History Main / NothingIsScarier

27th Jun '17 4:07:34 AM AmuckCricetine
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*** "The Dead Planet", the first episode of the serial "The Daleks", where the TARDIS crew explore a strange petrified jungle where everything is dead, and yet they have the feeling that something is following them. They enter a deadly-beautiful ruined city with long corridors and proportions built uncomfortably for human bodies, and begin to be aware that something ''else'' is following them. We only get to see any monsters right at the very end of the story via a ShakyPOVCam shot as it suddenly ambushes Barbara at the end of a corridor, and even then, only its hand is visible. [[NightmareRetardant Or - well - its]] [[SpecialEffectsFailure/DoctorWho plunger]].
*** "The Edge of Destruction" has no clear enemy for the first episode, with the malevolent presence represented by the TARDIS doors opening and closing and everyone on the ship going slightly mad thanks to its psychic influence. The second episode of the serial shows them actually puzzling through the problem and isn't half as scary, but the first episode is just horrifying.
*** "World's End", first episode of "The Dalek Invasion of Earth", opens with a shot of a cyborg committing suicide in a CrapsackWorld version of London where a sign informs us "it is forbidden to dump bodies into the river". The crew spend the episode wondering around, trying to imagine who or what could be responsible for the total collapse of civilisation. Then something comes out of the Thames... with its eye stalk wobbling back and forth and its plunger waving.
*** Episode 1 of "The Space Museum" has the crew caught in a TARDIS technical fault in which they are unable to interact with or see anyone, can't leave footprints, and time occasionally flows backwards or skips ahead of events they have no recollection of doing. It is very spooky and atmospheric and especially stands out when the rest of the serial is a fairly light-hearted comedy story.

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*** "The Dead Planet", the first episode of the serial "The Daleks", "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E2TheDaleks The Daleks]]", where the TARDIS crew explore a strange petrified jungle where everything is dead, and yet they have the feeling that something is following them. They enter a deadly-beautiful ruined city with long corridors and proportions built uncomfortably for human bodies, and begin to be aware that something ''else'' is following them. We only get to see any monsters right at the very end of the story via a ShakyPOVCam shot as it suddenly ambushes Barbara at the end of a corridor, and even then, only its hand is visible. [[NightmareRetardant Or - well - its]] [[SpecialEffectsFailure/DoctorWho plunger]].
*** "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E3TheEdgeOfDestruction The Edge of Destruction" Destruction]]" has no clear enemy for the first episode, with the malevolent presence represented by the TARDIS doors opening and closing and everyone on the ship going slightly mad thanks to its psychic influence. The second episode of the serial shows them actually puzzling through the problem and isn't half as scary, but the first episode is just horrifying.
*** "World's End", first episode of "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E2TheDalekInvasionOfEarth The Dalek Invasion of Earth", Earth]]", opens with a shot of a cyborg committing suicide in a CrapsackWorld version of London where a sign informs us "it is forbidden to dump bodies into the river". The crew spend the episode wondering around, trying to imagine who or what could be responsible for the total collapse of civilisation. Then something comes out of the Thames... with its eye stalk wobbling back and forth and its plunger waving.
*** Episode 1 of "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E7TheSpaceMuseum The Space Museum" Museum]]" has the crew caught in a TARDIS technical fault in which they are unable to interact with or see anyone, can't leave footprints, and time occasionally flows backwards or skips ahead of events they have no recollection of doing. It is very spooky and atmospheric and especially stands out when the rest of the serial is a fairly light-hearted comedy story.



** There's a scene near the beginning of "The Eleventh Hour" where Amy has the Doctor handcuffed and he lets slip where Prisoner Zero is hiding. She starts walking towards the door, and he's screaming at her not to open it, but she walks through anyway... the appearance of the giant piranha-eel thing suspended from the ceiling directly behind Amy's head is actually a bit of a relief compared to the empty, dusty room that's always been in your house but you've never noticed it that the Doctor is yelling to ''get out of now''.
** In "The God Complex", a HellHotel has a room that contains each visitor's greatest fear. When the Doctor finds his room, the audience doesn't see it. All we get is a dark room with the sound of the Cloister Bell (which only goes off in big emergencies) and the Doctor remarking "Of course, who else would it be?" Knowing the Doctor, whatever is on the other side may be too much for humans to comprehend. [[spoiler:In the 2013 Christmas special, we find out that it's the cracks in time from the fifth series.]]
** Used effectively (and effects-savingly) in "Cold War": Immediately after Skaldak leaves his armor, all we see is something just out of frame rushing past; later, aside from a few closeups of his face in the shadows, all we see is a pair of ''very'' large claws. Also, when Clara realizes Skaldak has abandoned his armor, she's searching all over the room without finding anything, invoking this in spades.
* While ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' is generally pretty up front with its monsters, there have been a few notable -- and scary! -- exceptions. Probably the most frightening is the Season 5 episode "Forever," where Dawn recruits Spike's assistance to bring [[spoiler:Joyce]] back from the dead. The final scene of the episode is lifted directly from the short story "The Monkey's Paw," and is equally chilling.

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** There's a scene near the beginning of "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E1TheEleventhHour The Eleventh Hour" Hour]]" where Amy has the Doctor handcuffed and he lets slip where Prisoner Zero is hiding. She starts walking towards the door, and he's screaming at her not to open it, but she walks through anyway... the appearance of the giant piranha-eel thing suspended from the ceiling directly behind Amy's head is actually a bit of a relief compared to the empty, dusty room that's always been in your house but you've never noticed it that the Doctor is yelling to ''get out of now''.
** In "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E11TheGodComplex The God Complex", Complex]]", a HellHotel has a room that contains each visitor's greatest fear. When the Doctor finds his room, the audience doesn't see it. All we get is a dark room with the sound of the Cloister Bell (which only goes off in big emergencies) and the Doctor remarking "Of course, who else would it be?" Knowing the Doctor, whatever is on the other side may be too much for humans to comprehend. [[spoiler:In the 2013 Christmas special, we find out that it's the cracks in time from the fifth series.]]
** Used effectively (and effects-savingly) in "Cold War": "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS33E8ColdWar Cold War]]": Immediately after Skaldak leaves his armor, all we see is something just out of frame rushing past; later, aside from a few closeups of his face in the shadows, all we see is a pair of ''very'' large claws. Also, when Clara realizes Skaldak has abandoned his armor, she's searching all over the room without finding anything, invoking this in spades.
* While ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' is generally pretty up front with its monsters, there have been a few notable -- and scary! -- exceptions. Probably the most frightening is the Season 5 episode "Forever," "[[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS5E17Forever}} Forever]]", where Dawn recruits Spike's assistance to bring [[spoiler:Joyce]] back from the dead. The final scene of the episode is lifted directly from the short story "The Monkey's Paw," and is equally chilling.



** There's also the season four finale "Restless" in which Xander, Willow, Giles and Buffy are hunted in their dreams by a malevolent entity that is only ever seen as a shadowy shape or a blurred, fast-moving brown thing or a shimmering, indistinct object stalking back and forth in the heat-blasted distance...
** In the notably nightmare-inducing season 4 episode "Hush", the villains-of-the-week are collecting 7 human hearts for ''something'', but we're never told what it is - which of course only serves to make the whole thing that much creepier.
** In a Season 7 episode, the Potentials are introduced to the pleasant, friendly, thoroughly non-evil demon Clem, who looks like a bald human with rather too much skin. Then he shows them his other face. All we see is various bits that fly out to the sides, from the back, and the girls all screaming, very much like a scene in Film/{{Beetlejuice}}.

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** There's also the season four finale "Restless" "[[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS4E22Restless}} Restless]]" in which Xander, Willow, Giles and Buffy are hunted in their dreams by a malevolent entity that is only ever seen as a shadowy shape or a blurred, fast-moving brown thing or a shimmering, indistinct object stalking back and forth in the heat-blasted distance...
** In the notably nightmare-inducing season 4 episode "Hush", "[[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS4E10Hush}} Hush]]", the villains-of-the-week are collecting 7 human hearts for ''something'', but we're never told what it is - which of course only serves to make the whole thing that much creepier.
** In a Season 7 episode, the Potentials are introduced to the pleasant, friendly, thoroughly non-evil demon Clem, who looks like a bald human with rather too much skin. Then he shows them his other face. All we see is various bits that fly out to the sides, from the back, and the girls all screaming, very much like a scene in Film/{{Beetlejuice}}.''Film/{{Beetlejuice}}''.



* ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' has an episode "They Keep Killing Suzie", Gwen's driving Suzie through the night. Suzie tells her that something evil is in the darkness, but it doesn't show up until a later episode.

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* ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' has an episode "They "[[{{Recap/TorchwoodS1E8TheyKeepKillingSuzie}} They Keep Killing Suzie", Suzie]]", Gwen's driving Suzie through the night. Suzie tells her that something evil is in the darkness, but it doesn't show up until a later episode.



** In "Midnight," there is...''[[EldritchAbomination something]]''... that torments the Doctor and the people he's traveling with. [[spoiler:We ''never'' find out anything about it, other than that it [[{{Deconstruction}} utterly deconstructs an ordinary Doctor Who episode]] and brings all of the Doctor's flaws to the forefront.]]
** From "The Pandorica Opens": [[spoiler: never have the words "silence will fall" been more scary. ''Even the background music stops.'']] Earlier in the same episode, we suddenly hear [[spoiler:"silence will fall"]] spoken by a hideous, rasping voice out of goddamn nowhere, just before the TARDIS is hijacked. The source of the sound, and hence the source of the tampering, is ''never shown''.
** Played with more famously in "Blink", when every time you see the Weeping Angels, people are safe. It's between these moments that they're lethal, but the audience is most frightened when everything is, for the moment, clearly fine by the story's rules.

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** In "Midnight," "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E10Midnight Midnight]]," there is...''[[EldritchAbomination something]]''... that torments the Doctor and the people he's traveling with. [[spoiler:We ''never'' find out anything about it, other than that it [[{{Deconstruction}} utterly deconstructs an ordinary Doctor Who episode]] and brings all of the Doctor's flaws to the forefront.]]
** From "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E12ThePandoricaOpens The Pandorica Opens": Opens]]": [[spoiler: never have the words "silence will fall" been more scary. ''Even the background music stops.'']] Earlier in the same episode, we suddenly hear [[spoiler:"silence will fall"]] spoken by a hideous, rasping voice out of goddamn nowhere, just before the TARDIS is hijacked. The source of the sound, and hence the source of the tampering, is ''never shown''.
** Played with more famously in "Blink", "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E10Blink Blink]]", when every time you see the Weeping Angels, people are safe. It's between these moments that they're lethal, but the audience is most frightened when everything is, for the moment, clearly fine by the story's rules.



** The concept of "the Void" as the gap which separates universes, according to the Tenth Doctor's explanation in "Army of Ghosts".

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** The concept of "the Void" as the gap which separates universes, according to the Tenth Doctor's explanation in "Army "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E12ArmyOfGhosts Army of Ghosts".Ghosts]]".



** The central premise of the episode "Listen": The Doctor tries to find out ''why'' "nothing" is so unnerving, and concludes that there is a race so effective at hiding that no-one has ever seen them. In his investigation, he finds himself in several situations where he confronts a scary "nothing", but never actually sees them. [[spoiler: Because they probably don't exist. Sometimes your imagination playing tricks on you is just your imagination playing tricks on you, even in ''Doctor Who''.]]
** There are many fans who find {{Missing Episode}}s scarier than surviving episodes thanks to this trope. Fans are occasionally forced to reevaluate a story thought of as a masterpiece of horror after the visuals are rediscovered and shown to be rather dull or [[SpecialEffectFailure poorly]] [[FightSceneFailure executed]] compared to a terrifying central concept. "Fury From the Deep", in which the seaweed monster is represented by a terrifying electronic pounding that appears in the background of scenes, is one episode that probably benefits from an audio-only reconstruction rather than viewing a slideshow of dreadful seaweed costumes and foam.
* Used very effectively in the ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' episode "Countrycide" where it seems as if aliens are kidnapping and skinning people. Made even ''more'' creepy when we learn the danger is [[spoiler: the local villagers, who kidnap strangers in order to eat them. Just because it "makes them happy". It's the ''only'' episode in the entire Whoniverse that doesn't feature anything supernatural, which is completely PlayedForDrama. Gwen suffers a full-on breakdown from the realization that humans can be worse than any alien threat she'll ever face.]]
** And yet this isn't the last time ''Torchwood'' portrays humans as worse than aliens. "Children of Earth" and "Miracle Day" both do that.

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** The central premise of the episode "Listen": "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E4Listen Listen]]": The Doctor tries to find out ''why'' "nothing" is so unnerving, and concludes that there is a race so effective at hiding that no-one has ever seen them. In his investigation, he finds himself in several situations where he confronts a scary "nothing", but never actually sees them. [[spoiler: Because they probably don't exist. Sometimes your imagination playing tricks on you is just your imagination playing tricks on you, even in ''Doctor Who''.]]
** There are many fans who find {{Missing Episode}}s scarier than surviving episodes thanks to this trope. Fans are occasionally forced to reevaluate a story thought of as a masterpiece of horror after the visuals are rediscovered and shown to be rather dull or [[SpecialEffectFailure poorly]] [[FightSceneFailure executed]] compared to a terrifying central concept. "Fury From "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS5E6FuryFromTheDeep Fury from the Deep", Deep]]", in which the seaweed monster is represented by a terrifying electronic pounding that appears in the background of scenes, is one episode that probably benefits from an audio-only reconstruction rather than viewing a slideshow of dreadful seaweed costumes and foam.
* Used very effectively in the ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' episode "Countrycide" "[[{{Recap/TorchwoodS1E6Countrycide}} Countrycide]]" where it seems as if aliens are kidnapping and skinning people. Made even ''more'' creepy when we learn the danger is [[spoiler: the local villagers, who kidnap strangers in order to eat them. Just because it "makes them happy". It's the ''only'' episode in the entire Whoniverse that doesn't feature anything supernatural, which is completely PlayedForDrama. Gwen suffers a full-on breakdown from the realization that humans can be worse than any alien threat she'll ever face.]]
** And yet this isn't the last time ''Torchwood'' portrays humans as worse than aliens. "Children of Earth" ''Series/TorchwoodChildrenOfEarth'' and "Miracle Day" ''Series/TorchwoodMiracleDay'' both do that.
20th Jun '17 9:20:18 AM IceMaster
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[[caption-width-right:320: Nothing to fear...]]]]

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[[caption-width-right:320: Nothing to fear...]]]]]]



This is a {{Horror}} trope where fear is not induced by some traumatic visual element or by a physical threat, but by the ''sole lack of event''. This is a case of rampant creepiness, associated not with what is happening, but with the general atmosphere of a scene. When properly done, it can result in one of the scariest moments. It does so for one simple reason: the author refuses to show us what is causing this scariness but we desperately wish to know what, so imagination fills in the blanks and our minds provide the content, using what the individual considers scary.

It often has to do with ''where'' the events are happening, generally because said place is just inherently scary somehow, but sometimes merely because of the way it is filmed or described.

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This is a {{Horror}} trope where fear is not isn't induced by some a traumatic visual element or by a physical threat, but by the ''sole lack of event''. This is a case of rampant creepiness, associated not with what is happening, but with the general atmosphere of a scene. When properly done, it can result in one of the scariest terrifying moments. It does so for one simple reason: the author creator refuses to show us what is what's causing this scariness horror, but we desperately wish to know what, know, so imagination fills in the blanks and our minds provide the content, using what the individual considers scary.

It often has to do with ''where'' the events are happening, generally because said place is just inherently scary somehow, scary, but sometimes merely because of the way it is filmed or described.



* The classic version, where the moment serves to build up suspense and tension, until something scary [[JumpScare suddenly jumps at you]] from [[OffscreenTeleportation nowhere]]. It has been done a million times, and is often poorly executed, ending up with the [[AttackOfTheKillerWhatever killer/monster/whatever]] apparition being ''less'' scary than the preceding sequence.[[note]]Creator/StephenKing once said that the actual presence of the "big scary thing" itself tends to be the ''cause'' of the letdown -- whatever they actually show is unlikely to be worse than what we were expecting. And even if it is, it's not going to have nearly as much impact on a viewer who's been anticipating it for the last minute or more.[[/note]] Many times, what the directors do is make the character look around with some small light source (flashlight, cellphone, camera flashes) for that [[HellIsThatNoise mystery noise]] and then suddenly turn around right when the suspense music reaches that peak. [[{{SubvertedTrope}} Of course, they sigh when they see nothing,]] [[DoubleSubversion and then they turn around again, and]] [[JumpScare WHAM!]]. Both of these methods [[CyclicTrope alternate between being the norm]] that they can still keep the tension high, even when expected.
* The full version is when there is ''really'' nothing happening, but the result can be several orders of magnitude scarier than the classic version, because the audience is left to [[PrimalFear imagine]] what ''[[YourWorstNightmare could]]'' have happened.

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* The classic version, where the moment serves to build up suspense and tension, until something scary [[JumpScare suddenly jumps at you]] from [[OffscreenTeleportation nowhere]].elsewhere]]. It has been done a million times, and is often poorly executed, ending up with the [[AttackOfTheKillerWhatever killer/monster/whatever]] apparition being ''less'' scary than the preceding sequence.[[note]]Creator/StephenKing once said that the actual presence of the "big scary thing" itself tends to be the ''cause'' of the letdown -- whatever they actually show is unlikely to be worse than what we were expecting. And even if it is, it's not going to have nearly as much impact on a viewer who's been anticipating it for the last minute or more.so.[[/note]] Many times, what the directors do is make the character look around with some small light source (flashlight, cellphone, camera flashes) for that a [[HellIsThatNoise mystery noise]] and mysterious noise]], then suddenly turn around right when the suspense music reaches that its peak. [[{{SubvertedTrope}} Of course, they sigh when they see nothing,]] [[DoubleSubversion and then they turn around again, and]] [[JumpScare WHAM!]]. Both of these methods [[CyclicTrope alternate between being the norm]] norm]], in that they can still keep the tension high, even when expected.
* The full version is when there is ''really'' really ''is'' nothing happening, but the result can be several orders of magnitude magnitudes scarier than the classic version, because the audience is left to [[PrimalFear imagine]] what ''[[YourWorstNightmare could]]'' have happened.



[[MusicalSpoiler Scary music]] can be used to reinforce the effect, but it seems to work best when there's [[QuieterThanSilence no music at all]]. The camera might slowly close in on the "nothing", either as a character musters the courage to open the door, enter the dark depths, or [[CowerPower cowers abjectly]] at the impenetrable darkness.

This trope can be used in combination with ''many'' other tropes; ThroughTheEyesOfMadness, DarknessEqualsDeath, QuieterThanSilence, LeaveTheCameraRunning, MindScrew, and ObscuredSpecialEffects are just some examples. Since the space is very, very empty, it may also appear as a part of SpaceMadness, usually as the second variant. ''Anything'' will do [[RuleOfScary as long as the result is scary]]. ParanoiaFuel is a near-must, though.

In RealLife this trope is why it's so scary to walk through even a familiar dark room by yourself, or through the woods or a secluded street at night, or why there is a promise of something after death (as opposed to CessationOfExistence, which is the ultimate nothingness) in every single religion. This is one horror trope ''everyone'' is familiar with.

And in RealLife, ''this'' is one of the reasons why the SilentTreatment is the most emotionally (and sometimes physically) damaging punishment of them all.

to:

[[MusicalSpoiler Scary music]] can Scare chords and cues]] may be used to reinforce the effect, but it seems to work best when there's [[QuieterThanSilence no music at all]]. The camera might slowly close in on the "nothing", either as a character musters the courage to open the door, enter the dark depths, or [[CowerPower cowers abjectly]] at the impenetrable darkness.

This trope can be used in combination with ''many'' several other tropes; ThroughTheEyesOfMadness, DarknessEqualsDeath, QuieterThanSilence, LeaveTheCameraRunning, MindScrew, and ObscuredSpecialEffects are just some examples. Since the space is very, very empty, it may also appear as a part of SpaceMadness, usually as the second variant. ''Anything'' Anything will do [[RuleOfScary as long as the result is scary]]. ParanoiaFuel is a near-must, though.

near-must.

In RealLife this trope is why it's so scary terrifying to walk through even a familiar dark room by yourself, or through the woods or a secluded street at night, or why there is a promise of something after death (as opposed to CessationOfExistence, which is the ultimate nothingness) in every single religion. This is one horror trope ''everyone'' is familiar with.

And in RealLife, ''this'' is one of the reasons why the SilentTreatment is the most emotionally (and sometimes physically) damaging punishment of them all.
punishment.
20th Jun '17 9:07:15 AM IceMaster
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[[caption-width-right:320:[[Nothing to fear...]]]]

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[[caption-width-right:320:[[Nothing [[caption-width-right:320: Nothing to fear...]]]]
20th Jun '17 9:06:56 AM IceMaster
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[[caption-width-right:320:[[DoubleEntendre Nothing to fear...]]]]

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[[caption-width-right:320:[[DoubleEntendre Nothing [[caption-width-right:320:[[Nothing to fear...]]]]
19th Jun '17 12:16:29 AM erforce
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* Much of the horror of the original ''Film/TheWickerMan'' film comes from this. There's no [[JumpScare Jump Scares]], no gore, no supernatural horror, [[spoiler: not even any deaths until the final scene]]; just a persistent aura of weirdness and a vague, ever-pervading sense that there's something very, very wrong with the people of Summerisle.

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* Much of the horror of the original ''Film/TheWickerMan'' film ''Film/TheWickerMan1973'' comes from this. There's no [[JumpScare Jump Scares]], no gore, no supernatural horror, [[spoiler: not even any deaths until the final scene]]; just a persistent aura of weirdness and a vague, ever-pervading sense that there's something very, very wrong with the people of Summerisle.
3rd Jun '17 11:57:17 PM Emperor_Oshron
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Added DiffLines:

** The opening of ''Film/JurassicParkIII'' takes this to its logical extreme: the incident which triggers the plot of the movie takes place when tourists Eric Kirby and Ben Hildebrand hire a parasailing service to take them close to Isla Sorna, and they have alot of fun as they glide near the island. Then, the boat towing them goes into a fog bank, they feel the line towing them being jerked around, and when the boat reemerges from the fog, all that's left of the men on it is blood spatters. We never see what kills them, and though it's implied that either ''Pteranodons'' or the ''Spinosaurus'' were responsible, ([[VoodooShark though that raises questions of its own]]) [[WordOfGod the writers themselves said that they wanted to leave it up to the viewers' imagination]].
** And in ''TheLostWorldJurassicPark'', too. Near the end of the movie, the ship carrying the adult tyrannosaur arrives earlier than expected and crashes into the docks, and it's revealed in short order that the entire crew has somehow been slaughtered with bits and pieces of them all over the place. Like in ''Jurassic Park III'', the implication that the tyrannosaur was responsible is a bit obvious but also has some holes in it, leaving the real culprit up in the air.[[note]]An earlier version of the script says that some raptors had gotten aboard the ship and they were responsible, giving credence to the massacre itself without much damage to the ship.[[/note]]
28th May '17 4:08:02 PM PeaceAndLove
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[[caption-width-right:320:Nothing to fear...]]

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[[caption-width-right:320:Nothing [[caption-width-right:320:[[DoubleEntendre Nothing to fear...]]]]]]
27th May '17 5:03:23 PM jamespolk
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* The movies Creator/ValLewton produced for RKO had (as [[ExecutiveMeddling dictated by his bosses]]) low budgets and lurid titles such as ''Film/CatPeople'', ''Bedlam'', ''Film/TheBodySnatcher'' and ''I Walked With a Zombie'', but he was able to work around those limitations to produce films that were subtle and thoughtful, and at the same time delivered the chills. He was a firm believer in the idea that what you can't see can be scarier than what you can see. The "chase" from '"Film/CatPeople'' is still taught in many Film Schools as a perfect example of the use of minimalism to create an amazing amount of terror with a horror movie.

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* The movies Creator/ValLewton produced for RKO had (as [[ExecutiveMeddling dictated by his bosses]]) low budgets and lurid titles such as ''Film/CatPeople'', ''Bedlam'', ''Film/{{Bedlam}}'', ''Film/TheBodySnatcher'' and ''I Walked With a Zombie'', ''Film/IWalkedWithAZombie'', but he was able to work around those limitations to produce films that were subtle and thoughtful, and at the same time delivered the chills. He was a firm believer in the idea that what you can't see can be scarier than what you can see. The "chase" from '"Film/CatPeople'' is still taught in many Film Schools as a perfect example of the use of minimalism to create an amazing amount of terror with a horror movie.
26th May '17 9:10:33 PM PeppertheFatboyTabby
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* In the ''Disney/TheJungleBook 1967 Disney animated version of The Jungle Book'', Shere Khan does not physically appear until two-thirds through it. Before that, he is all built up so you know how formidable he is. It is not Shere Khan himself but his reputation as a ferocious man-eater that compels the wolves to send Mowgli to the man-village.

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* In the ''Disney/TheJungleBook 1967 Disney animated version of The Jungle Book'', ''Disney/TheJungleBook'', Shere Khan does not physically appear until two-thirds through it. Before that, he is all built up so you know how formidable he is. It is not Shere Khan himself but his reputation as a ferocious man-eater that compels the wolves to send Mowgli to the man-village.
26th May '17 9:09:18 PM PeppertheFatboyTabby
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* In the 1967 Disney animated version of The Jungle Book, Shere Khan does not physically appear until two-thirds through it. Before that, he is all built up so you know how formidable he is. It is not Shere Khan himself but his reputation as a ferocious man-eater that compels the wolves to send Mowgli to the man-village.

to:

* In the ''Disney/TheJungleBook 1967 Disney animated version of The Jungle Book, Book'', Shere Khan does not physically appear until two-thirds through it. Before that, he is all built up so you know how formidable he is. It is not Shere Khan himself but his reputation as a ferocious man-eater that compels the wolves to send Mowgli to the man-village.
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