - they're so cheaply made that you reload them by ''throwing'' them, and after they explode your storage deck builds a new one for you, but you still lose any ammo that was in it, because that's what fueled the explosion.

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** ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands 2}}'' also does this, but has more exceptions. In addition to the... unorthodox weapons with magazines that look like [=CDs=], and the countless belt fed belt-fed things, there's also every Tediore weapon - they're so cheaply made that you reload them by ''throwing'' them, and after they explode your storage deck builds a new one for you, but you still lose any ammo that was in it, because that's what fueled the explosion.



* The ''VideoGame/FarCry'' series plays the trope straight at all times, bar one weapon in ''VideoGame/FarCry2''. The double barrel shotgun in the DLC replaces both shells with every reload, but only because the character ''fires'' both shells at once (something shotguns of that type are indeed capable of doing, but it's not a good idea in real life with modern ones), making a literal one bullet/shell clip.

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* The ''VideoGame/FarCry'' series plays the trope straight at all times, bar one weapon in ''VideoGame/FarCry2''. The double barrel shotgun in the DLC replaces both shells with every reload, but only because the character ''fires'' both shells at once (something shotguns of that type are indeed capable of doing, but it's not a good idea doing in real life with modern ones), life, as they generally have two separate triggers), making it a literal one bullet/shell clip.example in practice.



** The automatic CZ 75 was another example when it was first added. Like the R8, it only features one spare magazine to make it a "high-risk, high-reward" weapon, and that spare magazine is mounted as a foregrip on the front of the gun, which your character will detach and load after emptying the first mag. However, nothing is stopping you from reloading before emptying the gun, so you can switch to the fore-mounted magazine after three bullets fired - and before a patch added more animations to the weapon, reloading ''again'' after the first reload would have that magazine teleport back onto the front of the gun so you could reload with it again. A later update added a second reloading animation to the gun once the fore-mounted mag has been loaded, where the player will grab a new mag from their gear like with the other pistols.

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** The automatic CZ 75 CZ-75 was another example when it was first added. Like the R8, it only features one spare magazine to make it a "high-risk, high-reward" weapon, and that spare magazine is mounted as a foregrip on the front of the gun, which your character will detach and load after emptying the first mag. However, nothing is stopping you from reloading before emptying the gun, so you can switch to the fore-mounted magazine after three bullets fired - and before a patch added more animations to the weapon, reloading ''again'' after the first reload would have that magazine teleport back onto the front of the gun so you could reload with it again. A later update added a second reloading animation to the gun once the fore-mounted mag has been loaded, where the player will grab a new mag from their gear like with the other pistols.



* In the ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' series, you can always reload the exact number of bullets needed directly from your inventory, never spending a magazine. This is made even more confusing by the icons for ammunition items in one's inventory, many of which feature a container of loose bullets, chains of linked cartridges, and partly loaded magazines that look like they could fit in one or two of the many weapons that will take a given type of ammunition.

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* In the ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' series, you can always reload the exact number of bullets rounds needed directly from your inventory, never spending a magazine. This is made even more confusing by the icons for ammunition items in one's inventory, many of which feature a container of loose bullets, ammunition, chains of linked cartridges, and partly loaded magazines that look like they could fit in one or two of the many weapons that will take a given type of ammunition.



*** However, ''New Vegas'' also averts the trope with revolvers that have loading gates (like the .357 and [[ICallItVera Lucky]]), lever-action guns, and shotguns; you'll reload exactly as many bullets as you've fired, be it one, three or four, or the gun's entire magazine capacity. It's played straight when you take multiple ammo types into account, however - if you switch ammo types more than once before the animation starts actually replacing any rounds, then it'll play out as if there was only one that needed replacing, even if the gun was (nearly) empty.
* Not only is this trope possible in ''VideoGame/ParasiteEve2'', complete with ejecting spend bullet cartridges etc. But Aya reloads at the end of every encounter automatically. Making it possible, if you time it right, to reload your weapon ejecting all the cartridges, and then before she's even started putting more bullets in the automatic-reload kicks in and she ejects all another full set of bullet cartridges from the weapon.

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*** However, ''New Vegas'' also averts the trope with revolvers that have loading gates (like the .357 and [[ICallItVera Lucky]]), lever-action guns, and shotguns; you'll reload exactly as many bullets rounds as you've fired, be it one, three or four, or the gun's entire magazine capacity. It's played straight when you take multiple ammo types into account, however - if you switch ammo types more than once before the animation starts actually replacing any rounds, then it'll play out as if there was only one that needed replacing, even if the gun was (nearly) empty.
* Not only is this trope possible in ''VideoGame/ParasiteEve2'', complete with ejecting spend bullet cartridges etc. But spent casings or shells, but Aya reloads at the end of every encounter automatically. Making it possible, if you time it right, to reload your weapon ejecting all the cartridges, ammunition, and then before she's even started putting more bullets in ammo in, the automatic-reload kicks in and she ejects all another full set of bullet cartridges magazine's worth (or equivalent) from the weapon.



** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' switched from the MSX games' classic "can fire as long as you have bullets" to actually requiring a reload after every certain number of shots from a gun, but the trope is still played perfectly straight. In particular, Snake can reload instantly simply by un-equipping and re-equipping his current weapon, and keeps all his ammo. In a rare example of the entire magazine teleporting back into the player's inventory, if the player actually finishes a magazine, it's stored in their inventory despite being discarded on the ground during the reload animation. Moreover, Snake loads three tracers at the base of each FAMAS mag, yet never encounters an entire magazine of consolidated tracers.
** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots'' eliminated the instant reloads (largely because of how easy they'd made ''VideoGame/{{Metal Gear Solid 3|SnakeEater}}''[='=]s [[HumongousMecha Shagohod]] boss) and required the actual reload animation play out; this showed him taking out the old magazine and tucking it away for later. However, almost all weapons have a DramaticGunCock which usually ejects a non-spent round, which is never deducted from the player's total, and all weapons that aren't single-shot follow this trope to the letter. Moreover, the abundance of usable weapons compared to previous games meant the ammo system had to be switched out from dedicated ammo pickups for each weapon to [[UniversalAmmunition identifying by caliber and having weapons draw from the same ammo pools]], allowing you to instantly reload an empty M14 EBR by picking up a bad guy's SCAR without actually having to go through the process of unloading the ammo from it.

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** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' switched from the MSX games' classic "can fire as long as you have bullets" to actually requiring a reload after every certain number of shots from a gun, but the trope is still played perfectly straight. In particular, Snake can reload instantly simply by un-equipping and re-equipping his current weapon, and keeps all his ammo. In a rare example of the entire magazine teleporting back into the player's inventory, if the player actually finishes a magazine, it's stored in their inventory despite being discarded on the ground during the reload animation. Moreover, Snake loads three tracers at the base of each FAMAS mag, yet never encounters an entire magazine of consolidated tracers.
tracers. (TruthInTelevision once again: It is standard practice in the French military to load tracers at the end of their magazines to signal that they are running low and will need to reload soon.)
** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots'' eliminated the instant reloads (largely because of how easy they'd made ''VideoGame/{{Metal Gear Solid 3|SnakeEater}}''[='=]s [[HumongousMecha Shagohod]] boss) and required the actual reload animation play out; this showed him taking out the old magazine and tucking it away for later. However, almost all weapons have a DramaticGunCock which usually ejects a non-spent an unspent round, which is never deducted from the player's total, and all weapons that aren't single-shot follow this trope to the letter. Moreover, the abundance of usable weapons compared to previous games meant the ammo system had to be switched out from dedicated ammo pickups for each weapon to [[UniversalAmmunition identifying by caliber and having weapons draw from the same ammo pools]], allowing you to instantly reload an empty M14 EBR by picking up a bad guy's SCAR without actually having to go through the process of unloading the ammo from it.



* ''VideoGame/GearsOfWar'' takes this to baffling levels because of its "Active Reload" mechanic. Reloading a gun starts a slide that takes a few seconds, but stopping the slide in a thin bar will reload faster. Missing the bar will cause the gun to jam, making the reload take longer than simply waiting. However, hitting a small area inside the bar will trigger a "Perfect Reload," which will bestow bonuses (typically to some combination of damage, rate of fire, recoil reduction, effective range, or shot prep time on some heavy weapons)--but only to the bullets it actually replaced. This means that doing a mid-mag perfect reload will show the character ejecting a magazine and replacing it with another, but only bestows the bonus to as many bullets within the new magazine as were absent from the previous one. The first two games overwrote previous Perfect Reloads whenever a new reload was attempted (i.e., 8 perfectly reloaded rounds left in a 30 round mag will leave a mag with 22 perfectly reloaded rounds after another Perfect Reload), while the third allows all Perfectly Reloaded bullets to keep the bonus until they are fired or it expires.

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* ''VideoGame/GearsOfWar'' takes this to baffling levels because of its "Active Reload" mechanic. Reloading a gun starts a slide that takes a few seconds, but stopping the slide in a thin bar will reload faster. Missing the bar will cause the gun to jam, making the reload take longer than simply waiting. However, hitting a small area inside the bar will trigger a "Perfect Reload," which will bestow bonuses (typically to some combination of damage, rate of fire, recoil reduction, effective range, or shot prep time on some heavy weapons)--but only to the bullets rounds it actually replaced. This means that doing a mid-mag perfect reload will show the character ejecting a magazine and replacing it with another, but only bestows the bonus to as many bullets rounds within the new magazine as were absent from the previous one. The first two games overwrote previous Perfect Reloads whenever a new reload was attempted (i.e., 8 perfectly reloaded rounds left in a 30 round mag will leave a mag with 22 perfectly reloaded rounds after another Perfect Reload), while the third allows all Perfectly Reloaded bullets rounds to keep the bonus until they are fired or it expires.



* Revolvers[[note]]except those meant to use rimless cartridges; said cartridges are held in the cylinder by way of a moon or half-moon clip, which also keeps them stuck together if you try to remove just one used cartridge[[/note]], shotguns with tube magazines, and weapons with internal magazines can be partially reloaded in real life, taking out spent shells and just putting in the needed ones; clips for these weapons exist mostly to quickly and fully reload them from empty.

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* Revolvers[[note]]except those meant to use rimless cartridges; said cartridges are held in the cylinder by way of a moon or half-moon clip, which also keeps them stuck together if you try to remove just one used cartridge[[/note]], shotguns with tube magazines, and weapons with internal magazines can be partially reloaded in real life, taking out spent shells and just putting in the needed ones; clips and speedloaders for these weapons exist mostly to quickly and fully reload them from empty.



** ''VideoGame/PathwaysIntoDarkness'' had its ammunition management integrated into its inventory system, in which everything that can hold another item (including guns that hold a magazine and magazines that hold bullets) were treated as generic "containers" openable with a click of their disclosure triangle (exactly the same as the Macintosh Finder's list view, similar to Windows Explorer's [=TreeView=]), and items can be moved in and out of each other with a drag and drop. Individual magazines and the bullets in each one are all tracked as separate items, although you can not repack bullets from one magazine to another. In case you're wondering how all this works in the heat of combat, [[TalkingIsAFreeAction the game pauses whenever you click outside its main window]].

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** ''VideoGame/PathwaysIntoDarkness'' had its ammunition management integrated into its inventory system, in which everything that can hold another item (including guns that hold a magazine and magazines that hold bullets) ammunition) were treated as generic "containers" openable with a click of their disclosure triangle (exactly the same as the Macintosh Finder's list view, similar to Windows Explorer's [=TreeView=]), and items can be moved in and out of each other with a drag and drop. Individual magazines and the bullets rounds in each one are all tracked as separate items, although you can not repack bullets transfer ammunition from one magazine to another. In case you're wondering how all this works in the heat of combat, [[TalkingIsAFreeAction the game pauses whenever you click outside its main window]].



* Keeping with its other attempts at a realistic portrayal, ''VideoGame/SWAT4'' prevents you from taking rounds out of your enemies' weapons, as they're evidence and in most cases not actually compatible with your current loadout (especially when using non-lethal or less-lethal arms). Also, when reloading, one simply switches to the next magazine with rounds still within it. Shotguns are still required to load in one round at a time, as well.

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* Keeping with its other attempts at a realistic portrayal, ''VideoGame/SWAT4'' prevents you from taking rounds ammunition out of your enemies' weapons, weapons (or, in fact, taking their weapons at all), as they're evidence and in most cases not actually compatible with your current loadout (especially when using non-lethal or less-lethal arms). Also, when reloading, one simply switches to the next magazine with rounds still within in it. Shotguns are still required to load in one round at a time, as well.



* The ''VideoGame/RainbowSix'' series, based off the work of Tom Clancy, is very accurate in its depiction of firearms. The ammo counter shows the number of rounds in the weapon, and the number of magazines in reserve, however in ''Vegas'' the number is not tracked internally. Instead ''Vegas'' just keeps track of the number of magazines the rounds you have left would fill. In its more tactical predecessors though, if you reload a half-full magazine, it jumps to the back of the line, and you may just put it back in later. This can lead to a player carrying six magazines with two bullets each. Rainbow Six is also very realistic with this "fast loading" by actually showing the magazine size + the one bullet left in the chamber. Shotguns, on the other hand, track individual shells, and they must be reloaded one at a time.

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* The ''VideoGame/RainbowSix'' series, based off the work of Tom Clancy, is very accurate in its depiction of firearms. The ammo counter shows the number of rounds in the weapon, and the number of magazines in reserve, however in ''Vegas'' the number is not tracked internally. Instead ''Vegas'' just keeps track of the number of magazines the rounds you have left would fill. In its more tactical predecessors though, if you reload a half-full magazine, it jumps to the back of the line, and you may just put it back in later. This can lead to a player carrying six magazines with two bullets rounds each. Rainbow Six is also very realistic with this "fast loading" by actually showing the magazine size + tracking the one bullet left round in the chamber. Shotguns, on the other hand, track individual shells, and they must be reloaded one at a time.



** Being a throwback to ''Rainbow Six''-type shooters, ''VideoGame/TakedownRedSabre'' handles weapon reloading much like it does. The odd bit, however, is that weapons only have one fixed-length reloading animation, which always includes the slide locking back or the player pulling the charging handle or what have you, only to somehow ''not'' eject an unused bullet.

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** Being a throwback to ''Rainbow Six''-type shooters, ''VideoGame/TakedownRedSabre'' handles weapon reloading much like it does. The odd bit, however, is that weapons only have one fixed-length reloading animation, which always includes the slide locking back or the player pulling the charging handle or what have you, only to somehow ''not'' eject an unused bullet.unfired round.



* ''VideoGame/FrontlinesFuelOfWar'' gives you 3 magazines. Reloading will just drop the mag, wasting any bullets still left in it, which makes [[DamnYouMuscleMemory it really annoying if you play a lot of games where this trope comes into play.]]

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* ''VideoGame/FrontlinesFuelOfWar'' gives you 3 magazines. Reloading will just drop the mag, wasting any bullets ammo still left in it, which makes [[DamnYouMuscleMemory it really annoying if you play a lot of games where this trope comes into play.]]



** ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield 4}}'' and ''VideoGame/BattlefieldHardline'' play this straight in the same manner as ''3'', but also have the old behavior as part of hardcore mode and a toggle-able option for other servers, where all the remaining bullets in a magazine (minus the one in the chamber, a mechanic added to the series in ''3'') are lost on a reload.
* In ''Franchise/TheChroniclesOfRiddick: VideoGame/EscapeFromButcherBay'', any ammo you currently have in your magazine is discarded with it. It has to be noted, however, that you get so darn many magazines in the course of the game that preserving ammo isn't really necessary.

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** ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield 4}}'' and ''VideoGame/BattlefieldHardline'' play this straight in the same manner as ''3'', but also have the old behavior as part of hardcore mode and a toggle-able option for other servers, where all the remaining bullets ammo in a magazine (minus the one in the chamber, a mechanic added to the series in ''3'') are lost on a reload.
* In ''Franchise/TheChroniclesOfRiddick: VideoGame/EscapeFromButcherBay'', any ammo you currently have had in your the previous magazine is discarded with it.it when reloading. It has to be noted, however, that you get so darn many magazines in the course of the game that preserving ammo isn't really necessary.



* The original ''VideoGame/GhostRecon'' and its trilogy of expansion packs played this differently depending on system. In the PC version, this was played in the same manner as ''Rainbow Six'', where used magazines were put back in a queue and could end up loaded later if you go through a lot of ammo throughout a mission. The console versions instead go for dumping the current mag entirely when you reload, with the tutorial at the beginning making a point of saying that it is better to sacrifice a few bullets and reload when the coast is clear than to have a magazine run out in the middle of a fight. However, there is no animation or extra time needed for racking the charging handle of an automatic weapon if you emptied the mag, nor do you get to keep an extra round in the chamber if you reload early. Later games got progressively more arcadey about this, playing this trope completely straight by ''Future Soldier'' where even the added animations for pulling the charging handle only ever add a quarter of a second to an empty reload.
* Averted in the ''Delta Force'' series of first person shooters by Novalogic. In these games, if you reload, even if you only used a few bullets, the entire rest of the magazine goes to waste. Needless to say, one should almost never manually reload an [[MoreDakka M249 Squad Automatic Weapon]] in the game, which the player usually can only carry 2 spare magazines for because of their size. At least starting from ''Land Warrior'', the games do keep track of the extra bullet in the chamber, however, so you ''can'' reload with one bullet left in the magazine and get to keep that bullet anyway.

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* The original ''VideoGame/GhostRecon'' and its trilogy of expansion packs played this differently depending on system. In the PC version, this was played in the same manner as ''Rainbow Six'', where used magazines were put back in a queue and could end up loaded later if you go through a lot of ammo throughout a mission. The console versions instead go for dumping the current mag entirely when you reload, with the tutorial at the beginning making a point of saying that it is better to sacrifice a few bullets rounds and reload when the coast is clear than to have a magazine run out in the middle of a fight. However, there is no animation or extra time needed for racking the charging handle of an automatic weapon if you emptied the mag, nor do you get to keep an extra round in the chamber if you reload early. Later games got progressively more arcadey about this, playing this trope completely straight by ''Future Soldier'' where even the added animations for pulling the charging handle only ever add a quarter of a second to an empty reload.
* Averted in the ''Delta Force'' series of first person shooters by Novalogic. In these games, if you reload, even if you only used a few bullets, rounds, the entire rest of the magazine goes to waste. Needless to say, one should almost never manually reload an [[MoreDakka M249 Squad Automatic Weapon]] in the game, which the player usually can only carry 2 spare magazines belts for because of their size. At least starting from ''Land Warrior'', the games do keep track of the extra bullet round in the chamber, however, so you ''can'' reload with one bullet 1 round left in the magazine counter and get to keep that bullet last round anyway.



* Fully averted in ''VideoGame/AmericasArmy'', where the game keeps track of the individual magazines, so if you fire a bullet and reload you can later re-reload that magazine with one less bullet. It also keeps track of whether a round is in the chamber.
* ''VideoGame/{{Unreal}}'' had the Automag, which is the only weapon in the game that needed a reload, after 20 shots. In fact, even the Automag avoids this trope, because while you have to reload it, you can't reload manually - the only way to do it is firing the remaining bullets or switching it out. Additionally, you can't see the amount of bullets left in the magazine (though you can hear the gun clicking on the last five shots). Originally, ''VideoGame/UnrealTournament'''s Enforcer was also meant to work like this, though all that remains of this is the animation in the game files.[[note]]A certain mod for UT, Oldskool Amp'd, has the Automag's reload much more manageable via a key and an ammo counter.[[/note]]

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* Fully averted in ''VideoGame/AmericasArmy'', where the game keeps track of the each individual magazines, so if you fire a bullet magazine, and reload you can later re-reload that magazine with one less bullet. It also keeps track of whether a round is in the chamber.
rounds chambered.
* ''VideoGame/{{Unreal}}'' had the Automag, which is the only weapon in the game that needed a reload, after 20 shots. In fact, even the Automag avoids this trope, because while you have to reload it, you can't reload manually - the only way to do it is firing the remaining bullets rounds or switching it out. Additionally, you can't see the amount of bullets rounds left in the magazine (though you can hear the gun clicking on the last five shots). Originally, ''VideoGame/UnrealTournament'''s Enforcer was also meant to work like this, though all that remains of this is the animation in the game files.[[note]]A certain mod for UT, Oldskool Amp'd, has the Automag's reload much more manageable via a key and an ammo counter.[[/note]]



** ''Red Orchestra'' [[AvertedTrope averts]] this trope, not just with tracking magazines and not individual rounds, but there is no bullet counter at all, even for loaded magazines. When reloading an SMG magazine for instance, the only information it gives you is how heavy it feels ("heavy" means fully/almost fully loaded, while "very light" means only a few bullets left). It's like ''VideoGame/JurassicParkTrespasser'', but without the voices.

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** ''Red Orchestra'' [[AvertedTrope averts]] this trope, not just with tracking magazines and not individual rounds, but there is no bullet counter at all, even for loaded magazines. When reloading an SMG magazine for instance, the only information it gives you is how heavy it feels ("heavy" means fully/almost fully loaded, while "very light" means only a few bullets rounds left). It's like ''VideoGame/JurassicParkTrespasser'', but without the voices.



** The last release of the ''Covert Forces'' mod keeps track of the bullet in the chamber, but otherwise plays the trope straight, even spawning an empty magazine model that drops to the ground regardless of if the player actually emptied their last mag.
* Averted in ''VideoGame/TheDarkness'': If you reload a weapon before you empty the entire magazine, the remaining part of that magazine is gone (for pistols this is because [[ThrowAwayGuns Jackie doesn't bother reloading them normally]]). Careless players might take a while to realize where all their ammo went when they had around 100 bullets only a couple minutes beforehand.
* ''OPERATION 7'', a tactical MMO FPS, deals with this realistically like the ''VideoGame/RainbowSix'' series. Since there's no way to consolidate partial magazines at any time, you could wind up with mags that are a third-full or worse.
* ''Firearms'', a GameMod of ''VideoGame/HalfLife1'' also had this, although it did allow you to consolidate partially loaded magazines at any time during gameplay.
* Averted in ''VideoGame/DukeNukem3D'', where the pistol fires twelve shots before reloading. Interestingly, however, the game actually ''doesn't'' keep track of the number of bullets in the magazine - rather, a reload is automatically triggered whenever the pistol's total ammo count reaches a multiple of twelve. Since the maximum ammo for the pistol is 200 rounds rather than something divisible by twelve, that means Duke can carry a maximum of 16 magazines, plus one with only eight rounds which he'll load first. It also means that with the right timing in finding or getting enemies to drop pistol mags, Duke could either fire ''far'' more bullets than normal from that supposedly-less-loaded mag, or load a full mag and then feel the need to replace it with one to four bullets still left in it. A few other Build-engine games like ''VideoGame/{{Blood}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Shadow Warrior|1997}}'' also tracked bullets and had reloading animations, though as with ''Duke 3D'' there was only ever the one weapon per game (SawedOffShotgun and [[GunsAkimbo potentially-dual]] Uzis respectively) that this actually applied to.

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** The last release of the ''Covert Forces'' mod keeps track of the bullet round in the chamber, but otherwise plays the trope straight, even spawning an empty magazine model that drops to the ground regardless of if the player actually emptied their last mag.
* Averted in ''VideoGame/TheDarkness'': If you reload a weapon before you empty the entire magazine, the any remaining part of that magazine ammunition is gone along with it (for pistols this is because [[ThrowAwayGuns Jackie doesn't bother reloading them normally]]). Careless players might take a while to realize where all their ammo went when they had around 100 bullets rounds only a couple minutes beforehand.
* ''OPERATION 7'', a tactical MMO FPS, deals with this realistically like the ''VideoGame/RainbowSix'' series. Since there's no way to consolidate refill partial magazines at any time, you could wind up with mags that are a third-full or worse.
* ''Firearms'', a GameMod of ''VideoGame/HalfLife1'' also had this, although it did allow you to consolidate partially loaded magazines at any time during gameplay.
* Averted in ''VideoGame/DukeNukem3D'', where the pistol fires twelve shots before reloading. Interestingly, however, the game actually ''doesn't'' keep track of the number of bullets rounds in the magazine - rather, a reload is automatically triggered whenever the pistol's total ammo count reaches a multiple of twelve. Since the maximum ammo for the pistol is 200 rounds rather than something divisible by twelve, that means Duke can carry a maximum of 16 magazines, plus one with only eight rounds which he'll load first. It also means that with the right timing in finding or getting enemies to drop pistol mags, Duke could either fire ''far'' more bullets rounds than normal from that supposedly-less-loaded mag, or load a full mag and then feel the need to replace it with one to four bullets rounds still left in it. A few other Build-engine games like ''VideoGame/{{Blood}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Shadow Warrior|1997}}'' also tracked bullets ammunition and had reloading animations, though as with ''Duke 3D'' there was only ever the one weapon per game (SawedOffShotgun and [[GunsAkimbo potentially-dual]] Uzis respectively) that this actually applied to.



* Part of the premise of ''VideoGame/{{Receiver}}'' is that the gun mechanics are simulated in complete detail. Thus, reloading if you only have one magazine means taking the magazine out, holstering the gun, adding individual bullets to the magazine, drawing the gun, reinserting the magazine, and, if necessary, racking the slide or hitting the slide release lever. Every one of these steps has a dedicated keypress.[[note]]In the default controls: e, ~, repeated z (once per bullet), ~ again, z again, and r or t respectively. If unsure whether there's already a bullet in the chamber, hold t and then r for the last step to check.[[/note]]

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* Part of the premise of ''VideoGame/{{Receiver}}'' is that the gun mechanics are simulated exactly as they would in complete detail. real life. Thus, reloading if you only have one magazine means taking the magazine out, holstering the gun, adding individual bullets rounds to the magazine, drawing the gun, reinserting the magazine, and, if necessary, racking the slide or hitting the slide release lever. Every one of these steps has a dedicated keypress.[[note]]In the default controls: e, ~, repeated z (once per bullet), ~ again, z again, and r or t respectively. If unsure whether there's already a bullet in the chamber, hold t and then r for the last step to perform a brass check.[[/note]]



* ''VideoGame/SWAT4'' averts this as a game mechanic. For all weapons that have detachable magazines, the player has a set number of mags and the game keeps track of how many rounds are in each one. Reloading while your gun still has ammo in it will result in a "tactical reload" in which a fresh mag will be inserted, while the old mag will be kept with however many rounds are still remaining for later use. Reloading when you gun is empty will result in the empty mag being discarded.
* ''VideoGame/KillingFloor2'' averts this. Reloading an empty magazine will play an animation where the magazine is reloaded normally. Reloading when the magazine still has bullets will play a different animation where the used magazine is stored and replaced. Attempting to reload when the magazine is full will play a third, much shorter animation, but will not affect the remaining ammunition.
* In ''VideoGame/CryOfFear'' any magazine-based weapon loses all bullets in the mag when reloaded. Of course, Simon is a disturbed teenager, not a soldier. Given his already remarkable proficiency with the weapons, he can be forgiven for not thinking of simply saving the magazines and manually topping them up from each other. The exception is the shotgun, which is reloaded one shell at a time; the revolver and hunting rifle, however, also lose every bullet from the current clip on reloading even though they also are reloaded one round at a time.[[note]]For the revolver, at least, this is explained in that Simon dumps all the rounds from the cylinder like with the mag-fed weapons, but the rifle has no such excuse - at ''best'', it should only lose the round currently in the chamber when he opens it up to put new rounds in.[[/note]]


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* ''VideoGame/SWAT4'' averts this as a game mechanic. For all weapons that have detachable magazines, the player has a set number of mags and the game keeps track of how many rounds are in each one. Reloading while your gun still has ammo in it will result in a "tactical reload" in which a fresh mag will be inserted, while the old mag will be kept with however many rounds are still remaining for later use. Reloading when you gun is empty will result in the empty mag being discarded.
discarded (a so-called "emergency reload").
* ''VideoGame/KillingFloor2'' averts this. Reloading from an empty magazine will play an animation where the magazine is reloaded normally. Reloading when the from a partially loaded magazine still has bullets will play a different animation where the used magazine is stored and replaced. Attempting to reload when the magazine is full will play a third, much shorter animation, but will not affect the remaining ammunition.
* In ''VideoGame/CryOfFear'' any magazine-based weapon loses all bullets rounds in the mag when reloaded. Of course, Simon is a disturbed teenager, not a soldier. Given his already remarkable proficiency with the weapons, he can be forgiven for not thinking of simply saving the magazines and manually topping them up from each other. The exception is the shotgun, which is reloaded one shell at a time; the revolver and hunting rifle, however, also lose every bullet round from the current clip cylinder/magazine on reloading even though they also are reloaded one round at a time.[[note]]For the revolver, at least, this is explained in that Simon dumps all the rounds from the cylinder like with the mag-fed weapons, but the rifle has no such excuse - at ''best'', it should only lose the round currently in the chamber when he opens it up the bolt to put new rounds in.[[/note]]

[[/note]]



* ''VideoGame/VirtuaCop 3'' provides an example of actually accounting for the chambered round. Practically every gun from the default pistol with unlimited ammo to the ones you collect from pickups will keep the chambered round upon reloading when you haven't spent the full clip. You even get to see a cross-section of the magazine and chamber so you can view the entire process as well as have the ammo counter go up by 1 when a round is kept chambered. Though every other aspect of the ammo system plays this trope straight.
* ''VideoGame/HouseOfTheDead: OVERKILL'' does like ''Shattered Soldier'' above, where the intro cutscene for the final level has G and Washington loading individual bullets into assault rifle mags, only for them to, as always, have an infinite number of reserve magazines in gameplay.

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* ''VideoGame/VirtuaCop 3'' provides an example of actually accounting for the chambered round. Practically every gun from the default pistol with unlimited ammo to the ones you collect from pickups will keep the chambered round upon reloading when you haven't spent the full clip.magazine. You even get to see a cross-section of the magazine and chamber so you can view the entire process as well as have the ammo counter go up by 1 when a round is kept chambered. Though every other aspect of the ammo system plays this trope straight.
* ''VideoGame/HouseOfTheDead: OVERKILL'' does like ''Shattered Soldier'' above, where the intro cutscene for the final level has G and Washington loading individual bullets rounds into assault rifle mags, only for them to, as always, have an infinite number of reserve magazines in gameplay.



* Averted in the Sega Genesis version of ''TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}}''. Ammuntion was listed in number of magazines instead of bullets, and characters would only reload when their magazines were empty. However, it is possible to reload in the pause screen. Doing so when the magazine isn't empty brings up a warning: "You still have ammo left. Reload?" Accepting would discard the ammo left in the half-empty magazine.

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* Averted in the Sega Genesis version of ''TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}}''. Ammuntion was listed in number of magazines instead of bullets, rounds, and characters would only reload when their magazines were empty. However, it is possible to reload in the pause screen. Doing so when the magazine isn't empty brings up a warning: "You still have ammo left. Reload?" Accepting would discard the ammo left in the half-empty magazine.



* In the original 80's version of ''VideoGame/CastleWolfenstein'' (the non-3D one), the character only wielded one pistol, and did not store any extra bullet magazines. Thus if he came across enemy bullets, he only reloaded if they had more bullets then he currently had.
* ''VideoGame/{{Siren}}'' avoids this issue by simply not using weapons that have detachable magazines. The guns in the game are either revolvers or hunting rifles; you reload the cylinders or internal magazines with loose bullets. It also deals with the corollary by [[UnusableEnemyEquipment not letting you take weapons from fallen enemies.]]

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* In the original 80's version of ''VideoGame/CastleWolfenstein'' (the non-3D one), the character only wielded one pistol, and did not store any extra bullet magazines. Thus if he came across enemy bullets, ammunition from dead enemies, he only reloaded if they had more bullets ammunition then he currently had.
* ''VideoGame/{{Siren}}'' avoids this issue by simply not using weapons that have detachable magazines. The guns in the game are either revolvers or hunting rifles; you reload the cylinders or internal magazines with loose bullets.rounds. It also deals with the corollary by [[UnusableEnemyEquipment not letting you take weapons from fallen enemies.]]



* The first three ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' games account for already-chambered bullets when reloading - do a quick reload and your weapon will have an extra bullet. ''VideoGame/{{Metal Gear Solid 4|GunsOfThePatriots}}'' mostly does away with this, due to the DramaticGunCock at the end of every reload - pistols keep a round in the chamber, and the M870 Custom has the first round from an empty reload breech-loaded, but that's it.
** Also in ''[=MGS4=]'' is the Type 17 pistol, which required a speedloader to reload. You cannot reload it unless your entire mag is empty.

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* The first three ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' games account for already-chambered bullets chambered rounds when reloading - do a quick reload and your weapon will have be able to fire an extra bullet.round. ''VideoGame/{{Metal Gear Solid 4|GunsOfThePatriots}}'' mostly does away with this, due to the DramaticGunCock at the end of every reload - pistols keep a round in the chamber, and the M870 Custom has the first round from an empty reload breech-loaded, but that's it.
** Also in ''[=MGS4=]'' is the Type 17 pistol, which required a speedloader stripper clip to reload. You cannot reload it unless your entire mag is empty.



* Averted in ''VideoGame/EternalDarkness'': when revolvers (the most common firearm) are reloaded, only the spent shells are dropped, and each bullet is reloaded one at a time (you can even stop before the revolver is full by letting go of the reload button or moving). Weapons like shotguns and single-shot rifles also avert this trope; however, in the one level where a character acquires magazine-loading weapons, this trope is played completely straight.

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* Averted in ''VideoGame/EternalDarkness'': when revolvers (the most common firearm) are reloaded, only the spent shells are dropped, and each bullet round is reloaded one at a time (you can even stop before the revolver is full by letting go of the reload button or moving). Weapons like shotguns and single-shot rifles also avert this trope; however, in the one level where a character acquires magazine-loading weapons, this trope is played completely straight.



* When reloading an empty unscoped rifle in ''VideoGame/{{Cryostasis}}'' the protagonist is shown using a speedloader to reload. However when you try to reload a non-empty rifle the protagonist takes the required amount of bullets from the next ammo pouch and loads them in manually.

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* When reloading an empty unscoped rifle in ''VideoGame/{{Cryostasis}}'' the protagonist is shown using a speedloader stripper clip to reload. However when you try to reload a non-empty rifle the protagonist takes the required amount of bullets from the next ammo pouch and loads them in manually.



** ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil6'' still follows this trope. It does get a little odd at times, like Leon reloading both of the Wing Shooters even though he only shot one bullet from one of the guns. Or Helena completely emptying the Triplebarrel to reload less than 3 shells.
** Interestingly enough, in the ''VideoGame/ResidentEvilOutbreak'' spinoffs, characters find both filled magazines and individual shells, and if you reload using the latter, your character has to reload each shell individually. Magazines can be used to reload instantly, but only when the weapon is empty.
** This happens a lot with shotguns in third-person shooters. In ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil4'' Leon always loads two shells into his shotgun(s), regardless of how many shells you actually load with it. Especially in the case of the Striker, which, when fully upgraded, can hold a staggering 100 shells, but still only needs two to fully reload).
*** Speaking of ''[=RE4=]'', this is also averted with the HandCannon: Leon is shown loading three shells into the chamber when he reloads, which is the number of bullets the gun actually holds. Upgrading its capacity at all makes him start using speedloaders instead.
*** Furthermore, in ''[=RE4=]'' Leon picks up loose bullets as opposed to actual magazines and clips. Since he carries these in boxes, and doesn't have any magazines in his inventory, it's unknown where he gets the magazines from. Although, having to watch Leon load 15 individual bullets into a magazine would get extremely aggravating.


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** ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil6'' still follows this trope. It does get a little odd at times, like Leon reloading both of the Wing Shooters even though he only shot one bullet round from one of the guns. Or Helena completely emptying the Triplebarrel to reload less than 3 shells.
** Interestingly enough, in the ''VideoGame/ResidentEvilOutbreak'' spinoffs, characters find both filled magazines and individual shells, rounds, and if you reload using the latter, your character has to reload each shell round individually. Magazines can be used to reload instantly, but only when the weapon is empty.
** This happens a lot with shotguns in third-person shooters. In ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil4'' Leon always loads two shells into his shotgun(s), regardless of how many shells you actually load with it. Especially in the case of the Striker, which, when fully upgraded, can hold a staggering (and completely unrealistic) 100 shells, but still only needs two to fully reload).
*** Speaking of ''[=RE4=]'', this is also averted with the HandCannon: Leon is shown loading three shells rounds into the chamber when he reloads, which is corresponds to its actual capacity in the number of bullets game, despite the gun actually holds.real life weapon it is based on (the S&W Model 500) having the ability to hold 5. Upgrading its capacity at all makes him start using speedloaders instead.
*** Furthermore, in ''[=RE4=]'' Leon picks up loose bullets rounds as opposed to actual magazines and clips. Since he carries these in boxes, and doesn't have any magazines in his inventory, it's unknown where he gets the magazines from. Although, having to watch Leon load 15 individual bullets into a magazine would perhaps get extremely aggravating.




* In ''VideoGame/{{Oni}}'', individual rounds aren't tracked, only whole magazines (not that they could be given ''Oni'''s universal ammo system), so reloading with a shot left in the weapon wastes it (and magazines are very hard to come by). Enemies carry finite numbers of ammo magazines, and reload, so their weapon will have exactly as many bullets in it as they had left to shoot at you (so, it's best to kill him just as he reloads.)
* ''[[VideoGame/SOCOMUSNavySeals SOCOM]]'' games tend to do this. When reloading, you simply switch between magazines you're carrying on you, so you could end up with any number of One Bullet magazines if you're not budgeting how you use each magazine.
* In the video game adaptation/sequel to ''VideoGame/TheThing2002,'' if you reload a magazine based weapon, the remaining bullets in the replaced magazine are gone forever.
* In ''[=WinBack=]'', reloading your sub-machine gun or silenced pistol while there were still bullets in the magazine led to those spare bullets being discarded as well (though the one in the chamber would be saved). Unfortunately this was kind of redundant as your starting pistol was very accurate, did decent damage, granted you a bonus if you completed a mission using nothing else, and had infinite ammo - in comparison, to start with you can only carry ''one'' extra magazine for the other weapons.
* ''VideoGame/{{ARMA}}: Armed Assault'' keeps track of the amount of ammunition in each magazine in your inventory, only throwing away magazines if they are completely depleted. If you have multiple semi-depleted magazines, they are sorted in order of decreasing bullets.
** The sequel ''ARMA 2'' and its expansion ''Operation Arrowhead'' continue this behavior, militantly so. However, it should be noted that the U.S. M1014 shotgun and clip-fed weapons are some of the few that do NOT work "properly" as identified in the trope definition. In the real world these weapons use integral magazines, loaded one round at a time or with stripper clips. Tactical doctrine for the M1014 calls for the soldier to load additional shells at any opportunity. ''ARMA 2'' breaks this, where you are never able to load single rounds, and instead mime reloading with an invisible magazine, which somehow replaces every round currently in the weapon with a fresh one. The game's other shotguns are more correct in this regard, since they actually do use magazines.

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Oni}}'', individual rounds aren't tracked, only whole magazines (not that they could be be, given ''Oni'''s universal ammo system), so reloading even with a shot round left in the weapon wastes it (and magazines are very hard to come by). Enemies carry finite numbers of ammo magazines, and reload, so their weapon will have exactly as many bullets rounds in it as they had left to shoot at you (so, it's best to kill him just as he reloads.)
* ''[[VideoGame/SOCOMUSNavySeals SOCOM]]'' games tend to do this. When reloading, you simply switch between magazines you're carrying on you, so you could end up with any number of One Bullet partially loaded magazines if you're not budgeting carefully managing how you use each magazine.
* In the video game adaptation/sequel to ''VideoGame/TheThing2002,'' if you reload a magazine-fed weapon, any ammunition in the old magazine based weapon, the remaining bullets in the replaced magazine are gone forever.
will be wasted.
* In ''[=WinBack=]'', reloading your sub-machine submachine gun or silenced pistol while there were still bullets rounds in the magazine led to those spare bullets these rounds being discarded as well (though the one in the chamber would be saved). Unfortunately this was kind of redundant as your starting pistol was very accurate, did decent damage, granted you a bonus if you completed a mission using nothing else, and had infinite ammo - in comparison, to start with you can only carry ''one'' extra magazine for the other weapons.
* ''VideoGame/{{ARMA}}: Armed Assault'' keeps track of the amount of ammunition in each magazine in your inventory, only throwing away magazines if they are completely depleted. If you have multiple semi-depleted magazines, they are sorted in order of decreasing bullets.
order ; most full magazine first, least full magazines last.
** The sequel ''ARMA 2'' and its expansion ''Operation Arrowhead'' continue this behavior, militantly so. However, it should be noted that the U.S. M1014 shotgun and clip-fed weapons are some of the few that do NOT work "properly" as identified in the trope definition. In the real world these weapons use integral magazines, loaded one round at a time or with stripper clips. Tactical doctrine for the M1014 calls for the soldier to load additional shells at any opportunity. ''ARMA 2'' breaks this, where you are never able to load single rounds, and instead mime reloading with an invisible magazine, which somehow replaces every round currently in the weapon with a fresh one. The game's other shotguns are more correct in this regard, since they actually do use magazines. In addition, chambered rounds were not tracked.



** Whenever you reload mid-mag you lose any bullets you had left and get a note saying how many you lost if it's a significant amount. Especially annoying when you're using a minigun, and you reload it after taking two shots because that's what you always do in shooters, and promptly lose half of the precious ammo you started the level with. However, to compensate for [[ViolationOfCommonSense inverting the usual rule about reloading]], the game has a ''VideoGame/GearsOfWar''-esque tactical reload that cuts down reload speed to about a third.

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** Whenever you reload mid-mag you lose any bullets rounds you had left in the previous magazine, and get a note saying how many you lost if it's a significant amount. Especially annoying when you're using a minigun, and you reload it after taking two shots because that's what you always do in shooters, and promptly lose half of the precious ammo you started the level with. However, to compensate for [[ViolationOfCommonSense inverting the usual rule about reloading]], the game has a ''VideoGame/GearsOfWar''-esque tactical reload that cuts down reload speed to about a third.



* ''VideoGame/BloodRayne'' doesn't reload weapons. She fires until the magazine is empty (or she finds a better weapon) and then tosses the entire gun to grab a fresh one.

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* ''VideoGame/BloodRayne'' doesn't reload weapons. She fires until the magazine is empty (or she finds a better weapon) and then [[ThrowAwayGuns tosses the entire gun to grab a fresh one.
one]].



* ''VideoGame/JaggedAlliance 2'' works similarly, except that when the squad isn't in contact with the enemy, reloading a partially full weapon transfers rounds from the new magazine until the weapon is full. This allows partial magazines to be consolidated between battles.
** The characters seem to haul a BagOfHolding full of empty magazines of every size and description, though; it's possible to load an arbitrary number of, say, 10-bullet magazines of 7.62 WP bullets into an AK-47 (three magazines of 10 at a time, obviously) and have a fully loaded 30-round magazine, or vice versa with the Dragunov sniper rifle (although that leaves you with a loaded 10-round magazine and a 30-round magazine with 20 rounds remaining). Note that in some fan mods of the game such as some iterations/builds of the famous and continually evolving ''v1.13'', using magazines not suited for a weapon (such as feeding a 7-shot pistol a 30-round SMG mag of the same caliber) costs extra action points

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* ''VideoGame/JaggedAlliance 2'' works similarly, except that when the squad isn't in contact with the enemy, reloading a partially full weapon transfers rounds from the new magazine until the weapon is full. This allows partial magazines to be consolidated refilled between battles.
** The characters seem to haul a BagOfHolding full of empty magazines of every size and description, though; it's possible to load an arbitrary number of, say, 10-bullet magazines of 7.62 WP bullets into an AK-47 (three magazines of 10 at a time, obviously) and have a fully loaded 30-round magazine, or vice versa with the Dragunov sniper rifle (although that leaves you with a loaded 10-round magazine and a 30-round magazine with 20 rounds remaining). Note that in some fan mods of the game such as some iterations/builds of the famous and continually evolving ''v1.13'', using magazines not suited for a weapon (such as feeding a 7-shot pistol a 30-round SMG mag of the same caliber) costs extra action points



*** Averted in 1.13. Not only was the above issue fixed, it also features every kind of production ammo ever made, some of the wildcat cartridges, and a couple of fictional ammo types, just for fun. The one area where it still plays this straight is that it doesn't keep track of whether a round is in the chamber when a gun is reloaded due to an engine limitation.

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*** Averted in 1.13. Not only was the above issue fixed, fixed by introducing proper caliber names and types for each weapon, it also features every kind of production ammo ever made, some of the wildcat cartridges, ''a lot more'' caliber types, including a few wildcats, and a couple of fictional ammo types, just for fun. The 1.13 mod also introuced a penalty when trying to reload a weapon with the wrong magazine type (trying to reload a pistol with an 8-round capacity by using a 30-round magazine); doing so costs extra action points. The one area where it still plays this straight is that it doesn't keep track of whether a round is in the chamber when a gun is reloaded reloaded, although that is due to an engine limitation.



* Averted to an almost ridiculous extent by ''7.62 High Calibre''. If you have a box of bullets, but no spare magazine, it takes significantly longer to reload your gun as you have to insert the bullets into the existing magazine one at a time. Because many guns require a magazine to function, losing all of your magazines makes that gun useless; a major part of properly using a gun is purchasing spare mags or looting them from bodies, which makes magazine availability a big choice in determining what gun to use (do you use the one that's very good but only has one mag, or the one that's pretty crappy but you've got an entire backpack full of loaded mags for?). Guns that are reloaded one round at a time (bolt-action rifles, shotguns, and revolvers [there are no speedloaders]) take longer to reload the more rounds you're reloading at one time. It's also possible to tape two magazines together; while the ammo counter depicts a doubled capacity (making it seems like the taped mags are treated as one large mag), the shooter actually has an automatic pause when they empty half of the ammo for about a second while they flip the magazines around.

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* Averted to an almost ridiculous extent by ''7.62 High Calibre''. If you have a box of bullets, ammunition, but no spare magazine, it takes significantly longer to reload your gun as you have to insert the bullets rounds into the existing magazine one at a time. Because many guns require a magazine to function, losing all of your magazines makes that gun useless; a major part of properly using a gun is purchasing spare mags or looting them from bodies, which makes magazine availability a big choice in determining what gun to use (do you use the one that's very good but only has one mag, or the one that's pretty crappy but you've got an entire backpack full of loaded mags for?). Guns that are reloaded one round at a time (bolt-action rifles, shotguns, and revolvers [there are no speedloaders]) take longer to reload the more rounds you're reloading at one time. It's also possible to tape two magazines together; while the ammo counter depicts a doubled capacity (making it seems like the taped mags are treated as one large mag), the shooter actually has an automatic pause when they empty half of the ammo for about a second while they flip the magazines around.



* Averted in ''VideoGame/{{Mercenaries}} 2: World in Flames''. Whenever you pick up a gun, you get X number of magazines with Y number of bullets in each. When you reload, you throw the magazine, and any bullets left in it, on the ground.
* Also averted in ''VideoGame/{{Gun}}''. If you shoot four of your six bullets you'll watch Colton put exactly four bullets in the cylinder before he's ready to fire.
* ''VideoGame/SevenDaysToDie'' averted this as well, but maybe a little too much. Reloading a pistol empties it of any remaining bullets and reloads with a fresh mag. For a shotgun on the other hand, reloading ''also'' empties it of the remaining shells and refills it with a new batch.
* ''VideoGame/{{Unturned}}'' has magazines with their own ammo count, and reloading causes the magazine and whatever ammo was left in it to fall onto the ground and swaps it with another magazine. Each magazine has to be filled manually by placing whatever type of ammo the gun uses and the magazine in the crafting menu. However, refilling a magazine will use up an entire ammo box whether the mag was empty or only missing one bullet of twenty, meaning that while magazines can be picked back up and used again after reloading, actually putting ammo in magazines that aren't empty will result in wasted ammunition.

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* Averted in ''VideoGame/{{Mercenaries}} 2: World in Flames''. Whenever you pick up a gun, you get X number of magazines with Y number of bullets rounds loaded in each. When you reload, you throw the magazine, and any bullets rounds left in it, on the ground.
* Also averted in ''VideoGame/{{Gun}}''. If you shoot four of your six bullets rounds you'll watch Colton put exactly four bullets fresh rounds in the cylinder before he's ready to fire.
* ''VideoGame/SevenDaysToDie'' averted this as well, but maybe a little too much. Reloading a pistol empties it of any remaining bullets ammunition and reloads with a fresh mag. For a shotgun on the other hand, reloading ''also'' empties it of the remaining shells and refills it with a new batch.
* ''VideoGame/{{Unturned}}'' has magazines with their own ammo count, and reloading causes the magazine and whatever ammo was left in it to fall onto the ground and swaps it with another magazine. Each magazine has to be filled manually by placing whatever type of ammo the gun uses and the magazine in the crafting menu. However, refilling a magazine will use up an entire ammo box whether the mag was empty or only missing one bullet round of twenty, meaning that while magazines can be picked back up and used again after reloading, actually putting ammo in magazines that aren't empty will result in wasted ammunition.



** The best example would be the SKS in ''Firearms: Source'' that not only takes longer to reload with bullets left as you eject the remaining rounds from the internal magazine but any bullets in that magazine are completely gone. Using the SKS with a twenty round magazine means you have to load two clips worth of rounds into it and you can only reload after you fire more than ten rounds, and even then, you only get ten rounds rather than a full reload.
** Shotguns are also notable in which the character reloads an empty shotgun by placing a shell directly in the chamber through the open ejection port then the rest of the shells are placed in the mag tube through the flap.
** Taken to its extreme with the addon Mag System for Customizable Weaponry 2.0, in which you have to allocate magazine, reload them individually and can only use the remaining bullets in magazines.
* ''VideoGame/{{Stalker}}: Shadow of Chernobyl'' follows this trope with the player's weapons, with a few exceptions; most notably, switching ammo types with the shotgun requires the player to manually unload the tube magazine in the inventory menu. Enemy weapons are a mixed bag; the player has to unload actual guns manually rather than removing and hoovering up magazines with their shoes, but the rest of an enemy's ammo is simply depicted as boxes of bullets or shells.
** You can also use it to use a mixed load. For example, the shotguns can often use the regular pellet shells, a dart shell and a slug. If you take the time to juggle it, you can have it so your gun is loaded with one type, then the next, then the last type, and so on.


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** The best example would be the SKS in ''Firearms: Source'' that not only takes longer to reload with bullets rounds left as you eject the remaining rounds from the internal magazine but any bullets rounds in that magazine are completely gone. Using the SKS with a twenty round magazine means you have to load two clips worth of rounds into it and you can only reload after you fire more than ten rounds, and even then, you only get ten rounds rather than a full reload.
** Shotguns are also notable in which the character reloads an empty shotgun by placing loading a shell directly in the chamber through the open ejection port port, then the rest of the shells are placed in loaded into the mag tube through the flap.
** Taken to its extreme with the addon Mag System for Customizable Weaponry 2.0, in which you have to allocate magazine, reload them individually and can only use the remaining bullets in magazines.
tube.
* ''VideoGame/{{Stalker}}: Shadow of Chernobyl'' follows this trope with the player's weapons, with a few exceptions; most notably, switching ammo types with the shotgun requires the player to manually unload the tube magazine in the inventory menu. Enemy weapons are a mixed bag; the player has to unload actual guns manually rather than removing and hoovering up magazines with their shoes, but the rest of an enemy's ammo is simply depicted as boxes of bullets or shells.
boxes.
** You can also use it to use a load your shotgun with mixed load. ammunition types. For example, the shotguns can often use the regular pellet shells, buckshot, a dart shell and a slug. If you take the time to juggle it, you can have it so your gun is loaded with one type, then the next, then the last type, load any combination of buckshot, dart and so on.

slug shells.



* Sidestepped in ''VideoGame/{{Pathologic}}''. The revolver is reloaded offscreen (the character pulls it down to their side first), avoiding the need for custom animations depending on how many bullets it currently has. The rifle is reloaded on-screen, but it has a literal one-bullet clip, so the trope doesn't apply. Played straight with the shotgun, however -- your character always chucks the shells out of the gun, regardless of whether or not one is still unspent. The shotgun is also guilty of the "reload more visible shots than you actually have" subtrope.

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* Sidestepped in ''VideoGame/{{Pathologic}}''. The revolver is reloaded offscreen (the character pulls it down to their side first), avoiding the need for custom animations depending on how many bullets rounds it currently has. holds. The rifle is reloaded on-screen, but it has a literal one-bullet clip, One Bullet Clip, so the trope doesn't apply. Played straight with the shotgun, however -- your character always chucks the shells out of the gun, regardless of whether or not one is still unspent. The shotgun is also guilty of the "reload more visible shots than you actually have" subtrope.
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