History Main / OmnidisciplinaryLawyer

19th Apr '18 6:54:53 AM nielas
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** Averted with Xander who is a very successful lawyer specializing in a very narrow area of technology law. When Louis, specializing in financial transactions law, goes against Xander in a technology law case, Xander demolishes Louis in their first court appearance due to his superior knowledge of the subject matter. Louis has to do a ton of research and reading up on case law before he finds a precedent that swings the case back in his favor.
18th Mar '18 2:42:02 PM Fireblood
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* On ''Series/{{Suits}}'', part of the reason why Harvey Specter rose so quickly through the law firms ranks is because he is proficient in multiple areas of the law. His main specialty is mergers and tax law but he also spent a few years working as a criminal prosecutor specifically to get a solid background in criminal law. This is averted with most of the firm's other partners who specialize exclusively in certain areas of the law and can be very territorial when Harvey gets involved in a case that falls into their area of expertise. On the other hand, as part of their TrainingFromHell, the junior associates are supposed to work any case that is assigned to them no matter what areas of the law it touches on or how proficient they are in the subject matter.

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* On ''Series/{{Suits}}'', part of the reason why Harvey Specter rose so quickly through the law firms firm's ranks is because he is proficient in multiple areas of the law. His main specialty is mergers and tax law but he also spent a few years working as a criminal prosecutor specifically to get a solid background in criminal law. This is averted with most of the firm's other partners who specialize exclusively in certain areas of the law and can be very territorial when Harvey gets involved in a case that falls into their area of expertise. On the other hand, as part of their TrainingFromHell, the junior associates are supposed to work any case that is assigned to them no matter what areas of the law it touches on or how proficient they are in the subject matter.
18th Mar '18 2:41:28 PM Fireblood
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18th Mar '18 2:38:59 PM Fireblood
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** Another variation of this occurs in any episode involving capital punishment, since there is no death penalty in Illinois, the state the show is set in[[note]]Technically Illinois didn't abolish capital punishment until 2011, but due to the actions of a previous Governor granting clemency to the state's entire death row and series of legal precedents the state had no executions in well over a decade prior to that, and effectively no death penalty.[[/note]], the death penalty case episodes are set in Indiana. But a legal license only permits an attorney to practice in the state it's issued in. It doesn't necessarily go without saying that all the main cast have current Indiana law licenses. That said, it is common for Illinois lawyers to have Indiana licenses, especially in the Chicago area, since the six counties in northwestern Indiana are part of the Chicago suburbs, and it is fairly easy for an attorney who has been admitted in Illinois and practicing there for several years to get an Indiana license (all it takes is some money and attending a seminar).

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** Another variation of this occurs in any episode involving capital punishment, since there is no death penalty in Illinois, the state the show is set in[[note]]Technically Illinois didn't abolish capital punishment until 2011, but due to the actions of a previous Governor granting clemency to the state's entire death row and series of legal precedents the state had no executions in well over a decade prior to that, and effectively no death penalty.[[/note]], the death penalty case episodes are set in Indiana. But a legal license only permits an attorney to practice in the state it's issued in. It doesn't necessarily go without saying that all the main cast have current Indiana law licenses. That said, it is common for Illinois lawyers to have Indiana licenses, especially in the Chicago area, since the six counties in northwestern Indiana are part of the Chicago suburbs, and it is fairly easy for an attorney who has been admitted in Illinois and practicing there for several years to get an Indiana license (all it takes is some money and attending a seminar). It's also possible for an out of state lawyer to be admitted on a one-time basis (called ''pro hac vice'') in a case.
21st Jan '18 7:21:16 PM Thranx
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** What tends to vary from volume to volume is whether Jen is one of the '''best''' superhero lawyers, or one of the '''only''' ones. In some versions, her entire firm is occupied with superhero law, while in others, she's employed at a more prosaic firm where the senior partners expect her to attract superhero business (and she's been fired for failing to do so).





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\n** Flash-forward to the modern day: Matt Murdock has given up defense to work for the NYC District Attorney. Perhaps because this happened under the watch of Charles Soule, a man who practices law as well as writing comics, the switch to prosecution is treated as a deal at least as big as Murdock regaining his secret identity. (Though only the latter change gets a super-powered explanation.)
16th Jan '18 11:34:39 PM AdamC
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* Averted and lampshaded in ''Film/GhostbustersII''. As noted in the page quote, Louis Tully specifically warns the main quartet that he doesn't know criminal law. [[RealityEnsues Sure enough, he botches the defense and the judge rules against them]]. It's only the timely appearance of ghosts (thereby proving to the disbelieving judge that ghosts are real) that get the Ghostbusters off the hook. To his credit, Tully does help play legal hardball at that moment to force the judge to rescind the restraining order. Interestingly, in the previous movie he was actually an ''accountant'', so he actually ''is'' at least ''multi''-disciplinary (especially since he later on becomes a Ghostbuster...sort of).

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* Averted and lampshaded in ''Film/GhostbustersII''. As noted in the page quote, Louis Tully specifically warns the main quartet that he doesn't know criminal law. [[RealityEnsues Sure enough, he botches the defense and the judge rules against them]]. It's only the timely appearance of ghosts (thereby proving to the disbelieving judge that ghosts are real) that get the Ghostbusters off the hook. To his credit, Tully does help play legal hardball at that moment to force the judge to rescind the restraining order. Interestingly, in the previous movie he was actually an ''accountant'', ''accountant'' (hence why his legal focus is on tax law), so he actually ''is'' at least ''multi''-disciplinary (especially since he later on becomes a Ghostbuster...sort of).
16th Jan '18 11:33:08 PM AdamC
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* Justified in ''Literature/ToKillAMockingbird.'' Atticus spends the story defending Tom Robinson for murder despite the fact that he's ''not'' a criminal defense attorney, and he's mentioned having difficulty with the case because of his lack of experience. But Atticus is one of a very small number of lawyers in the rural community and naturally has to generalize his practice of law to meet the needs of his clients. He's also one of the least-prejudiced and most-respected people in town, and thus one of the few people the local sheriff thinks can give Tom Robinson a fair trial.
5th Oct '17 12:04:09 PM Julia1984
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* Princess Diana of England was so impressed with how Anthony Julius handled a libel case for her that she later hired him to handle her divorce as well. The story goes that when Julius tried to tell her he was a libel attorney and this would be his first divorce case, Diana replied, "That's all right, this will be my first divorce."
28th May '17 12:46:28 PM Morgenthaler
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* ''Series/TheGoodWife'' has had the main cast at Lockhart/Gardner and eventually Florrick/Agos doing everything from capital crime defense to immigration law to copyright law. Recurring characters tend to be specialists, however: Lockhart/Gardner's David Lee specializes in family law (e.g. divorces and paternity suits), while recurring antagonist Louis Canning mainly defends corporations from class-actions. Also, when they need to be interrogated or stand trial, once in a blue moon, they get someone else to represent them.

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* ''Series/TheGoodWife'' has had the ''Series/TheGoodWife'':
** The
main cast at Lockhart/Gardner and eventually Florrick/Agos doing have done everything from capital crime defense to immigration law to copyright law. Recurring characters tend to be specialists, however: Lockhart/Gardner's David Lee specializes in family law (e.g. divorces and paternity suits), while recurring antagonist Louis Canning mainly defends corporations from class-actions. Also, when they need to be interrogated or stand trial, once in a blue moon, they get someone else to represent them.



* On ''Series/{{JAG}}'', Harm argues before a Navajo Tribunal Court in "The Return of Jimmy Blackhorse" and an Australian Court in "Boomerang". Mac argues before a Sharia court in "The Princess and The Petty Officer". And both Harm and Mac defends Secretary of the Navy Edward Sheffield at the International Criminal Court in "People v. [=SecNav=]".

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* On ''Series/{{JAG}}'', ''Series/{{JAG}}'':
**
Harm argues before a Navajo Tribunal Court in "The Return of Jimmy Blackhorse" and an Australian Court in "Boomerang". Mac argues before a Sharia court in "The Princess and The Petty Officer". And both Harm and Mac defends Secretary of the Navy Edward Sheffield at the International Criminal Court in "People v. [=SecNav=]".



* In ''Series/ModernFamily'''s fourth-season finale, "Goodnight Gracie", the cast goes to Florida when Phil's mother dies. While there, Gloria has to answer for an old arrest warrant. Mitchell accompanies her to court and winds up representing not only her but various other defendants there. Yes, somehow a lawyer from California who's been shown doing primarily civil and corporate work there will just find it a breeze to represent clients in Florida charged with petty crimes and traffic violations.

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* ''Series/ModernFamily'':
**
In ''Series/ModernFamily'''s the fourth-season finale, "Goodnight Gracie", the cast goes to Florida when Phil's mother dies. While there, Gloria has to answer for an old arrest warrant. Mitchell accompanies her to court and winds up representing not only her but various other defendants there. Yes, somehow a lawyer from California who's been shown doing primarily civil and corporate work there will just find it a breeze to represent clients in Florida charged with petty crimes and traffic violations.
27th Apr '17 1:52:30 PM dmcreif
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* ''Series/Daredevil2015'': Matt Murdock and Foggy Nelson primarily practice criminal law, although in the season 2 premiere, at least one of the clients in their reception room is dealing with denied working papers (a civil issue), the tenement dispute in season 1 between Wilson Fisk's cronies and Elena Cardenas is a blur of civil and criminal law, and a flashback to their internship at Landman & Zack shows them participating in a civil lawsuit. Justified in this case: for one, they cater to working-class people in Hell's Kitchen who [[WeHelpTheHelpless can't afford]] the higher prices of firms like Hogarth Chao & Benowitz, and two, as the firm's staff is composed of just Matt, Foggy, and Karen, it qualifies as a General Practice.
* ''Series/BreakingBad'' and ''Series/BetterCallSaul'': Jimmy [=McGill=] / Saul Goodman seems to be a general practitioner.

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* ''Series/Daredevil2015'': Matt Murdock and Foggy Nelson primarily practice criminal law, although in the season 2 premiere, at least one of the clients in their reception room is dealing with denied working papers (a civil issue), the tenement dispute in season 1 between Wilson Fisk's cronies and Elena Cardenas is a blur of civil and criminal law, issues, and a flashback to their internship at Landman & Zack shows them participating in a civil lawsuit. Justified in this case: for one, they cater to working-class people in Hell's Kitchen who [[WeHelpTheHelpless can't afford]] the higher prices of firms like Hogarth Chao & Benowitz, and two, as the firm's staff is composed of just Matt, Foggy, and Karen, it qualifies as a General Practice.
* ''Series/BreakingBad'' and ''Series/BetterCallSaul'': Jimmy [=McGill=] / Saul Goodman seems to be a general practitioner. He primarily is a ''[[AmoralAttorney criminal]]'' [[AmoralAttorney lawyer]], but before becoming Saul, he dabbles a bit in elder law, then brushes up on contract law prior to getting fired from Davis & Main, and even when dabbling in those other attempts to go legit, Jimmy still helps out criminals like Mike Ehrmantraut and Nacho Varga.
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