History Main / OddlySmallOrganization

5th Jun '16 1:06:36 PM karstovich2
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The House of Representatives actually used to scale with total population; if the original ratio had been maintained to the present, instead of being halted at 435, there would be about 10,000 Congressmen. Compared to that number, the current Congress is a small organization indeed. Even among people who think the size of the Congress should be increased (to make it a bit more representative, and particularly to keep states with larger populations from being shortchanged), the proposals only bump the House up to 500, 550, or at the most 650. There is a reason for this, though; once a legislature gets above a certain size, it becomes unwieldy and can't get stuff done. The largest legislature in the world that meaningfully acts as a primary lawmaking body[[note]]The Chinese National People's Congress, with over 2,000 members, doesn't count, as it is a mere rubber stamp, and the British House of Lords, with about 850 members, also doesn't count, as a large number of members never show up and because it is mostly a consultative body, providing an incentive for the Commons to think carefully before acting.[[/note]] is the European Parliament, with 751 members; the next largest are the British House of Commons and German Bundestag, with 650 and 631 members, respectively. Also, the US is a [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFederalism federation]], so although the federal Congress can seem unrepresentative, Americans are much better represented by their state legislatures, which have a lot of power. That being said, the Congress ''does'' have an alarmingly small ''staff''--in particular, its research and analysis departments, which are supposed to assess bills for their impact, inform legislatures about policy, draft bill text, and review bills to make sure they are coherent and have no embarrassing or dangerous errors, are frighteningly understaffed and lacking in resources, meaning that legislators often have to rely on dubious information presented by activists, lobbyists, corporations, and others with incentives to present biased and incomplete analyses.

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The House of Representatives actually used to scale with total population; if the original ratio had been maintained to the present, instead of being halted at 435, there would be about 10,000 Congressmen. Compared to that number, the current Congress is a small organization indeed. Even among people who think the size of the Congress should be increased (to make it a bit more representative, and particularly to keep states with larger populations from being shortchanged), the proposals only bump the House up to 500, 550, or at the most 650. There is a reason for this, though; once a legislature gets above a certain size, it becomes unwieldy and can't get stuff done. The largest legislature in the world that meaningfully acts as a primary lawmaking body[[note]]The Chinese National People's Congress, with over 2,000 members, doesn't count, as it is a mere rubber stamp, and the British House of Lords, with about 850 members, also doesn't count, as a large number of members never show up and because it is mostly a consultative body, providing an incentive for the Commons to think carefully before acting.[[/note]] is the European Parliament, with 751 members; the next largest are the British House of Commons and German Bundestag, with 650 and 631 members, respectively. Also, the US is a [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFederalism federation]], so although the federal Congress can seem unrepresentative, Americans are much better represented by their state legislatures, which have a lot of power. That being said, the Congress ''does'' have an alarmingly small ''staff''--in particular, its research and analysis departments, which are supposed to assess bills for their impact, inform legislatures legislators about policy, draft bill text, and review bills to make sure they are coherent and have no embarrassing or dangerous errors, are frighteningly understaffed and lacking in resources, meaning that legislators often have to rely on dubious information presented by activists, lobbyists, corporations, and others with incentives to present biased and incomplete analyses.
5th Jun '16 1:05:06 PM karstovich2
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The House of Representatives actually used to scale with total population; if the original ratio had been maintained to the present, instead of being halted at 435, there would be about 10,000 Congressmen. Compared to that number, the current Congress is a small organization indeed. Even among people who think the size of the Congress should be increased (to make it a bit more representative, and particularly to keep states with larger populations from being shortchanged), the proposals only bump the House up to 500, 550, or at the most 650.

to:

The House of Representatives actually used to scale with total population; if the original ratio had been maintained to the present, instead of being halted at 435, there would be about 10,000 Congressmen. Compared to that number, the current Congress is a small organization indeed. Even among people who think the size of the Congress should be increased (to make it a bit more representative, and particularly to keep states with larger populations from being shortchanged), the proposals only bump the House up to 500, 550, or at the most 650. There is a reason for this, though; once a legislature gets above a certain size, it becomes unwieldy and can't get stuff done. The largest legislature in the world that meaningfully acts as a primary lawmaking body[[note]]The Chinese National People's Congress, with over 2,000 members, doesn't count, as it is a mere rubber stamp, and the British House of Lords, with about 850 members, also doesn't count, as a large number of members never show up and because it is mostly a consultative body, providing an incentive for the Commons to think carefully before acting.[[/note]] is the European Parliament, with 751 members; the next largest are the British House of Commons and German Bundestag, with 650 and 631 members, respectively. Also, the US is a [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFederalism federation]], so although the federal Congress can seem unrepresentative, Americans are much better represented by their state legislatures, which have a lot of power. That being said, the Congress ''does'' have an alarmingly small ''staff''--in particular, its research and analysis departments, which are supposed to assess bills for their impact, inform legislatures about policy, draft bill text, and review bills to make sure they are coherent and have no embarrassing or dangerous errors, are frighteningly understaffed and lacking in resources, meaning that legislators often have to rely on dubious information presented by activists, lobbyists, corporations, and others with incentives to present biased and incomplete analyses.
5th Jun '16 11:11:49 AM Adeon
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* The Nsburg Volunteer Coast Guard in ''WebOriginal/{{Qwerpline}}'' consists of one person, Gordon. However since Nsburg is landlocked the volunteer coast guard is primarily responsible for inspecting sewers and culverts so more people probably aren't needed.
** Officer Steve is the only member of the Nsburg Police Department ever heard in the show, although it's not clear if he's actually the only member or not. However, since the Nsburg PD does deputize the Girl Scouts to help with riot control the department is clearly quite small.
3rd Jun '16 8:59:11 AM SteveMB
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** BigBad Dr. Drakken is occasionally shown to have a few dozen PunchClockVillain {{Mooks}} at his disposal, but in most episodes they're nowhere to be seen and the whole [[EvilPlan Evil Plot]] Of The Week is just him and DarkActionGirl Shego doing their thing. At one point, they were briefly seen in [[DenOfIniquity an employee lounge]] and took no further part in the episode. Then again, Shego is pretty much all the help he needs.

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** BigBad Dr. Drakken is occasionally shown to have a few dozen PunchClockVillain {{Mooks}} at his disposal, but in most episodes they're nowhere to be seen and the whole [[EvilPlan Evil Plot]] Of The Week is just him and DarkActionGirl Shego doing their thing. At one point, they were briefly seen in [[DenOfIniquity an employee lounge]] and took no further part in the episode. Then again, Shego is pretty much all the help he needs.needs (especially considering that the rank-and-file mooks are [[SurroundedByIdiots generally useless]] and serve as little more than [[RedShirt minor speed bumps]] in Kim's way).
3rd Jun '16 8:55:32 AM SteveMB
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See also TheMainCharactersDoEverything, which is related if there are no extras in the background, and CriticalStaffingShortage. May be a result of the characters being AlwaysOnDuty. Also compare ClubStub.

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See also TheMainCharactersDoEverything, which is related if there are no extras in the background, and CriticalStaffingShortage. May be a result of the characters being AlwaysOnDuty. Also compare ClubStub.
ClubStub. TwoTeacherSchool is a special case for school-based stories where the adult staff is severely limited to keep the focus on the students.


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** Almost every class we see at Middleton High School is [[TwoTeacherSchool taught by Mr. Barkin]]. He occasionally explains that he is substituting for another teacher who was sidelines by [[NoodleIncident some random mishap]].
1st Jun '16 9:32:12 AM thatother1dude
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* [[{{WesternAnimation/Archer}} ISIS]] initially appeared to have a full support staff and a large number of field agents, but by about season 4 they seem to have dropped down to about six people. There does seem to have been a bit of transition in terms of fatalities and budget cuts; some of the later episodes even make a plot point about how they're forced to start using people like accountants and HR reps as extra agents.

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* [[{{WesternAnimation/Archer}} ISIS]] ''{{WesternAnimation/Archer}}'': ISIS initially appeared to have a full support staff and a large number of field agents, but by about season 4 they seem to have dropped down to about six people. There does seem to have been a bit of transition in terms of fatalities and budget cuts; some of the later episodes even make a plot point about how they're forced to start using people like accountants and HR reps as extra agents. Following this, the fifth season premiere results in ISIS dissolving, the main cast together going off for other ventures, and the other surviving employees (if there were any) presumably going elsewhere.
31st May '16 10:19:47 AM ShaneReader
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** The Faceless Men are master assassins from Braavos who are so renowned and feared that Westerosi nobles discuss them. [[All we ever see of them in the show is one man and one petite woman, and their new recruit Arya Stark. It's unclear if there're actually many more Faceless Men who all simply wear the same faces, if other members remain unseen, or if these two are really just that good.]]

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** The Faceless Men are master assassins from Braavos who are so renowned and feared that Westerosi nobles discuss them. [[All [[spoiler:All we ever see of them in the show is one man and one petite woman, and their new recruit Arya Stark. It's unclear if there're actually many more Faceless Men who all simply wear the same faces, if other members remain unseen, or if these two are really just that good.]]
31st May '16 10:17:38 AM ShaneReader
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* In ''Series/GameOfThrones'', the warlock Pyat Pree is the leader of an coven called "the undying", who are spoken of as a multitude. However, no other warlocks are seen in the House of the Undying, [[spoiler:only Pree's [[MesACrowd many, many clones]]]].

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* In ''Series/GameOfThrones'', the warlock Pyat Pree is the leader of an a coven called "the undying", who are spoken of as a multitude. However, no other warlocks are seen in the House of the Undying, [[spoiler:only Pree's [[MesACrowd many, many clones]]]].


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** The Faceless Men are master assassins from Braavos who are so renowned and feared that Westerosi nobles discuss them. [[All we ever see of them in the show is one man and one petite woman, and their new recruit Arya Stark. It's unclear if there're actually many more Faceless Men who all simply wear the same faces, if other members remain unseen, or if these two are really just that good.]]
31st May '16 3:43:40 AM Da1tonTheGreat
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-->'''Kenneth:''' Sir, I have a problem with my time card.
-->'''Jack Donaghy:''' So, naturally, you came to me, because this company is [[TheMainCharactersDoEverything just the two of us.]]
23rd May '16 4:39:41 PM LentilSandEater
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* ''Franchise/StarWars'': Both the Jedi and the Sith. For the Sith: "[[RuleOfTwo Always two, there are. No more, no less. A master, and an apprentice."]]. The second one is justified. The Sith was originally a very ''big'' organization, but infighting and internal strife between their leaders led to their downfall at their enemies' hands. The only survivor was Darth Bane (not the founder of the order, which some sources claim, but still an important figure). He implemented the Rule of Two, realizing that the only way to avoid the mistakes that had nearly wiped the order out was to limit it to only a master and an apprentice from that point on. However, this doesn't mean that they can't train other Force-sensitives to padawan-like levels, especially if the Sith apprentice is trying to supplant his or her master and is training his or her own secret apprentice. LoopholeAbuse is common. Some sources have the Sith more like communist cells: there are only two (or one, or three, depending on whether the apprentice kills the master before or after starting to train his own apprentice) Sith in each group at any given time, but Bane set up several independent parallel groups, each of which believed itself to be the only one.

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* ''Franchise/StarWars'': Both the Jedi and the Sith.
**
For the Sith: "[[RuleOfTwo Always two, there are. No more, no less. A master, and an apprentice."]]. The second one is justified. The Sith was originally a very ''big'' organization, but infighting and internal strife between their leaders led to their downfall at their enemies' hands. The only survivor was Darth Bane (not the founder of the order, which some sources claim, but still an important figure). He implemented the Rule of Two, realizing that the only way to avoid the mistakes that had nearly wiped the order out was to limit it to only a master and an apprentice from that point on. However, this doesn't mean that they can't train other Force-sensitives to padawan-like levels, especially if the Sith apprentice is trying to supplant his or her master and is training his or her own secret apprentice. LoopholeAbuse is common. Some sources have the Sith more like communist cells: there are only two (or one, or three, depending on whether the apprentice kills the master before or after starting to train his own apprentice) Sith in each group at any given time, but Bane set up several independent parallel groups, each of which believed itself to be the only one.one.
** The Jedi are guardians of peace and justice in the galaxy, but it's a ''big'' galaxy. Even in their golden ages there are rarely more than a few thousand Jedi and in most stories there's considerably less. That said they tend to do a pretty good job in a OneRiotOneRanger way: if you send a Jedi to solve a world-wide dispute, they'll probably succeed.
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