History Main / NothingIsScarier

23rd Sep '16 10:58:27 PM nombretomado
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*** Smilarly enough, CoheedAndCambria's album "In Keeping Secrets of Silent Earth: 3" album has a hidden track, which is a separate track between the aptly titled ten tracks "A Whole Lot of Nothing".

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*** Smilarly enough, CoheedAndCambria's Music/CoheedAndCambria's album "In Keeping Secrets of Silent Earth: 3" album has a hidden track, which is a separate track between the aptly titled ten tracks "A Whole Lot of Nothing".
21st Sep '16 1:59:34 PM MyFinalEdits
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* Similar to the ''Doctor Who'' example above - the classic ''[[Series/TheTwilightZone Twilight Zone]]'' episode "The Eye of the Beholder." A doctor and a nurse discuss the patient of their experimental reconstructive surgery - a woman whose face is so deformed that other people have hated and reviled her all her life. And they're preparing to ''take off the bandages'' to see if the surgery has worked. The set-up to TheReveal is so effective that it strips the rest of the episode of any possible Narm-itude.

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* Similar to the ''Doctor Who'' example above - the classic ''[[Series/TheTwilightZone Twilight Zone]]'' ''Series/TheTwilightZone'':
** The
episode "The Eye of the Beholder." A doctor and a nurse discuss the patient of their experimental reconstructive surgery - a woman whose face is so deformed that other people have hated and reviled her all her life. And they're preparing to ''take off the bandages'' to see if the surgery has worked. The set-up to TheReveal is so effective that it strips the rest of the episode of any possible Narm-itude.



* Similar to the ''Sopranos'' example above in that it's dramatic rather than scary, the ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' episode "The Body" - [[spoiler:in which Joyce's body is found]] - has very little actually happening, making it that much more depressing.
** And of course, since this is Buffy, nobody is safe from further abuse, even the fans. So it also eliminates the ''background soundtrack'' to remove the ''possible relief of tension it could provide.'' The effect is, shall we say, [[TearJerker powerful.]]
** What makes it even scarier is when Dawn [[spoiler: tries to use a spell to bring Joyce back to life]]. We see a pair of legs staggering from the cemetery, a shadow pass by the window, and the front doorknob rattling...but Dawn [[spoiler: stops the spell just as Buffy is about to open the door, so we never see Joyce's face or upper body.]] Fans have pointed out the FridgeBrilliance that arises after [[spoiler: Buffy herself comes back from the dead in a later season; she's just fine, and presumably, Joyce would have been too, which makes it all the sadder.]]

to:

* Similar to the ''Sopranos'' example above in that it's dramatic rather than scary, the The ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' episode "The Body" - [[spoiler:in which Joyce's body is found]] - has very little actually happening, making it that much more depressing.
**
depressing. And of course, since this is Buffy, nobody is safe from further abuse, even the fans. So it also eliminates the ''background soundtrack'' to remove the ''possible relief of tension it could provide.'' The effect is, shall we say, [[TearJerker powerful.]]
**
]] What makes it even scarier is when Dawn [[spoiler: tries to use a spell to bring Joyce back to life]]. We see a pair of legs staggering from the cemetery, a shadow pass by the window, and the front doorknob rattling...but Dawn [[spoiler: stops the spell just as Buffy is about to open the door, so we never see Joyce's face or upper body.]] Fans have pointed out the FridgeBrilliance that arises after [[spoiler: Buffy herself comes back from the dead in a later season; she's just fine, and presumably, Joyce would have been too, which makes it all the sadder.]]



* In an episode of ''Series/{{Bones}}'', the characters are investigating the dead body found in the middle of nowhere by a [=UFO=] hunter. The episode is known for several creepy moments, unusual for the crime drama. However, the scariest moment happens at the end, after the murder is solved. Booth and Brennan are in a field, lying on a car hood, stargazing and talking about the possibility of alien life. Suddenly, all sounds stop, even the crickets and the wind don't make a sound. Both characters are suddenly very uncomfortable. End of the episode.
** Made worse by the fact that right after this happens, Booth asks, "Did you hear that?" The viewers NEVER FIND OUT WHAT THEY HEARD.

to:

* In an episode of ''Series/{{Bones}}'', the characters are investigating the dead body found in the middle of nowhere by a [=UFO=] hunter. The episode is known for several creepy moments, unusual for the crime drama. However, the scariest moment happens at the end, after the murder is solved. Booth and Brennan are in a field, lying on a car hood, stargazing and talking about the possibility of alien life. Suddenly, all sounds stop, even the crickets and the wind don't make a sound. Both characters are suddenly very uncomfortable. End of the episode.
**
episode. Made worse by the fact that as, right after this happens, Booth asks, asks "Did you hear that?" The viewers NEVER FIND OUT WHAT THEY HEARD.



** It could be said that, in ''Firefly'', outer space qualifies for this. There was never any sound in space, you were always reminded that, outside the ship, there was nothing, and, as Jayne says in the same episode, "It's impressive what nothing can do to a man."
* In the episode "The Hounds of Baskerville" from ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'', after [[spoiler: accidentally inhaling a hallucinogenic that induces fear]], John gets locked in a lab where he hears the growls of the titular hound and desperately tries to hide by locking himself in a cage. He eventually claims he can see the hound, but the audience never does.

to:

* ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'':
** It could be said that, in ''Firefly'', outer space qualifies for this. There was never any sound in space, you were always reminded that, outside the ship, there was nothing, and, as Jayne says in the same episode, "It's impressive what nothing can do to a man."
*
In the episode "The Hounds of Baskerville" from ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'', Baskerville", after [[spoiler: accidentally inhaling a hallucinogenic that induces fear]], John gets locked in a lab where he hears the growls of the titular hound and desperately tries to hide by locking himself in a cage. He eventually claims he can see the hound, but the audience never does.



* "The Boyfriend's Death" is another example. As in the aforementioned tale, a couple is making out in the car but this time when they hear sounds outside the boy goes to investigate. He never returns. In the pitch darkness, the girl only hears an odd sound and then an irregular tapping against the top of the car. Terrified, she locks the doors, hides, and waits there through the night. The next day when the sun comes up a local sheriff arrives and tells her to get out of the car, walk to his car, and not to look back. She does look back, of course, to see [[spoiler: her boyfriend's severed head impaled on the car's CB antenna. The tapping sound was his blood dripping onto the roof of the car.]]
** In other variations, the tapping is [[spoiler: the boyfriend's foot tapping against the car roof, as he's been hanged on a tree, or a scraping sound in a similar scenario--only this time he's upside down, so the noise is made by his fingernails]]. But the scariest version of all has [[spoiler: ''the psychotic killer himself'' standing outside the car and beating the boyfriend's head against it like a drum, meaning that he could have gotten into the vehicle at any time.]]

to:

* "The Boyfriend's Death" is another example. As in the aforementioned tale, a couple is making out in the car but this time when they hear sounds outside the boy goes to investigate. He never returns. In the pitch darkness, the girl only hears an odd sound and then an irregular tapping against the top of the car. Terrified, she locks the doors, hides, and waits there through the night. The next day when the sun comes up a local sheriff arrives and tells her to get out of the car, walk to his car, and not to look back. She does look back, of course, to see [[spoiler: her boyfriend's severed head impaled on the car's CB antenna. The tapping sound was his blood dripping onto the roof of the car.]]
**
]] In other variations, the tapping is [[spoiler: the boyfriend's foot tapping against the car roof, as he's been hanged on a tree, or a scraping sound in a similar scenario--only this time he's upside down, so the noise is made by his fingernails]]. But the scariest version of all has [[spoiler: ''the psychotic killer himself'' standing outside the car and beating the boyfriend's head against it like a drum, meaning that he could have gotten into the vehicle at any time.]]
21st Sep '16 2:12:00 AM PaulA
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* In ''[[Literature/PhilipMarlowe The Little Sister]]'', the series takes an unusual turn when the conclusion has Marlowe investigating an isolated estate on a private road. The lack of traffic or people makes it eerily quiet as it is, but then even Marlowe himself [[ItsQuietTooQuiet suddenly announces something seems off.]]

to:

* In ''[[Literature/PhilipMarlowe The Little Sister]]'', ''Literature/TheLittleSister'', the series takes an unusual turn when the conclusion has Marlowe investigating an isolated estate on a private road. The lack of traffic or people makes it eerily quiet as it is, but then even Marlowe himself [[ItsQuietTooQuiet suddenly announces something seems off.]]off]].
20th Sep '16 5:46:38 AM Gravidef
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Added DiffLines:

** In other variations, the tapping is [[spoiler: the boyfriend's foot tapping against the car roof, as he's been hanged on a tree, or a scraping sound in a similar scenario--only this time he's upside down, so the noise is made by his fingernails]]. But the scariest version of all has [[spoiler: ''the psychotic killer himself'' standing outside the car and beating the boyfriend's head against it like a drum, meaning that he could have gotten into the vehicle at any time.]]


Added DiffLines:

* The story "High Beams" has a young girl driving home from some event when she notices she's being followed by a large truck. She tries to shake it, but it won't go away; occasionally, the truck driver turns on his high-beam headlights for no apparent reason. When the girl gets home and her parents call the police, the truck driver--a huge, bearded man--emerges from his vehicle with a gun and refuses to move from the driveway. The cops show up to arrest him...[[spoiler: at which point he says "Not me. Him," pointing to the girl's car. They open the back doors and find a man hiding there with a rope and a knife. It turns out that the kidnapper/rapist was hiding in the car the whole time, and the truck driver was only following her to protect her. Whenever he turned on the high beams, the man had risen up behind the girl and was preparing to attack; he dropped down when the beams shone to keep from being seen.]]
20th Sep '16 5:34:33 AM Gravidef
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** In "Death's Head Revisited," [[NaziProtagonist Gunther]] [[ForTheEvulz Lutze]] tortured his prisoners in a manner that one of his victims, Becker, described as "unspeakable". He is forced to undergo it. It's unknown what exactly he did (though the fact that he was clutching at his [[EyeScream eyes]] and groin gives us a few ideas), but the agony is so great that it causes his final descent into insanity.
** In "And When the Sky Was Opened," three astronauts return from a space mission and begin to [[CessationOfExistence disappear]] one by one--that is, their names are stricken from reports, and everyone but the astronauts, including their own parents, lose all memory of them. We ''never find out why this is happening.'' One of the astronauts briefly muses that they were supposed to die in the mission, but survived, causing the universe to [[BalancingDeathsBooks begin to balance itself]], but this fails to explain why they're outright vanishing from the fabric of reality itself.



* Similar to the ''Sopranos'' example above in that it's dramatic rather than scary, the ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' episode The Body - [[spoiler:in which Joyce's body is found]] - has very little actually happening, making it that much more depressing.

to:

* Similar to the ''Sopranos'' example above in that it's dramatic rather than scary, the ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' episode The Body "The Body" - [[spoiler:in which Joyce's body is found]] - has very little actually happening, making it that much more depressing.



** What makes it even scarier is when Dawn [[spoiler: tries to use a spell to bring Joyce back to life]]. We see a pair of legs staggering from the cemetery, a shadow pass by the window, and the front doorknob rattling...but Dawn [[spoiler: stops the spell just as Buffy is about to open the door, so we never see Joyce's face or upper body.]] Fans have pointed out the FridgeBrilliance that arises after [[spoiler: Buffy herself comes back from the dead in a later season; she's just fine, and presumably, Joyce would have been too, which makes it all the sadder.]]



** Made worse by the fact that right after this happens, Booth asks, "Did you hear that?" the viewers NEVER FIND OUT WHAT THEY HEARD.

to:

** Made worse by the fact that right after this happens, Booth asks, "Did you hear that?" the The viewers NEVER FIND OUT WHAT THEY HEARD.



* In the ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' episode Death's Head Revisited, [[NaziProtagonist Gunther]] [[ForTheEvulz Lutze]] tortured his prisoners in a manner that one of his victims, Becker, described as "unspeakable". He is forced to undergo it. It's unknown what exactly he did (though the fact that he was clutching at his [[EyeScream eyes]] and groin gives us a few ideas), but the agony is so great that it causes his final descent into insanity.
18th Sep '16 3:10:53 AM KingClark
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* ''Encyclopedia Dramatica'' features an article "Offended", a ShockSite unto its own (once you start scrolling down past the pictures of cute animals). Visit [[spoiler:the [[http://whatport80.com/Offended same article on its SFW counterpart]]]], and you'll find [[spoiler:nothing but pictures of cute animals. What, you expected those nasty, nasty things on an explicitly SFW site?]]
11th Sep '16 11:50:56 AM WillBGood
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* The premise of TheLastManHeardAKnock, the shortest horror/scifi story: "The last man in the world sits alone in a room. There was a knock at the door." Its variant has no knock, simply an ominously locked door.
11th Sep '16 11:33:04 AM WillBGood
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* Both played straight and played ''with'' in Joseph Conrad's ''Literature/HeartOfDarkness'', which ''starts out'' creepy and just gets worse from there. From the moment Charlie Marlow begins speaking (to the unnamed narrator who frames the story) he makes clear that he has learned ''something'' that destroyed his innocence, but for the longest time he won't say precisely what it was. Then, as he launches into his tale about journeying to the Congo, he alternates between building more suspense on the one hand and outright describing horrible things on the other (Fresleven's slaying, for example); the genius of it is that even the horrible things, which at worst are merely gruesome, become ''terrifying'' in the context of what is revealed later. Very early, Marlow speaks of the Congo as a "snake" that bewitched him, compelling him to take up a job on a steamer there...for reasons even he couldn't fully understand. Once he gets there, it's not too long before he starts to hear about and even see some pretty horrible things - but he tries to ignore them at first, and even though he now knows ''what'' is happening, he still doesn't know ''why''. The greatest riddle is put before him when he tries to peer into the impenetrable African jungle, noting that it looks like nothing he's ever seen in Europe, and reflecting that the immense vegetation, the humidity and the steam are together creating an atmosphere of tantalizing mystery that he simply ''must'' know about. "What was in there?" he asks himself - and also disturbingly slips into anthropomorphization when he wonders, "Would we handle [it], or [[RussianReversal would it handle]] ''[[RussianReversal us?]]"'' What Marlow eventually learns, of course, is that it's not the jungle itself that is creepy; it's [[GoMadFromTheRevelation what happens to "civilized" men when they go into the jungle]].

to:

* Both played straight and played ''with'' in Joseph Conrad's ''Literature/HeartOfDarkness'', which ''starts out'' creepy and just gets worse from there. From the moment Charlie Marlow begins speaking (to the unnamed narrator who frames the story) he makes clear that he has learned ''something'' that destroyed his innocence, but for the longest time he won't say precisely what it was. Then, as he launches into his tale about journeying to the Congo, he alternates between building more suspense on the one hand and outright describing horrible things on the other (Fresleven's slaying, for example); the genius of it is that even the horrible things, which at worst are merely gruesome, become ''terrifying'' in the context of what is revealed later. Very early, Marlow speaks of the Congo as a "snake" that bewitched him, compelling him to take up a job on a steamer there...for reasons even he couldn't fully understand. Once he gets there, it's not too long before he starts to hear about and even see some pretty horrible things - but he tries to ignore them at first, and even though he now knows ''what'' is happening, he still doesn't know ''why''. The greatest riddle is put before him when he tries to peer into the impenetrable African jungle, noting that it looks like nothing he's ever seen in Europe, and reflecting that the immense vegetation, the humidity and the steam are together creating an atmosphere of tantalizing mystery that he simply ''must'' know about. "What was in there?" he asks himself - and also disturbingly slips into anthropomorphization when he wonders, "Would we handle [it], or [[RussianReversal would it handle]] ''[[RussianReversal us?]]"'' us?]]''" What Marlow eventually learns, of course, is that it's not the jungle itself that is creepy; it's [[GoMadFromTheRevelation what happens to "civilized" men when they go into the jungle]].
11th Sep '16 11:32:49 AM WillBGood
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* Both played straight and played ''with'' in Joseph Conrad's ''Literature/HeartOfDarkness'', which ''starts out'' creepy and just gets worse from there. From the moment Charlie Marlow begins speaking (to the unnamed narrator who frames the story) he makes clear that he has learned ''something'' that destroyed his innocence, but for the longest time he won't say precisely what it was. Then, as he launches into his tale about journeying to the Congo, he alternates between building more suspense on the one hand and outright describing horrible things on the other (Fresleven's slaying, for example); the genius of it is that even the horrible things, which at worst are merely gruesome, become ''terrifying'' in the context of what is revealed later. Very early, Marlow speaks of the Congo as a "snake" that bewitched him, compelling him to take up a job on a steamer there...for reasons even he couldn't fully understand. Once he gets there, it's not too long before he starts to hear about and even see some pretty horrible things - but he tries to ignore them at first, and even though he now knows ''what'' is happening, he still doesn't know ''why''. The greatest riddle is put before him when he tries to peer into the impenetrable African jungle, noting that it looks like nothing he's ever seen in Europe, and reflecting that the immense vegetation, the humidity and the steam are together creating an atmosphere of tantalizing mystery that he simply ''must'' know about. "What was in there?" he asks himself - and also disturbingly slips into anthropomorphization when he wonders, [[RussianReversal "Would we handle [it], or would it handle]] ''[[RussianReversal us?"]]'' What Marlow eventually learns, of course, is that it's not the jungle itself that is creepy; it's [[GoMadFromTheRevelation what happens to "civilized" men when they go into the jungle]].

to:

* Both played straight and played ''with'' in Joseph Conrad's ''Literature/HeartOfDarkness'', which ''starts out'' creepy and just gets worse from there. From the moment Charlie Marlow begins speaking (to the unnamed narrator who frames the story) he makes clear that he has learned ''something'' that destroyed his innocence, but for the longest time he won't say precisely what it was. Then, as he launches into his tale about journeying to the Congo, he alternates between building more suspense on the one hand and outright describing horrible things on the other (Fresleven's slaying, for example); the genius of it is that even the horrible things, which at worst are merely gruesome, become ''terrifying'' in the context of what is revealed later. Very early, Marlow speaks of the Congo as a "snake" that bewitched him, compelling him to take up a job on a steamer there...for reasons even he couldn't fully understand. Once he gets there, it's not too long before he starts to hear about and even see some pretty horrible things - but he tries to ignore them at first, and even though he now knows ''what'' is happening, he still doesn't know ''why''. The greatest riddle is put before him when he tries to peer into the impenetrable African jungle, noting that it looks like nothing he's ever seen in Europe, and reflecting that the immense vegetation, the humidity and the steam are together creating an atmosphere of tantalizing mystery that he simply ''must'' know about. "What was in there?" he asks himself - and also disturbingly slips into anthropomorphization when he wonders, [[RussianReversal "Would we handle [it], or [[RussianReversal would it handle]] ''[[RussianReversal us?"]]'' us?]]"'' What Marlow eventually learns, of course, is that it's not the jungle itself that is creepy; it's [[GoMadFromTheRevelation what happens to "civilized" men when they go into the jungle]].
11th Sep '16 11:32:06 AM WillBGood
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* Both played straight and played ''with'' in Joseph Conrad's ''Literature/HeartOfDarkness'', which ''starts out'' creepy and just gets worse from there. From the moment Charlie Marlow begins speaking (to the unnamed narrator who frames the story) he makes clear that he has learned ''something'' that destroyed his innocence, but for the longest time he won't say precisely what it was. Then, as he launches into his tale about journeying to the Congo, he alternates between building more suspense on the one hand and outright describing horrible things on the other (Fresleven's slaying, for example); the genius of it is that even the horrible things, which at worst are merely gruesome, become ''terrifying'' in the context of what is revealed later. Very early, Marlow speaks of the Congo as a "snake" that bewitched him, compelling him to take up a job on a steamer there...for reasons even he couldn't fully understand. Once he gets there, it's not too long before he starts to hear about and even see some pretty horrible things - but he tries to ignore them at first, and even though he now knows ''what'' is happening, he still doesn't know ''why''. The greatest riddle is put before him when he tries to peer into the impenetrable African jungle, noting that it looks like nothing he's ever seen in Europe, and reflecting that the immense vegetation, the humidity and the steam are together creating an atmosphere of tantalizing mystery that he simply ''must'' know about. "What was in there?" he asks himself - and also disturbingly slips into anthropomorphization when he wonders, [[RussianReversal "Would we handle [it], or would it handle]] ''[[RussianReversal us?]]'' What Marlow eventually learns, of course, is that it's not the jungle itself that is creepy; it's [[GoMadFromTheRevelation what happens to "civilized" men when they go into the jungle]].

to:

* Both played straight and played ''with'' in Joseph Conrad's ''Literature/HeartOfDarkness'', which ''starts out'' creepy and just gets worse from there. From the moment Charlie Marlow begins speaking (to the unnamed narrator who frames the story) he makes clear that he has learned ''something'' that destroyed his innocence, but for the longest time he won't say precisely what it was. Then, as he launches into his tale about journeying to the Congo, he alternates between building more suspense on the one hand and outright describing horrible things on the other (Fresleven's slaying, for example); the genius of it is that even the horrible things, which at worst are merely gruesome, become ''terrifying'' in the context of what is revealed later. Very early, Marlow speaks of the Congo as a "snake" that bewitched him, compelling him to take up a job on a steamer there...for reasons even he couldn't fully understand. Once he gets there, it's not too long before he starts to hear about and even see some pretty horrible things - but he tries to ignore them at first, and even though he now knows ''what'' is happening, he still doesn't know ''why''. The greatest riddle is put before him when he tries to peer into the impenetrable African jungle, noting that it looks like nothing he's ever seen in Europe, and reflecting that the immense vegetation, the humidity and the steam are together creating an atmosphere of tantalizing mystery that he simply ''must'' know about. "What was in there?" he asks himself - and also disturbingly slips into anthropomorphization when he wonders, [[RussianReversal "Would we handle [it], or would it handle]] ''[[RussianReversal us?]]'' us?"]]'' What Marlow eventually learns, of course, is that it's not the jungle itself that is creepy; it's [[GoMadFromTheRevelation what happens to "civilized" men when they go into the jungle]].
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