History Main / OmnidisciplinaryLawyer

1st May '16 6:02:23 PM StarSword
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The legal counterpart of an OmnidisciplinaryScientist.



Part of ArtisticLicenseLaw. Often considered an AcceptableBreakFromReality in {{Law Procedural}}s, since it gives the writers more flexibility in the kinds of cases they can write while keeping the price of the cast down.

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Part of ArtisticLicenseLaw. Often considered an AcceptableBreakFromReality in {{Law Procedural}}s, since it gives the writers more flexibility in the kinds of cases they can write while keeping the price of the cast down.
down. SisterTrope to OmnidisciplinaryScientist and DoAnythingSoldier.
15th Apr '16 5:45:04 PM karstovich2
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** Another variation of this occurs in any episode involving capital punishment, since there is no death penalty in Illinois, the state the show is set in[[note]]Technically Illinois didn't abolish capital punishment until 2011, but due to the actions of a previous Governor granting clemency to the state's entire death row and series of legal precedents the state had no executions in well over a decade prior to that, and effectively no death penalty.[[/note]], the death penalty case episodes are set in Indiana. But a legal license only permits an attorney to practice in the state it's issued in, and it's quite unlikely that the main cast have passed the bar in Indiana or met the continuing requirements to keep a license there.

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** Another variation of this occurs in any episode involving capital punishment, since there is no death penalty in Illinois, the state the show is set in[[note]]Technically Illinois didn't abolish capital punishment until 2011, but due to the actions of a previous Governor granting clemency to the state's entire death row and series of legal precedents the state had no executions in well over a decade prior to that, and effectively no death penalty.[[/note]], the death penalty case episodes are set in Indiana. But a legal license only permits an attorney to practice in the state it's issued in, and it's quite unlikely in. It doesn't necessarily go without saying that all the main cast have passed the bar in current Indiana or met law licenses. That said, it is common for Illinois lawyers to have Indiana licenses, especially in the continuing requirements Chicago area, since a good chunk of northwestern Indiana is part of "Chicagoland," and it is fairly easy for an attorney who has been admitted in Illinois and practicing there for several years to keep a get an Indiana license there.(all it takes is some money and attending a seminar).
15th Apr '16 5:37:54 PM karstovich2
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Now, in an emergency situation it's not unreasonable to turn to the first lawyer available to you for basic advice while you search for an actual specialist. That tax lawyer isn't a criminal law specialist, but he certainly understands more about the mechanisms of the legal process than an elementary school teacher or taxidermist.

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Now, in an emergency situation it's not unreasonable to turn to the first lawyer available to you for basic advice while you search for an actual specialist. That tax lawyer isn't a criminal law specialist, but in a pinch (e.g. you just got arrested and he's literally the only lawyer you know), he certainly understands more about the mechanisms of the legal process than an elementary school teacher or taxidermist.taxidermist, which is why he has a law license.
20th Mar '16 7:32:15 AM Dragon101
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* Averted and lampshaded in ''Film/GhostbustersII''. As noted in the page quote, Louis Tully specifically warns the main quartet that he doesn't know criminal law. [[RealityEnsues Sure enough, he botches the defense and the judge rules against them]]. It's only the timely appearance of ghosts (thereby proving to the disbelieving judge that ghosts are real) that get the Ghostbusters off the hook. To his credit, Tully does help play legal hardball at that moment to force the judge to rescind the restraining order.
* ''Film/{{Daredevil}}'': Murdock and Nelson in the Ben Affleck Movie is all over the place, at one point being a prosecutor and a civil lawyer.

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* Averted and lampshaded in ''Film/GhostbustersII''. As noted in the page quote, Louis Tully specifically warns the main quartet that he doesn't know criminal law. [[RealityEnsues Sure enough, he botches the defense and the judge rules against them]]. It's only the timely appearance of ghosts (thereby proving to the disbelieving judge that ghosts are real) that get the Ghostbusters off the hook. To his credit, Tully does help play legal hardball at that moment to force the judge to rescind the restraining order.
order. Interestingly, in the previous movie he was actually an ''accountant'', so he actually ''is'' at least ''multi''-disciplinary (especially since he later on becomes a Ghostbuster...sort of).
* ''Film/{{Daredevil}}'': Murdock and Nelson in the Ben Affleck Movie is all over the place, at one point being a prosecutor and a civil lawyer. Somewhat justified- their practice represents people who can't afford legal representation (which means they are also perpetually broke) so possibly they handle anything and everything they can get away with both because [[WeHelpTheHelpless they help the helpless]] and because [[MoneyDearBoy they are just that strapped for cash]]. The most egregious example is where he is questioning rapist [[NoCelebritiesWereHarmed Jose Quesada]] and acting like a prosecutor, even though he is technically a defence attorney and is speaking for his client (there are certain was this could happen- if she was suing him for instance- but the scene itself is just vague on details).
14th Mar '16 2:36:52 AM Morgenthaler
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** Another ''Law & Order'' example: Marty Winston, the defendant in the episode "By Perjury", was a lawyer who decided to defend himself in his murder trial. However, he was a civil litigator who had never touched a criminal case before. In this case it was due to pure arrogance, as he was supremely confident in his ability to beat the murder rap by himself.

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** Another ''Law & Order'' example: Marty Winston, the defendant in the episode "By Perjury", was a lawyer who decided to defend himself in his murder trial. However, he was a civil litigator who had never touched a criminal case before. In this case it was due to pure arrogance, as he was supremely confident in his ability to beat the murder rap by himself.
14th Mar '16 2:36:20 AM Morgenthaler
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* [[Film/{{Daredevil}} Murdock and Nelson]] in the Ben Affleck Movie is all over the place, at one point being a prosecutor and a civil lawyer.

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* [[Film/{{Daredevil}} ''Film/{{Daredevil}}'': Murdock and Nelson]] Nelson in the Ben Affleck Movie is all over the place, at one point being a prosecutor and a civil lawyer.
14th Mar '16 2:33:51 AM Morgenthaler
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-->-- ''Film/{{Ghostbusters}} 2''

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-->-- ''Film/{{Ghostbusters}} 2''
''Film/GhostbustersII''



* In the MarvelUniverse, Jennifer Walters, the She-Hulk, specializes in superhero law, but that includes criminal cases, civil rights law, civil suits and anything else that might come up.
* A villainous example ([[IneffectualSympatheticVillain well, more or less)]] was Tony Stark's former lawyer [[AmoralAttorney Bert Hindel]]. Tony ordered Hindel, as the head of his legal department, to use the courts to stop [[CorruptCorporateExecutive Justin Hammer]] from using technology Hammer had stolen from Stark Enterprises. Hindel did such a poor job of representing Stark's interests that Tony finally fired him. Hindel would later return as the defense lawyer for Stark's StalkerWithACrush, Kathy Dare, who was facing attempted murder charges for [[{{Yandere}} shooting Tony]]. He used all sorts of sleazy legal tactics to make Stark look bad and portray Kathy as being under considerable mental stress. As a way of getting revenge on Stark, he also planned to write a juicy tell-all book with Kathy about what Tony was supposedly really like. Fortunately, Hindel didn't do any better than when he was the head of Stark's legal team, and ended up getting Kathy committed to a sanitarium. In any event, the fact that Hindel was trying to practice public, private, criminal, and civil law simultaneously, and was ''incompetent'' at all of them, shows why this Trope is unrealistic.

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* In the MarvelUniverse, Franchise/MarvelUniverse, Jennifer Walters, the She-Hulk, specializes in superhero law, but that includes criminal cases, civil rights law, civil suits and anything else that might come up.
* ''ComicBook/IronMan'': A villainous example ([[IneffectualSympatheticVillain well, more or less)]] was Tony Stark's former lawyer [[AmoralAttorney Bert Hindel]]. Tony ordered Hindel, as the head of his legal department, to use the courts to stop [[CorruptCorporateExecutive Justin Hammer]] from using technology Hammer had stolen from Stark Enterprises. Hindel did such a poor job of representing Stark's interests that Tony finally fired him. Hindel would later return as the defense lawyer for Stark's StalkerWithACrush, Kathy Dare, who was facing attempted murder charges for [[{{Yandere}} shooting Tony]]. He used all sorts of sleazy legal tactics to make Stark look bad and portray Kathy as being under considerable mental stress. As a way of getting revenge on Stark, he also planned to write a juicy tell-all book with Kathy about what Tony was supposedly really like. Fortunately, Hindel didn't do any better than when he was the head of Stark's legal team, and ended up getting Kathy committed to a sanitarium. In any event, the fact that Hindel was trying to practice public, private, criminal, and civil law simultaneously, and was ''incompetent'' at all of them, shows why this Trope is unrealistic.



* Averted and lampshaded in ''Film/{{Ghostbusters}} 2''. As noted in the page quote, Louis Tully specifically warns the main quartet that he doesn't know criminal law. [[RealityEnsues Sure enough, he botches the defense and the judge rules against them]]. It's only the timely appearance of ghosts (thereby proving to the disbelieving judge that ghosts are real) that get the Ghostbusters off the hook. To his credit, Tully does help play legal hardball at that moment to force the judge to rescind the restraining order.

to:

* Averted and lampshaded in ''Film/{{Ghostbusters}} 2''.''Film/GhostbustersII''. As noted in the page quote, Louis Tully specifically warns the main quartet that he doesn't know criminal law. [[RealityEnsues Sure enough, he botches the defense and the judge rules against them]]. It's only the timely appearance of ghosts (thereby proving to the disbelieving judge that ghosts are real) that get the Ghostbusters off the hook. To his credit, Tully does help play legal hardball at that moment to force the judge to rescind the restraining order.
1st Feb '16 8:22:22 AM feyhunde
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Added DiffLines:

* [[Film/{{Daredevil}} Murdock and Nelson]] in the Ben Affleck Movie is all over the place, at one point being a prosecutor and a civil lawyer.
25th Dec '15 9:40:51 PM Premonition45
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In real life, each specific area of the law has centuries worth of traditions and precedents built up behind it. There are unique legal principles at work in all of these case areas. Law schools make their students take classes in a broad range of legal issues, but true understanding and expertise comes only through years of specialized training and experience. Put simply, a tax lawyer is not the guy you want handling your slip-and-fall case.

The legal counterpart of an OmnidisciplinaryScientist. In fiction, however, if you have a law degree, that means you can work on any legal issue, particularly trial law. Never mind that there are countless branches of law, such as tax law and copyright law, which are unrelated to trial law.

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The legal counterpart of an OmnidisciplinaryScientist.

In real life, each specific area of the law has centuries worth of traditions and precedents built up behind it. There are unique legal principles at work in all of these case areas. Law schools make their students take classes in a broad range of legal issues, but true understanding and expertise comes only through years of specialized training and experience. Put simply, a tax lawyer is not the guy you want handling your slip-and-fall case.

The legal counterpart of an OmnidisciplinaryScientist.
experience.

In fiction, however, if you have a law degree, that means you can work on any legal issue, particularly trial law. Never mind that there are countless branches of law, such as tax law and copyright law, which are unrelated to trial law.
law. Put simply, a tax lawyer is not the guy you want handling your slip-and-fall case.
25th Dec '15 6:39:12 PM nombretomado
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* During the SilverAge, [[Comicbook/{{Daredevil}} Murdock and Nelson]] seemed to be the only law firm in MarvelComics New York City. So despite the fact they were mostly defence attorneys, Foggy and Matt seemed to be involved in everything from wills to contract negotiation.


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* During the SilverAge, UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|of Comic Books}}, [[Comicbook/{{Daredevil}} Murdock and Nelson]] seemed to be the only law firm in MarvelComics New York City. So despite the fact they were mostly defence attorneys, Foggy and Matt seemed to be involved in everything from wills to contract negotiation.

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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.OmnidisciplinaryLawyer