History Main / ObliviousAdoption

10th Jun '17 8:35:52 AM Montanto
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* Nancy, in ''{{Rhapsodies}}'', gets annoyed when Paul only realizes this after meeting her [[http://rhapsodies.wpmorse.com/comic/04032007/ WASP mother.]]
-->'''Nancy:''' Jiminy Cricket, Paul! With a name like “Wellington” what the hell did you think?\\
'''Paul:''' Well... I just assumed that... ah...\\
'''Nancy:''' Keeping in mind if you say “Some geriatric’s trophy wife” you die.\\
'''Paul:''' Oh no! I was thinking of something completely different!
9th Jun '17 7:11:09 PM Montanto
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Added DiffLines:

* Nancy, in ''{{Rhapsodies}}'', gets annoyed when Paul only realizes this after meeting her [[http://rhapsodies.wpmorse.com/comic/04032007/ WASP mother.]]
-->'''Nancy:''' Jiminy Cricket, Paul! With a name like “Wellington” what the hell did you think?\\
'''Paul:''' Well... I just assumed that... ah...\\
'''Nancy:''' Keeping in mind if you say “Some geriatric’s trophy wife” you die.\\
'''Paul:''' Oh no! I was thinking of something completely different!
23rd May '17 10:47:38 PM SomberCaelifera
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* ''Series/DoctorWho'': [[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E9NightTerrors "Night Terrors"]] inverts it in a frightening way. The Doctor visits a little boy that's scared of everything with a mysterious cupboard giving him off-the-scale readings on his Sonic Screwdriver. When asked about his birth, the father reveals his wife [[spoiler:can't have kids.]] The Doctor reveals [[spoiler:the kid is an alien and is using a perception filter to make it seem like they always had him.]]

to:

* ''Series/DoctorWho'': [[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E9NightTerrors "Night Terrors"]] inverts it in a frightening way. The Doctor visits a little boy that's scared of everything with a mysterious cupboard giving him off-the-scale readings on his Sonic Screwdriver. When asked about his birth, the father reveals his wife [[spoiler:can't have kids.]] The Doctor reveals [[spoiler:the kid is an alien and is using a perception filter to make it seem like they always had him. This is how his species normally reproduces. They find a childless couple, and leave them with one of their young. They're pretty much alien cuckoos.]]
1st Apr '17 12:17:09 PM AthenaBlue
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* Subverted in Creator/RumikoTakahashi's ''Fire Tripper'': a flashback shows that the female lead Suzuko realized on her own that she was adopted (as her parents had no baby photos of her) and, when Mom and Dad came to her with the intention to tell her, she told them that she already knew, and thanked them for [[GoodParents raising her lovingly]]. [[spoiler: She's actually a little girl from MedievalJapan [[TimeTravel who was thrown in time and space]], alongside a boy from the modern era who was tossed into Feudal Japan and grew into the male lead Shukumaru. [[IChooseToStay They stay in Medieval Japan and get married there]].]]



* In ''Anime/MacrossFrontier'': Ranka is at first unaware that she's the adopted younger sister of Ozma Lee. When she eventually does find out, there's minimal denial or angst over it, as Ozma has always loved her as though she were his sister. The reasons ''why'' she was adopted, [[DoomedHometown on the other hand]]...



* In ''Anime/MacrossFrontier'': Ranka is at first unaware that she's the adopted younger sister of Ozma Lee. When she eventually does find out, there's minimal denial or angst over it, as Ozma has always loved her as though she were his sister. The reasons ''why'' she was adopted, [[DoomedHometown on the other hand]]...
* Subverted in Creator/RumikoTakahashi's ''Fire Tripper'': a flashback shows that the female lead Suzuko realized on her own that she was adopted (as her parents had no baby photos of her) and, when Mom and Dad came to her with the intention to tell her, she told them that she already knew, and thanked them for [[GoodParents raising her lovingly]]. [[spoiler: She's actually a little girl from MedievalJapan [[TimeTravel who was thrown in time and space]], alongside a boy from the modern era who was tossed into Feudal Japan and grew into the male lead Shukumaru. [[IChooseToStay They stay in Medieval Japan and get married there]].]]



* In Creator/JohnByrne's retelling of Franchise/{{Superman}}'s origin, Martha Kent, who had suffered two miscarriages and a stillbirth, was horrified that anyone would shoot off a rocket with a little baby in it. She claimed to have given birth to Clark, and she and Jonathan preserved the secret throughout his childhood -- which, naturally, meant keeping it from Clark. Only when Clark's powers started to emerge did Jonathan confess. In this version of the retelling, they were able to get away with it due to Smallville suffering a blizzard soon after they found Clark that kept them inside for weeks, and due to her previous miscarriages the neighbors bought that she wouldn't have shared news of her latest pregnancy until the kid was actually born.



* Subverted in the French manga-style comic book ''Appa''. The title heroine is called by her father on his deathbed, who starts saying that he has an important reveal to make to her. When she realizes he's about to tell her that she is a foundling, she points out that she noticed they were different a ''long'' time ago. (She's a little human girl; her adoptive parents are ''anthropomorphic walrus''.) The father is quite upset by this fact, ranting that he wouldn't have agonized for so long over not telling her sooner if he'd knew, while the mother rolls her eyes.
* Similarly spoofed in a strip by French comic book artist [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claire_Bretécher Claire Bretécher]]. A couple tries to explain to their (young adult) children that they were adopted, being apologetic that they've waited so long to tell them. The parents are White; the son is Asian and the daughter is Black, yet both were oblivious. When finally clued in that they're NotBloodSiblings, however, they immediately and happily GetARoom.



* Similarly spoofed in a strip by French comic book artist [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claire_Bretécher Claire Bretécher]]. A couple tries to explain to their (young adult) children that they were adopted, being apologetic that they've waited so long to tell them. The parents are White; the son is Asian and the daughter is Black, yet both were oblivious. When finally clued in that they're NotBloodSiblings, however, they immediately and happily GetARoom.

to:

* Similarly spoofed in In Creator/JohnByrne's retelling of Franchise/{{Superman}}'s origin, Martha Kent, who had suffered two miscarriages and a strip by French comic book artist [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claire_Bretécher Claire Bretécher]]. A couple tries to explain to their (young adult) children stillbirth, was horrified that anyone would shoot off a rocket with a little baby in it. She claimed to have given birth to Clark, and she and Jonathan preserved the secret throughout his childhood -- which, naturally, meant keeping it from Clark. Only when Clark's powers started to emerge did Jonathan confess. In this version of the retelling, they were adopted, being apologetic able to get away with it due to Smallville suffering a blizzard soon after they found Clark that they've waited so long kept them inside for weeks, and due to tell them. The parents are White; her previous miscarriages the son is Asian and the daughter is Black, yet both were oblivious. When finally clued in neighbors bought that they're NotBloodSiblings, however, they immediately and happily GetARoom.she wouldn't have shared news of her latest pregnancy until the kid was actually born.



* Subverted in the French manga-style comic book ''Appa''. The title heroine is called by her father on his deathbed, who starts saying that he has an important reveal to make to her. When she realizes he's about to tell her that she is a foundling, she points out that she noticed they were different a ''long'' time ago. (She's a little human girl; her adoptive parents are ''anthropomorphic walrus''.) The father is quite upset by this fact, ranting that he wouldn't have agonized for so long over not telling her sooner if he'd knew, while the mother rolls her eyes.



* The Dog from ''ComicStrip/FootrotFlats'' was raised in a cats' home, by a cat obsessed old lady, and for many years thought he himself was a cat. He got over it. Similarly, Horse originally thought he was a baby coat.



* The Dog from ''ComicStrip/FootrotFlats'' was raised in a cats' home, by a cat obsessed old lady, and for many years thought he himself was a cat. He got over it. Similarly, Horse originally thought he was a baby coat.



* In ''Fanfic/TheElementsOfFriendship'', Butter-And-Eggs is an Earth Pony raised by a Stag named Cobnut, who comes complete with a set of sticks he wears as antlers. [[spoiler:Turns out he put them on himself at a young age and forgot they were fake. He gets over being told pretty quickly.]]



* In ''Fanfic/TheElementsOfFriendship'', Butter-And-Eggs is an Earth Pony raised by a Stag named Cobnut, who comes complete with a set of sticks he wears as antlers. [[spoiler:Turns out he put them on himself at a young age and forgot they were fake. He gets over being told pretty quickly.]]



* In the French movie ''Les As de la jungle : Opération banquise'' (''The Jungle Bunch: The Movie''), the hero Maurice is an antarctic penguin that was adopted by a tiger from the day he hatched. He later himself adopt a tiger-striped ''fish'' as his son. Unlike other example of this trope, Maurice never ''ever'' clues in that he's not a fierce tiger, even after meeting some other penguins (whom he considers "silly-looking birds"). He goes as far as regularly painting yellow stripes on his black plumage to keep the tiger look.
* Eggs from ''WesternAnimation/TheBoxtrolls'' is convinced he's one of the eponymous boxtrolls until [[PluckyGirl Winnie]] convinces him otherwise. It just never seemed to occur to him that there was a reason he looked nothing like his adoptive father, or the rest of the family for that matter. He just figured he was "long-boned," and had some sort of skin condition and a "speech impediment".
* Disney's ''Disney/{{Hercules}}'' has this trope in full force, with the accidentally-exiled baby god being taken in by childless mortals, only to grow up feeling weird and ostracized because of his excessive strength.



** Inverted in the third film; Po meets his father [[spoiler:who was revealed at the end of the second movie]] and doesn't recognize him. At all. Even after said father says the only reason he's in town was because he was looking for his son. Rather than state the obvious, Po instead wishes him good luck and the two part ways. ''Everyone else involved facepalm''. When the Furious Five meet Li-Shen, they immediately guess that he's Po's father.

to:

** Inverted in the third film; Po meets his father [[spoiler:who was revealed at the end of the second movie]] and doesn't recognize him. At all. Even after said father says the only reason he's in town was because he was looking for his son. Rather than state the obvious, Po instead wishes him good luck and the two part ways. ''Everyone else involved facepalm''. {{facepalm}}s''. When the Furious Five meet Li-Shen, they immediately guess that he's Po's father.father.
* ''Disney/LambertTheSheepishLion'': Only Lambert himself is out of the loop; all of the other sheep know and (aside from his loving mother) mock him for not acting like his actual species, though eventually Lambert [[CowardlyLion does discover his inner bestial nature]] [[ParentsInDistress when a wolf imperils his mother]].
* Greenie from ''Animation/LeafieAHenIntoTheWild'' is a duck while his mother is a chicken. He doesn't realize that he's adopted until his teens.



* Disney's ''Disney/{{Hercules}}'' has this trope in full force, with the accidentally-exiled baby god being taken in by childless mortals, only to grow up feeling weird and ostracized because of his excessive strength.
* In the French movie ''Les As de la jungle : Opération banquise'' (''The Jungle Bunch: The Movie''), the hero Maurice is an antarctic penguin that was adopted by a tiger from the day he hatched. He later himself adopt a tiger-striped ''fish'' as his son. Unlike other example of this trope, Maurice never ''ever'' clues in that he's not a fierce tiger, even after meeting some other penguins (whom he considers "silly-looking birds"). He goes as far as regularly painting yellow stripes on his black plumage to keep the tiger look.
* Eggs from ''WesternAnimation/TheBoxtrolls'' is convinced he's one of the eponymous boxtrolls until [[PluckyGirl Winnie]] convinces him otherwise. It just never seemed to occur to him that there was a reason he looked nothing like his adoptive father, or the rest of the family for that matter. He just figured he was "long-boned," and had some sort of skin condition and a "speech impediment".
* Greenie from ''Animation/LeafieAHenIntoTheWild'' is a duck while his mother is a chicken. He doesn't realize that he's adopted until his teens.



* ''Film/{{Elf}}'': "Of course you're not an elf, Buddy. You're six-foot-three and had a beard since you were fifteen."
* In ''Film/TheJerk'' (1979), the title character (who is white) is raised the son of poor black sharecroppers. When his adoptive parents reveal "You're not our natural-born child," he responds with "I'm not? You mean I'm gonna STAY this color?" Later in the film, the character is shown to STILL consider himself black. When one of his business advisers uses a racial slur in passing while discussing keeping "negroes" away from the business, he responds "You, sir, happen to be talking to a NEGRO!" He then proceeds to kick the guy's ass with some previously unseen martial arts expertise.

to:

* ''Film/{{Elf}}'': "Of course you're not an elf, Buddy. You're six-foot-three and had a beard since you were fifteen."
* In ''Film/TheJerk'' (1979),
Inverted in ''Film/{{Changeling}}'', where it's the title character (who is white) is raised mother who finds out the son of poor black sharecroppers. When his adoptive parents reveal "You're not our natural-born child," he responds with "I'm not? You mean I'm gonna STAY child is different. In this color?" Later in case though, the film, mother knew immediately the character is shown to STILL consider himself black. When one of his business advisers uses a racial slur in passing while discussing keeping "negroes" away from kid wasn't hers. And its revealed pretty much everyone else, including the business, he responds "You, sir, happen to be talking to a NEGRO!" He then proceeds to kick boy, involved knew as well, the guy's ass with some previously unseen martial arts expertise.corrupt police department just wanted to say that the case of the boy's disappearance had been solved.



* Inverted in ''Film/{{Changeling}}'', where it's the mother who finds out the child is different. In this case though, the mother knew immediately the kid wasn't hers. And its revealed pretty much everyone else, including the boy, involved knew as well, the corrupt police department just wanted to say that the case of the boy's disappearance had been solved.
* The film version of ''Literature/StuartLittle'' plays it kinda straight in the start, but the cute little mouse gets over it quite quickly. His human brother, on the other hand...
* ''Film/SplittingHeirs'' plays this for laughs with its protagonist Tommy Patel, who was adopted by an Indian family living in London as an infant and grows up to be blond, blue-eyed Creator/EricIdle; he's ''stunned'' when his family breaks the news to him.
-->'''Tommy:''' Y-you mean I'm not really Asian?
* Disney's ''Film/TheUglyDachshund'' concerns a Great Dane who was adopted into a family of dachshunds. The Great Dane grows up thinking he is a dachshund. HilarityEnsues.
* Reversed in ''Film/MurderByDeath''. It apparently took Lionel Twain more than a decade to realize that his adopted son Sydney Wang was Asian.

to:

* Inverted in ''Film/{{Changeling}}'', where it's the mother who finds out the child is different. In this case though, the mother knew immediately the kid wasn't hers. And its revealed pretty much everyone else, including the boy, involved knew as well, the corrupt police department ''Film/DumbAndDumberTo'': When Harry learns that he needs a new kidney, he visits his parents (who live just wanted to say that down the case of the boy's disappearance had been solved.
* The film version of ''Literature/StuartLittle'' plays it kinda straight in the start, but the cute little mouse gets over it quite quickly. His human brother, on the other hand...
* ''Film/SplittingHeirs'' plays this
street) to ask them for laughs with its protagonist Tommy Patel, who was adopted by an Indian family living in London as an infant and grows up to be blond, blue-eyed Creator/EricIdle; he's ''stunned'' when his family breaks the news to him.
-->'''Tommy:''' Y-you mean I'm not really Asian?
* Disney's ''Film/TheUglyDachshund'' concerns a Great Dane who was adopted into a family of dachshunds. The Great Dane grows up thinking he
one. He is a dachshund. HilarityEnsues.
* Reversed in ''Film/MurderByDeath''. It apparently took Lionel Twain more than a decade to realize
astounded that his adopted son Sydney Wang was Asian.Asian-American mother and father aren't his blood relatives.



* ''Film/{{Elf}}'': "Of course you're not an elf, Buddy. You're six-foot-three and had a beard since you were fifteen."
* In ''Film/TheJerk'' (1979), the title character (who is white) is raised the son of poor black sharecroppers. When his adoptive parents reveal "You're not our natural-born child," he responds with "I'm not? You mean I'm gonna STAY this color?" Later in the film, the character is shown to STILL consider himself black. When one of his business advisers uses a racial slur in passing while discussing keeping "negroes" away from the business, he responds "You, sir, happen to be talking to a NEGRO!" He then proceeds to kick the guy's ass with some previously unseen martial arts expertise.
* Reversed in ''Film/MurderByDeath''. It apparently took Lionel Twain more than a decade to realize that his adopted son Sydney Wang was Asian.
* ''Film/SplittingHeirs'' plays this for laughs with its protagonist Tommy Patel, who was adopted by an Indian family living in London as an infant and grows up to be blond, blue-eyed Creator/EricIdle; he's ''stunned'' when his family breaks the news to him.
-->'''Tommy:''' Y-you mean I'm not really Asian?
* The film version of ''Literature/StuartLittle'' plays it kinda straight in the start, but the cute little mouse gets over it quite quickly. His human brother, on the other hand...



* ''Film/DumbAndDumberTo'': When Harry learns that he needs a new kidney, he visits his parents (who live just down the street) to ask them for one. He is astounded that his Asian-American mother and father aren't his blood relatives.

to:

* ''Film/DumbAndDumberTo'': When Harry learns that Disney's ''Film/TheUglyDachshund'' concerns a Great Dane who was adopted into a family of dachshunds. The Great Dane grows up thinking he needs a new kidney, he visits his parents (who live just down the street) to ask them for one. He is astounded that his Asian-American mother and father aren't his blood relatives.a dachshund. HilarityEnsues.



* In the incomprehensible ''Literature/AtlantaNights'', Bruce Lucent doesn't notice he's black and both of his "parents" are white until adulthood. As with most of the book's plotlines, this lasts for exactly one chapter and is never spoken of again.



*** Wanting to keep the adoption under wraps is justified by the cultural norms of the setting--the major religion frowns on adoption. The main character speculates that this is because the skewed birthrate makes boys so much more valuable than girls, and abandonment of excessive female children might be more prevalent if other families could be convinced to take them in. An oblivious adoption is the only option to avoid scorn.

to:

*** Wanting to keep the adoption under wraps is justified by the cultural norms of the setting--the setting -- the major religion frowns on adoption. The main character speculates that this is because the skewed birthrate makes boys so much more valuable than girls, and abandonment of excessive female children might be more prevalent if other families could be convinced to take them in. An oblivious adoption is the only option to avoid scorn. scorn.
* In ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia'' novel ''Literature/TheHorseAndHisBoy'', Shasta, a boy raised in Calormen, learns he was adopted when he eavesdrops on his "father" talking to a nobleman spending the night at their house. The nobleman was quick to realize this because Shasta has the pale skin of the northern nations while Calormenes are noticeably darker. As his "father" is willing to sell Shasta to the nobleman, he chooses to run away and find his real family, and turns out to be [[spoiler:the long-lost prince of Archenland]].



* In ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'' series, Rand al'Thor is eighteen years old before he discovers that [[MuggleFosterParents farmers]] [[GoodParents Tam and Kari al'Thor]] are not his birth parents. This revelation doesn't change the fact that Rand still [[HappilyAdopted loves them just the same]] and resolutely refers to them as his ''real'' parents, even after uncovering the identities of his [[BlueBlood royal]] biological parents.
* In a ''Literature/{{Dragonlance}}'' short story, an ogre loses his memory in the Cataclysm...and is adopted by a clan of Gully Dwarves. An adult, 9-foot-tall ogre, adopted by a bunch of creatures under 4 feet that can't count to 3. HilarityEnsues. Later he gets his memory back and gets angry...[[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming but simply can't bring himself to hurt the little creatures that treated him like family]].

to:

* In ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'' series, Rand al'Thor is eighteen years old before he discovers that [[MuggleFosterParents farmers]] [[GoodParents Tam and Kari al'Thor]] are not his birth parents. This revelation doesn't change The ''Series/DoctorWho Literature/EighthDoctorAdventures'' have a strange inversion. The Eighth Doctor adopts a young girl named Miranda who nonetheless has a very StrongFamilyResemblance to him, except for the fact she's blond. They're even the same height once she's fully grown. And apparently neither ever wonders whether they're blood relatives. People who've met both of them tend to be surprised to find out that Rand still [[HappilyAdopted loves them she's adopted. Miranda's birth father turns out to be [[spoiler:the last survivor of a war that ravaged Gallifrey. Given that children of the Doctor have a tendency to look like the Doctor's previous regenerations, there's a fairly good chance that Miranda and the Doctor are biologically related.]]
-->''If he hadn't known she was adopted, he’d never have guessed. She looked
just the same]] and resolutely refers to them as his ''real'' parents, even after uncovering the identities of his [[BlueBlood royal]] biological parents.
* In a ''Literature/{{Dragonlance}}'' short story, an ogre loses his memory in the Cataclysm...and is adopted by a clan of Gully Dwarves. An adult, 9-foot-tall ogre, adopted by a bunch of creatures under 4 feet that can't count to 3. HilarityEnsues. Later he gets his memory back and gets angry...[[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming but simply can't bring himself to hurt the little creatures that treated him
like family]].her stepfather.''



* In a ''Literature/{{Dragonlance}}'' short story, an ogre loses his memory in the Cataclysm...and is adopted by a clan of Gully Dwarves. An adult, 9-foot-tall ogre, adopted by a bunch of creatures under 4 feet that can't count to 3. HilarityEnsues. Later he gets his memory back and gets angry...[[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming but simply can't bring himself to hurt the little creatures that treated him like family]].
* In ''Funhouse'' by Diane Hoh, the narrative shifts from third-person to first-person accounts from the villain, who is recalling how he found a diary hidden in his family's attic, revealing that he was adopted, or rather, sold, after his birth parents were financially ruined by an unscrupulous group of businessmen who wanted control of the boardwalk containing the titular funhouse. The diary belonged to the villain's mother, who felt she had no choice but to give her son up because she didn't have the strength to raise him. The villain goes on a RoaringRampageOfRevenge aimed at the teenage children of the owners of the boardwalk, killing one and crippling two in roller coaster accident. [[spoiler: It turns out the villain is in fact the main character's brother.]]



* The ''Series/DoctorWho Literature/EighthDoctorAdventures'' have a strange inversion. The Eighth Doctor adopts a young girl named Miranda who nonetheless has a very StrongFamilyResemblance to him, except for the fact she's blond. They're even the same height once she's fully grown. And apparently neither ever wonders whether they're blood relatives. People who've met both of them tend to be surprised to find out that she's adopted. Miranda's birth father turns out to be [[spoiler:the last survivor of a war that ravaged Gallifrey. Given that children of the Doctor have a tendency to look like the Doctor's previous regenerations, there's a fairly good chance that Miranda and the Doctor are biologically related.]]
-->''If he hadn't known she was adopted, he’d never have guessed. She looked just like her stepfather.''
* In ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia'' novel ''Literature/TheHorseAndHisBoy'', Shasta, a boy raised in Calormen, learns he was adopted when he eavesdrops on his "father" talking to a nobleman spending the night at their house. The nobleman was quick to realize this because Shasta has the pale skin of the northern nations while Calormenes are noticeably darker. As his "father" is willing to sell Shasta to the nobleman, he chooses to run away and find his real family, and turns out to be [[spoiler:the long-lost prince of Archenland]].
* In ''Funhouse'' by Diane Hoh, the narrative shifts from third-person to first-person accounts from the villain, who is recalling how he found a diary hidden in his family's attic, revealing that he was adopted, or rather, sold, after his birth parents were financially ruined by an unscrupulous group of businessmen who wanted control of the boardwalk containing the titular funhouse. The diary belonged to the villain's mother, who felt she had no choice but to give her son up because she didn't have the strength to raise him. The villain goes on a RoaringRampageOfRevenge aimed at the teenage children of the owners of the boardwalk, killing one and crippling two in roller coaster accident. [[spoiler: It turns out the villain is in fact the main character's brother.]]
* In the incomprehensible ''Literature/AtlantaNights'', Bruce Lucent doesn't notice he's black and both of his "parents" are white until adulthood. As with most of the book's plotlines, this lasts for exactly one chapter and is never spoken of again.
* In Creator/AndreNorton's ''Literature/TheZeroStone'', Jern first learns he was adopted when his father was dead. His mother uses it to justify her ParentalFavoritism. It enrages him to hear he is not his father's son, but later he consoles himself with the knowledge that his father prefered him because he was in mind more like him than the blood children.



* In ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'' series, Rand al'Thor is eighteen years old before he discovers that [[MuggleFosterParents farmers]] [[GoodParents Tam and Kari al'Thor]] are not his birth parents. This revelation doesn't change the fact that Rand still [[HappilyAdopted loves them just the same]] and resolutely refers to them as his ''real'' parents, even after uncovering the identities of his [[BlueBlood royal]] biological parents.
* In Creator/AndreNorton's ''Literature/TheZeroStone'', Jern first learns he was adopted when his father was dead. His mother uses it to justify her ParentalFavoritism. It enrages him to hear he is not his father's son, but later he consoles himself with the knowledge that his father prefered him because he was in mind more like him than the blood children.



* In one episode of ''Series/NewsRadio'', Matthew doesn't figure out that he's adopted until his "identical twin" brother points it out to him. This despite the fact that the two look ''absolutely'' nothing alike; Matthew is played by gangly, blond Andy Dick, while his twin brother is played by Creator/JonStewart. Turns out at the end of the episode that Matthew knew he and his brother weren't really twins, but kept pretending he did so that his brother wouldn't catch that HE was the adopted one (an unseen photo of their parents confirms Matthew is their biological child by nature of a startling resemblance). One wonders why their parents didn't tell them they were ''fraternal'' twins. There's also a line suggesting they're not the same age, making it unclear why they were called twins at all. Then again, Matthew's parents could be as strange as he is.

to:

* In one One episode of ''Series/NewsRadio'', Matthew doesn't figure out that he's adopted until his "identical twin" brother points it out to him. This despite ''Series/ThirtyRock'' had the fact that characters' mothers appearing on the two look ''absolutely'' nothing alike; Matthew show. Danny (who is played by gangly, blond Andy Dick, while his twin brother is played by Creator/JonStewart. Turns out at the end of the episode that Matthew knew white) reveals he has an Asian mother, which someone comments on and his brother weren't really twins, but kept pretending thus him realizing he did so that his brother wouldn't catch that HE was the adopted one (an unseen photo of their parents confirms Matthew is their biological child by nature of a startling resemblance). One wonders why their parents didn't tell them they were ''fraternal'' twins. There's also a line suggesting they're not the same age, making it unclear why they were called twins at all. Then again, Matthew's parents could be as strange as he is.adopted.



* Greg's father from ''Series/YesDear'' spent much of his life without knowing he was adopted.

to:

* Greg's MadeForTVMovie ''Based on an Untrue Story'' features Morgan Fairchild, who never questions the fact that her parents are Asian and she's a tall blonde up until the minute the plot requires it.
* An odd case was referenced in one episode of ''Series/{{Cheers}}''. To account for [[CoolOldGuy Coach]]'s absence towards the end of season 3 ([[AuthorExistenceFailure his actor had died before the end of the season]], he would be explained away as being somehwere. One of these cases was being at a family reunion- and everybody aside from him in the photo is African-American. Turns out, he was mailed an invite to one of their gatherings by accident, and felt it would be rude not to go. Hence, he showed up at more of their family functions, and was considering holding the reunion at his house that year (the family called him "Uncle Whitey").
* ''Series/DoctorWho'': [[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E9NightTerrors "Night Terrors"]] inverts it in a frightening way. The Doctor visits a little boy that's scared of everything with a mysterious cupboard giving him off-the-scale readings on his Sonic Screwdriver. When asked about his birth, the
father reveals his wife [[spoiler:can't have kids.]] The Doctor reveals [[spoiler:the kid is an alien and is using a perception filter to make it seem like they always had him.]]
* In ''Series/GameOfThrones'' [[spoiler: Jon Snow]] hasn't the slightest clue of being adopted [[spoiler: by his biological uncle Ned Stark, whom he believes to be his biological father. His biological parents are actually the deceased Rhaegar Targaryen and Lyanna Stark, who have been dead for all of his life. As Lyanna knew she was dying, she manages to pass her infant son (Jon) into the care of her brother, Ned, and [[DyingWish asks him to protect her son]]
from ''Series/YesDear'' spent much Robert Baratheon before she dies. Ned brings Jon home with him, raises and loves Jon as his own son alongside his other children, and [[TheGreatestStoryNeverTold spends the rest of his life without knowing protecting his sister's son]] by hiding Jon's biological parentage by claiming Jon as his own illegitimate son since the current-reigning regime, the Baratheons, would kill Jon if they ever found out he was adopted.the hidden son of Rhaegar Targyaren and Lyanna Stark.]]



* One episode of ''Series/ThirtyRock'' had the characters' mothers appearing on the show. Danny (who is white) reveals he has an Asian mother, which someone comments on and thus him realizing he was adopted.
* Inverted in a frightening way in the ''Series/DoctorWho'' story "Night Terrors". The Doctor visits a little boy that's scared of everything with a mysterious cupboard giving him off-the-scale readings on his Sonic Screwdriver. When asked about his birth, the father reveals his wife [[spoiler:can't have kids.]] The Doctor reveals [[spoiler:the kid is an alien and is using a perception filter to make it seem like they always had him.]]



* Another MadeForTVMovie, ''Based on an Untrue Story'', features Morgan Fairchild, who never questions the fact that her parents are Asian and she's a tall blonde up until the minute the plot requires it.



* In one episode of ''Series/NewsRadio'', Matthew doesn't figure out that he's adopted until his "identical twin" brother points it out to him. This despite the fact that the two look ''absolutely'' nothing alike; Matthew is played by gangly, blond Andy Dick, while his twin brother is played by Creator/JonStewart. Turns out at the end of the episode that Matthew knew he and his brother weren't really twins, but kept pretending he did so that his brother wouldn't catch that HE was the adopted one (an unseen photo of their parents confirms Matthew is their biological child by nature of a startling resemblance). One wonders why their parents didn't tell them they were ''fraternal'' twins. There's also a line suggesting they're not the same age, making it unclear why they were called twins at all. Then again, Matthew's parents could be as strange as he is.
* One episode of the Israeli sitcom ''Shemesh'' shows [[TheDitz Sasi]]’s parents, who turn out to be very wealthy, educated, and look nothing like him. He discusses with fellow [[TheDitz Ditz]] [[DumbBlonde ‘Ogen]] the possibility that he might be adopted, and when he finally goes to ask his mother, it turns out they’ve actually told him that he is, several times, only he never bothered to listen. (Of course, [[ContinuitySnarl that’s just one explanation]] of [[MultipleChoicePast Sasi’s origins]].)
* In ''Series/UpperMiddleBogan'', Margaret kept Bess's adoption from her for over thirty years, and there's no suggestion she would have told her if she hadn't suddenly found out their blood types were incompatible.



* In ''Series/UpperMiddleBogan'', Margaret kept Bess's adoption from her for over thirty years, and there's no suggestion she would have told her if she hadn't suddenly found out their blood types were incompatible.
* One episode of the Israeli sitcom ''Shemesh'' shows [[TheDitz Sasi]]’s parents, who turn out to be very wealthy, educated, and look nothing like him. He discusses with fellow [[TheDitz Ditz]] [[DumbBlonde ‘Ogen]] the possibility that he might be adopted, and when he finally goes to ask his mother, it turns out they’ve actually told him that he is, several times, only he never bothered to listen. (Of course, [[ContinuitySnarl that’s just one explanation]] of [[MultipleChoicePast Sasi’s origins]].)
* In ''Series/GameOfThrones'' [[spoiler: Jon Snow]] hasn't the slightest clue of being adopted [[spoiler: by his biological uncle Ned Stark, whom he believes to be his biological father. His biological parents are actually the deceased Rhaegar Targaryen and Lyanna Stark, who have been dead for all of his life. As Lyanna knew she was dying, she manages to pass her infant son (Jon) into the care of her brother, Ned, and [[DyingWish asks him to protect her son]] from Robert Baratheon before she dies. Ned brings Jon home with him, raises and loves Jon as his own son alongside his other children, and [[TheGreatestStoryNeverTold spends the rest of his life protecting his sister's son]] by hiding Jon's biological parentage by claiming Jon as his own illegitimate son since the current-reigning regime, the Baratheons, would kill Jon if they ever found out he was the hidden son of Rhaegar Targyaren and Lyanna Stark.]]
* An odd case was referenced in one episode of ''Series/{{Cheers}}''. To account for [[CoolOldGuy Coach]]'s absence towards the end of season 3 ([[AuthorExistenceFailure his actor had died before the end of the season]], he would be explained away as being somehwere. One of these cases was being at a family reunion- and everybody aside from him in the photo is African-American. Turns out, he was mailed an invite to one of their gatherings by accident, and felt it would be rude not to go. Hence, he showed up at more of their family functions, and was considering holding the reunion at his house that year (the family called him "Uncle Whitey").

to:

* In ''Series/UpperMiddleBogan'', Margaret kept Bess's adoption Greg's father from her for over thirty years, and there's no suggestion she would have told her if she hadn't suddenly found out their blood types were incompatible.
* One episode of the Israeli sitcom ''Shemesh'' shows [[TheDitz Sasi]]’s parents, who turn out to be very wealthy, educated, and look nothing like him. He discusses with fellow [[TheDitz Ditz]] [[DumbBlonde ‘Ogen]] the possibility that he might be adopted, and when he finally goes to ask his mother, it turns out they’ve actually told him that he is, several times, only he never bothered to listen. (Of course, [[ContinuitySnarl that’s just one explanation]] of [[MultipleChoicePast Sasi’s origins]].)
* In ''Series/GameOfThrones'' [[spoiler: Jon Snow]] hasn't the slightest clue of being adopted [[spoiler: by his biological uncle Ned Stark, whom he believes to be his biological father. His biological parents are actually the deceased Rhaegar Targaryen and Lyanna Stark, who have been dead for all of his life. As Lyanna knew she was dying, she manages to pass her infant son (Jon) into the care of her brother, Ned, and [[DyingWish asks him to protect her son]] from Robert Baratheon before she dies. Ned brings Jon home with him, raises and loves Jon as his own son alongside his other children, and [[TheGreatestStoryNeverTold spends the rest
''Series/YesDear'' spent much of his life protecting his sister's son]] by hiding Jon's biological parentage by claiming Jon as his own illegitimate son since the current-reigning regime, the Baratheons, would kill Jon if they ever found out without knowing he was the hidden son of Rhaegar Targyaren and Lyanna Stark.]]
* An odd case was referenced in one episode of ''Series/{{Cheers}}''. To account for [[CoolOldGuy Coach]]'s absence towards the end of season 3 ([[AuthorExistenceFailure his actor had died before the end of the season]], he would be explained away as being somehwere. One of these cases was being at a family reunion- and everybody aside from him in the photo is African-American. Turns out, he was mailed an invite to one of their gatherings by accident, and felt it would be rude not to go. Hence, he showed up at more of their family functions, and was considering holding the reunion at his house that year (the family called him "Uncle Whitey").
adopted.



* ''Disney/LambertTheSheepishLion'': Only Lambert himself is out of the loop; all of the other sheep know and (aside from his loving mother) mock him for not acting like his actual species, though eventually Lambert [[CowardlyLion does discover his inner bestial nature]] [[ParentsInDistress when a wolf imperils his mother]].
* ''WesternAnimation/RockosModernLife'' has Heffer being surprised he's adopted after Rocko brings it up at a dinner visit to his family. Rocko, at least, found it obvious, as Heffer is a steer and his family are ''wolves''. Who originally raised Heffer so that they could eat him, incidentally. They came to love him and changed their plans, of course.
* On ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'', Mr. Krabs, [[SpeciesSurname a crab]], is the proud father of Pearl, a whale. The show treats this as an ElephantInTheLivingRoom[=/=]UnusuallyUninterestingSight.

to:

* ''Disney/LambertTheSheepishLion'': Only Lambert himself is out of the loop; all of the other sheep know and (aside A [[http://tylerkungpao.tumblr.com/post/35365952684 cut scene]] from his loving mother) mock him for not acting like his actual species, though eventually Lambert [[CowardlyLion does discover his inner bestial nature]] [[ParentsInDistress when a wolf imperils his mother]].
* ''WesternAnimation/RockosModernLife'' has Heffer
the ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' episode "The Lich" was going to reveal that [[KidHero Finn]] didn't realize he was adopted, despite being surprised raised by talking dogs. This may have been cut for pure FridgeLogic: he ''does'' specifically know that he's adopted after Rocko brings human ([[LastOfHisKind it up at a dinner visit to his family. Rocko, at least, found it obvious, as Heffer is a steer makes him soul-searchy]]) and his family are ''wolves''. Who originally raised Heffer so "Memories of Boom-Boom Mountain" shows that they could eat him, incidentally. They came to love he [[NoInfantileAmnesia apparently remembers]] his adoptive parents finding him and changed their plans, of course.
* On ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'', Mr. Krabs, [[SpeciesSurname a crab]], is
in the proud father of Pearl, a whale. The show treats this as an ElephantInTheLivingRoom[=/=]UnusuallyUninterestingSight.woods.



* Ike on ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' is an interesting example: while Ike himself is just a baby, his older brother Kyle was apparently unaware that Ike was really adopted from Canada, though Canadians on ''South Park'' are animated differently than Americans. Subverted somewhat in that ''the viewer'' couldn't be sure of this, either; this episode is basically what established that rule, though Canadians had been shown animated differently before (on a ShowWithinAShow, which could have been another explanation for [[StylisticSuck the style difference]]).

to:

* Ike on ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' is an interesting example: while Ike himself is just a baby, his older brother Kyle was apparently unaware that Ike was really adopted Buddy from Canada, though Canadians on ''South Park'' are animated differently than Americans. Subverted somewhat in that ''the viewer'' couldn't be sure of this, either; this episode ''WesternAnimation/DinosaurTrain'' is basically what established that rule, though Canadians had been shown animated differently before (on a ShowWithinAShow, which could have been another explanation for [[StylisticSuck the style difference]]).young TyrannosaurusRex raised by pterodactyls.



* Technobear from ''WesternAnimation/HarveyBeaks'' was raised by turtles, and he thought he was one as well until the end of "Terrybear".
* ''WesternAnimation/RockosModernLife'' has Heffer being surprised he's adopted after Rocko brings it up at a dinner visit to his family. Rocko, at least, found it obvious, as Heffer is a steer and his family are ''wolves''. Who originally raised Heffer so that they could eat him, incidentally. They came to love him and changed their plans, of course.
* Ike on ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' is an interesting example: while Ike himself is just a baby, his older brother Kyle was apparently unaware that Ike was really adopted from Canada, though Canadians on ''South Park'' are animated differently than Americans. Subverted somewhat in that ''the viewer'' couldn't be sure of this, either; this episode is basically what established that rule, though Canadians had been shown animated differently before (on a ShowWithinAShow, which could have been another explanation for [[StylisticSuck the style difference]]).
* On ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'', Mr. Krabs, [[SpeciesSurname a crab]], is the proud father of Pearl, a whale. The show treats this as an ElephantInTheLivingRoom[=/=]UnusuallyUninterestingSight.



* Buddy from ''WesternAnimation/DinosaurTrain'' is a young TyrannosaurusRex raised by pterodactyls.

to:

* Buddy from ''WesternAnimation/DinosaurTrain'' The trope is pushed to an extreme level of silliness in the AnimatedAdaptation of ''ComicBook/TrollsDeTroy''. The heroine, Waha, is a young TyrannosaurusRex raised human girl who was adopted by pterodactyls.a family of trolls ([[AllTrollsAreDifferent in this world, big, hairy, smelly, man-eating humanoids]]). She ''stays'' utterly oblivious to this fact (unlike in the original comic, where her adoptive father reveals the truth to her in the first issue, when they desperately need her to use magic). In fact, [[BerserkButton she responds with violence]] to the mere suggestion that she could be human. Instead, she thinks of herself as a troll with a [[InsistentTerminology "thwarted pilosity"]] -- and the other trolls believe it too! Of course, trolls are notoriously stupid and scatterbrained, but even ''her adoptive parents'' seem to have forgotten about the little matter of her adoption. The worst part, however, is that even every human she encounters (admittedly, barely smarter than the trolls in general) also swallows the "hairless troll" story. This even includes an experienced troll hunter (who wants to add her head to his trophy wall) and a "trolologist" (but he was crazy anyway). Chances of Waha ever realizing her true heritage? Zero.



* A [[http://tylerkungpao.tumblr.com/post/35365952684 cut scene]] from the ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' episode "The Lich" was going to reveal that [[KidHero Finn]] didn't realize he was adopted, despite being raised by talking dogs. This may have been cut for pure FridgeLogic: he ''does'' specifically know that he's human ([[LastOfHisKind it makes him soul-searchy]]) and "Memories of Boom-Boom Mountain" shows that he [[NoInfantileAmnesia apparently remembers]] his adoptive parents finding him in the woods.
* Technobear from ''WesternAnimation/HarveyBeaks'' was raised by turtles, and he thought he was one as well until the end of "Terrybear".
* The trope is pushed to an extreme level of silliness in the AnimatedAdaptation of ''ComicBook/TrollsDeTroy''. The heroine, Waha, is a human girl who was adopted by a family of trolls ([[AllTrollsAreDifferent in this world, big, hairy, smelly, man-eating humanoids]]). She ''stays'' utterly oblivious to this fact (unlike in the original comic, where her adoptive father reveals the truth to her in the first issue, when they desperately need her to use magic). In fact, [[BerserkButton she responds with violence]] to the mere suggestion that she could be human. Instead, she thinks of herself as a troll with a [[InsistentTerminology "thwarted pilosity"]] -- and the other trolls believe it too! Of course, trolls are notoriously stupid and scatterbrained, but even ''her adoptive parents'' seem to have forgotten about the little matter of her adoption. The worst part, however, is that even every human she encounters (admittedly, barely smarter than the trolls in general) also swallows the "hairless troll" story. This even includes an experienced troll hunter (who wants to add her head to his trophy wall) and a "trolologist" (but he was crazy anyway). Chances of Waha ever realizing her true heritage? Zero.


Added DiffLines:

13th Mar '17 11:40:02 AM arkholt
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Webcomic/TheBirdFeeder'':
** Inverted with Darryl and Edna, two cardinals, and their adopted children, who, in [[http://thebirdfeeder.com/comic/1 the very first strip]] are revealed to be an adopted bluejay and titmouse, and were only adopted because Edna is colorblind.
** Done more traditionally with Tina, a hummingbird. In [[http://thebirdfeeder.com/comic/163 #163]], "Bunnies," she tries to find her real parents, as she herself was [[RaisedByWolves raised by rabbits]], and accidentally adopts a rabbit.
22nd Feb '17 3:46:45 PM Wordpainter
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* In ''Literature/ABrothersPrice'' this is invoked with Neddie at the end of the novel. [[spoiler:She is actually the child of a family executed for treason, and a toddler at the time she is adopted. The Whistlers do everything to help her fit in, from dyeing her hair to giving her the same tattoos her "sisters" have. They seem to hope that she will forget about her birth family, and not want revenge once they tell her the truth when she comes of age.]]
** Wanting to keep the adoption under wraps is justified by the cultural norms of the setting--the major religion frowns on adoption. The main character speculates that this is because the skewed birthrate makes boys so much more valuable than girls, and abandonment of excessive female children might be more prevalent if other families could be convinced to take them in. An oblivious adoption is the only option to avoid scorn.

to:

* In ''Literature/ABrothersPrice'' this ''Literature/ABrothersPrice'':
** This
is invoked with Neddie at the end of the novel. [[spoiler:She is actually the child of a family executed for treason, and a toddler at the time she is adopted. The Whistlers do everything to help her fit in, from dyeing her hair to giving her the same tattoos her "sisters" have. They seem to hope that she will forget about her birth family, and not want revenge once they tell her the truth when she comes of age.]]
** *** Wanting to keep the adoption under wraps is justified by the cultural norms of the setting--the major religion frowns on adoption. The main character speculates that this is because the skewed birthrate makes boys so much more valuable than girls, and abandonment of excessive female children might be more prevalent if other families could be convinced to take them in. An oblivious adoption is the only option to avoid scorn.
22nd Feb '17 12:40:55 PM Wordpainter
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* In ''Literature/ABrothersPrice'' this is invoked with Neddie. [[spoiler:She is actually the child of a family executed for treason, and a toddler at the time she is adopted. The Whistlers do everything to help her fit in, from dyeing her hair to giving her the same tattoos her "sisters" have. They seem to hope that she will forget about her birth family, and not want revenge once they tell her the truth when she comes of age.]]

to:

* In ''Literature/ABrothersPrice'' this is invoked with Neddie.Neddie at the end of the novel. [[spoiler:She is actually the child of a family executed for treason, and a toddler at the time she is adopted. The Whistlers do everything to help her fit in, from dyeing her hair to giving her the same tattoos her "sisters" have. They seem to hope that she will forget about her birth family, and not want revenge once they tell her the truth when she comes of age.]]]]
** Wanting to keep the adoption under wraps is justified by the cultural norms of the setting--the major religion frowns on adoption. The main character speculates that this is because the skewed birthrate makes boys so much more valuable than girls, and abandonment of excessive female children might be more prevalent if other families could be convinced to take them in. An oblivious adoption is the only option to avoid scorn.
20th Feb '17 5:03:38 PM StFan
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* The trope is pushed to an extreme level of silliness in the AnimatedAdaptation of ''ComicBook/TrollDeTroy''. The heroine, Waha, is a human girl who was adopted by a family of trolls ([[AllTrollsAreDifferent in this world, big, hairy, smelly, man-eating humanoids]]). She ''stays'' utterly oblivious to this fact (unlike in the original comic, where her adoptive father reveals the truth to her in the first issue, when they desperately need her to use magic). In fact, [[BerserkButton she responds with violence]] to the mere suggestion that she could be human. Instead, she thinks of herself as a troll with a [[InsistentTerminology "thwarted pilosity"]] -- and the other trolls believe it too! Of course, trolls are notoriously stupid and scatterbrained, but even ''her adoptive parents'' seem to have forgotten about the little matter of her adoption. The worst part, however, is that even every human she encounters (admittedly, barely smarter than the trolls in general) also swallows the "hairless troll" story. This even includes an experienced troll hunter (who wants to add her head to his trophy wall) and a "trolologist" (but he was crazy anyway). Chances of Waha ever realizing her true heritage? Zero.

to:

* The trope is pushed to an extreme level of silliness in the AnimatedAdaptation of ''ComicBook/TrollDeTroy''.''ComicBook/TrollsDeTroy''. The heroine, Waha, is a human girl who was adopted by a family of trolls ([[AllTrollsAreDifferent in this world, big, hairy, smelly, man-eating humanoids]]). She ''stays'' utterly oblivious to this fact (unlike in the original comic, where her adoptive father reveals the truth to her in the first issue, when they desperately need her to use magic). In fact, [[BerserkButton she responds with violence]] to the mere suggestion that she could be human. Instead, she thinks of herself as a troll with a [[InsistentTerminology "thwarted pilosity"]] -- and the other trolls believe it too! Of course, trolls are notoriously stupid and scatterbrained, but even ''her adoptive parents'' seem to have forgotten about the little matter of her adoption. The worst part, however, is that even every human she encounters (admittedly, barely smarter than the trolls in general) also swallows the "hairless troll" story. This even includes an experienced troll hunter (who wants to add her head to his trophy wall) and a "trolologist" (but he was crazy anyway). Chances of Waha ever realizing her true heritage? Zero.
20th Feb '17 5:02:55 PM StFan
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* The trope is pushed to an extreme level of silliness in the AnimatedAdaptation of ''ComicBook/TrollDeTroy''. The heroine, Waha, is a human girl who was adopted by a family of trolls ([[AllTrollsAreDifferent in this world, big, hairy, smelly, man-eating humanoids]]). She ''stays'' utterly oblivious to this fact (unlike in the original comic, where her adoptive father reveals the truth to her in the first issue, when they desperately need her to use magic). In fact, [[BerserkButton she responds with violence]] to the mere suggestion that she could be human. Instead, she thinks of herself as a troll with a [[InsistentTerminology "thwarted pilosity"]] -- and the other trolls believe it too! Of course, trolls are notoriously stupid and scatterbrained, but even ''her adoptive parents'' seem to have forgotten about the little matter of her adoption. The worst part, however, is that even every human she encounters (admittedly, barely smarter than the trolls in general) also swallows the "hairless troll" story. This even includes an experienced troll hunter (who wants to add her head to his trophy wall) and a "trolologist" (but he was crazy anyway). Chances of Waha ever realizing her true heritage? Zero.
27th Jan '17 3:34:26 AM Morgenthaler
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* WizardsOfWaverlyPlace: plays with this. First we meet a kid who claims to be the runt of his giant family when he was about the same size as a normal human. Then later it turns out he's adopted. [[WhatAnIdiot Which he knew, but he'd always assumed he'd been adopted from other giants]] [[FridgeLogic Despite the fact he was a wizard.]]

to:

* WizardsOfWaverlyPlace: ''Series/WizardsOfWaverlyPlace'': plays with this. First we meet a kid who claims to be the runt of his giant family when he was about the same size as a normal human. Then later it turns out he's adopted. [[WhatAnIdiot Which he knew, but he'd always assumed he'd been adopted from other giants]] [[FridgeLogic Despite the fact he was a wizard.]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ObliviousAdoption