History Main / Novelization

2nd Sep '17 8:30:38 AM HalcyonDayz
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* The ''Literature/RedDwarf'' novels are somewhere between a novelisation and an original TieInNovel, taking elements from the episodes and connecting them together with original material. (The first one, for instance, combines elements of "The End", "Future Echoes", "Kryten", "Me2" and "Better Than Life" with an original plot in which Lister comes up with a plan to get back to Earth.)

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* The ''Literature/RedDwarf'' novels are somewhere between a novelisation and an original TieInNovel, taking elements from the episodes and connecting them together with original material. (The first one, for instance, combines elements of "The End", "Future Echoes", "Kryten", "Me2" "[=Me2=]" and "Better Than Life" with an original plot in which Lister comes up with a plan to get back to Earth.)
28th Jul '17 1:25:51 PM GrammarNavi
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** Likewise, ''Creator/MaryShelley's Literature/{{Frankenstein}}'' by Leonore Fleischer, the novelization of KennethBranagh's [[Film/MaryShelleysFrankenstein 1994 film]]. (Saberhagen reportedly offered his services for this novelization as well, primarily because it would then have been "''Mary Shelley's Frankenstein'', by the author of ''Bram Stoker's Dracula''".) Fleischer is a veteran novelizer, with "Based on..." works including ''Film/RainMan'', ''Film/ThreeAmigos'', ''Film/{{Annie|1982}}'' (yes, that's right, the book of the film of the musical of the comic strip) and even ''Film/{{Fame}}''. (Yes, that's right, the book of the musical.)

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** Likewise, ''Creator/MaryShelley's Literature/{{Frankenstein}}'' by Leonore Fleischer, the novelization of KennethBranagh's Creator/KennethBranagh's [[Film/MaryShelleysFrankenstein 1994 film]]. (Saberhagen reportedly offered his services for this novelization as well, primarily because it would then have been "''Mary Shelley's Frankenstein'', by the author of ''Bram Stoker's Dracula''".) Fleischer is a veteran novelizer, with "Based on..." works including ''Film/RainMan'', ''Film/ThreeAmigos'', ''Film/{{Annie|1982}}'' (yes, that's right, the book of the film of the musical of the comic strip) and even ''Film/{{Fame}}''. (Yes, that's right, the book of the musical.)
25th Jul '17 2:38:13 PM ThatTwerp
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* The novelization of the ''Film/SpiderManTrilogy'' movies and ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'' movies was given to Creator/PeterDavid, who had previously written the comic book series of both characters. Notably, the novelization of ''Film/SpiderMan3'' included many scenes that were cut from the movie to make room for less interesting themes. David also added the touch of giving names to background characters that went unnamed in the ''The Incredible Hulk'' film which corresponded to similar characters from the source comics.

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* The novelization of the ''Film/SpiderManTrilogy'' movies and ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'' movies was given to Creator/PeterDavid, who had previously written the comic book series of both characters. Notably, the novelization of ''Film/SpiderMan3'' included many scenes that were cut from the movie to movie, most notably several scenes in the final battle that make room for less interesting themes.it play out much differently than it did in the film. David also added the touch of giving names to background characters that went unnamed in the ''The Incredible Hulk'' film which corresponded to similar characters from the source comics.



** It should be noted that ''Ghostbusters'' actually has ''two'' different novelisations, one written by Richard Mueller (who later wrote for ''WesternAnimation/TheRealGhostbusters''), the other written by Larry Milne and published in Britain - the latter, unusually, is written in the present tense and also contains bios of key cast and crew members... and, bizarrely, virtually all of the film's credits ("From Columbia-Delphi Productions").
** The ''Film/GhostbustersII'' novelisation isn't ''quite'' as good, but does have this line:

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** It should be noted that ''Ghostbusters'' actually has ''two'' different novelisations, novelizations, one written by Richard Mueller (who later wrote for ''WesternAnimation/TheRealGhostbusters''), the other written by Larry Milne and published in Britain - the latter, unusually, is written in the present tense and also contains bios of key cast and crew members... and, bizarrely, virtually all of the film's credits ("From Columbia-Delphi Productions").
** The ''Film/GhostbustersII'' novelisation novelization isn't ''quite'' as good, but does have this line:



* The novelisation of ''Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture'' was written by Creator/GeneRoddenberry himself (to the disgust of Harold Livingston, who wrote the script for the movie). Notable because he gave a massive boost to the [[YaoiFangirl Kirk / Spock slashers]] by stating outright that the honorific Spock uses for Kirk "t'hy'la" was interpreted from the Vulcan language as "brother/friend/lover" and what the shippers have reinterpreted as meaning "soulmate".

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* The novelisation novelization of ''Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture'' was written by Creator/GeneRoddenberry himself (to the disgust of Harold Livingston, who wrote the script for the movie). Notable because he gave a massive boost to the [[YaoiFangirl Kirk / Spock slashers]] by stating outright that the honorific Spock uses for Kirk "t'hy'la" was interpreted from the Vulcan language as "brother/friend/lover" and what the shippers have reinterpreted as meaning "soulmate".



* The ''Film/SpiderManTrilogy'' had novelizations done by Creator/PeterDavid. ''Film/TheAmazingSpiderManSeries'', while not receiving complete-novelizations, did receive junior novelizations.

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* The ''Film/SpiderManTrilogy'' had novelizations done by Creator/PeterDavid. ''Film/TheAmazingSpiderManSeries'', while not receiving complete-novelizations, complete novelizations, did receive junior novelizations.
25th Jul '17 2:33:42 PM ThatTwerp
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Novelizations are also often put together quickly, using an early draft of the film's script so that the author can finish the writing and have the book published to [[TieInNovel tie in]] with the movie's theatrical release; this incurs a very real risk that the copy of the script the author was working from may differ substantially from the final script used in filming (this happened with Chris Claremont's ''Film/X2XMenUnited'' novelization, amongst many others). If the movie winds up having its release delayed, the book might be in something of a no man's land when it comes to sales, while the film itself is potentially spoiled by anyone who reads the novel (which happened to ''Penelope''). On the other hand, sometimes the book is better than the movie, especially if the movie wasn't great in the first place.

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Novelizations are also often put together quickly, using an early draft of the film's script so that the author can finish the writing and have the book published to [[TieInNovel tie in]] with the movie's theatrical release; this incurs a very real risk that the copy of the script the author was working from may differ substantially from the final script used in filming (this happened with Chris Claremont's ''Film/X2XMenUnited'' novelization and Peter David's ''Film/SpiderMan3'' novelization, amongst many others). If the movie winds up having its release delayed, the book might be in something of a no man's land when it comes to sales, while the film itself is potentially spoiled by anyone who reads the novel (which happened to ''Penelope''). On the other hand, sometimes the book is better than the movie, especially if the movie wasn't great in the first place.



* The ''[[Franchise/TheAmazingSpiderManSeries Spiderman]]'' [[SpiderManTrilogy movie]] franchises had novels.

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* The ''[[Franchise/TheAmazingSpiderManSeries Spiderman]]'' [[SpiderManTrilogy movie]] franchises ''Film/SpiderManTrilogy'' had novels.novelizations done by Creator/PeterDavid. ''Film/TheAmazingSpiderManSeries'', while not receiving complete-novelizations, did receive junior novelizations.
6th Jul '17 10:24:09 PM rjd1922
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** On a more obscure note, there exist two ([[NoExportForYou Japan-only]]) novelizations of the anime, written by the original anime director Creator/TakeshiShudo. The second volume includes a ToBeContinued note in the afterword, but it was CutShort; no third installment was released, plus Shudo died in 2010.

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** On a more obscure note, there exist two ([[NoExportForYou Japan-only]]) [[LightNovel/PocketMonstersTheAnimation novelizations of the anime, anime]], written by the original anime director Creator/TakeshiShudo. The second volume includes a ToBeContinued note in the afterword, but it was CutShort; no third installment was released, plus Shudo died in 2010.
11th Jun '17 3:12:38 PM nombretomado
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* ''YesMinister'' and ''Yes, Prime Minister'' found its way into print in the form of James Hacker's memoirs. (With the editors sprinkling in additions gleaned from the private papers of Sir Humphrey Appleby and Sir Bernard Woolley.)

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* ''YesMinister'' ''Series/YesMinister'' and ''Yes, Prime Minister'' found its way into print in the form of James Hacker's memoirs. (With the editors sprinkling in additions gleaned from the private papers of Sir Humphrey Appleby and Sir Bernard Woolley.)
31st May '17 6:48:53 PM nombretomado
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* Most of the ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'' series have had novel adaptations, sometime resolving very different from the anime. And there are also side stories and sequels that originate as novels. Notable is ''Beltochika's Children''; it was originally YoshiyukiTomino's rejected plot for ''[[Anime/MobileSuitGundamCharsCounterattack Char's Counterattack]]'', which, in turn, is an adaption of Tomino's novel ''Hi-Streamer''. In other words, it's a novelization of TheFilmOfTheBook (by the same author).

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* Most of the ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'' series have had novel adaptations, sometime resolving very different from the anime. And there are also side stories and sequels that originate as novels. Notable is ''Beltochika's Children''; it was originally YoshiyukiTomino's Creator/YoshiyukiTomino's rejected plot for ''[[Anime/MobileSuitGundamCharsCounterattack Char's Counterattack]]'', which, in turn, is an adaption of Tomino's novel ''Hi-Streamer''. In other words, it's a novelization of TheFilmOfTheBook (by the same author).
27th May '17 11:36:09 PM Karxrida
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* The ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' series has tie-in [[Manga/KingdomHearts manga]] for each game.
** They also have [[Literature/KingdomHearts novelizations]], with many characters made [[AdaptationalAngstUpgrade angstier]] and made-up scenes that wind up contradicting game canon as the series progresses. Game director Tetsuya Nomura noted this in one interview, and it was probably a reason why he brought the novels' writer, Tomoco Kanemaki, on to actually help write the scenario for one of the actual video games, ''358/2 Days'', ''before'' writing the novel version (and even then, Nomura rewrote the script once she was done with it).

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* The ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' series has tie-in [[Manga/KingdomHearts manga]] manga for each game.
**
game. They also have [[Literature/KingdomHearts novelizations]], novelizations, with many characters made [[AdaptationalAngstUpgrade angstier]] and made-up scenes that wind up contradicting game canon as the series progresses. Game director Tetsuya Nomura noted this in one interview, and it was probably a reason why he brought the novels' writer, Tomoco Kanemaki, on to actually help write the scenario for one of the actual video games, ''358/2 Days'', ''before'' writing the novel version (and even then, Nomura rewrote the script once she was done with it).
17th May '17 7:31:39 PM nombretomado
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* ''Film/{{Dragonheart}}'' has both a regular novelization and a junior one. The novelization, written by the film's screenwriter Charles Edward Pogue, is based on his early screenplay before it was changed by {{creative differences}} with director Rob Cohen and {{executive meddling}} from {{Universal}}. Compared to the family-friendly nature of the film, the novelization has the {{darker and edgier}} feel the film was meant to have. It also expands on the world, details the characters and their relationships, gives previously minor or unnamed supporting characters larger roles such as the dragonslayers introduced near the end, includes vital scenes and moments of character development deleted from the film, rearranges some scenes and lines of dialogue to help the story make more sense, and removes elements added to the film that Pogue disapproved of like the pigs in the swamp village. While the film received a mixed reception, the novelization is praised by readers and fans, deeming it superior to the film and lamenting {{What Could Have Been}}. The book notably features more direct interaction between Draco and the other characters than shown in the film that was limited due to the CGI technology at the time.

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* ''Film/{{Dragonheart}}'' has both a regular novelization and a junior one. The novelization, written by the film's screenwriter Charles Edward Pogue, is based on his early screenplay before it was changed by {{creative differences}} with director Rob Cohen and {{executive meddling}} from {{Universal}}.Creator/{{Universal}}. Compared to the family-friendly nature of the film, the novelization has the {{darker and edgier}} feel the film was meant to have. It also expands on the world, details the characters and their relationships, gives previously minor or unnamed supporting characters larger roles such as the dragonslayers introduced near the end, includes vital scenes and moments of character development deleted from the film, rearranges some scenes and lines of dialogue to help the story make more sense, and removes elements added to the film that Pogue disapproved of like the pigs in the swamp village. While the film received a mixed reception, the novelization is praised by readers and fans, deeming it superior to the film and lamenting {{What Could Have Been}}. The book notably features more direct interaction between Draco and the other characters than shown in the film that was limited due to the CGI technology at the time.
25th Apr '17 7:58:31 PM PaulA
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* For the ''Franchise/TheChroniclesOfRiddick'', there are novelizations of the first two films. ''Film/PitchBlack'', by Frank Lauria, is mostly a cut-and-paste from an early draft of the script (so that one important twist from the movie doesn't appear), but it does add some backstory on how Riddick was captured and why he went to prison in the first place. The one for ''Film/TheChroniclesOfRiddick'' by AlanDeanFoster added in tons of details, several extra scenes, and detailed backstory, including an appendix with more details on the Necromonger religion.

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* For the ''Franchise/TheChroniclesOfRiddick'', there are novelizations of the first two films. ''Film/PitchBlack'', by Frank Lauria, is mostly a cut-and-paste from an early draft of the script (so that one important twist from the movie doesn't appear), but it does add some backstory on how Riddick was captured and why he went to prison in the first place. The one for ''Film/TheChroniclesOfRiddick'' by AlanDeanFoster Creator/AlanDeanFoster added in tons of details, several extra scenes, and detailed backstory, including an appendix with more details on the Necromonger religion.
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