History Main / NoobBridge

7th Aug '16 4:53:30 PM KingLyger
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* New ''VideoGame/DanceDanceRevolution'' players often return their feet back to the center tile after each step, not knowing that there is no penalty for leaving one's feet on the panels, something that several of the series' games point out in their respective tutorials. If you don't break out of this habit you will ''never'' clear songs beyond level 4.[[labelnote:*]]on the current 1-20 scale, or 3 on the clasic 1-10 scale.[[/labelnote]]

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* New ''VideoGame/DanceDanceRevolution'' players often return their feet back to the center tile after each step, not knowing that there is no penalty for leaving one's feet on the panels, panels. Even though this is something that several of the series' games point out in their respective tutorials. tutorials, most people don't bother watching them, or the original Japanese text explaining this fact is untranslated. Watching even a semi-serious player will show that they don't return their feet to the center; no "professional" DDR player would be caught dead doing it. If you don't break out of this habit you will ''never'' clear won't be clearing songs beyond level 4.[[labelnote:*]]on 4 on the current 1-20 scale, or 3 on the clasic 1-10 scale.[[/labelnote]]difficulty scale of 1 through 20.
16th Jul '16 8:29:51 PM TheBuddy26
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* Euclid's ''Elements of Geometry'' includes a [[OlderThanDirt surprisingly old]] and surprisingly literal example: the fifth proposition is traditionally known as the "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pons_asinorum Asses' Bridge]]", because the diagram looks somewhat bridgelike and the proof is said to be the first one that is complex enough to scare off newbies to the subject.

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* Euclid's ''Elements of Geometry'' includes a an [[OlderThanDirt surprisingly extremely old]] and surprisingly literal example: the fifth proposition is traditionally known as the "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pons_asinorum Asses' Bridge]]", because the diagram looks somewhat bridgelike and the proof is said to be the first one that is complex enough to scare off newbies to the subject.



* ''VideoGame/SuperMetroid'' is the TropeNamer, described above.
** Though since the Dash button was described in the manual, the giant drop that required Wall Jumping to escape was a bigger noob bridge for people who started with the SNES game.
** Players who grew up with later ''Metroid'' games are more likely to fall victim to this, as those games don't have a run button.
** The game also has the "Noob Tube", a [[SharkTunnel glass tube]] that needs to be shattered with a Power Bomb to pass. This is the only tube in the game that Power Bombs do this, and it's not the only way to get into Maridia. However, if one doesn't press start at the title screen, the subsequent montage of clips shows that this is possible, as well as several hidden (but never required) moves.
** An even more basic one is that the series includes doors that are opened by shooting them. The start of ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime3Corruption'' puts the player in the hanger of a friendly space station and door shooting is required to progress. The game assumes that this is obvious but for new players it is not logical to shoot friendly-controlled doors in order to open them.



* ''VideoGame/SuperMetroid'' has the TropeNamer, described above.
** Though since the Dash button was described in the manual, the giant drop that required Wall Jumping to escape was a bigger noob bridge for people who started with the SNES game.
** Players who grew up with later ''Metroid'' games are more likely to fall victim to this, as those games don't have a run button.
** The game also has the "Noob Tube", a [[SharkTunnel glass tube]] that needs to be shattered with a Power Bomb to pass. This is the only tube in the game that Power Bombs do this, and it's not the only way to get into Maridia. However, if one doesn't press start at the title screen, the subsequent montage of clips shows that this is possible, as well as several hidden (but never required) moves.
** An even more basic one is that the series includes doors that are opened by shooting them. The start of ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime3Corruption'' puts the player in the hanger of a friendly space station and door shooting is required to progress. The game assumes that this is obvious but for new players it is not logical to shoot friendly-controlled doors in order to open them.
17th Jun '16 12:54:23 AM erforce
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* In ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry3'', people commonly have trouble figuring out how to beat Squirt when playing for the first time. It turns out that as Ellie the elephant, you can suck water by pressing L (or Down+R in the GBA version) while standing next to a waterfall. Next, you can squirt the water back at Squirt's eyes by pressing R. Once you figure that out, the boss becomes easy.

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* In ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry3'', ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry3DixieKongsDoubleTrouble'', people commonly have trouble figuring out how to beat Squirt when playing for the first time. It turns out that as Ellie the elephant, you can suck water by pressing L (or Down+R in the GBA version) while standing next to a waterfall. Next, you can squirt the water back at Squirt's eyes by pressing R. Once you figure that out, the boss becomes easy.
22nd May '16 1:46:04 PM billybobfred
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* In ''VideoGame/PapersPlease'', on day 3, Jorji will arrive in your booth bearing absolutely no documentation whatsoever. It's plainly obvious that you're supposed to deny him entry, but without anything to use your denial stamp on, it's not so clear ''how''. What the player needs to do is open the rulebook and use the discrepancy highlighter to highlight the rule that states that people trying to enter the country need a passport, and then highlight the empty countertop, which makes the Inspector dismiss Jorji. Highlighting both rules in the rulebook and the countertop is required later on in the game—in particular, once you are required to provide a reason for denial.

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* In ''VideoGame/PapersPlease'', on day 3, Jorji will arrive in your booth bearing absolutely no documentation whatsoever. It's plainly obvious that you're supposed to deny him entry, but without anything to use your denial stamp on, it's not so clear ''how''. What the player needs to do is open the rulebook and use the discrepancy highlighter to highlight the rule that states that people trying to enter the country need a passport, and then highlight the empty countertop, which makes the Inspector dismiss Jorji. The game has received multiple updates attempting to make this clearer. Highlighting both rules in the rulebook and the countertop is required later on in the game—in particular, once you are required to provide a reason for denial.
2nd Mar '16 2:17:48 PM deimos415
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* ''VideoGame/MonsterHunter'' provides a distinct example in that the game as a ''whole'' is this. Charging in and challenging the games' titular monsters like one would for any other action game and just smashing buttons ''will'' get you killed. The action tends to be slower, more purposeful, and actually requires observation as well as patience. The sheer myriad of intricacies and nuances in gameplay mechanics can be incredibly daunting to any player, no matter how many action games they've played.



* ''VideoGame/MonsterHunter'' provides a distinct example in that the game as a ''whole'' is this. Charging in and challenging the games' titular monsters like one would for any other action game and just smashing buttons ''will'' get you killed. The action tends to be slower, more purposeful, and actually requires observation as well as patience. The sheer myriad of intricacies and nuances in gameplay mechanics can be incredibly daunting to any player, no matter how many action games they've played.
2nd Mar '16 2:17:09 PM deimos415
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Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/MonsterHunter'' provides a distinct example in that the game as a ''whole'' is this. Charging in and challenging the games' titular monsters like one would for any other action game and just smashing buttons ''will'' get you killed. The action tends to be slower, more purposeful, and actually requires observation as well as patience. The sheer myriad of intricacies and nuances in gameplay mechanics can be incredibly daunting to any player, no matter how many action games they've played.
1st Mar '16 3:32:57 AM LucaEarlgrey
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* ''VideoGame/DaytonaUSA'' has the third and final turn of the Beginner course in all games, which is a sharp turn that mandates powersliding through it to complete without losing a lot of speed. Unfortunately, new players of the original are not likely aware of how to powerslide and usually end up eating wall; the result is that an overwhelming majority of players [[TimedMission run out of time]] before finishing all 8 laps because they slam into the wall ''every time''. ''Daytona USA 2'' alleviates this a little by showing a powersliding tutorial during the AttractMode.

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* ''VideoGame/DaytonaUSA'' has the third and final turn of the Beginner course in all games, which is a sharp turn that mandates powersliding through it to complete without losing a lot of speed. Unfortunately, new players of the original are not likely aware of how to powerslide and usually end up eating wall; the result is that an overwhelming majority of players [[TimedMission run out of time]] before finishing all 8 the required laps because they slam into the wall ''every time''. ''Daytona USA 2'' alleviates this a little by showing a powersliding tutorial during the AttractMode.
1st Mar '16 3:32:43 AM LucaEarlgrey
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* ''VideoGame/DaytonaUSA'' has the third and final turn of the Beginner course in all games, which is a sharp turn that mandates powersliding through it to complete without losing a lot of speed. Unfortunately, new players of the original are not likely aware of how to powerslide and usually end up eating wall. ''Daytona USA 2'' alleviates this a little by showing a powersliding tutorial during the AttractMode.

to:

* ''VideoGame/DaytonaUSA'' has the third and final turn of the Beginner course in all games, which is a sharp turn that mandates powersliding through it to complete without losing a lot of speed. Unfortunately, new players of the original are not likely aware of how to powerslide and usually end up eating wall.wall; the result is that an overwhelming majority of players [[TimedMission run out of time]] before finishing all 8 laps because they slam into the wall ''every time''. ''Daytona USA 2'' alleviates this a little by showing a powersliding tutorial during the AttractMode.
1st Mar '16 3:31:41 AM LucaEarlgrey
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Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/DaytonaUSA'' has the third and final turn of the Beginner course in all games, which is a sharp turn that mandates powersliding through it to complete without losing a lot of speed. Unfortunately, new players of the original are not likely aware of how to powerslide and usually end up eating wall. ''Daytona USA 2'' alleviates this a little by showing a powersliding tutorial during the AttractMode.
17th Feb '16 3:15:39 PM MegaMarioMan
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* ''VideoGame/LaMulana'' has a similar door that works the same way, and is just as good at tripping up noobs.



* ''VideoGame/LaMulana'' has a similar door that works the same way, and is just as good at tripping up noobs.
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