History Main / NotChristianRock

22nd Sep '17 8:01:04 PM LaptopGuy
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* Music/{{NSYNC}}'s "God Must Have Spent a Little More Time on You", later covered by Alabama. There are references to creation, angels, and of course, the Lord Himself in the title.


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* Several of Music/TheFray's songs can qualify, such as "How To Save a Life" and "You Found Me".


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* Virginia pop-rockers Parachute are hardly considered a Christian rock band, but some of their songs do dip into Christian themes, most notably "Something to Believe In."
11th Sep '17 1:59:28 AM JakesBrain
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** Considering that the song "Black Sabbath" -- the first track on their first album, describing a black Mass -- literally contains the line "No, no, please God help me," it's hard to contend that the band are ''in favor'' of Satanism.
16th Aug '17 12:44:40 PM VicGeorge2011
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** And it was also covered by the Christian band dc Talk, who changed one of the lyric lines to saying "I have been a sinner, we all sinned, but I have a friend in Jesus".

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** And it was also covered by the Christian band dc Talk, who changed one of the lyric lines to saying "I have been "You know that I'm a sinner, we all sinned, but I have a friend in Jesus".
30th Jul '17 10:41:06 PM thelivingtoad
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* The 1980s British indie rock band The Housemartins often seemed like a borderline Christian band. Lead singer Paul Heaton was a devout Christian, and his faith was readily apparent in many of his lyrics. But there were several things that kept the group as a strictly secular act. Firstly was Heaton's famously biting wit; His lyrics were often just as scathingly satirical against Thatcherism or the British class system as they were religious. Heaton and his bandmates were also Marxists, and their politics were just as important to understanding his songwriting and their aesthetic as their Christianity was. Their debut album's liner notes even included the message "Take Jesus, take Marx, take hope" and later pressings added a song called "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6iRcn-x0gBc I'll Be Your Shelter]]" which ends with gospel-style coda that praises both Jesus and Marx equally.

to:

* The 1980s British indie rock band The Housemartins often seemed like a borderline Christian band. Lead singer Paul Heaton was a devout Christian, and his faith was readily apparent in many of his lyrics. But there were several things that kept the group as a strictly secular act. Firstly First was Heaton's famously biting wit; His lyrics were often just as scathingly satirical against Thatcherism or the British class system as they were religious. Heaton and his bandmates were also Marxists, and their politics were just as important to understanding his songwriting and their aesthetic as their Christianity was. Their debut album's liner notes even included the message "Take Jesus, take Marx, take hope" and later pressings added a song called "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6iRcn-x0gBc I'll Be Your Shelter]]" which ends with gospel-style coda that praises both Jesus and Marx equally.
30th Jul '17 10:39:59 PM thelivingtoad
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* The 1980s British indie rock band The Housemartins often seemed like a borderline Christian band. Lead singer Paul Heaton was a devout Christian, and his faith was readily apparent in many of his lyrics. But there were several things that kept the group as a strictly secular act. Firstly was Heaton's famously biting wit; His lyrics were often just as scathingly satirical against Thatcherism or the British class system as they were religious. Heaton and his bandmates were also Marxists, and their politics were just as important to understanding his songwriting and their aesthetic as their Christianity was. Their debut album's liner notes even included the message "Take Jesus, take Marx, take hope" and included a song called "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6iRcn-x0gBc I'll Be Your Shelter]]" which ends with gospel-style coda that praises both Jesus and Marx equally.

to:

* The 1980s British indie rock band The Housemartins often seemed like a borderline Christian band. Lead singer Paul Heaton was a devout Christian, and his faith was readily apparent in many of his lyrics. But there were several things that kept the group as a strictly secular act. Firstly was Heaton's famously biting wit; His lyrics were often just as scathingly satirical against Thatcherism or the British class system as they were religious. Heaton and his bandmates were also Marxists, and their politics were just as important to understanding his songwriting and their aesthetic as their Christianity was. Their debut album's liner notes even included the message "Take Jesus, take Marx, take hope" and included later pressings added a song called "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6iRcn-x0gBc I'll Be Your Shelter]]" which ends with gospel-style coda that praises both Jesus and Marx equally.
30th Jul '17 10:39:20 PM thelivingtoad
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* The 1980s British indie rock band The Housemartins often seemed like a borderline Christian band. Lead singer Paul Heaton was a devout Christian, and his faith was readily apparent in many of his lyrics. But there were several thing that kept the group as a strictly secular act. Firstly was Heaton's famously biting wit; His lyrics were often just as scathingly satirical against Thatcherism or the British class system as they were religious. Heaton and his bandmates were also Marxists, and their politics were just as important to understanding his songwriting and their aesthetic as their Christianity was. Their debut album's liner notes even included the message "Take Jesus, take Marx, take hope" and included a song called "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6iRcn-x0gBc I'll Be Your Shelter]]" which ends with gospel-style coda that praises both Jesus and Marx equally.

to:

* The 1980s British indie rock band The Housemartins often seemed like a borderline Christian band. Lead singer Paul Heaton was a devout Christian, and his faith was readily apparent in many of his lyrics. But there were several thing things that kept the group as a strictly secular act. Firstly was Heaton's famously biting wit; His lyrics were often just as scathingly satirical against Thatcherism or the British class system as they were religious. Heaton and his bandmates were also Marxists, and their politics were just as important to understanding his songwriting and their aesthetic as their Christianity was. Their debut album's liner notes even included the message "Take Jesus, take Marx, take hope" and included a song called "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6iRcn-x0gBc I'll Be Your Shelter]]" which ends with gospel-style coda that praises both Jesus and Marx equally.
30th Jul '17 10:38:56 PM thelivingtoad
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Added DiffLines:

* The 1980s British indie rock band The Housemartins often seemed like a borderline Christian band. Lead singer Paul Heaton was a devout Christian, and his faith was readily apparent in many of his lyrics. But there were several thing that kept the group as a strictly secular act. Firstly was Heaton's famously biting wit; His lyrics were often just as scathingly satirical against Thatcherism or the British class system as they were religious. Heaton and his bandmates were also Marxists, and their politics were just as important to understanding his songwriting and their aesthetic as their Christianity was. Their debut album's liner notes even included the message "Take Jesus, take Marx, take hope" and included a song called "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6iRcn-x0gBc I'll Be Your Shelter]]" which ends with gospel-style coda that praises both Jesus and Marx equally.
6th Jul '17 3:36:45 AM Ccook1956
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* Supertramp's ''Lord, Is It Mine?'', from their album "Breakfast In America."
19th Jun '17 3:11:51 PM jormis29
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* "From a Distance", originally performed by Nanci Griffith and later covered by Bette Midler, has fallen subject to this, and has even been covered by some contemporary Christian singers. This despite the fact that the songs make no specific references to a ''Christian'' God -- and this tendency has been criticized by other Evangelical Christians, due to the belief that the song goes against basic Christian doctrine (God doesn't watch us "from a distance", He's right next to us).

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* "From a Distance", originally performed by Nanci Griffith and later covered by Bette Midler, Music/BetteMidler, has fallen subject to this, and has even been covered by some contemporary Christian singers. This despite the fact that the songs make no specific references to a ''Christian'' God -- and this tendency has been criticized by other Evangelical Christians, due to the belief that the song goes against basic Christian doctrine (God doesn't watch us "from a distance", He's right next to us).
23rd May '17 8:49:59 PM Lirodon
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* A Christian radio station in Winnipeg actually tried to use this as their ''format'' for a period, trying to downplay their status to appeal to mainstream advertisers and listeners while promoting themselves as "FREQ 107, Winnipeg's New Rock Alternative", but supposedly remaining in compliance with [[ExecutiveMeddling the station's license actually requiring them to play religious music]] by justifying that their Not Christian Rock had religious themes. It ended up being an [[AudienceAlienatingPremise Advertiser Alienating Premise]]; religious advertisers were turned off by their secular skew, while mainstream advertisers were [[AvoidTheDreadedGRating reluctant to advertise on a Christian station]]. Admitting defeat, their new owner played the Total Abandonment card twice; first to a younger-skewing Christian format (as a sister to an older-skewing counterpart), and then to classical music.

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* A Christian radio station in Winnipeg actually tried to use this as their ''format'' for a period, trying period. They wanted to downplay their status to appeal to mainstream advertisers and listeners while promoting listeners, so they promoted themselves as "FREQ 107, Winnipeg's New Rock Alternative", but and supposedly remaining remained in compliance with [[ExecutiveMeddling the station's license actually requiring them to play religious music]] music]], by justifying that their Not Christian Rock had religious themes. It ended up being an [[AudienceAlienatingPremise Advertiser Alienating Premise]]; advertiser-alienating premise]]; religious advertisers were turned off by their secular skew, while mainstream advertisers were [[AvoidTheDreadedGRating reluctant to advertise on a Christian station]]. Admitting defeat, their new owner played the Total Abandonment card twice; first to a younger-skewing Christian format (as a sister to an older-skewing counterpart), and then to classical music.
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