History Main / NobleSavage

6th Jun '16 12:31:48 PM Morgenthaler
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* SMStirling's ''IslandInTheSeaOfTime'' plays this fairly straight with the Firnan Boholugi, subverts it with their enemies the Sun People and subverts it with the Olmec (much to the shock of some of the more naive characters).
** Also by S. M. Stirling, the {{Emberverse}} features plenty of Native American Characters, but most Native Americans appear just to be trying to survive in a post apocalyptic world.

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* SMStirling's ''IslandInTheSeaOfTime'' ''Literature/IslandInTheSeaOfTime'' plays this fairly straight with the Firnan Boholugi, subverts it with their enemies the Sun People and subverts it with the Olmec (much to the shock of some of the more naive characters).
** Also by S. M. Stirling, the {{Emberverse}} Literature/{{Emberverse}} features plenty of Native American Characters, but most Native Americans appear just to be trying to survive in a post apocalyptic world.



* ''ASwiftlyTiltingPlanet'': The People of the Wind in L'Engle's novel; they are close to nature and pacifistic. They are contrasted with greedy and corrupt whites.

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* ''ASwiftlyTiltingPlanet'': ''Literature/ASwiftlyTiltingPlanet'': The People of the Wind in L'Engle's novel; they are close to nature and pacifistic. They are contrasted with greedy and corrupt whites.
24th May '16 6:23:52 AM ChronoLegion
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* ''Literature/PastwatchTheRedemptionOfChristopherColumbus'': Toyed with, then averted in the Creator/OrsonScottCard novel. One of the characters monitoring the past watches in despair as European explorers rape, murder, and plunder their way through a tribe of "gentle" natives in the Caribbean, and resolves to intervene. It is then discovered that Columbus' voyage to America was the result of an earlier intervention from a different future people, because without European influence, the Americas would have been subjected to an ''even greater'' atrocity, the complete subjugation by a local culture fanatically dedicated to human sacrifice. There is even an in-universe aversion: a man of pure Native American blood has to work very hard to convince the more European characters that his ancestors, left to themselves, really would have been that bad.
** There's also the issue of slavery. The watcher mentioned above who despairs is of African descent and wishes above all else to find a way to eliminate slavery from history. Then along comes a Turkish meteorologist claiming that slavery was a ''good thing'', considering that it replaced human sacrifice. According to him, it was Noah himself who advocated slavery, along with a nomadic lifestyle, after his homeland of Atlantis (ItMakesSenseInContext) was destroyed by a flood at the end of the last Ice Age.

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* ''Literature/PastwatchTheRedemptionOfChristopherColumbus'': Toyed with, then averted in the Creator/OrsonScottCard novel. One of the characters monitoring the past watches in despair as European explorers rape, murder, and plunder their way through a tribe of "gentle" natives in the Caribbean, and resolves to intervene. It is then discovered that Columbus' voyage to America was the result of an earlier intervention from a different future people, because without European influence, the Americas (and then the rest of the world) would have been subjected to an ''even greater'' atrocity, the complete subjugation by a local culture fanatically dedicated to human sacrifice. There is even an in-universe aversion: a man of pure Native American blood has to work very hard to convince the more European characters that his ancestors, left to themselves, really would have been that bad.
** There's also the issue of slavery. The watcher mentioned above who despairs is of African descent and wishes above all else to find a way to eliminate slavery from history. Then along comes a Turkish meteorologist claiming that slavery was a ''good thing'', considering that it replaced human sacrifice. According to him, it was Noah himself who advocated slavery, along with a nomadic lifestyle, after his homeland of Atlantis (ItMakesSenseInContext) was destroyed by a flood at the end of the last Ice Age. He points to the Americas as an example of societies where human sacrifice was common due to the lack of this transition from human sacrifice to slavery. This is a case of CriticalResearchFailure, though, as Pre-Columbian civilizations did practice slavery, although the slaves were more like indentured servants rather than property and earned their freedom after paying of their debts. Prisoners of war (those who weren't sacrificed) were also treated as slaves.
** The whole point of the novel is for the protagonists to somehow figure out a way of keeping the greedy Europeans from imposing their rule and worldviews on the Americas, while also removing the "savage" part from this trope among the American civilizations. To this end, [[spoiler:they start unifying the various tribes under two banners with the goal of eventually joining the two resulting empires, while also teaching them a version of Christianity, modified to be a lot more tolerant and inclusive. The end result is Columbus personally leading an armada of 1000 heavily-armed ships to European shores as a show of force to get the Europeans to understand that Native Americans are not to be fucked with, while also offering them a chance at equal trade relations]].
24th May '16 6:14:06 AM ChronoLegion
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Added DiffLines:

* Additionally, most of what we know about Native Americans comes from the time when 90% of their entire population was wiped out by European diseases, likely spread by Cortes's contact with the Aztecs earlier. Before that, the natives had cities and actually cut down so many trees that some historians think that the resultant sudden rise in CO2 helped stop the Little Ice Age in ''Europe'' (i.e. on the other side of the world). Monk's Mound is an example of Native American engineering, with earth for the mound being carried for many miles without the benefit of horses.
3rd May '16 1:39:57 AM PaulA
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* Iron Eyes Cody, the famous CryingIndian in the "People Start Pollution, People Can Stop It" public service announcements of the early '70's. Ironically, he wasn't actually Cherokee -- he was Sicilian.
** And from New Jersey, to boot.

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* Iron Eyes Cody, the famous CryingIndian in the "People Start Pollution, People Can Stop It" public service announcements of the early '70's. Ironically, he wasn't actually Cherokee -- he was Sicilian.
**
Sicilian. And from New Jersey, to boot.



* Eagle Free, the Native American NatureHero sidekick of ''ComicBook/{{Prez}}''.



[[folder:Films -- Animation]]

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[[folder:Films -- - Animation]]
22nd Apr '16 5:37:02 PM Bishop999
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* The trope also tends to ''vastly'' underplay the actual difficulties hunter-gatherer societies face, such as the commonness and sheer brutality of tribal warfare, famine, disease, personal and gender roles defined by necessity and sky-high child mortality in a further attempt to portray civilized life as more decadent and less optimized in comparison.

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* The trope also tends to ''vastly'' underplay the actual difficulties hunter-gatherer societies face, such as the commonness and sheer brutality of tribal warfare, famine, disease, disease and personal and gender roles defined by necessity and mysticism, not to mention sky-high child mortality mortality, all in a further attempt to portray civilized life as more decadent and less optimized in comparison.
22nd Apr '16 5:35:23 PM Bishop999
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* The trope also tends to ''vastly'' underplay the actual difficulties hunter-gatherer societies face, such as the commonness and sheer brutality of tribal warfare, famine, disease, personal and gender roles defined by necessity and sky-high child mortality in a further attempt to portray civilized life as more decadent and less optimized.

to:

* The trope also tends to ''vastly'' underplay the actual difficulties hunter-gatherer societies face, such as the commonness and sheer brutality of tribal warfare, famine, disease, personal and gender roles defined by necessity and sky-high child mortality in a further attempt to portray civilized life as more decadent and less optimized.optimized in comparison.
22nd Apr '16 5:34:23 PM Bishop999
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Added DiffLines:

* The trope also tends to ''vastly'' underplay the actual difficulties hunter-gatherer societies face, such as the commonness and sheer brutality of tribal warfare, famine, disease, personal and gender roles defined by necessity and sky-high child mortality in a further attempt to portray civilized life as more decadent and less optimized.
20th Mar '16 6:37:45 PM Kyle_Reese
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* Magawisca in ''Literature/HopeLeslie'', being one of the most morally exemplary characters in the novel as well as a Native American.
5th Jan '16 12:22:28 PM megankoumori
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* Used in Zane Grey's [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Rainbow_Trail ''The Rainbow Trail'']] where the Navajo play a large role through the story. After spending time with them, the white protagonist, Shefford, comes to view them with awe and reverence, finding in their ways the spiritual fulfillment he's been seeking. He eventually comes to the conclusion that the White Man's influence does more harm than good and that said White Man should just leave the Indians alone. Averted in some places with mentions of more hostile tribes and with antagonist Shadd, described as a "half-breed" [[spoiler: (We later find out he's not.).]]

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* Used in Zane Grey's [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Rainbow_Trail ''The Rainbow Trail'']] where the Navajo play a large role through throughout the story. After spending time with them, the white protagonist, Shefford, comes to view them with awe and reverence, finding in their ways the spiritual fulfillment he's been seeking. He eventually comes to the conclusion that the White Man's influence does more harm than good and that said White Man should just leave the Indians alone. Averted in some places with mentions of more hostile tribes and with antagonist Shadd, described as a "half-breed" [[spoiler: (We later find out he's not.).]]
5th Jan '16 12:21:02 PM megankoumori
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Added DiffLines:

* Used in Zane Grey's [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Rainbow_Trail ''The Rainbow Trail'']] where the Navajo play a large role through the story. After spending time with them, the white protagonist, Shefford, comes to view them with awe and reverence, finding in their ways the spiritual fulfillment he's been seeking. He eventually comes to the conclusion that the White Man's influence does more harm than good and that said White Man should just leave the Indians alone. Averted in some places with mentions of more hostile tribes and with antagonist Shadd, described as a "half-breed" [[spoiler: (We later find out he's not.).]]
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