History Main / NonStandardGameover

10th Feb '16 6:04:51 PM Onlythrice
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* ''VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition'': ** If you get evicted from the ball by reaching 0 court approval, you are told that Orlais was left leaderless and thrown in chaos, leaving both it and your Inquisition easy prey for the BigBad.
to:
* ''VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition'': ''VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition'' typically gives the message "Your Journey Ends" should the player fall in combat, but tends to go [[ItsaWonderfulFailure into more detail]] during main quests. ** If you get evicted from the ball by reaching 0 court approval, approval during Wicked Eyes and Wicked Hearts, you are told that Orlais was left leaderless and thrown in chaos, leaving both it and your Inquisition easy prey for the BigBad.
6th Feb '16 4:28:43 PM Johnnytherock
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* The standard Chrononauts has this occur if there are thirteen temporal paradoxes on the field at one time. An expansion included a character who actually had a temporal paradox as his own win condition.
5th Feb '16 3:19:52 PM Onlythrice
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
** If you die while attempting to escape the Envy Demon during Champions of the Just, you are told that it impersonates you and uses the Inquisition to conquer the world and destroy the Chantry.
5th Feb '16 2:57:41 PM Onlythrice
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** If you decided to side with the Templars earlier on and fail to defend the Great Hall by reaching 0 status (or dying), the Red Templars take over and you are shown Ser Barris being executed by a Red Templar Horror.
to:
** If you decided to side with the Templars earlier on and fail to defend the Great Hall by reaching 0 status (or dying), you are told that the Red Templars take over rampage across Thedas, killing or enslaving everyone and you are shown Ser Barris being executed by a Red Templar Horror.
4th Feb '16 3:48:55 PM MyFinalEdits
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Please link properly
* [[VideoGame/BatmanArkhamKnight]] has a few Game Overs that are different from those of the previous games.
to:
* [[VideoGame/BatmanArkhamKnight]] ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamKnight'' has a few Game Overs that are different from those of the previous games.
4th Feb '16 9:13:36 AM Anarky17
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* [[VideoGame/BatmanArkhamKnight]] has a few Game Overs that are different from those of the previous games. ** Occasionally you'll receive a comforting send-off from Alfred or Robin, guaranteeing that Gotham will remember you and they'll keep fighting the good fight. ** If you fail during one of the Poison Ivy missions, she'll lament the destruction of her plant, saying that [[DarkestHour there's no way she can save Gotham now]]. ** A rather terrifying example comes if you fail during the GCPD defense mission. You get a cutscene of Barbara and the cops in the lockup room, when suddenly the elevator opens and a minigunner starts firing, complete with audible screams.
31st Jan '16 8:28:56 PM MyFinalEdits
Is there an issue? Send a Message
What's so hard about indenting properly?
** Losing to the TrueFinalBoss in ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaAriaOfSorrow'' results in Soma being taken over by Dracula completely, and you get a short scene where Julius Belmont is implied to make good on the ICannotSelfTerminate promise he made with Soma earlier. *** The DS sequel one-ups this even more: getting the NonStandardGameOver unlocks ''a new game mode'' where the other characters team up to take down the now [[FaceHeelTurn Face Heel Turned]] protagonist.
to:
** Losing to the TrueFinalBoss in ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaAriaOfSorrow'' results in Soma being taken over by Dracula completely, and you get a short scene where Julius Belmont is implied to make good on the ICannotSelfTerminate promise he made with Soma earlier. *** earlier. The DS sequel one-ups this even more: getting the NonStandardGameOver unlocks ''a new game mode'' where the other characters team up to take down the now [[FaceHeelTurn Face Heel Turned]] protagonist.

* ''VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition'': If you get evicted from the ball by reaching 0 court approval, you are told that Orlais was left leaderless and thrown in chaos, leaving both it and your Inquisition easy prey for the BigBad. ** Similarly to the above example, if you decided to side with the Templars earlier on and fail to defend the Great Hall by reaching 0 status (or dying), the Red Templars take over and you are shown Ser Barris being executed by a Red Templar Horror.
to:
* ''VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition'': ''VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition'': ** If you get evicted from the ball by reaching 0 court approval, you are told that Orlais was left leaderless and thrown in chaos, leaving both it and your Inquisition easy prey for the BigBad. ** Similarly to the above example, if If you decided to side with the Templars earlier on and fail to defend the Great Hall by reaching 0 status (or dying), the Red Templars take over and you are shown Ser Barris being executed by a Red Templar Horror.
31st Jan '16 6:06:06 PM Onlythrice
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** The DS sequel one-ups this even more: getting the NonStandardGameOver unlocks ''a new game mode'' where the other characters team up to take down the now [[FaceHeelTurn Face Heel Turned]] protagonist.
to:
** *** The DS sequel one-ups this even more: getting the NonStandardGameOver unlocks ''a new game mode'' where the other characters team up to take down the now [[FaceHeelTurn Face Heel Turned]] protagonist.

** There's a couple ways to get one of these in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidVThePhantomPain''.
to:
** There's a couple few ways to get one of these in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidVThePhantomPain''.

Added DiffLines:
** There's a couple ways *** Killing any child soldiers in Africa causes the screen to get one of these in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidVThePhantomPain''. flash red and the camera to focus on the corpse before going to the normal game over screen.
31st Jan '16 5:23:09 PM Onlythrice
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
** Similarly to the above example, if you decided to side with the Templars earlier on and fail to defend the Great Hall by reaching 0 status (or dying), the Red Templars take over and you are shown Ser Barris being executed by a Red Templar Horror.
31st Jan '16 1:00:02 PM Gimere
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* A number of quiz shows from the late 1960s and early 1970s -- including the ''Who, What or Where Game'' and the original ''Series/SaleOfTheCentury'' -- had rules where falling below zero at any time immediately eliminated that player from further play. These games spotted the players a small bankroll ($20 for ''[=$otC=]'', $125 for the betting-type ''3 Ws'') and, like ''Jeopardy!'', money was deducted for incorrect answers. But enough incorrect answers meant falling to or below $0 and, per the rules, meant they were eliminated immediately. The "$0 means goodbye" rule was eliminated for the more familiar 1983 ''[=$otC=]'' and the ''3 Ws'' 1990 remake ''The Challengers''. (With the earlier incarnations, the standard "game over" is at the end of the front game of ''[=$otC=]'' (we've just played the last question, here's the scores, here's our champion) or, on the ''3 Ws'', after the day's final category is played with all three contestants participating.
to:
* A number of quiz shows from the late 1960s and early 1970s -- including the ''Who, What or Where Game'' and the original ''Series/SaleOfTheCentury'' -- had rules where falling below zero at any time immediately eliminated that player from further play. These games spotted the players a small bankroll ($20 for ''[=$otC=]'', $125 for the betting-type ''3 Ws'') and, like ''Jeopardy!'', money was deducted for incorrect answers. But enough incorrect answers meant falling to or below $0 and, per the rules, meant they were eliminated immediately. The "$0 means goodbye" rule was eliminated for the more familiar 1983 ''[=$otC=]'' and the ''3 Ws'' 1990 remake ''The Challengers''.''Series/TheChallengers''. (With the earlier incarnations, the standard "game over" is at the end of the front game of ''[=$otC=]'' (we've just played the last question, here's the scores, here's our champion) or, on the ''3 Ws'', after the day's final category is played with all three contestants participating.

* ''Series/CardSharks'': In the Money Cards bonus round, the game automatically ended prior to the Big Bet card if, while on the second row, the contestant busted - i.e., bet everything on an incorrect hunch. (On the NBC version, this was marked by a harsh buzzer followed by a truncated [[LosingHorns ''The Price is Right'' losing horns]]). Quite a few times, there were players who "two-card busted" (meaning they blew everything on the first card, then - with the card moved immediately to the second row and the player given a new bankroll - immediately lost everything on their next call of the cards). This was also originally possible if the next card was of the same value as the previous one; it was originally ruled as a loss, but on later episodes, [[ObviousRulePatch the next card being of the same value resulted in neither a gain nor a loss]] (referred to in-show as a "push"). * ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'': In its broadest sense, any player who has $0 or a negative cash score at the end of the "Double Jeopardy!" round ends his participation in the show early (i.e., he's not around for "Final Jeopardy!"). However, at least once on the original NBC series - the late 1960s, by most accounts - the trope truly kicked into full effect when all three players had negative cash scores and thus were ineligible for "Final Jeopardy!" No "Final Jeopardy!" was played that day, and Art Fleming spent the rest of the time talking with the audience. The standard "game over" is with all three players participating in "Final Jeopardy!"
to:
* ''Series/CardSharks'': In On ''Series/CardSharks'', the Money Cards bonus round, the game BonusRound automatically ended prior to the Big Bet card if, while on the second row, the contestant busted - i.e., bet everything on an incorrect hunch. (On the NBC version, this was marked by a harsh buzzer followed by a truncated [[LosingHorns version of ''The Price is Right'' losing horns]]).{{losing horns}}). Quite a few times, there were players who "two-card busted" (meaning they blew everything on the first card, then - with the card moved immediately to the second row and the player given a new bankroll - immediately lost everything on their next call of the cards). This was also originally possible if the next card was of the same value as the previous one; it was originally ruled as a loss, but on later episodes, [[ObviousRulePatch the next card being of the same value resulted in neither a gain nor a loss]] (referred to in-show as a "push"). * ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'': ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'': ** In its broadest sense, any player who has $0 or a negative cash score at the end of the "Double Jeopardy!" round ends his participation in the show early (i.e., he's not around for "Final Jeopardy!"). However, at least once on the original NBC series - the late 1960s, by most accounts - the trope truly kicked into full effect when all three players had negative cash scores and thus were ineligible for "Final Jeopardy!" No "Final Jeopardy!" was played that day, and Art Fleming spent the rest of the time talking with the audience. The standard "game over" is with all three players participating in "Final Jeopardy!"

** Another example came after the tweaking began in Season 2. From that point onward, the teams were now given a few "bonus letters" that they could add to the words at any time if they got stuck; also, the board had only 12 spots covered, but a Lingo could now be made in only one draw, with a larger prize (either a trip or a ProgressiveJackpot) for completing the Lingo in only one draw, and a smaller prize for doing it in two or more draws. A standard game over was still the consolation prize for failing to complete a Lingo before all the earned balls were used up. The ''non''-standard came when a team who won 7 balls failed to make a Lingo in all 7 draws; host Chuck Woolery, incredulous over what just happened, [[LetsJustSeeWhatWouldHaveHappened reached into the hopper himself]] to draw another ball and, [[EpicFail against 99.9% odds, drew the only number that ''still'' didn't make a Lingo.]]
to:
** Another example came after the tweaking began in Season 2. From that point onward, the teams were now given a few "bonus letters" that they could add to the words at any time if they got stuck; also, the board had only 12 spots covered, but a Lingo could now be made in only one draw, with a larger prize (either a trip or a ProgressiveJackpot) for completing the Lingo in only one draw, and a smaller prize for doing it in two or more draws. A standard game over was still the consolation prize for failing to complete a Lingo before all the earned balls were used up. The ''non''-standard came when a team who won 7 balls failed to make a Lingo in all 7 draws; host Chuck Woolery, incredulous over what just happened, [[LetsJustSeeWhatWouldHaveHappened reached into the hopper himself]] to draw another ball and, [[EpicFail against 99.9% odds, drew the only number that ''still'' didn't make a Lingo.]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 470. Show all.