History Main / NotCompletelyUseless

8th Jan '18 7:05:53 PM X2X
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** ''Radiant Dawn'' makes a big deal about Micaiah's Sacrifice ability, which allows her to heal others without a staff, but in battle the ability is mostly worthless since it [[CastFromHitPoints drains Micaiah's own HP when she uses it]], and Micaiah is a SquishyWizard who's death results in a [[WeCannotGoOnWithoutYou game over]]. Since traditional healing items and staves are not hard to come by, you're usually better off using them. However the ability does have some niche use on a few select maps, since it removes all status ailments on the affected target, basically making it a free Restore staff. It also lets her get 10 exp every turn, provided that she has a wounded ally nearby and 2 or more HP. Considering Micaiah is one of the units that changes class at plot points and [[CantDropTheHero is required]] for the final chapters, you pretty much need a way to level her up to 20 while keeping her away from the fray.
** Gareth is a character example. As a combat unit, he's pretty much worthless: sure he has some of the highest Strength and physical Defence in the game... but at the point he joins (with only 2 chapters left in the game) ''all enemies use magic'' so his immense physical tanking ability is completley useless. What makes him fall under this trope though is a skill he comes with, Blood Tide. This increases the Strength and Skill of all adjacent allies by 5, a pretty significant amount, and it stacks with the one other Blood Tide user in the game (who's also somewhat useless in combat, though less so than Gareth). This ability greatly helps in taking down the penultimate boss and especially the FinalBoss, making him worth deploying for the skill alone.
** Mist in ''Path of Radiance'' is another character example. As a healer she is largely overshadowed by Rhys, who joins significantly earlier in the game several levels higher than she does, and has a much better promoted class. However, leveling Mist does give you a significant advantage on one particular map, Chapter 27-2, in which she is the only unit other than [[TheHero Ike]] you can deploy. Also, her unique build also makes her pretty much the only playable character in the game who can wield Runeswords effectively[[note]]Mist gains the ability to use swords when she promotes, but has a pitiful strength stat and so is rather terrible with them. However, Runeswords run off the magic stat instead of the strength stat, and Mist is one of only two sword-wielding character in the game with better magic than strength, the other being Elincia, who has her own custom weapon and requires lots of late-game babying to be effective[[/note]], though this is sadly considered AwesomeButImpractical for the effort involved vs. the reward. And finally, if promoted, she is one of only two characters that can move ''after'' healing (the other is Elincia, who isn't playable until nearly the end of the game), reducing the risk of getting attacked and saving the use of the rare Physic staves.
** The Nihil skill is also an example of this, one that the player had better realise before Radiant Dawn's Endgame. It's a Skill that causes the user to ignore the effects of their enemy's Skills in combat. The problem is it takes up a disproportionately huge amount of skill capacity, meaning the user won't be able to make much use of skills themself, and in ''Path of Radiance'' there simply aren't enough enemies with skills to make it worth its cost. The same is true for most of ''Radiant Dawn''... until the late-game chapters, where 90% of bosses have skills that [[ThereIsNoKillLikeOverkill essentially spell instant death if they trigger.]] Suddenly immunity to skills becomes something ''definately'' worth the capacity cost, making your few Nihil scrolls extremely valuable. Also, the FinalBoss has barriers that reflect all damage they take directly onto the attacker, making the fight extremely annoying... until you realise that this AttackReflector ability is tied to one of their ''skills''. There's a reason Ike automatically learns Nihil on promoting to his ultimate class.
* The various [[JokeItem Joke Weapons]] in ''{{VideoGame/Fire Emblem Awakening}}'' can be used where [[GoneHorriblyRight killing enemies too quickly can be hazardous]]. For example, if one of your units is hiding behind a bottleneck, enemies will usually body-block each other while trying to attack the unit, allowing you to pick them off one by one and heal the unit after each round. This doesn't work if your unit is strong enough to kill each enemy in one round, and will probably get them killed by ZergRush. Give them a crappy weapon, however, and the bottleneck strategy works again. The joke healing staff (the Kneader) also is handy for certain builds that rely on being at low-but-not-minimum HP (e.g. those using Vantage, Vengeance, and/or Miracle).
** Similarly, Bronze Weapons in ''Radiant Dawn'' and ''Fates'' are unable to critical. This is supposed to be a handicap, but as mentioned above there are times where you ''really'' don't want to get critical hits.

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** ''Radiant Dawn'' ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemRadiantDawn Radiant Dawn]]'' makes a big deal about Micaiah's Sacrifice ability, which allows her to heal others without a staff, but in battle the ability is mostly worthless since it [[CastFromHitPoints drains Micaiah's own HP when she uses it]], and Micaiah is a SquishyWizard who's death results in a [[WeCannotGoOnWithoutYou game over]]. Since traditional healing items and staves are not hard to come by, you're usually better off using them. However the ability does have some niche use on a few select maps, since it removes all status ailments on the affected target, basically making it a free Restore staff. It also lets her get 10 exp every turn, provided that she has a wounded ally nearby and 2 or more HP. Considering Micaiah is one of the units that changes class at plot points and [[CantDropTheHero is required]] for the final chapters, you pretty much need a way to level her up to 20 while keeping her away from the fray.
** Gareth is a character example. As a combat unit, he's pretty much worthless: sure he has some of the highest Strength and physical Defence in the game... but at the point he joins (with only 2 chapters left in the game) ''all enemies use magic'' so his immense physical tanking ability is completley completely useless. What makes him fall under this trope though is a skill he comes with, Blood Tide. This increases the Strength and Skill of all adjacent allies by 5, a pretty significant amount, and it stacks with the one other Blood Tide user in the game (who's also somewhat useless in combat, though less so than Gareth). This ability greatly helps in taking down the penultimate boss and especially the FinalBoss, making him worth deploying for the skill alone.
** Mist in ''Path ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemPathOfRadiance Path of Radiance'' Radiance]]'' is another character example. As a healer she is largely overshadowed by Rhys, who joins significantly earlier in the game several levels higher than she does, and has a much better promoted class. However, leveling Mist does give you a significant advantage on one particular map, Chapter 27-2, in which she is the only unit other than [[TheHero Ike]] you can deploy. Also, her unique build also makes her pretty much the only playable character in the game who can wield Runeswords effectively[[note]]Mist effectively [[note]]Mist gains the ability to use swords when she promotes, but has a pitiful strength stat and so is rather terrible with them. However, Runeswords run off the magic stat instead of the strength stat, and Mist is one of only two sword-wielding character in the game with better magic than strength, the other being Elincia, who has her own custom weapon and requires lots of late-game babying to be effective[[/note]], though this is sadly considered AwesomeButImpractical for the effort involved vs. the reward. And finally, if promoted, she is one of only two characters that can move ''after'' healing (the other is Elincia, who isn't playable until nearly the end of the game), reducing the risk of getting attacked and saving the use of the rare Physic staves.
** The Nihil skill is also an example of this, one that the player had better realise before Radiant Dawn's Endgame. It's a Skill that causes the user to ignore the effects of their enemy's Skills in combat. The problem is it takes up a disproportionately huge amount of skill capacity, meaning the user won't be able to make much use of skills themself, and in ''Path of Radiance'' there simply aren't enough enemies with skills to make it worth its cost. The same is true for most of ''Radiant Dawn''... until the late-game chapters, where 90% of bosses have skills that [[ThereIsNoKillLikeOverkill essentially spell instant death if they trigger.]] Suddenly immunity to skills becomes something ''definately'' ''definitely'' worth the capacity cost, making your few Nihil scrolls extremely valuable. Also, the FinalBoss has barriers that reflect all damage they take directly onto the attacker, making the fight extremely annoying... until you realise that this AttackReflector ability is tied to one of their ''skills''. There's a reason Ike automatically learns Nihil on promoting to his ultimate class.
* The various [[JokeItem Joke Weapons]] in ''{{VideoGame/Fire Emblem Awakening}}'' ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening'' can be used where [[GoneHorriblyRight killing enemies too quickly can be hazardous]]. For example, if one of your units is hiding behind a bottleneck, enemies will usually body-block each other while trying to attack the unit, allowing you to pick them off one by one and heal the unit after each round. This doesn't work if your unit is strong enough to kill each enemy in one round, and will probably get them killed by ZergRush. Give them a crappy weapon, however, and the bottleneck strategy works again. The joke healing staff (the Kneader) also is handy for certain builds that rely on being at low-but-not-minimum HP (e.g. those using Vantage, Vengeance, and/or Miracle).
** Similarly, Bronze Weapons in ''Radiant Dawn'' and ''Fates'' ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemFates Fates]]'' are unable to critical. This is supposed to be a handicap, but as mentioned above there are times where you ''really'' don't want to get critical hits.



*** The Ice Arrows are surprisingly useful against Bongo Bongo. Their freezing effect can be used to distract the hands, letting you get a shot at the eye. They are also useful in a particular room in the Spirit Temple, where the player has to trick an Armos Knight into landing on a switch at the end of its rampage. An Ice Arrow can force it to stop on that switch at any time during its attack period. Lastly, there is a programming quirk where any enemy that can be frozen is damaged twice when shot with an Ice Arrow, which makes them a one-hit-kill on the infamous Like-Likes.

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*** The Ice Arrows are surprisingly useful against Bongo Bongo. Their freezing effect can be used to distract the hands, letting you get a shot at the eye. They are also useful in a particular room in the Spirit Temple, where the player has to trick an Armos Knight into landing on a switch at the end of its rampage. An Ice Arrow can force it to stop on that switch at any time during its attack period. Lastly, there is a programming quirk where any enemy that can be frozen is damaged twice when shot with an Ice Arrow, which makes them a one-hit-kill OneHitKill on the infamous Like-Likes.



* In ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor,'' the fifth boss, Cortez, summons a ''gigantic'' horde of flying swords to attack the player when he's in his third form. The swords do massive damage each turn, and are considered both aerial enemies and spiked enemies--meaning that only very certain special moves hold any chance of damaging them and thus removing them from the fight. ...Unless, of course, you use Flurrie's Gale Force move, which instantly blows any aerial enemies away from the battle.

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* In ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor,'' ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor'', the fifth boss, Cortez, summons a ''gigantic'' horde of flying swords to attack the player when he's in his third form. The swords do massive damage each turn, and are considered both aerial enemies and spiked enemies--meaning that only very certain special moves hold any chance of damaging them and thus removing them from the fight. ...Unless, of course, you use Flurrie's Gale Force move, which instantly blows any aerial enemies away from the battle.



* The ''Franchise/YuGiOh'' card [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Heavy_Slump Heavy Slump]] seems completely useless, since its effect requires your opponent to have 8 cards in their hand, which is extraordinarily rare - in fact, one of the basic rules of the game is that players cannot have more than 6 cards in their hand when they end their turn, and it's quite rare for this rule to come into play in the first place. Then you play the video game ''Over the Nexus'', and ThatOneBoss decides to be a [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard cheating bastard]] and start the duel with 10 cards. Opening with this card turns a nightmare into a cakewalk.
* The Eden colony from ''{{VideoGame/Outpost 2}}'' can develop a system for shooting down incoming meteors using high energy particle beams combined with an observatory, which is pretty cool, except [[CoolButInefficient the energy and staff requirements to maintain it are surprisingly high]]. Meteors don't do much damage to begin with, so it's easier and cheaper to simply repair any buildings that happen to be hit. This changes in the final mission of Eden's campaign, where Plymouth improvises a devastating EMP missile using their space launchers, and Eden's meteor defense system can be similarly repurposed to destroy them.
* ''VideoGame/ZombiesAteMyNeighbors'' is ''built'' around this trope. You are given tons of seemingly worthless weapons alongside the few intuitively useful ones, but as it turns out, every single weapon in the game will [[OneHitKill One-Shot]] (or at least be extremely powerful) against at least one kind of enemy. Some are obvious, like using silverware against werewolves or the freezing fire-extinguisher on the blobs, while things like using tomatoes against martians or the martian bubble gun against the ants [[GuideDangIt aren't so clear]].
* The Monography Gun from ''VideoGame/RogueGalaxy''. What does it do? It creates platforms to stand on. When do you use it? The WakeUpCallBoss, [[spoiler: after freezing the waterfall on Juraika and the first stage of the final boss.]] You don't need to use it again after that and all it does is take up inventory space. Oh, and if you jump on a platform [[GoombaStomp floating over an enemy]] it deals a PercentDamageAttack which makes it useful when fighting Mimics.

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* The ''Franchise/YuGiOh'' card [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Heavy_Slump Heavy Slump]] seems completely useless, since its effect requires your opponent to have 8 cards in their hand, which is extraordinarily rare - -- in fact, one of the basic rules of the game is that players cannot have more than 6 cards in their hand when they end their turn, and it's quite rare for this rule to come into play in the first place. Then you play the video game ''Over the Nexus'', and ThatOneBoss decides to be a [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard cheating bastard]] and start the duel with 10 cards. Opening with this card turns a nightmare into a cakewalk.
* The Eden colony from ''{{VideoGame/Outpost ''VideoGame/{{Outpost 2}}'' can develop a system for shooting down incoming meteors using high energy particle beams combined with an observatory, which is pretty cool, except [[CoolButInefficient the energy and staff requirements to maintain it are surprisingly high]]. Meteors don't do much damage to begin with, so it's easier and cheaper to simply repair any buildings that happen to be hit. This changes in the final mission of Eden's campaign, where Plymouth improvises a devastating EMP missile using their space launchers, and Eden's meteor defense system can be similarly repurposed to destroy them.
* ''VideoGame/ZombiesAteMyNeighbors'' is ''built'' around this trope. You are given tons of seemingly worthless weapons alongside the few intuitively useful ones, but as it turns out, every single weapon in the game will [[OneHitKill One-Shot]] one-shot]] (or at least be extremely powerful) against at least one kind of enemy. Some are obvious, like using silverware against werewolves or the freezing fire-extinguisher on the blobs, while things like using tomatoes against martians or the martian bubble gun against the ants [[GuideDangIt aren't so clear]].
* The Monography Gun from ''VideoGame/RogueGalaxy''. What does it do? It creates platforms to stand on. When do you use it? The WakeUpCallBoss, [[spoiler: after [[spoiler:after freezing the waterfall on Juraika and the first stage of the final boss.]] boss]]. You don't need to use it again after that and all it does is take up inventory space. Oh, and if you jump on a platform [[GoombaStomp floating over an enemy]] it deals a PercentDamageAttack which makes it useful when fighting Mimics.



* ''VideoGame/BravelySecond'' lets you buy the Spirit Magic scroll "Spirit" in Florem, allowing you to inflict non-elemental damage with your magic attacks, but at a low power level compared to the likes of [[DeathFromAbove Comet and Meteor]]. Considering how just about everything you encounter is either a humanoid or is weak to some element, this sounds pretty pathetic. ...And then you run into Vucub Caquix, who has the ability to [[ElementalAbsorption absorb]] ''every element'' in the game. Guess what your Spellcrafters are going to be using? [[note]]Also, at least on the first playthrough, you can't encounter Khamer, and thus get the Time Mage job which offers Comet and Meteor, until after Vucub Caquix is destroyed.[[/note]]

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* ''VideoGame/BravelySecond'' lets you buy the Spirit Magic scroll "Spirit" in Florem, allowing you to inflict non-elemental damage with your magic attacks, but at a low power level compared to the likes of [[DeathFromAbove Comet and Meteor]]. Considering how just about everything you encounter is either a humanoid or is weak to some element, this sounds pretty pathetic. ... And then you run into Vucub Caquix, who has the ability to [[ElementalAbsorption absorb]] ''every element'' in the game. Guess what your Spellcrafters are going to be using? [[note]]Also, at least on the first playthrough, you can't encounter Khamer, and thus get the Time Mage job which offers Comet and Meteor, until after Vucub Caquix is destroyed.[[/note]]



** The move Hidden Power is a move that, depending on the Pokémon, can be any type and (prior to Gen VI) any level of power from 30 to 70. The exact specifics are [[GuideDangIt a tricky thing to understand]] and the move itself isn't especially useful, but for many Pokémon, Hidden Power is their best/only counter to certain threats (Grass-types, for instance, love using a Fire-type Hidden Power to counter Steel-types that resist all their attacks).

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** The move Hidden Power is a move that, depending on the Pokémon, can be any type and (prior to Gen VI) any level of power from 30 to 70. The exact specifics are [[GuideDangIt a tricky thing to understand]] and the move itself isn't especially useful, but for many Pokémon, Hidden Power is their best/only counter to certain threats (Grass-types, (Grass types, for instance, love using a Fire-type Hidden Power to counter Steel-types that resist all their attacks).



* ''Videogame/BreathofFire3'' had the backhand ability you could learn from one of the earliest masters. It did normal damage but wouldn't inflict lethal damage, thus making it pointless in most fights. However, you have to know the move to be able to unlock the spell for one-hit-killing undead enemies which is very useful in several late game battles and makes the first post-timeskip boss a joke. It is also highly useful in the "Train Boyd" minigame as he gains defense per blocked hit and will always block at low hp, so you can just backhand him to untouchable defense in about 3 nights.

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* ''Videogame/BreathofFire3'' ''VideoGame/BreathOfFire3'' had the backhand ability you could learn from one of the earliest masters. It did normal damage but wouldn't inflict lethal damage, thus making it pointless in most fights. However, you have to know the move to be able to unlock the spell for one-hit-killing undead enemies which is very useful in several late game battles and makes the first post-timeskip boss a joke. It is also highly useful in the "Train Boyd" minigame as he gains defense per blocked hit and will always block at low hp, so you can just backhand him to untouchable defense in about 3 nights.



[[folder: Non-Video Games]]

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[[folder: Non-Video [[folder:Non-Video Games]]
2nd Jan '18 10:00:12 AM EricSwan
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** The 'Mental Block' perk is completely useless [[spoiler:up until the battle with the main villain of the game, when the perk grants the player complete immunity against the villain's psychic attacks.]]
31st Dec '17 6:58:43 PM HiddenInTheTruth
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*''Videogame/BreathofFire3'' had the backhand ability you could learn from one of the earliest masters. It did normal damage but wouldn't inflict lethal damage, thus making it pointless in most fights. However, you have to know the move to be able to unlock the spell for one-hit-killing undead enemies which is very useful in several late game battles and makes the first post-timeskip boss a joke. It is also highly useful in the "Train Boyd" minigame as he gains defense per blocked hit and will always block at low hp, so you can just backhand him to untouchable defense in about 3 nights.
12th Dec '17 9:15:03 AM Coolnut
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** Mist in ''Path of Radiance'' is another character example. As a healer she is largely overshadowed by Rhys, who joins significantly earlier in the game several levels higher than she does, and has a much better promoted class. However, leveling Mist does give you a significant advantage on one particular map, Chapter 27-2, in which she is the only unit other than [[TheHero Ike]] you can deploy. Her unique build also makes her pretty much the only playable character in the game who can wield Runeswords effectively[[note]]Mist gains the ability to use swords when she promotes, but has a pitiful strength stat and so is rather terrible with them. However, Runeswords run off the magic stat instead of the strength stat, and Mist is one of only two sword-wielding character in the game with better magic than strength, the other being Elincia, who has her own custom weapon and requires lots of late-game babying to be effective[[/note]], though this is sadly considered AwesomeButImpractical for the effort involved vs. the reward.

to:

** Mist in ''Path of Radiance'' is another character example. As a healer she is largely overshadowed by Rhys, who joins significantly earlier in the game several levels higher than she does, and has a much better promoted class. However, leveling Mist does give you a significant advantage on one particular map, Chapter 27-2, in which she is the only unit other than [[TheHero Ike]] you can deploy. Her Also, her unique build also makes her pretty much the only playable character in the game who can wield Runeswords effectively[[note]]Mist gains the ability to use swords when she promotes, but has a pitiful strength stat and so is rather terrible with them. However, Runeswords run off the magic stat instead of the strength stat, and Mist is one of only two sword-wielding character in the game with better magic than strength, the other being Elincia, who has her own custom weapon and requires lots of late-game babying to be effective[[/note]], though this is sadly considered AwesomeButImpractical for the effort involved vs. the reward. And finally, if promoted, she is one of only two characters that can move ''after'' healing (the other is Elincia, who isn't playable until nearly the end of the game), reducing the risk of getting attacked and saving the use of the rare Physic staves.
2nd Dec '17 10:26:46 PM Minishear
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* ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaDawnOfSorrow Dawn of Sorrow]]'' has a similar use for the Imp soul, which temporarily effectively switches ''all'' enemies' HP and MP. Iron Golem, once again, has thousands of HP and about 15 MP. The multi-hit LethalJokeWeapon Terror Bear (which, like its name implies, is a stuffed bear filled with iron sand which Soma swings by holding one of its arms) makes it even easier.

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* ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaDawnOfSorrow Dawn of Sorrow]]'' has a similar use for the Imp soul, which temporarily effectively switches ''all'' enemies' HP and MP. Iron Golem, once again, has thousands of more HP and about 15 than MP. The multi-hit LethalJokeWeapon Terror Bear (which, like its name implies, is a stuffed bear filled with iron sand which Soma swings by holding one of its arms) makes it even easier.
29th Nov '17 7:12:02 PM darkabomination
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* The Grail Sphere [[LimitBreak S-Craft]] from ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfHeroesTrailsInTheSky''. It protects anyone within range from any one attack, Art, or Craft (two at 200 CP). While this sounds useful on paper, Kevin has several good healing and support Crafts that'll keep your party going, and his Orbment setup by default in ''SC'' is built for distance healing anyway. Plus, the Earth Guard/Wall Arts can do the exact same thing for 70 EP which is pretty small after the first third of the game. There is however, one scenario where this could very well save you from a TotalPartyKill. When you
fight [[spoiler:Renne]], she'll immediately start the battle with her S-Break, which has a 50% chance of inflicting [[OneHitKO Deathblow]], on top of hitting all of the party and does heavy damage in its own right (even with anti-Deathblow accessories). But if you mash Kevin's S-Craft half a second before she does, you'll NoSell it. The same applies in [[spoiler:her rematch, and the showdown with Loewe.]]

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* The Grail Sphere [[LimitBreak S-Craft]] from ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfHeroesTrailsInTheSky''. It protects anyone within range from any one attack, Art, or Craft (two at 200 CP). While this sounds useful on paper, Kevin has several good healing and support Crafts that'll keep your party going, and his Orbment setup by default in ''SC'' is built for distance healing anyway. Plus, the Earth Guard/Wall Arts can do the exact same thing for 70 EP which is pretty small cheap after the first third of the game. There is however, one scenario where this could very well save you from a TotalPartyKill. When you
you fight [[spoiler:Renne]], she'll immediately start the battle with her S-Break, which has a 50% chance of inflicting [[OneHitKO Deathblow]], on top of hitting all of the party and does doing heavy damage in its own right (even with anti-Deathblow accessories). But if you mash Kevin's S-Craft half a second before she does, you'll he'll NoSell it. The same applies in [[spoiler:her rematch, and the showdown with Loewe.]]
29th Nov '17 7:07:20 PM darkabomination
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Added DiffLines:

* The Grail Sphere [[LimitBreak S-Craft]] from ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfHeroesTrailsInTheSky''. It protects anyone within range from any one attack, Art, or Craft (two at 200 CP). While this sounds useful on paper, Kevin has several good healing and support Crafts that'll keep your party going, and his Orbment setup by default in ''SC'' is built for distance healing anyway. Plus, the Earth Guard/Wall Arts can do the exact same thing for 70 EP which is pretty small after the first third of the game. There is however, one scenario where this could very well save you from a TotalPartyKill. When you
fight [[spoiler:Renne]], she'll immediately start the battle with her S-Break, which has a 50% chance of inflicting [[OneHitKO Deathblow]], on top of hitting all of the party and does heavy damage in its own right (even with anti-Deathblow accessories). But if you mash Kevin's S-Craft half a second before she does, you'll NoSell it. The same applies in [[spoiler:her rematch, and the showdown with Loewe.]]
16th Oct '17 12:34:08 AM Abodos
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** Also in the Prime series, the hazard proximity bar in the HUD is generally considered a pointless aesthetic touch. But during certain boss fights like the Omega Pirate, Dark Samus 1, and Emperor Ing, it becomes incredibly useful for letting you know when you're dangerously close to a pool of Phazon, for example, since you can't see where you're strafing or backing away while locked on to the boss.
** Seeker Missiles are generally ignored aside from opening certain doors. However they turn out to be exceedingly useful for taking out the tentacles of Emperor Ing's first form. And in ''Prime 3'' their ability to lock 5 missiles onto a single enemy provide a semi-decent replacement for the absent Super Missiles or beam combos, and at least don't cost health unlike Hyper Missiles.

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** Also in the Prime series, ''VideoGame/MetroidPrimeTrilogy'', the hazard proximity bar in the HUD is generally considered a pointless aesthetic touch. But during certain boss fights like the Omega Pirate, Pirate in the first game and Dark Samus 1, 1 and Emperor Ing, Ing in ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime2Echoes'', it becomes incredibly useful for letting you know when you're dangerously close to a pool of Phazon, for example, since you can't see where you're strafing or backing away while locked on to the boss.
** Seeker Missiles are generally ignored aside from opening certain doors. However they turn out to be exceedingly useful for taking out the tentacles of Emperor Ing's first form. And in ''Prime 3'' ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime3Corruption'' their ability to lock 5 missiles onto a single enemy provide a semi-decent replacement for the absent Super Missiles or beam combos, and at least don't cost health unlike Hyper Missiles.
22nd Aug '17 4:26:51 AM Pr1A
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** The Bloody Mess -perk in ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' gives you a rather negligible 5% boost to all damage while also greatly increasing the probability to cause dismemberment. In the base game, the latter effect is almost completely visual aside of the Three-Card Bounty -quest where it's actually detrimental since you must avoid damaging the Fiend leaders' heads too much when killing them to get the best reward. However, the perk is quite useful against the Ghost People in the Dead Money DLC as dismembering them is the only way to kill them for good.

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** The Bloody Mess -perk in ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' gives you a rather negligible 5% boost to all damage while also greatly increasing the probability to cause of causing dismemberment. In the base game, the latter effect is almost completely visual aside of the Three-Card Bounty -quest where it's actually detrimental since you must avoid damaging the Fiend leaders' heads too much when killing them to get the best reward. However, the perk is quite useful against the Ghost People in the Dead Money DLC as dismembering them is the only way to kill them for good.
22nd Aug '17 4:25:11 AM Pr1A
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** The Bloody Mess -perk in ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' gives you a rather negligible 5% boost to all damage while also greatly increasing the probability to cause dismemberment. In the base game, the latter effect is almost completely visual aside of the Three-Card Bounty -quest where it's actually detrimental since you must avoid damaging the Fiend leaders' heads too much when killing them to get the best reward. However, the perk is quite useful against the Ghost People in the Dead Money DLC as dismembering them is the only way to kill them for good.
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