History Main / NotCompletelyUseless

17th Feb '17 11:17:13 AM Chabal2
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* ''DragonQuestIX'': The Have A Ball and Thunder Thrust skills allow you to fire eight weak attacks at random / have a 50/50 chance of scoring a critical or missing outright. Neither are exactly reliable in regular battles, until you realize it can do 1-8 damage to a MetalSlime (Metal Slash, the move that is designed to reliably do damage to metal monsters, does 1-2 per turn) or kill one outright (''if'' it hits).

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* ''DragonQuestIX'': ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIX'':
**
The Have A Ball and Thunder Thrust skills allow you to fire eight weak attacks at random / have a 50/50 chance of scoring a critical or missing outright. Neither are exactly reliable in regular battles, battles against more than one enemy, until you realize it can do 1-8 damage to a MetalSlime (Metal Slash, the move that is designed to reliably do damage to metal monsters, does 1-2 per turn) or kill one outright (''if'' it hits).


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** The Treasure Eye Land skill causes all red chests and stairs to show up on the minimap. Sounds useful, but it only detects red (non-respawning chests), making it completely useless in grottoes, which is where most endgame action happens. The only saving grace is showing where the stairs to the next floor is (and even then, often it's still not in the same map sector as you are).
10th Feb '17 4:03:41 PM SpinAttaxx
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* In ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'', the move Splash is completely useless; all it does is make the user flop around helplessly. However, as of ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'', the Normalium Z item can be used once per battle to upgrade it to Z-Splash, which raises the user's physical attack by ''three stages'' in one turn. Few other moves can raise a stat that much, and none of them are as widely available as Splash is. This once-useless attack is now a viable choice in TournamentPlay.

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* In ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'', the ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'':
** The
move Splash is completely useless; all it does is make the user flop around helplessly. However, as of ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'', the Normalium Z item can be used once per battle to upgrade it to Z-Splash, which raises the user's physical attack by ''three stages'' in one turn. Few other moves can raise a stat that much, and none of them are as widely available as Splash is. This once-useless attack is now a viable choice in TournamentPlay.TournamentPlay.
** Techno Blast, even after its power was increased in Gen VI, isn't that great owing to its reliance on a hold item to change types. However, the Douse Drive is arguably the best Drive to use, since it's Genesect's only learnable Water-type move outside of Hidden Power, and since it also can't learn Rock- or Ground-type moves, it's the ''only'' counter it has for Fire-types (to which [[WeakToFire it has a double weakness]]).
** The Rhyhorn line has Rock Head for an Ability, which prevents recoil damage. This would be useful... if they knew any moves that did recoil damage beyond Take Down. However, in ''[=FireRed/LeafGreen=]'' they can learn the more powerful Double-Edge via Move Tutors, and when evolvng into Rhyperior, Rock Head becomes Solid Rock, which reduces the damage done by its ([[KryptoniteIsEverywhere many]]) weaknesses by a quarter.
** The Starmie line has Analytic for its Hidden Ability, which increases their Special Attack if they move last. Being {{Fragile Speedster}}s, this isn't too useful... though the opponent switching makes Starmie move last, and since humans are more likely to switch than the AI, Starmie can be pretty dangerous with it in [=PvP=] matches.
** Hyper Beam [[CoolButInefficient is a very powerful move, but it forces the user to recharge the next turn]], so it isn't used by a lot of players. There are a few Pokémon that can use it effectively, though. Porygon-Z has an incredibly high Special Attack stat, gets additional damage from it due to STAB, can have Adaptability to boost said STAB bonus from x1.5 to x2, and on top of that, it can learn Nasty Plot to sharply boost its Special Attack. A Hyper Beam from a Porygon-Z '''hurts.''' Mega Pidgeot can also do a hefty amount of damage with it thanks to its high Special Attack, STAB, and No Guard [[AlwaysAccurateAttack to ensure Hyper Beam never misses]].
14th Dec '16 4:11:02 PM HarmoniousFusion
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* In ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'', the move Splash is completely useless; all it does is make the user flop around helplessly. However, as of ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'', the Normalium Z item can be used once per battle to upgrade it to Z-Splash, which raises the user's physical attack by ''three stages'' in one turn. Few other moves can raise a stat that much, and none of them are as widely available as Splash is. This once-useless attack is now a viable choice in TournamentPlay.
13th Dec '16 9:22:16 AM DracoKanji
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* In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'':
** The Ice Arrows are surprisingly useful against Bongo Bongo. Their freezing effect can be used to distract the hands, letting you get a shot at the eye. They are also useful in a particular room in the Spirit Temple, where the player has to trick an Armos Knight into landing on a switch at the end of its rampage. An Ice Arrow can force it to stop on that switch at any time during its attack period. Lastly, there is a programming quirk where any enemy that can be frozen is damaged twice when shot with an Ice Arrow, which makes them a one-hit-kill on the infamous Like-Likes.
** The Deku Nuts as well: They're probably forgotten about by the time you beat the Deku Tree, but they make Jabu Jabu's belly a cakewalk. They'll instantly kill ''every bubble enemy in the room'', stun those annoying jellyfish (Which you can't otherwise harm until you find the boomerang), and will force the jet-ray creatures out of the ground so you can get the drop on them. They're also handy as an adult when fighting Blue Bubbles.
** The broken Giant's Knife is ''intentionally'' meant to be useless, but it tears [[ThatOneBoss Dark Link]] to shreds since he is programmed to block against it as if it were still the full blade.



* In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'', the final boss can be distracted by the Fishing Rod, leaving him vulnerable to attacks. Of course, the Fishing Rod is only needed for two small plot hurdles, so many players would have likely forgotten about it by the time they reached the final boss, and since it has no offensive capabilities whatsoever, the few who did remember wouldn't normally think to equip it for the fight.

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* ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'':
** In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'':
*** The Ice Arrows are surprisingly useful against Bongo Bongo. Their freezing effect can be used to distract the hands, letting you get a shot at the eye. They are also useful in a particular room in the Spirit Temple, where the player has to trick an Armos Knight into landing on a switch at the end of its rampage. An Ice Arrow can force it to stop on that switch at any time during its attack period. Lastly, there is a programming quirk where any enemy that can be frozen is damaged twice when shot with an Ice Arrow, which makes them a one-hit-kill on the infamous Like-Likes.
*** The Deku Nuts as well: They're probably forgotten about by the time you beat the Deku Tree, but they make Jabu Jabu's belly a cakewalk. They'll instantly kill ''every bubble enemy in the room'', stun those annoying jellyfish (Which you can't otherwise harm until you find the boomerang), and will force the jet-ray creatures out of the ground so you can get the drop on them. They're also handy as an adult when fighting Blue Bubbles.
*** The broken Giant's Knife is ''intentionally'' meant to be useless, but it tears [[ThatOneBoss Dark Link]] to shreds since he is programmed to block against it as if it were still the full blade.
**
In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'', the final boss can be distracted by the Fishing Rod, leaving him vulnerable to attacks. Of course, the Fishing Rod is only needed for two small plot hurdles, so many players would have likely forgotten about it by the time they reached the final boss, and since it has no offensive capabilities whatsoever, the few who did remember wouldn't normally think to equip it for the fight.fight.
** Similarly, ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword'' lets you distract the boss with the bug net. It is otherwise used only for catching bugs and fairies.
26th Nov '16 5:11:00 AM AlexFullmoon
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** Another example is using items as so-called rift fodder. The Rift, location leading to a certain library, requires very high Climbing skill, as well as luck, to get down safely. Failing luck check (and in past builds it was bugged to almost always fail) will result in, among other things, destruction of up to hundreds items in your inventory. Usual way for dealing with this consists in filling inventory with cheap, light, useless items - arrows for non-archers, identified scrolls and potions with negative properties, etc. Considering relative rarity and potential ''usefulness'' of potion of uselessness, it is actually often excluded from rift fodder.
16th Nov '16 7:24:25 PM Gingerkitteh
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** Yuna's Nul-spells, a low-cost spell that hits the entire party and will protect them from one attack that matches the nulled element ([=NulBlaze=] will protect you from fire, [=NulTide=] will protect you from water, et cetera), are considered useless by some players. However, they can be very handy indeed when you know exactly what kind of elements are coming. Flans and Elements, in particular, will attack with specific elements, and if you cast the appropriate Nul- spell in time you won't be hurt at all. They're also very helpful the first time you fight Seymour, since he repeatedly casts each elemental spell in a specific order. If you know what's coming next (and the Sensor ability will explain the sequence to you), you can make what would be ThatOneBoss much more bearable.

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** Yuna's Nul-spells, a low-cost spell that hits the entire party and will protect them from one attack that matches the nulled element ([=NulBlaze=] will protect you from fire, [=NulTide=] will protect you from water, et cetera), are considered useless by some players. However, they can be very handy indeed when you know exactly what kind of elements are coming. Flans and Elements, Elementals, in particular, will attack with specific elements, and if you cast the appropriate Nul- spell in time you won't be hurt at all. They're also very helpful the first time you fight Seymour, since he repeatedly casts each elemental spell in a specific order. If you know what's coming next (and the Sensor ability will explain the sequence to you), you can make what would be ThatOneBoss much more bearable.
16th Nov '16 7:23:16 PM Gingerkitteh
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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX'' has Ipsen's Castle, a dungeon where stairs and ceilings swap places, and your current weapons inflict ScratchDamage. Most of the treasures you find here are the lousy starter weapons for your party that they came with. This, along with the general "reversal" theme, is a clue that that's what you should be using, as weapons do ''more'' damage the ''weaker'' they are, making your starter weapons not useless after all.

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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX'' has Ipsen's Castle, a dungeon where stairs and ceilings swap places, and your current weapons inflict ScratchDamage. Most of the treasures you find here are the lousy starter weapons for your party that they came with. This, along with the general "reversal" theme, is a clue that that's what you should be using, as weapons do ''more'' damage the ''weaker'' they are, making your starter weapons not useless after all. (Magic is unaffected by the reversal rules, sadly.)
16th Nov '16 6:01:39 PM Gingerkitteh
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**** In the case of FFIX, multi-targeting magic reduces its output by half. Still works out well when used against 3 or more enemies at once, since you're outputting more damage than the single-target version would anyway. Then you combine it with an Ability that Vivi has which seems specifically geared toward abusing this mechanic: "Reflect X2", which doubles the power of spells that are bounced off a Reflect first. Have all four of your characters under Reflect, multi-target them with a reflectable spell (such as Firaga), and you're actually doing four times the standard damage to your enemy in one hit: The X0.5 effect of multi-target gets cancelled by Reflect X2 doubling it back to X1, then each Reflected copy hits for X1 damage per character.
26th Oct '16 9:35:14 PM Zennistrad
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** The [[TabletopGame/{{Pokemon}} Pokémon Trading Card Game]] uses "Magic Bullet" cards in place of banning. One recent example is Machamp, who could [[OneHitKill instantly KO]] any non-evolved Pokémon at a time when non-evolved Pokémon was the norm in tournament play. Most cases are subtler than this, however.

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** The [[TabletopGame/{{Pokemon}} Pokémon Trading Card Game]] uses "Magic Bullet" cards in place of banning. One recent example is Machamp, [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Machamp_(Stormfront_20) Machamp]], who could [[OneHitKill instantly KO]] any non-evolved Pokémon at a time when non-evolved Pokémon was the norm in tournament play. Most cases are subtler than this, however.
12th Oct '16 12:46:54 AM ladytanuki
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** Even in a regular playthrough, such items can be quite useful when used on [[LightningBruiser Ayla]], especially early in the game when she doesn't have any really useful Techs.
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