History Main / NouveauRiche

19th Jun '16 6:01:29 PM Jhonny
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* Most Germans with "old money", even if it only dates back to the 1960s and even if the source is something like a discount store tend to be very reserved figures who rarely make public appearances and whose opinions and sometimes even faces are not widely known to the public. That of course makes crass noveau riche style behavior like that of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Geiss Reality TV family Geiss]] (source of wealth: a clothing brand) stand out even more.
11th Jun '16 2:13:56 PM Morgenthaler
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* Anna Nicole Smith - although the degree to which she fit this trope was embellished quite a bit by just about everyone responsible for promoting her cult of personality, including Anna Nicole herself. It is true that Anna (known as "Vickie" at that time) was living a working-class existence when she posed for ''{{Playboy}}'' in the spring of 1992, but that was largely by choice: she was raised in a comfortably middle-class household, got expelled from high school for delinquent behavior, and simply entered the job market rather than trying to complete her education.

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* Anna Nicole Smith - although the degree to which she fit this trope was embellished quite a bit by just about everyone responsible for promoting her cult of personality, including Anna Nicole herself. It is true that Anna (known as "Vickie" at that time) was living a working-class existence when she posed for ''{{Playboy}}'' ''Magazine/{{Playboy}}'' in the spring of 1992, but that was largely by choice: she was raised in a comfortably middle-class household, got expelled from high school for delinquent behavior, and simply entered the job market rather than trying to complete her education.
31st May '16 12:46:16 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''Series/SiliconValley'': People who make millions in Silicon Valley are almost always shown to have terrible taste and indulge heavily in ConspicuousConsumption.
** Russ Hanneman drives neon-colored supercars while blasting early-aughts nu-metal and wearing designer jeans covered in studs. He also bought a virtual nanny device that delivers discipline to his child over a loudspeaker so that he doesn't have to be an authority figure.
** Big Head gets a $20 million settlement from Hooli, but blows through it rapidly. He explains to his financial manager that he moved his pool several feet closer to the house, then decided moved to back again.
** It's a part of Silicon Valley culture to blow huge amounts of money on lavish parties to rub your success in the faces of your rivals.
25th May '16 6:38:09 AM WillBGood
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* Perhaps the most famous example in wrestling was John "Bradshaw" Layfield, former Texas hick turned millionaire thanks to [[WrestlingDoesntPay his (legit) job outside of wrestling as a stock-market consultant]]. Interestingly, he held the WWE Championship at the same time that the World Heavyweight Championship was held by the CulturedBadass Wrestling/TripleH.
* It is not known whether "Million-Dollar Man" Ted [=DiBiase=] fit this trope exactly, but he certainly acted like it. (His son has taken a more low-key road.)
** The kayfabe explanation for his purported wealth was due to a massive insurance settlement after his father "Iron" Mike DiBiase DiedInTheRing, so this trope definitely applies.
* The Fabulous Moolah, greatest Women's Champion of all time. (She was born to a family of sharecroppers in South Carolina, and eventually became successful enough to have a mansion for herself built not far from her family's home, as well as [[EgocentricTeamNaming having the street the mansion was on named for herself]].)
* Ted [=DiBiase=]'s son accused Wrestling/MontelVontaviousPorter of trying to appear high class but really being new money.

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* Perhaps the most famous example in wrestling was John "Bradshaw" Layfield, Wrestling/JohnBradshawLayfield, former Texas hick turned millionaire thanks to [[WrestlingDoesntPay his (legit) job outside of wrestling as a stock-market consultant]]. Interestingly, he held the WWE Championship at the same time that the World Heavyweight Championship was held by the CulturedBadass Wrestling/TripleH.
* It is not known whether "Million-Dollar Man" Ted [=DiBiase=] Wrestling/TedDiBiase fit this trope exactly, but he certainly acted like it. (His son has taken a more low-key road.)
** The kayfabe {{kayfabe}} explanation for his purported wealth was due to a massive insurance settlement after his father "Iron" Mike DiBiase DiedInTheRing, [=DiBiase=] was a CasualtyInTheRing, so this trope definitely applies.
* The Fabulous Moolah, Wrestling/TedDiBiaseJr accused Wrestling/MontelVontaviousPorter of trying to appear high class but really being new money.
* Wrestling/TheFabulousMoolah,
greatest Women's Champion of all time. (She was born to a family of sharecroppers in South Carolina, and eventually became successful enough to have a mansion for herself built not far from her family's home, as well as [[EgocentricTeamNaming having the street the mansion was on named for herself]].)
* Ted [=DiBiase=]'s son accused Wrestling/MontelVontaviousPorter of trying to appear high class but really being new money.
)
7th May '16 1:40:50 PM nombretomado
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* ''TheBradyBunch'': The Season 2 episode "The Treasure of Sierra Avenue," but applied to children and young teen-agers. After all, only $1,100 is found (in a vacant lot), and if they keep the money, each of them would have about $190 (split six ways), but to even a 15-year-old (Greg's age in the fall of 1970), that's ''a lot'' of money (again, remember this is 1970) and leads all the kids to wildly imagining how they'd spend the loot (although Mike says the money will go into the bank and turned into education bonds). By episode's end, the rightful owner shows up and the kids get to keep only a tiny fraction as a reward ($20, which split six ways is only $3.66, more than enough money for his kids in Mike's eyes).
* ''TheDukesOfHazzard'': The fourth-season episode "The $10 Million Sheriff" has Rosco ''temporarily'' becoming nouveau riche after an inaccurate will bequeathing him $10 million from his distant Uncle Hosiah. Rosco only got $10, which leads to huge, life-threatening problems from a bloodthirsty, no-nonsense bounty hunter who wants $100,000 for finally bringing the Duke boys to justice. In between Rosco thinking he's rich and learning he's not, he spends his money wildly, on (as series narrator Waylon Jennings might have put it) rhinestone suits and new expensive cars ... he's wanted that the same way for years, and needed a change.
* In ''GilmoreGirls'', the Gilmores have been a well-respected and wealthy family for over a hundred years but they're still considered Nouveau Riche trash by the Huntzbergers, who have been rich for centuries. Even by the gold-digging, former bar waitress matriarch who (it was implied by an angry [[MamaBear Emily]] while [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome chewing her out]]) only managed to marry into the family because she got pregnant.

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* ''TheBradyBunch'': ''Series/TheBradyBunch'': The Season 2 episode "The Treasure of Sierra Avenue," but applied to children and young teen-agers. After all, only $1,100 is found (in a vacant lot), and if they keep the money, each of them would have about $190 (split six ways), but to even a 15-year-old (Greg's age in the fall of 1970), that's ''a lot'' of money (again, remember this is 1970) and leads all the kids to wildly imagining how they'd spend the loot (although Mike says the money will go into the bank and turned into education bonds). By episode's end, the rightful owner shows up and the kids get to keep only a tiny fraction as a reward ($20, which split six ways is only $3.66, more than enough money for his kids in Mike's eyes).
* ''TheDukesOfHazzard'': ''Series/TheDukesOfHazzard'': The fourth-season episode "The $10 Million Sheriff" has Rosco ''temporarily'' becoming nouveau riche after an inaccurate will bequeathing him $10 million from his distant Uncle Hosiah. Rosco only got $10, which leads to huge, life-threatening problems from a bloodthirsty, no-nonsense bounty hunter who wants $100,000 for finally bringing the Duke boys to justice. In between Rosco thinking he's rich and learning he's not, he spends his money wildly, on (as series narrator Waylon Jennings might have put it) rhinestone suits and new expensive cars ... he's wanted that the same way for years, and needed a change.
* In ''GilmoreGirls'', ''Series/GilmoreGirls'', the Gilmores have been a well-respected and wealthy family for over a hundred years but they're still considered Nouveau Riche trash by the Huntzbergers, who have been rich for centuries. Even by the gold-digging, former bar waitress matriarch who (it was implied by an angry [[MamaBear Emily]] while [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome chewing her out]]) only managed to marry into the family because she got pregnant.



* A ''RoyalPains'' episode features a couple who's this trope. They are from Nebraska and have won the lottery. The husband becomes Hank's PatientOfTheWeek because he has gout due to all the expensive food his wife made him eat.
* A few show up in ''MidsomerMurders''. [[TropeOverdosed Like everything else]].

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* A ''RoyalPains'' ''Series/RoyalPains'' episode features a couple who's this trope. They are from Nebraska and have won the lottery. The husband becomes Hank's PatientOfTheWeek because he has gout due to all the expensive food his wife made him eat.
* A few show up in ''MidsomerMurders''.''Series/MidsomerMurders''. [[TropeOverdosed Like everything else]].



* The entire premise of ''KathAndKim''.

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* The entire premise of ''KathAndKim''.''Series/KathAndKim''.



** Clo Villagra, the mother of the two romantic female leads, became this due to a ''very'' succesful catering business that she built with the money coming from her dead husband's inheritance. [[spoiler:What Clo and her family didn't know, though, was that said riches came from dirty businesses. Which brings the male lead Octavio into their lives, as he's an ImpoverishedPatrician whose family was the main victim of said tricks and lost their own wealth due to them.]]

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** Clo Villagra, the mother of the two romantic female leads, became this due to a ''very'' succesful successful catering business that she built with the money coming from her dead husband's inheritance. [[spoiler:What Clo and her family didn't know, though, was that said riches came from dirty businesses. Which brings the male lead Octavio into their lives, as he's an ImpoverishedPatrician whose family was the main victim of said tricks and lost their own wealth due to them.]]
6th May '16 8:49:07 PM eowynjedi
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** The one example that might play it straight are Mrs. Elton (and Mr. Elton, who becomes rich by the marriage) in ''Literature/{{Emma}}''. She is overfamiliar and self-important and constantly brags of how wealthy her sister's family is, which drives Emma--and everyone else in Highbury society--nuts. Given that the rest of her work tends to favor the SelfMadeMan, it's safe to assume that Mrs. Elton would be obnoxious no matter how old the money was.



** Played with by Mrs Gaiter in ''Discworld/{{Hogfather}}'' whose husband made his fortune in boots and shoes. She's terrified of being seen as NouveauRiche if she doesn't know the difference between a serviette and a napkin, despite the fact a large amount of the actual nobility use neither.

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** Played with by Mrs Gaiter in ''Discworld/{{Hogfather}}'' whose husband made his fortune in boots and shoes. She's terrified of being seen as NouveauRiche if she doesn't know the difference between a serviette and a napkin, despite the fact a large amount that most of the actual nobility (at least, the ones Susan knows) don't use neither.either and rely on their dogs to deal with anything that falls to the floor.
23rd Mar '16 3:08:40 AM DeepRed
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A common method of playing with the trope -- and one more common in modern works where [[BlueBlood traditional aristocracy]] and 'OldMoney' aren't quite as revered as they used to be -- is to have the Nouveau Riche character despite their lack of 'class and breeding' be a lot more likeable and down-to-earth than the BlueBlood types, usually because they know exactly how lucky they are now and how unfortunate they were before. {{Bourgeois Bohemian}}s, with their pairing of progressive views and wealth, may be played this way. In this depiction, expect the 'class and breeding' the {{Blue Blood}}s and OldMoney types obsess over to be codewords for snobbery, arrogant entitlement and stuffy, fusty over-adherence to pointless tradition. In SlobsVersusSnobs works where it's one against the other, expect them to see the old money types as pompous, arrogant elitists who have no clue what it's like to ever have to work for and/or want for anything, and for the OldMoney to see them as crude, boorish, loudmouthed assholes who have far more money than they do dignity, taste, or basic integrity or moral character.

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A common method of playing with the trope -- and one more common in modern works where [[BlueBlood traditional aristocracy]] and 'OldMoney' aren't quite as revered as they used to be -- is to have the Nouveau Riche character despite their lack of 'class and breeding' be a lot more likeable and down-to-earth than the BlueBlood types, usually because they know exactly how lucky they are now and how unfortunate they were before. {{Bourgeois Bohemian}}s, with their pairing of progressive views and wealth, may be played this way.way if not as rivals. In this depiction, expect the 'class and breeding' the {{Blue Blood}}s and OldMoney types obsess over to be codewords for snobbery, arrogant entitlement and stuffy, fusty over-adherence to pointless tradition. In SlobsVersusSnobs works where it's one against the other, expect them to see the old money types as pompous, arrogant elitists who have no clue what it's like to ever have to work for and/or want for anything, and for the OldMoney to see them as crude, boorish, loudmouthed assholes who have far more money than they do dignity, taste, or basic integrity or moral character.
19th Mar '16 7:44:25 AM Hossmeister
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27th Feb '16 6:47:36 PM Furienna
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* In ''Literature/{{Overenskommelser}}'' by Creator/SimonaAhrnstedt, Seth becomes a [[ReconstructedTrope reconstruction]]. Many people think that he's an irritating upstart, who spends an insane amount of money on women, and the OldMoney generally despise him. And it does not help that he can mean unnecessarily mean and proud. But it soon becomes clear to the rader, that there is more depth to him than that, and in the end, [[spoiler: he becomes happily married]].

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* In ''Literature/{{Overenskommelser}}'' by Creator/SimonaAhrnstedt, Seth becomes a [[ReconstructedTrope reconstruction]]. Many people think that he's an irritating upstart, who spends an insane amount of money on women, and the OldMoney generally despise him. And it does not help that he can be mean unnecessarily mean and proud. But it soon becomes clear to the rader, that there is more depth to him than that, and in the end, [[spoiler: he becomes happily married]].
25th Feb '16 9:46:46 AM Menshevik
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* The [[UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte Bonaparte]] family were this for most of the 19th century, although they ''said'' their lineage could be traced to Italian nobility. Napoleon III made marriage offers to princesses from all over Europe, but none would ever consider the Bonapartes a 'real' noble family, so he had to settle for a much lower-rank Spanish Countess. However, part of his problem was that he lived at a time when moral standards for monarchs had become distinctly more strict than in the 18th century -- at the time he looked for a wife he had already fathered two natural children and was living with a mistress -- and that there were rumours that he was not the son of Louis Bonaparte (Napoleon's second-youngest brother), but the result of a marital indiscretion of his mother, Hortense Bonaparte née de Beauharnais (Napoleon's stepdaughter). It wasn't until the end of the 19th/start of the 20th century that other royal families began to accept them, by which time ironically they had no chance of ever being restored to the throne.

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* The [[UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte Bonaparte]] family were this for most of the 19th century, although they ''said'' their lineage could be traced to Italian nobility. Napoleon III made marriage offers to princesses from all over Europe, but none would ever consider the Bonapartes a 'real' noble family, so he had to settle for a much lower-rank Spanish Countess. However, part Part of his problem was that he lived at a time when moral standards for monarchs monarchs' private lives had become distinctly more strict stricter than in those of the 18th century -- at century[[note]] King Ludwig I of Bavaria for instance had been forced to abdicate in 1848 due to the time public's censure of his liaison with the Irish dancer Lola Montez[[/note]], and when he looked for a wife he had already fathered two natural children and was living with a mistress -- and mistress. It did not help that there were rumours rumours, fed by opponents like Creator/VictorHugo, that he was not the son of Louis Bonaparte (Napoleon's second-youngest brother), but the result of a marital indiscretion of his mother, Hortense Bonaparte née de Beauharnais (Napoleon's stepdaughter). It wasn't until the end of the 19th/start of the 20th century that other royal families began to accept them, by which time ironically they had no chance of ever being restored to the throne.



* Around 1920 the word ''Raffke'' entered the German language; derived from the verb ''raffen'' ("to snatch up") and related to ''Raffgier'' ("rapaciousness") it was applied to a sub-section of nouveaux riches, namely those who had amassed their fortunes as war profiteers during Wordl War I and by profiteering from [[UsefulNotes/WeimarGermany the political and economic crises that followed]], especially the hyper-inflation of 1923. For a while there was a spate of Raffke jokes and Creator/FritzLang once described his villain Film/DrMabuseTheGambler as a Raffke prototype.

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* Around 1920 the word ''Raffke'' entered the German language; originally a UsefulNotes/{{Berlin}} coinage derived from the verb ''raffen'' ("to snatch up") and related to ''Raffgier'' ("rapaciousness") ("rapaciousness"), it was applied to a sub-section of those nouveaux riches, namely those riches who had amassed their fortunes as war profiteers during Wordl War I and unscrupulously by profiteering from UsefulNotes/WorldWarI and [[UsefulNotes/WeimarGermany the political and economic crises that followed]], especially the hyper-inflation of 1923. For a while there was a spate of Raffke jokes and Creator/FritzLang once described his villain Film/DrMabuseTheGambler [[Film/DrMabuseTheGambler Dr. Mabuse]] as a Raffke prototype.
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