History Main / NotDrawnToScale

17th Apr '18 7:17:49 PM nombretomado
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* In ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4'', Snake's height and weight was given as 180cm and 63.8kg (5'11", ''one hundred and forty pounds''), which would be pretty badly underweight even for a man who wasn't very toned and muscular. This is all the more {{egregious}} because his height and weight was given in (the otherwise completely implausible and insane) ''VideoGame/MetalGear2SolidSnake'' as 178cm and 75kg(5'10", 165 lbs). It's a pretty sensible weight for an ''average'' man of 5'10", but not for a buff man. Muscle is much denser than fat, so muscular people tend to have a high body weight for their size. A more reasonable weight for someone as ripped as Snake would be in the range of 81-86 kg/180-190 lbs. Creator/ArnoldSchwarzenegger during TheEighties weighed over 100 kg despite -- indeed, because of -- having very little fat but plenty of muscle.

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* In ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4'', Snake's height and weight was given as 180cm and 63.8kg (5'11", ''one hundred and forty pounds''), which would be pretty badly underweight even for a man who wasn't very toned and muscular. This is all the more {{egregious}} JustForFun/{{egregious}} because his height and weight was given in (the otherwise completely implausible and insane) ''VideoGame/MetalGear2SolidSnake'' as 178cm and 75kg(5'10", 165 lbs). It's a pretty sensible weight for an ''average'' man of 5'10", but not for a buff man. Muscle is much denser than fat, so muscular people tend to have a high body weight for their size. A more reasonable weight for someone as ripped as Snake would be in the range of 81-86 kg/180-190 lbs. Creator/ArnoldSchwarzenegger during TheEighties weighed over 100 kg despite -- indeed, because of -- having very little fat but plenty of muscle.
17th Apr '18 7:16:50 PM nombretomado
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** Perhaps the most {{egregious}} example being the Mysidian HalfIdenticalTwins Palom and Porom from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV'', whose age is cited as 5. For what it's worth, the GBA remake did make their portraits look younger (probably no younger than 7-8, though).
** Another {{egregious}} example is Quistis Trepe in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII'', a Garden instructor who the manual identifies as being the ''same age'' as most of her students, which may make the school's hesitancy at her competence a little more understandable. For once, this is somewhat plot-relevant. [[spoiler:We even get to see it when the characters travel to Trabia Garden and they remember that almost all of them grew up in the same orphanage, Quistis included.]] Quistis is one year older than most of the key characters and graduated in the previous class. So the Garden was indeed a little hesitant, but not about her abilities (which were quite ample, thank you) -- it was mostly about her ''inexperience''.

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** Perhaps the most {{egregious}} JustForFun/{{egregious}} example being the Mysidian HalfIdenticalTwins Palom and Porom from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV'', whose age is cited as 5. For what it's worth, the GBA remake did make their portraits look younger (probably no younger than 7-8, though).
** Another {{egregious}} egregious example is Quistis Trepe in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII'', a Garden instructor who the manual identifies as being the ''same age'' as most of her students, which may make the school's hesitancy at her competence a little more understandable. For once, this is somewhat plot-relevant. [[spoiler:We even get to see it when the characters travel to Trabia Garden and they remember that almost all of them grew up in the same orphanage, Quistis included.]] Quistis is one year older than most of the key characters and graduated in the previous class. So the Garden was indeed a little hesitant, but not about her abilities (which were quite ample, thank you) -- it was mostly about her ''inexperience''.
9th Apr '18 8:32:49 PM nombretomado
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* A somewhat literal application of this trope: In an issue of ''Game Informer'' magazine, the creators of the newest ''RedFaction'' game have reported that the new, highly realistic physics engine, used to show the effects of damaging things, would allow the player to damage a building enough to topple it. It turned out that many of the buildings they'd designed have proven to be structurally unsound, and collapsed under their own weight shortly after being placed in the environment. Consequently, the devs have had to ''learn'' some architecture to continue work on the game.

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* A somewhat literal application of this trope: In an issue of ''Game Informer'' magazine, the creators of the newest ''RedFaction'' ''VideoGame/RedFaction'' game have reported that the new, highly realistic physics engine, used to show the effects of damaging things, would allow the player to damage a building enough to topple it. It turned out that many of the buildings they'd designed have proven to be structurally unsound, and collapsed under their own weight shortly after being placed in the environment. Consequently, the devs have had to ''learn'' some architecture to continue work on the game.
27th Feb '18 5:54:16 PM kouta
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Manga/KoiKaze'' completely subverts this. Everything is drawn to scale using techniques that ''only'' a professionally trained draftsperson who does know how to draw ink-on-linen would even recognize. The artist was showing off.
21st Jan '18 7:23:19 PM DustSnitch
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Literature/TheDivineComedy'', Dante provides some scattered measurements for places and things in Hell (such as the distance around one circle and the height of a [[OurGiantsAreBigger giant]]); from these, one can attempt to infer the overall dimensions of Hell, but the results are wildly inconsistent. But considering that it's ''Hell'', see AlienGeometries.
29th Dec '17 10:47:51 PM GiantJumboJellyfish
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** Precisely once has ''SRW'' used non-SD sprites, that being the oft-maligned ''VideoGame/ShinSuperRobotWars'' [=/=]''Super Robot Wars Neo''. The sprites were still NotDrawnToScale.

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** Precisely once has ''SRW'' used non-SD sprites, that being the oft-maligned ''VideoGame/ShinSuperRobotWars'' [=/=]''Super Robot Wars Neo''.[=/=]. The sprites were still NotDrawnToScale.
27th Nov '17 6:25:24 AM Cryoclaste
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** Possibly the worst case of this is Olimar in ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'', who is about and inch and a half tall in his native ''{{Pikmin}}'' series and yet is just barely smaller than most other characters in the roster.

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** Possibly the worst case of this is Olimar in ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'', who is about and inch and a half tall in his native ''{{Pikmin}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Pikmin}}'' series and yet is just barely smaller than most other characters in the roster.
10th Nov '17 7:46:47 AM 64SuperNintendo
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[[folder:Anime & Manga]]

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[[folder:Anime & and Manga]]
29th Aug '17 5:53:56 PM MBG
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* The ape in ''Film/KingKong1933'' ia taller in the city than on Skull Island. The life-size hand and head replicas were also not to the same scale.

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* The ape in ''Film/KingKong1933'' ia is taller in the city than on Skull Island. The life-size hand and head replicas were also not to the same scale.scale.
* When West End Games created ''TabletopGame/StarWarsD6'', they wrote up the sizes for a large number of ships and vehicles. Problem was, they basically pulled the numbers for them out of their butts, rather than attempting to scale through images (which, to be fair, they had to; it was 1987). Most early ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'' material used the RPG books as a source, which led to their rather odd sizing choices often spreading to other stories. Probably the most infamous is the sizing for the Executor, which was guessed by West End to be about eight kilometers long (compared to 1.6-kilometer Star Destroyers). This is really hard to swallow if you look at [[https://i.imgur.com/SCT6b3X.jpg any given picture]] of the Executor next to a Star Destroyer, with it easily dwarfing them at least ten times over. Executor's official length ended up changing multiple times, being sized up to 11.6 as an attempted compromise before finally being nailed down at 19 kilometers. This was stated in-universe to be the result of confusing intel; there were multiple Executor projects, some of which were fake, and some versions of the project had it being far smaller than it ended up being, which was the version that got dug up by the Rebels and distributed.
10th Jun '17 12:49:04 AM Az_Tech341
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As a general rule, the depictions of the size, age, or other aspects of characters and objects in fiction are not particularly consistent. This is in large part due to the fact that people without the right training often have a difficult time scaling how large some objects are relative to others, and considering how difficult it is to gain this kind of depth perception, it's somewhat understandable that many artists just do the best they can and don't do the research.

Clever writers will often recognize these limitations by deliberately avoiding clearly classifying character's traits like [[VagueAge age]], height, power, or minor biographical information -- these technical features seldom relate directly to the narrative so they can often get away with it. Unfortunately, if someone else involved with the production wants to use these statistics for some other facet like merchandise, they can end up being defined inaccurately anyway. For some fans this can turn into SeriousBusiness.

Contradictions arising from the implications of this trope can get involved in pretty much any facet of fiction involving [[WritersCannotDoMath math]], from DawsonCasting to [[PowerLevel bizarre tiers of superpowers]]. Sorting algorithm tropes can mitigate this to a large extent, as it avoids measuring anything objectively by instead only measuring things relative to other fictional objects. Even then, size and height is a consistent problem area, as most mundane objects do have general sizes, even if the writers forget this.

to:

As a general rule, the depictions of the size, age, or other aspects of characters and objects in fiction are not particularly consistent. This is in large part due to the fact that people without the right training often have a difficult time scaling how large some objects are relative to others, and and, considering how difficult it is to gain this kind of depth perception, it's somewhat understandable that many artists just do the best they can and don't do the research.

Clever writers will often recognize these limitations by deliberately avoiding clearly classifying character's traits like [[VagueAge age]], height, power, or minor biographical information -- these technical features seldom relate directly to the narrative so they can often get away with it. Unfortunately, if someone else involved with the production wants to use these statistics for some other facet like merchandise, they can end up being defined inaccurately anyway. For some fans fans, this can turn into SeriousBusiness.

Contradictions arising from the implications of this trope can get involved in pretty much any facet of fiction involving [[WritersCannotDoMath math]], from DawsonCasting to [[PowerLevel bizarre tiers of superpowers]]. Sorting algorithm tropes can mitigate this to a large extent, as it avoids measuring anything objectively by instead only measuring things relative to other fictional objects. Even then, size and height is are a consistent problem area, as most mundane objects do have general sizes, even if the writers forget this.
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