History Main / NoPunctuationPeriod

5th May '16 10:36:44 PM Kadorhal
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* Given that periods are not required in written Japanese, a lot of scanlations are prone to this. Or else! They will end every sentence the same way! With an exclamation mark! Even when it makes no sense! And when it reduces the impact of sentences that had an exclamation mark in Japanese!

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* Given that periods are not required in written Japanese, a lot of scanlations are prone to this. Or else! They will end every sentence the same way! With Usually with an exclamation mark! Even when it makes no sense! And when it reduces the impact of sentences that actually had an exclamation mark in Japanese!
29th Feb '16 3:13:30 PM Prfnoff
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* In ''Wonderful Town'', a character has to take an emergency pause for breath while reading an enormous run-on sentence in one of the [[StylisticSuck deliberately ridiculous]] [[ShowWithinAShow Plays Within The Play]].

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* In ''Wonderful Town'', a character ''Theatre/WonderfulTown'', Baker has to take an emergency pause for breath while reading an enormous run-on sentence in one of the [[StylisticSuck deliberately ridiculous]] [[ShowWithinAShow Plays Within The Play]].
Play]] written by Ruth.
7th Jan '16 9:01:49 AM LordInsane
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** While it is not ''explicitly'' stated that the source text lacked punctuation, the backstory of the ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms'' features a disagreement between translators over where punctuation should go in a prophetic text (and therefore where two sentences would end and begin), heavily implying this. This turns out to be rather important, as while there's no indication the prophecy actually told the future, one of the adherents of putting the punctuation earlier decided to ''make'' that interpretation come true.
26th Dec '15 9:04:15 PM nombretomado
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* A rather unusual characteristic of comic books from {{the Silver Age|OfComicBooks}} and forward, particularly those from {{DC|Comics}} (although [[http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.com/2010/01/28/comic-book-legends-revealed-245/ Marvel got in its share in 1971]]), is a complete lack of any punctuation other than exclamation points and question marks. In the beginning it was because the low-quality paper stock would render any small marks, like periods or commas, invisible or illegible. As it stands, the omission of periods and the use of all caps is a stylistic choice, not practiced by all letterers. The dialog is instead structured by comic's own unique punctuation mark, the speech balloon, which provides flow and rhythm via spacial placement, as well as other tone information.

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* A rather unusual characteristic of comic books from {{the UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|OfComicBooks}} and forward, particularly those from {{DC|Comics}} (although [[http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.com/2010/01/28/comic-book-legends-revealed-245/ Marvel got in its share in 1971]]), is a complete lack of any punctuation other than exclamation points and question marks. In the beginning it was because the low-quality paper stock would render any small marks, like periods or commas, invisible or illegible. As it stands, the omission of periods and the use of all caps is a stylistic choice, not practiced by all letterers. The dialog is instead structured by comic's own unique punctuation mark, the speech balloon, which provides flow and rhythm via spacial placement, as well as other tone information.
12th Sep '15 11:47:15 PM nombretomado
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* The fiction of Portuguese novelist José Saramago features only periods and commas, and nothing more. Furthermore, there's no indication of dialogue or who's talking what, except that each piece of dialogue starts with capital letters, just as if it was written normally. Finally, his paragraphs extend over pages. Sweden awarded him the NobelPrizeInLiterature.

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* The fiction of Portuguese novelist José Saramago features only periods and commas, and nothing more. Furthermore, there's no indication of dialogue or who's talking what, except that each piece of dialogue starts with capital letters, just as if it was written normally. Finally, his paragraphs extend over pages. Sweden awarded him the NobelPrizeInLiterature.UsefulNotes/NobelPrizeInLiterature.
26th Apr '15 6:31:37 AM Lyendith
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** In fact, originally punctuation didn't even ''exist'' in Japanese (it was imported in the early 20th century). In ''bungo'', the old form of written Japanese, the form of the verb differed depending on its position in the sentence. If it determined a following noun, it was in ''rentaikei'' (the cat sleeping here > koko de ''nuru'' neko); if it ended the sentence, it was in ''shūshikei'' (the cat sleeps here > neko ha koko de ''nu''). However, bungo fell out of use at the turn of the 20th century because of its increasingly absurd divergence with spoken Japanese − imagine 1890 Brith people speaking more or less in modern English but still writing like Shakespeare. Since modern Japanese no longer has that distinction, punctuation may have been a way to compensate.

to:

** In fact, originally punctuation didn't even ''exist'' in Japanese (it was imported in the early 20th century). In ''bungo'', the old form of written Japanese, the form of the verb differed depending on its position in the sentence. If it determined a following noun, it was in ''rentaikei'' (the cat sleeping here > koko de ''nuru'' neko); if it ended the sentence, it was in ''shūshikei'' (the cat sleeps here > neko ha koko de ''nu''). However, bungo fell out of use at the turn of the 20th century because of its increasingly absurd divergence with spoken Japanese − imagine 1890 Brith British people speaking more or less in modern English but still writing like Shakespeare. Since modern Japanese no longer has that distinction, punctuation may have been a way to compensate.
26th Apr '15 6:23:38 AM Lyendith
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** In fact, originally punctuation didn't even ''exist'' in Japanese (it was imported in the early 20th century). In ''bungo'', the old form of written Japanese, the form of the verb differed depending on its position in the sentence. If it determined a following noun, it was in ''rentaikei'' (the cat sleeping here > koko de ''nuru'' neko); if it ended the sentence, it was in ''shūshikei'' (the cat sleeps here > neko ha koko de ''nu'').

to:

** In fact, originally punctuation didn't even ''exist'' in Japanese (it was imported in the early 20th century). In ''bungo'', the old form of written Japanese, the form of the verb differed depending on its position in the sentence. If it determined a following noun, it was in ''rentaikei'' (the cat sleeping here > koko de ''nuru'' neko); if it ended the sentence, it was in ''shūshikei'' (the cat sleeps here > neko ha koko de ''nu''). However, bungo fell out of use at the turn of the 20th century because of its increasingly absurd divergence with spoken Japanese − imagine 1890 Brith people speaking more or less in modern English but still writing like Shakespeare. Since modern Japanese no longer has that distinction, punctuation may have been a way to compensate.
26th Apr '15 6:14:52 AM Lyendith
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Added DiffLines:

*** More confusing yet: sometimes question marks simply mark a rise in tone at the end of a sentence. "私はたこ焼きが好きですよ?" ("Watashi ha takoyaki ga suki desu yo?") is ''not'' a question.
** In fact, originally punctuation didn't even ''exist'' in Japanese (it was imported in the early 20th century). In ''bungo'', the old form of written Japanese, the form of the verb differed depending on its position in the sentence. If it determined a following noun, it was in ''rentaikei'' (the cat sleeping here > koko de ''nuru'' neko); if it ended the sentence, it was in ''shūshikei'' (the cat sleeps here > neko ha koko de ''nu'').
16th Apr '15 6:46:22 PM Elusivehawk
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->and then I asked him with my eyes to ask again yes and then he asked me would I yes to say yes my mountain flower and first I put my arms around him yes and drew him down to me so he could feel my breasts all perfume yes and his heart was going like mad and yes I said yes I will Yes.

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->and ->''"and then I asked him with my eyes to ask again yes and then he asked me would I yes to say yes my mountain flower and first I put my arms around him yes and drew him down to me so he could feel my breasts all perfume yes and his heart was going like mad and yes I said yes I will Yes."''
8th Apr '15 11:56:06 AM Smuglord
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Added DiffLines:

** Telegrams not punctuated. May be example of trope. [[AnalogyBackfire Usage of. Instead of period or full.]] Reduces alphabet by obsoleting punctuation.
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