History Main / NoPronunciationGuide

18th May '18 12:38:52 PM PiDa
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** Sniper Wolf calls Big Boss "Saladin", pronouncing it similarly to "salad-bin".
17th May '18 1:42:23 PM PiDa
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** The original PSX version describes the shaman Raven as a "shay-men", and in ''The Twin Snakes'' he is a "shah-man".

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** The original PSX version describes the shaman Raven as a "shay-men", "shay-men" ("[[RhymesOnADime Vulcan Raven, giant and shay-men"]]), and in ''The Twin Snakes'' he is a "shah-man"."shah-mun".


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* ''Podcast/ChapoTrapHouse'':
**The podcasters are significantly more well-read than they have had the opportunity to actually say the words in their vocabulary, and one will garble the pronunciation of some word or another nearly OnceAnEpisode, with the others immediately dunking on them for it. This is stereotypically Will, who once worked in the literature industry, and does all of the linking material, but Felix has also stumbled on words like "caveat".
**The hosts frequently screw up the names of various figures they cover on the podcast, and have commented a few times that the political class of America doesn't have normal names.
11th May '18 6:39:20 PM PiDa
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** The original PSX version describes the shaman Raven as a "shay-men", and in ''The Twin Snakes'' he is a "shah-man".
** Greg Eagles' Ninja tells Snake, "A fight to the death with you... Only in that can my soul find [[AccentOnTheWrongSyllable res-PYTE]]!". In ''Digital Graphic Novel'', Larc Spies' Ninja instead says his soul can find "RES-pit".
11th May '18 4:42:48 PM BreadBull
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** Can you figure out how to say [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Guinan]] without hearing it? (We'll put you out of your misery, it's Guy-nun)

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** Can you figure out how to say [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Guinan]] without hearing it? (We'll put (It's Guy-nun. Like Ruislip. What do you out of your misery, it's Guy-nun)mean that doesn't help?)
9th May '18 12:26:58 PM Dghcrh
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** The Romanian dub does this to the show's name. The correct pronounciation is "HAH-koo-sho", but this dub pronounces it "Hah-KOO-sho", with the accent on the second syllable.
26th Apr '18 9:17:41 PM nombretomado
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* In IvanhoeTheKingsKnight, Bois-Guilbert is pronounced without the "T" being silent as it should have been.
* WesternAnimation/PiratesPassage lampshades this with the Moehner's. Jim explains it is pronounced "Meaner" but looks like "Moaner."

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* In IvanhoeTheKingsKnight, ''WesternAnimation/IvanhoeTheKingsKnight'', Bois-Guilbert is pronounced without the "T" being silent as it should have been.
* WesternAnimation/PiratesPassage ''WesternAnimation/PiratesPassage'' lampshades this with the Moehner's. Jim explains it is pronounced "Meaner" but looks like "Moaner."
20th Apr '18 9:52:24 AM rjd1922
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* The personal name of God in Literature/TheBible. Only the consonants - yod-he-vav-he (JHWH) are known but not the vowels. The most common guesses among modern believers are "Yahweh" or "Jehova", but there is no indication as to the true spelling or pronunciation.

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* The personal name of God in Literature/TheBible. Only the consonants - yod-he-vav-he (JHWH) (YHWH) are known but not the vowels. The most common guesses among modern believers are "Yahweh" or "Jehova", "Jehovah" (the latter of which Hebrew linguists universally agree was ''not'' the original pronunciation), but there is no indication as to the true spelling or pronunciation.
16th Apr '18 10:22:35 PM BreadBull
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* How do you pronounce the name that translates as the Lord of the Flies? BEEL-zuh-bub, be-EL-zeh-bub, or BELL-zee-bub? be-EL-zeh-bub is probably the best, as the word derives from the word Ba'al, meaning Lord in several Semitic languages. It's pronounced with two syllables, with a glottal stop in the middle. And it's how Queen pronounced it in "Bohemian Rhapsody," and they are the highest earthly authority.



[[folder:Other]]
* Anytime the word "Shaman" appears. Someone is going to argue whether the first syllables has a long or soft "A". The terrible part? Both are technically correct.
* Also, the [[{{Golem}} Clay Warrior]] of legend who has been adapted into both Pokémon and many forms of fantasy (most notably D&D). "Golum" (the typical US pronunciation), or "Go-lem" (the British)? There's a [[AccentDepundent joke based on this]] in ''Literature/TheSecretsOfTheImmortalNicholasFlamel''. Flamel apparently uses the US pronunciation, because Sophie asks him, "Golem? Like in ''Literature/LordOfTheRings''?"
* How do you pronounce the name that translates as the Lord of the Flies? BEEL-zuh-bub, be-EL-zeh-bub, or BELL-zee-bub? be-EL-zeh-bub is probably the best, as the word derives from the word Ba'al, meaning Lord in several Semitic languages. It's pronounced with two syllables, with a glottal stop in the middle. And it's how Queen pronounced it in "Bohemian Rhapsody," and they are the highest earthly authority.
* [[OurLichesAreDifferent The word for an undead spellcaster]] sometimes gives rise to mispronunciations. It rhymes with "witch".
* CelticMythology:
** The [[PublicDomainArtifact legendary sword]] ''Claíomh Solais'' shows up in videogames a lot, where it confuses the hell out of anyone who doesn't speak Irish. The correct pronunciation is "CLEE-(u)v SULL-is".
** Also, Cú Chulainn. The first word is pronounced "Koo", and the second is the Irish form of "Cullen" (though with the ''c'' modified into ''ch'', giving it a guttural "kh" sound). In particular, most Japanese media transliterates it as "Kuu Hurin". ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII'' gets somewhat more creative with "Kyukurein".
[[/folder]]



[[folder:Real Life]]
* The Dachshund dog breed. Sure, if you know German, it's easy as hell, but you still hear "dash-hound"/ "dawk-suhnd" a lot.
** Actually, if you ''are'' German, you'll probably say "Dackel" anyway.
** [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keeshond Keeshonden]] is much more commonly mispronounced. It is usually said to be "keesh-hound", but, technically, it's something close to "kays-hund".
** In a similar vein, Xoloitzcuintles have their breed name mispronounced constantly. It's SHOW-low-eats-QUEEN-lee, and people usually have more trouble spelling it than saying it.
* Demi Moore's name was generally pronounced "demmy" for a while before she made it clear it was meant to be "d'mee". A surprisingly large number of people regarded this as an absurd pretension along the lines of Marias who insist on "ma-rye-ah" or Alices who insist on "a-lease", despite the fact that this is pretty much the only time anyone has ever heard this name.
** Exaserbated by Demi Lovato, whose name is pronounced "demmy", and who is now arguably the more well known Demi.
** "Ma-rye-ah" is the ''older'' pronunciation of the name in English. "Ma-ree-ah" is the Spanish and Italian version which has only recently taken over the English-speaking world, as well, with the former version only being used nowadays when there's an "h" on the end of the name, such as Mariah Carey.
* The name of the Rothschild international banking family is pronounced by most English speakers with the "s" as part of the first syllable thus sounding like "Roth's Child", but the "s" is actually part of the second syllable and thus should be pronounced more along the lines of "Rote shillt" or 'rot schild'. This is because the name is German in origin and means "red shield".
* There are far too many people who pronounce "Adobe" as Uh-Doeb. Some even go as far as to make fun of the people who pronounce it correctly! ([[IncrediblyLamePun PS:]] correct pronunciation = "ah-''[[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons D'OH]]''-bee.")
* Inversion; The correct Korean pronounciation of "Hyundai" is something like ''Hyun Die''; most American pronounce it "Hun Day" because the company's U.S. division always has, the automotive divison going as far as putting "rhymes with Sunday" in its early print ads. British/Irish advertisements (and, consequently, motorists) use the more accurate (but still wrong) "hie-UN-die". And Australians pronounce it "hee-UN-day", a weird mixture of the American and British versions. Go figure. ("Hun-Die" (very no "y") has been spotted in the southern US, but this is probably just a complete misreading of the name. )
** The ''real'' (i.e. Korean) pronunciation of Hyundai (in the transliteration system currently favored by the Korean government it is spelled "''hyeondae''") is actually closer to the common way of pronouncing it in the US than "Hyun Die". While "hyun" (being a single syllable) is a somewhat accurate representation of the Korean pronunciation using English orthography, "die" is blatantly wrong. Since most Anglophones seem utterly incapable of pronouncing a long "e" sound (not the English "e" but roughly like a longer version of the "e" in "bend") without corrupting it into a diphthong (the "ay" in "day") if a syllable ends with the vowel "e" in many foreign languages, "hyunday" is really the closest the vast majority of monoglot Anglophones are going to get to the original pronunciation. In summary, if you want to be as faithful as possible to the Korean pronunciation, "hyunday" (two syllables) really is your best shot.
** Maya Rudolph had an SNL character that stretched it out into four syllables: high-YON-die-yay.
** "Hün-die" and "Hyoon-die" have both been present in Finnish TV commercials.
* And another car company, Porsche ('porsh-uh', like the feminine name "Portia"). It is not pronounced 'Porsh', people. The "porsh" pronunciation has become fairly standard in the English-speaking world, to the extent that anyone who pronounces it correctly risks being labelled snobby or wrong.
* And then there's Jaguar where some Americans insist on pronouncing it Jag Wire, instead of Jagwarr. Which gets more complicated since it's a British auto maker and the British pronunciation is Jag-u-war, meanwhile the word itself is Tupi and can be Haguar or Yaguar.
* Australians pronounce auto maker Nissan as "NISS'n" and Britons as "Niss-an". Americans come far closer to the original Japanese with "NEE-sahn".
* Shampoo company Pantene is "Pan-ten" in Britain, an anglicisation of the original French pronunciation, but, in America it's "Pan-teen".
** And in Scandinavia, Germany, Spain, Italy and Portugal it is "Pan-tehn-uh" with the final 'e' pronounced.
* There are not a lot of silent E's in German (or Dutch): Anne Frank's first name has two syllables ("ann-uh"). Or technically three, seeing as her full name is Annelies Marie Frank.
* Isaac Asimov's name has presented innumerable difficulty to science fiction fans, both trying to remember how to spell it and trying to figure out how to pronounce it. (This includes his first name, which frequently comes up as "Issac", despite being relatively common.) Notable example: Joel Robinson never manages to pronounce Asimov correctly (or even fluently) when the Good Doctor is mentioned in early episodes of ''[[Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000 MST3K]]''. Which may be one reason why they eventually dropped the Asimov jokes.
** Isaac Asimov himself devoted an entire editorial in his magazine to the proper pronunciation and spelling of his name.
** The usual English pronunciation has the stress on the first syllable; in Russian, (Озимов) it's on the second, so a-ZEE-muf.
*** A similar thing happens in translations of Chuck Palahniuk's works into Russian and Ukrainian. They spell his last name "Паланик" (Palanik) and "Поланiк" (Polanik) respectively, even though the original spelling in both languages is "Палагнюк".
* Eoin Colfer, author of the Artemis Fowl series. It is so bad that the first question he is usually asked in interviews is how to pronounce it.
--> "It's pronounced 'Owen', so stop making that noise like a car wooshing past you at the Grand Prix." - Neil Gaiman
* Duquesne University, in Pittsburgh. Not "doo-KEZ-nee", but "doo-KANE".
** Which is almost the exact opposite problem fans of the film of ''Film/TheShawshankRedemption'' have when reading the original novella: seeing main character Andy's last name, pronounced "doo-FRAIN", spelled as "Dufresne". Though the vowel sound "u" doesn't sound anything at all like the english "oo" in french.

to:

[[folder:Real Life]]
Life - Languages In General]]
* The Dachshund dog breed. Sure, if you know German, it's easy as hell, but you still hear "dash-hound"/ "dawk-suhnd" [[UsefulNotes/ChineseLanguage Chinese Characters]]. To be fair, most characters follow a lot.
** Actually, if you ''are'' German, you'll probably say "Dackel" anyway.
** [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keeshond Keeshonden]] is much more commonly mispronounced. It is usually said
standard part x next to be "keesh-hound", but, technically, it's something close part y formula, where the character relates to "kays-hund".
** In a similar vein, Xoloitzcuintles have their breed name mispronounced constantly. It's SHOW-low-eats-QUEEN-lee,
x in meaning and people usually have more trouble spelling it than saying it.
* Demi Moore's name was generally pronounced "demmy" for a while before she made it clear it was meant to be "d'mee". A surprisingly large number of people regarded this as an absurd pretension along the lines of Marias who insist on "ma-rye-ah" or Alices who insist on "a-lease", despite the fact that this is pretty much the only time anyone has ever heard this name.
** Exaserbated by Demi Lovato, whose name
is pronounced "demmy", something like y, but this doesn't apply to all characters, and who is now arguably the more well known Demi.
** "Ma-rye-ah" is the ''older'' pronunciation of the name in English. "Ma-ree-ah" is the Spanish and Italian version which has only recently taken over the English-speaking world, as well, with the former version only being used nowadays when
there's an "h" no way to tell if a character is working on this system, or which part is phonetic. To make matters worse, a character formed this way used in Japanese, for example, using native pronounciation and not borrowing the end of the name, such as Mariah Carey.
* The name of the Rothschild international banking family is
pronounciation directly from chinese, will not be pronounced by most the way the phonetic component would have you believe, making it look entirely like an arbitrary, nonphonetic symbol.
* Foreign diplomatic families assigned to Moscow found the Cyrillic alphabet confusing. Seeing the Russian word for "resturant" written down as PECTOPAH, there was a distinct tendency to pronounce it as though it were in the Latin alphabet. This became a running joke at the British Embassy: "What time does the pectopah open? Which pectopah shall we dine at tonight?" et c.
** Even the Slavic languages that use the Latin alphabet tend to be confusing for
English speakers because they have consonant blends that don't exist in other languages. The "sh" and "ch" sounds are spelled, "sz" and "cz," respectively, while the "j" sound is spelled "dz".
* Greenlandic is infamous for this. To someone who has never seen the language before something like "Inuit tamarmik inunngorput nammineersinnaassuseqarlutik assigiimmillu ataqqinassuseqarlutillu pisinnaatitaaffeqarlutik" doesn't even look like a real sentence. God forbid if you're non Greenlandic and you actually have to say it.
* Many Hebrew names can lead to this, so many editions of the [[Literature/TheBible King James Bible]] spell the names out phonetically,
with the "s" as part of syllables separated by hyphens. This is often referenced by parodies written InTheStyleOf the first syllable thus sounding KJV, such as ''PrivateEye''`s take on contemporary news from the Middle East:
--> "And lo, Shar-on journeyeth into the land of Us, to the House that is White, there to meet with the King of Us, which is called [[UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush Dub-ya]]."
* The entire Hungarian language. You ever tried studying it? It has 14 vowels, with only very subtle differences between many of them. Even with a native speaker helping out, it's very hard to get it right.
** Dutch has more vowel sounds than that, including several that don't exist in other languages (don't even try pronouncing the "ui" or the "ij". You'll fail [[note]]If you still want to try, though, a good place to start for ''ij'' is a sound between ''sane'' and ''sign''. For ''ui'', you can say the ''a'' in ''cat'' and then follow it up with the sound of ''ü'' in German or ''u'' in French[[/note]] ).
*** To be precise, Dutch has 13 "pure" vowels and 4 "pure" diphthongs, however phonetically Dutch has 29 vowels (vowels and diphthongs combined). To make it even more confusing, there are two diphthongs that can be spelt in two different ways but still sound the same[[note]]"au" and "ou" which sound
like "Roth's Child", but the "s" is actually part of the second syllable "ow" and thus should "ei" and "ij" which sound like described above[[/note]], although depending on one's dialect they may be pronounced like two different vowels. And let's not start about local dialects.
* Nearly all Japanese words that have been added to the English language are mispronounced. The most common offender is to use the wrong vowel sound for trailing "e"s. "Karate" ("ka-rah-teh") and "sake" ("sa-keh"), for example. Karaoke is one of the worst offenders; it should be "ka-rah-oh-keh". A good rule of thumb is to think of all "e"s as having an accent on them, especially if it's a trailing "e". "Karaté," "saké," "karaoké," etc. It's also true with "kamikaze" (it's actually "ka-mee-ka-zeh").
** Another very subtle but important facet of the Japanese language that is utterly absent in English (and, thus, almost indiscernible to an English ear) is the practice of lengthening vowels on specific words by holding the sound just a split-second longer, which can change their meaning. A famous Rakugo comedian, Katsura Sunshine, often Lampshades this for laughs with a few examples: Obasan [[note]] Literally "Aunt", but used colloquially like "Madam" to refer respectfully to a middle-aged woman[[/note]] and Obaasan [[note]] Literally "Grandmother", used
more along generally to refer to senior-aged women and implies you think the lines of "Rote shillt" or 'rot schild'. This listener is because the name is German in origin old[[/note]]; shujin [[note]]Husband[[/note]] and means "red shield".
shuujin [[note]]Prisoner[[/note]]; komon [[note]]Adviser[[/note]] and koumon [[note]]Asshole[[/note]].
* There are far too many people who Do not expect any non-scientists (or even some scientists) to pronounce "Adobe" as Uh-Doeb. Some even go as far as to make fun the Latin-derived[[note]]Though these days Greek and indigenous languages are used much more often[[/note]] scientific names of organisms correctly. One of the people who worst cases is probably ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Troodon]]'', which almost everybody pronounces "TRUE-don" instead of "TROW-uh-don" which is correct.[[note]]Originally, it was spelled "Troödon," with a diaeresis, which indicates that the vowels are pronounced separately. Unless one mistakes it for an umlaut.[[/note]]
** It doesn't help that there really isn't a one true way to
pronounce Latin, as, historically, all countries that used it correctly! ([[IncrediblyLamePun PS:]] correct pronunciation = "ah-''[[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons D'OH]]''-bee.")
* Inversion; The correct Korean
as a scholarly language ended up using it slightly differently, bending the pronounciation of "Hyundai" to fit their own language better.
** In Latin, there
is something no soft C sound, all Cs are read like ''Hyun Die''; most American pronounce it "Hun Day" because the company's U.S. division always has, the automotive divison going Ks. Cue every Latin student ever pronouncing cinnis (ash) as far Sin-us, not Kin-is. Likewise, V's were pronounced as putting "rhymes with Sunday" in its early print ads. British/Irish advertisements (and, consequently, motorists) use the more accurate (but still wrong) "hie-UN-die". And Australians pronounce it "hee-UN-day", a weird mixture of the American and British versions. Go figure. ("Hun-Die" (very no "y") has been spotted in the southern US, but this is probably just a complete misreading of the name. )
** The ''real'' (i.e. Korean) pronunciation of Hyundai (in the transliteration system currently favored by the Korean government it is spelled "''hyeondae''")
W's. This means that Caesars famous line "Veni, vidi vici" is actually closer to the common way of pronouncing it in the US than "Hyun Die". While "hyun" (being a single syllable) is a somewhat accurate representation of the Korean pronunciation using English orthography, "die" is blatantly wrong. Since most Anglophones seem utterly incapable of pronouncing a long "e" sound (not the English "e" but roughly like a longer version of the "e" in "bend") without corrupting it into a diphthong (the "ay" in "day") if a syllable ends with the vowel "e" in many foreign languages, "hyunday" is really the closest the vast majority of monoglot Anglophones are going to get to the original pronunciation. In summary, if you want to be as faithful as possible to the Korean pronunciation, "hyunday" (two syllables) really is your best shot.
** Maya Rudolph had an SNL character that stretched it out into four syllables: high-YON-die-yay.
** "Hün-die" and "Hyoon-die" have both been present in Finnish TV commercials.
* And another car company, Porsche ('porsh-uh', like the feminine name "Portia"). It is not
pronounced 'Porsh', people. The "porsh" pronunciation has become fairly standard in the English-speaking world, to the extent that anyone who pronounces it correctly risks being labelled snobby or wrong.
* And then there's Jaguar where some Americans insist on pronouncing it Jag Wire, instead of Jagwarr.
as "Way-nee, wee-dee, wee-kee". Which gets more complicated since it's sounds considerably less cool than the way people usually say it. (Note: Classical Latin. High Church Latin introduced the soft C, and also the sound "vuh" for V.)
** Also Nqwebasaurus [[note]]the "nq" is actually
a British auto maker click, and the British pronunciation "weba" is Jag-u-war, meanwhile the word itself is Tupi pronounced "WAY-ba", not "weh-ba"[[/note]] and can be Haguar or Yaguar.
Piatnitzkysaurus.
* Australians pronounce auto maker Nissan as "NISS'n" Serbo-Croatian languages zig-zag around this trope. Bosnian and Britons Serbian neatly avoids this by having everything spelled as "Niss-an". Americans come far closer it is pronounced, e.g. Music/PaulMcCartney would be Pol Mekartni. (Warning: Do not try to the back-spell into original Japanese with "NEE-sahn".
* Shampoo company Pantene
language. Results in phonetic equivalent of BlindIdiotTranslation.) This is "Pan-ten" in Britain, an anglicisation of often ignored nowadays for languages that are well understood by the original French pronunciation, but, in America it's "Pan-teen".
** And in Scandinavia, Germany, Spain, Italy and Portugal it is "Pan-tehn-uh" with the final 'e' pronounced.
* There are not a lot of silent E's in
populace, mostly German (or Dutch): Anne Frank's first name has two syllables ("ann-uh"). Or technically three, seeing as her full name is Annelies Marie Frank.
* Isaac Asimov's name has presented innumerable difficulty to science fiction fans, both trying to remember how to spell it
and trying to figure out how to pronounce it. (This includes his first name, which frequently comes up as "Issac", despite being relatively common.) Notable example: Joel Robinson never manages to pronounce Asimov correctly (or even fluently) when the Good Doctor is mentioned in early episodes of ''[[Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000 MST3K]]''. Which may be one reason why they eventually dropped the Asimov jokes.
English.
** Isaac Asimov himself devoted an entire editorial in his magazine to the proper pronunciation and spelling of his name.
** The usual English pronunciation has the stress
Croatian on the first syllable; in Russian, (Озимов) it's on the second, so a-ZEE-muf.
*** A similar thing happens in translations of Chuck Palahniuk's works into Russian and Ukrainian. They spell his last name "Паланик" (Palanik) and "Поланiк" (Polanik) respectively, even though
other hand largely sticks with the original spelling in both for Romance and Germanic languages is "Палагнюк".
* Eoin Colfer, author of
(Paul [=McCartney=] would still be Paul [=McCartney=]), while foreign Slavic names are adjusted for Croatian. This even applies for some exotic languages like East Asian languages where the Artemis Fowl series. It spelling is so bad that either English or Croatian, depending on the first question he translator (e.g. "Deng Xiaoping" and "Deng Šaoping" are both usable).
** As for foreigners pronouncing Serbo-Croatian words and names, a couple basic rules: The sound English speaking folks recognize as "J"
is usually asked written as "Dž" or if softer "Đ" in interviews Bosnian, "Ž" is how to pronounce it.
--> "It's
the "G" in "genre" the Bosnian "J" is pronounced 'Owen', so stop making as "Y", Š = Sch, Č = Ch, Ć = Ch (soft), "C" is always pronounced as "TZ" in "blitzkrieg" - never as "K", "Lj" and "Nj" are separate letters and pronounced as very soft "Ly" and "Ny" (they are a common feature of Serbo-Croatian baby speak.) The vowels are never pronounced as you think and you're probably accenting them too much- [[http://usmilitary.about.com/library/miljokes/blvowels.htm also there are preciously few around for English/American ears]]. One more thing, "*cough*" and "*spit*" are not letters of the Serbo-Croatian alphabet - no matter what many foreigners seem to think.
* The Vietnamese alphabet has been around for more than 300 years and changed very little, not to mention all the peculiar rules
that noise have been there from the beginning, so beware of Vietnamese words and names - they might not be what they look like.
** For example, in Vietnamese, [[http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/be/Ph%E1%BB%9F.oga the word "pho" is pronounced with an unrounded vowel]], so "fuh" is the closest English approximation. It's not "foe" or "faw". Places
like [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar Pho King]] have the right idea.
[[/folder]]
[[folder:Real Life - Places]]
* Almost anything from pre-1500s America, including Tlaloc, Quetzalcoatl, Huitzilopochtli, Nezhualcoyotl, Twantinsuyu, and any other name of
a car wooshing past Native American god
** I see your Huitzilopochtli and I raise
you at a Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli ("tlahuizcalli" = dawn, "pan" = in, "tecuhtli" = lord), so "Lord in Dawn").
** Almost any Mesoamerican name, for that matter.
*** Oaxaca, anyone?[[labelnote:note]]It's "Wha-HA-ka".[[/labelnote]]
* When
the Grand Prix." - Neil Gaiman
river in question is within the state of Arkansas it is pronounced the "ar-kan-saw" river. When the river in question is within the state of Kansas, it is pronounced the "ar-kansas" river.
* Native Maine residents refer to the city of Bangor as "Bang-gore" despite everyone outside of the state (including in Wales where the name originated) referring to it as "Bang-er". There's also the town of Calais, pronounced exactly the way it's spelt ... in English. Cal-is.
* Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania (best known for its namesake, Bryn Mawr College), pronounced "brin mar". The original Welsh pronunciation is more similar to "brin mowr".
** Other Welsh-derived town names in the area include Tredyffrin ([=TruhDIFFrihn=]), and Bala Cynwyd (Bahla [=KINwood=]). These towns are part of a whole "Welsh Tract" west of UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} (mostly in Montgomery County, but also extending into Chester and Delaware Counties), originally settled by Welsh colonists.[[note]]Pennsylvania was of course originally the Quaker colony, and Quakerism was quite popular in 17th-century Wales. William Penn had originally considered "New Wales" as a name for his colony, along with Sylvania, but Charles II insisted that the colony be named "Pennsylvania" in honour of Penn's father, Admiral Sir William Penn, who had helped Charles win back his throne.[[/note]] The names have long since been anglicized (Lower Gwynedd Township is pronounced like "gwen-ed" not "gwin-eth"), and indeed some names are not even really Welsh (e.g. Gladwyne), as the Welsh names of some of the older Main Line towns (e.g. Merion, Radnor, Haverford, and the aforementioned Bala Cynwyd) were seen as rather stylish in the 1850s and 60s.
*** The Welsh language in general often seems to have been deliberately designed with the aim of confusing the English, as a TakeThat for Edward I's conquest.
* The city of Cairo is pronounced like "Ky-roh", different from how it looks. Unless you're talking about the one in Illinois, where the locals say "Kay-roh".
* Duquesne University, in Pittsburgh. Not "doo-KEZ-nee", but "doo-KANE".
**
"doo-KANE". Which is almost the exact opposite problem fans of the film of ''Film/TheShawshankRedemption'' have when reading the original novella: seeing main character Andy's last name, pronounced "doo-FRAIN", spelled as "Dufresne". Though the vowel sound "u" doesn't sound anything at all like the english "oo" in french.



* From the early days of the internet through to the present: [=GIFs=], the old standard for indexed color stills and animated graphics. Do you say it with a hard "G" as in "graphics", or a soft one, as in "jiffy". As this one was used in text as an acronym far more than it was spoken, its usage was codified long before its pronunciation.
** Hard G - JIFF/JIF is another image format based on JPEG, and "jif" is also short for "jiffy", which is an [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jiffy_(time) amount of time]]. Not to mention that G stands for "graphic" so the acronym should also have a hard G.
** Soft G - On the flip side, the original developers of GIF pronounced it "jif", often saying "choosy developers choose GIF." And the same argument can be made for JPEG; The P stands for "Photographic" which means it should be pronounced "jay-fegg."
** It's weird to hear "PNG" pronounced as anything other than "pee-en-gee", but the [[http://www.libpng.org/pub/png/#history official pronunciation is "ping"]]. Not to be confused with the network diagnostic tool, but it's hard to imagine any situation in which that confusion would arise in practice.
** The prefix "giga-" is always pronounced with a hard G today, but, at one point, (when consumer technology was not yet sufficiently advanced for it to be in the lexicon of the average person) it could alternatively be pronounced with a soft "g". ''Film/BackToTheFuture'' famously uses this pronunciation when referring to "1.21 jigawatts", as it's the pronunciation used by a physicist that Robert Zemeckis consulted.
* Also from the internet: is it LudicrousGibs as in "giblets", or "gibbons"? Gib is short for giblet; this pronunciation is used in the tutorial level for the original ''VideoGame/UnrealTournament''.
* Rene Auberjonois' name is so frequently reduced to hash that part of his convention shtick involves tutoring fans on how to pronounce it. For the record, it's a French pronunciation with emphasis on the second syllable: "aw-BEAR-zhon-wa".
* Kim Basinger. Long or short A? Hard or soft G? [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in TheSimpsons, when Homer calls her "Kim BASS-in-jer" and she responds "It's BAY-singer!"
* Penn Jillette claimed on his vlog that Dr. Seuss should be pronounced as if it's in German. Theodore Geisel himself used to say "Seuss rhymes with voice," while a collaborator of Seuss's [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dr._Seuss#Pen_names_and_pronunciations wrote of him:]]
-->You're wrong as the deuce
-->And you shouldn't rejoice
-->If you're calling him Seuss
-->He pronounces it Soice
* "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sovremenny_class_destroyer Sovremenny]]" is pronounced, approximately, "Suv-reh-MEN-niy". The final y actually stands for two sounds, the first being a hard "i" which does not exist in most dialects of English, and the second like the y in "may". Since the hard i is also transliterated as "y", such words are most commonly transliterated with just one y, instead of "iy".
* Creator/VicMignogna. It's "min-''yon''-uh," for the record, but you'd never guess that if you've only seen his name in credits.
** As Vic himself once put it, "Sort of like 'tomorrow' in Spanish." (Mañana)
** Or as Creator/LittleKuriboh puts it, "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vaFp2MwE9Qs Vic McDerpaderp!]]"
* Likewise, you're likely to mostly see "Creator/SteveBlum" printed out, and probably not realize it's supposed to be pronounced "bloom".
* Kyle Hebert ("Hey-''bear''") has the same problem. Worse, it's so close to "Herbert", it's sometimes misspelled as well.
* Many people still think the ''Row'' in [[Literature/HarryPotter J. K. Rowling]] rhymes with ''cow''. Actually, her last name is pronounced "rolling".
* Creator/MattGroening. Pronounced GRAY-ning, not "Groaning". (His ancestors in Germany would have pronounced it to rhyme fairly closely with "churning".) Probably doesn't help he spells it "Groaning" in the Treehouse of Horror episodes.
** [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in ''VideoGame/TheSimpsonsGame''.
-->'''Groening (into intercom)''': Doris! Activate the super-tuned defense systems!\\
'''Doris (over intercom)''': Yes, mister Groening ("GROW-ning")...\\
'''Groening''': It's GRAY-ning!\\
'''Doris (condecendingly)''': Are you sure?\\
'''Groening (sadly)''': No...
* Brett Favre. {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in ''Film/TheresSomethingAboutMary''.
* While FDR pronounced his name "ROSE-a-velt", earlier President Teddy (a distant cousin) pronounced it "ROOS-a-velt."
* Creator/{{Amanda Seyfried}}'s last name is almost never pronounced correctly, ranging from "say-freed" to "see-fried" to "seg-freed". [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FGIUaI1jkMo She pronounces it "sigh-fred"]]
* Tone Lōc: Perplexingly averted. The confusion over how to pronounce his name is rather baffling. Isn't the guide ''in his name?''
** Not for the majority of English speakers, whose language has almost no such pronunciation marks. We see them so rarely that when we see them, we don't know what they are, so they don't register. For this reason, people now spell "résumé" without the accent marks and "Naïve" without the diaeresis.
* Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o. It looks harder than it really is.
* Would-be deadly militia group Hutaree (a word they made up that means Christian Warrior) has been pronunced "Hootery" and "[[Creator/{{Atari}} Hatari]]" by the news ([[Series/TheColbertReport Colbert]] went with "'Hatari', no relation to Atari").
* "Lingerie" is almost universally pronounced ("lahn-zhuh-RAY") in the English-speaking world. "Lan-zhe-REE" (first syllable rhyming with "can") is about as close as an anglicisation is going to get, but most people pronounce the first syllable with a long "ah", with some going on to pronounce the third as [[ItIsPronouncedTroPAY "ray" with emphasis]]. ''Lengery'' rhyming with ''revengery'' (if that were a word) would work, too.
* Pasta magnate Ettore Boiardi averted this trope with his canned products, by spelling his name phonetically as "Boyardee" on the packaging.

to:

* From Even people ''within'' the early days of the internet through to the present: [=GIFs=], the old standard for indexed color stills and animated graphics. Do you say it with a hard "G" city written as in "graphics", or a soft one, as in "jiffy". As this one was used in text as an acronym far more than it was spoken, its usage was codified long before its pronunciation.
** Hard G - JIFF/JIF is another image format based on JPEG, and "jif" is also short for "jiffy", which is an [[http://en.
[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jiffy_(time) amount of time]]. Not to mention that G stands for "graphic" so org/wiki/Kakamigahara,_Gifu 各務原]] in Japan can't be sure how the acronym city's name should also be pronounced. The city hall uses "Kakamigahara," the two rail operators that serve the city have a hard G.
** Soft G - On
their own way of calling it; JR calls it Kagamigahara while Meitetsu calls it Kagamihara. What's more, the flip side, the original developers of GIF pronounced it "jif", often saying "choosy developers choose GIF." And the same argument can be made for JPEG; local schools decides it's Kakamihara.
*
The P stands for "Photographic" which means it should French tire manufacturer Michelin. Is supposed to be pronounced "jay-fegg."Meesh-lan". Amusingly, people will often get it right (or at least a lot closer than "Mitchell-in") when talking about Michelin star restaurants. Presumably there's not much crossover between people who talk about high-class restaurants and people who talk about tires - even though the tire manufacturers are the same company who publish the Michelin Guide (the point of the Guide, which first appeared in 1900, was to show people interesting places they could go by road in these newfangled automobiles--the further people go in their cars, the more they'll wear their tires out, the more they'll need to buy new tires).
* Mississippi has a lot of these. The city of Biloxi, on the Gulf Coast is pronounced like "Bi-LUX-ee" not "Bi-LOX-ee", The local river, Tchoutacabouffa River, is pronounced, "TOO-ta-ca-BUFF-a". Gautier, a small town 20 miles east of Biloxi is pronounced , "GO-shay" or sometimes, "GO-chay". Saucier, a small town 20 miles west of Biloxi is pronounced, "SO-sure".
* Missouri residents remain [[http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/13/us/politics/missouree-missouruh-to-be-politic-in-missouri-say-both.html?_r=0 bitterly divided]] over whether their state's name should end in an "ee" sound or an "uh" sound. ''Literature/DaveBarrySleptHere'' jokingly refers to this division as the Missouri Compromise, though unlike the actual Missouri Compromise there is no clear dividing line.
* Washington State has several cities and towns with names that are either Native American words or derived from such. Two of the more irritating ones are the city of Puyallup and Sequim. People from out of state tend to pronounce them "poo-YAA-lup" and "see-kwim" (think "sequin"). They're really pronounced "pyu-AH-lup" and "skwim.
"
** * Worcester, Massachusetts. It's weird not Warchester, it's not Warsister, it's ''[[HollywoodNewEngland Woostah]]'' - think "Worce-ster".
* ‘’[[UsefulNotes/Britain The United Kingdom]]’’:
** Americans tend to emphasize the last syllable in names ending with "-ham". Brits are always amused
to hear "PNG" pronounced as anything other than "pee-en-gee", but Americans talking about "[=BuckingHAYum=] Palace", when the [[http://www.libpng.org/pub/png/#history official native pronunciation is "ping"]]. Not more like "Bucking'm".
*** English places ending with "-bury" have the same issue. Many an American musician has announced how excited they are
to be confused with the network diagnostic tool, but it's hard playing [=GlastonBERRY=] festival to imagine any situation in which that confusion would arise in practice.
** The prefix "giga-" is always pronounced with a hard G today, but, at one point, (when consumer technology was not yet sufficiently advanced for it to be in the lexicon of the average person) it could alternatively be pronounced with a soft "g". ''Film/BackToTheFuture'' famously uses this pronunciation when referring to "1.21 jigawatts", as it's the pronunciation used by a physicist that Robert Zemeckis consulted.
* Also
stifled laughs from the internet: is it LudicrousGibs as in "giblets", or "gibbons"? Gib is short for giblet; this crowd. The local pronunciation is used more like Glaston-bree.
**** On the other hand, anything with the word "berry" in it (e.g., strawberry, blueberry, raspberry, etc.) is also pronounced the same way
in the tutorial level for U.K..
*** Also occurs with many places in Australia, including
the original ''VideoGame/UnrealTournament''.
* Rene Auberjonois' name is so frequently reduced to hash that part
state capitals of Melbourne ("Melb'n" vs "Mel-BORN") and Brisbane ("Brisb'n" vs "Bris-BAYN"). Jerry Holkins of Webcomic/PennyArcade noted this in one of his convention shtick involves tutoring fans on news posts when visiting Melbourne for PAX Australia:
--> '''Jerry:''' Melbourne is actually pronounced Mel-Byn, as though it were a wizard.
*** Tip: Pronounce the word ten times really fast and by the end you'll get a likely approximation of
how to pronounce it. For it's said. And yes, for the record, it's a French pronunciation with emphasis on the second syllable: "aw-BEAR-zhon-wa".
* Kim Basinger. Long or short A? Hard or soft G? [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in TheSimpsons, when Homer calls her "Kim BASS-in-jer" and she responds "It's BAY-singer!"
* Penn Jillette claimed on his vlog
that Dr. Seuss is how these places got less-than-obvious pronunciations: people slurring words / being lazy.
** Cambridge, the University city in Cambridgeshire, is pronounced "came bridge". Cambridge, the village in Gloucestershire, is pronounced "cam bridge". By the way, Gloucestershire is pronounced "GLOS-ter-sheer". Similarly, "Leicester" is simply pronounced "Lester". Rochester is pronounced ([[UsefulNotes/AmericanAccents mostly]]) how it looks, however.
** The English town of Shrewsbury is notorious for disagreement over whether it
should be pronounced as if it's spelt, or as "Shrovesbury". So notorious, in German. Theodore Geisel himself used to say "Seuss rhymes with voice," while a collaborator of Seuss's [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dr._Seuss#Pen_names_and_pronunciations wrote of him:]]
-->You're wrong as
fact, that whenever the deuce
-->And you shouldn't rejoice
-->If you're calling him Seuss
-->He pronounces it Soice
* "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sovremenny_class_destroyer Sovremenny]]"
town is pronounced, approximately, "Suv-reh-MEN-niy". The final y actually stands for two sounds, mentioned on radio or TV, this is almost guaranteed to be the first being a hard "i" which does not exist in most dialects of English, and thing that gets brought up. On the second like whole, the y in "may". Since the hard i locals don't actually care.
*** This
is also transliterated as "y", such words are most true of Pontefract (traditionally 'Pumfrit', a bastardisation of the original French pronunciation, nowadays more commonly transliterated with just one y, instead of "iy".
* Creator/VicMignogna. It's "min-''yon''-uh," for the record, but you'd never guess that if you've only seen his name in credits.
** As Vic himself once put it, "Sort of like 'tomorrow' in Spanish." (Mañana)
** Or as Creator/LittleKuriboh puts it, "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vaFp2MwE9Qs Vic McDerpaderp!]]"
* Likewise, you're likely to mostly see "Creator/SteveBlum" printed out,
'Pon-te-fract') and probably not realize it's supposed to Cirencester (traditionally 'Sissister' nowadays more commonly 'Sirensester').
** The English town of Southwell has people (even locals) disagreeing over whether it should
be pronounced "bloom".
* Kyle Hebert ("Hey-''bear''") has the same problem. Worse, it's so close to "Herbert", it's sometimes misspelled as well.
* Many
"South-Well" or "Suth-ell", with people still think the ''Row'' in [[Literature/HarryPotter J. K. Rowling]] rhymes with ''cow''. Actually, her last name is pronounced "rolling".
* Creator/MattGroening. Pronounced GRAY-ning, not "Groaning". (His ancestors in Germany would have pronounced it to rhyme fairly closely with "churning".) Probably doesn't help he spells it "Groaning" in the Treehouse of Horror episodes.
** [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in ''VideoGame/TheSimpsonsGame''.
-->'''Groening (into intercom)''': Doris! Activate the super-tuned defense systems!\\
'''Doris (over intercom)''': Yes, mister Groening ("GROW-ning")...\\
'''Groening''': It's GRAY-ning!\\
'''Doris (condecendingly)''': Are you sure?\\
'''Groening (sadly)''': No...
* Brett Favre. {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in ''Film/TheresSomethingAboutMary''.
* While FDR pronounced his name "ROSE-a-velt", earlier President Teddy (a distant cousin) pronounced it "ROOS-a-velt."
* Creator/{{Amanda Seyfried}}'s last name is almost never pronounced correctly, ranging from "say-freed" to "see-fried" to "seg-freed". [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FGIUaI1jkMo She pronounces it "sigh-fred"]]
* Tone Lōc: Perplexingly averted. The confusion over how to pronounce his name is rather baffling. Isn't the guide ''in his name?''
** Not for the majority of English speakers, whose language has almost no such pronunciation marks. We see them so rarely
claiming that when we see them, we don't know what they are, so the one they don't register. For this reason, people now spell "résumé" without use is posh. Apparently (according to a local radio feature on pronunciation) even the accent marks BBC doesn't have an "official" answer and "Naïve" without the diaeresis.
* Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o. It looks harder than it really is.
* Would-be deadly militia group Hutaree (a word
tells presenters to use whichever version they made up that means Christian Warrior) has been pronunced "Hootery" would usually.
** Gotham, England. No, not "Goth-am", it's "Got-ham", similar to cities like Nottingham
and "[[Creator/{{Atari}} Hatari]]" by Birmingham. Oh, and it's not actually "got-ham" either, it's "goat-um".
[[/folder]]
[[folder:Real Life Companies and Groups]]
* Al-Qaida. In
the news ([[Series/TheColbertReport Colbert]] went with "'Hatari', no relation to Atari").
* "Lingerie" is almost universally
US, it seems, it's usually pronounced ("lahn-zhuh-RAY") in the English-speaking world. "Lan-zhe-REE" (first "Al KYE-duh" or "Al KYE-uh-duh" (emphasized syllable rhyming with "can") "dye"). In Britain, the media usually pronounces it "Al Kah-EE-duh." Just don't say "al-kayder". Please.
** The American pronunciation, especially the one that adds a short, neutral vowel in the middle,
is about as close as closer; the Arabic has four syllables and contains both /q/ (a uvular sound that doesn't exist in English and is very hard for English-speakers to pronounce, and /ʕ/ (or /ʢ/, depending on dialect), a pharyngeal (or epiglottal) sound which also doesn't exist in English and is virtually ''impossible'' for English-speakers to pronounce. Arabic names in general tend to be awful for English speakers, since they contain many sounds that don't exist in English, including (besides the ones mentioned) the ''h'' in ''Muhammad'' (like an anglicisation is going to get, English ''h'', but more from the throat - and definitely '''not''' like a German ''ch'') and the "S" in "Saddam" (which involves constricting the airflow through your pharynx while saying "s"--''much'' harder than it sounds, since most people hardly realize that they can control their pharynx). Another tough one is the name of Muammar al-Qaddafi/Gaddafi, [[SpellMyNameWithAnS which nobody seems to be sure how to spell it either]] (both are acceptable: [[UsefulNotes/ArabicLanguage the "Q" spelling reflects Standard Arabic, while the "G" spelling reflects Libyan Arabic]]).
* The pronunciation of Antifa, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement whose ideas will not be elaborated on]], is almost more controversial than the group. Some
pronounce it Ant I Fah but Anteefuh is just as common with Anit-Fash [[note]]Antifa is an abbreviation for anti-facist[[/note]]and even Aunti-fah-dah also occasionally being heard. It doesn't help matters at all that, despite being known for protest/riots, the first syllable group coordinates online and rarely meets outside of their rallies. So even within the group there are some arguments about pronunciation.
* Music/{{Bjork}}. The umlaut on 'o' is NOT gratuitous.
* Nobody seems to be sure if the fossa's name is pronounced 'foosa' (as seen in the film WesternAnimation/{{Madagascar}}), or
with a long "ah", with some going on to pronounce the third as [[ItIsPronouncedTroPAY "ray" with emphasis]]. ''Lengery'' rhyming with ''revengery'' (if that were a word) would work, too.
* Pasta magnate Ettore Boiardi averted this trope with his canned products, by spelling his name phonetically as "Boyardee" on the packaging.
short 'o' like how it's spelled.



* Inversion; The correct Korean pronounciation of "Hyundai" is something like ''Hyun Die''; most American pronounce it "Hun Day" because the company's U.S. division always has, the automotive divison going as far as putting "rhymes with Sunday" in its early print ads. British/Irish advertisements (and, consequently, motorists) use the more accurate (but still wrong) "hie-UN-die". And Australians pronounce it "hee-UN-day", a weird mixture of the American and British versions. Go figure. ("Hun-Die" (very no "y") has been spotted in the southern US, but this is probably just a complete misreading of the name. )
** The ''real'' (i.e. Korean) pronunciation of Hyundai (in the transliteration system currently favored by the Korean government it is spelled "''hyeondae''") is actually closer to the common way of pronouncing it in the US than "Hyun Die". While "hyun" (being a single syllable) is a somewhat accurate representation of the Korean pronunciation using English orthography, "die" is blatantly wrong. Since most Anglophones seem utterly incapable of pronouncing a long "e" sound (not the English "e" but roughly like a longer version of the "e" in "bend") without corrupting it into a diphthong (the "ay" in "day") if a syllable ends with the vowel "e" in many foreign languages, "hyunday" is really the closest the vast majority of monoglot Anglophones are going to get to the original pronunciation. In summary, if you want to be as faithful as possible to the Korean pronunciation, "hyunday" (two syllables) really is your best shot.
** Maya Rudolph had an SNL character that stretched it out into four syllables: high-YON-die-yay.
** "Hün-die" and "Hyoon-die" have both been present in Finnish TV commercials.
* Would-be deadly militia group Hutaree (a word they made up that means Christian Warrior) has been pronunced "Hootery" and "[[Creator/{{Atari}} Hatari]]" by the news ([[Series/TheColbertReport Colbert]] went with "'Hatari', no relation to Atari").
* Then there's Jaguar where some Americans insist on pronouncing it Jag Wire, instead of Jagwarr. Which gets more complicated since it's a British auto maker and the British pronunciation is Jag-u-war, meanwhile the word itself is Tupi and can be Haguar or Yaguar.
* Australians pronounce auto maker Nissan as "NISS'n" and Britons as "Niss-an". Americans come far closer to the original Japanese with "NEE-sahn".
* Shampoo company Pantene is "Pan-ten" in Britain, an anglicisation of the original French pronunciation, but, in America it's "Pan-teen".
** And in Scandinavia, Germany, Spain, Italy and Portugal it is "Pan-tehn-uh" with the final 'e' pronounced.
* Another car company, Porsche ('porsh-uh', like the feminine name "Portia"). It is not pronounced 'Porsh', people. The "porsh" pronunciation has become fairly standard in the English-speaking world, to the extent that anyone who pronounces it correctly risks being labelled snobby or wrong.
* The name of the Rothschild international banking family is pronounced by most English speakers with the "s" as part of the first syllable thus sounding like "Roth's Child", but the "s" is actually part of the second syllable and thus should be pronounced more along the lines of "Rote shillt" or 'rot schild'. This is because the name is German in origin and means "red shield".

[[/folder]]
[[folder:Real Life - People]]
* Creator/{{Amanda Seyfried}}'s last name is almost never pronounced correctly, ranging from "say-freed" to "see-fried" to "seg-freed". [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FGIUaI1jkMo She pronounces it "sigh-fred"]]
* There are not a lot of silent E's in German (or Dutch): Anne Frank's first name has two syllables ("ann-uh"). Or technically three, seeing as her full name is Annelies Marie Frank.
* Brett Favre. {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in ''Film/TheresSomethingAboutMary''.
* Many interviewers pronounce Creator/CateBlanchett's surname incorrectly, it's ''Blan''chett, not Blan''chette'', pretty obviously because there is no E on the end. It's perhaps understandable seeing as Blanchett is a surname with French origin, but Cate herself has confirmed many times that ''Blan''chett is the correct pronounciation.
* Demi Moore's name was generally pronounced "demmy" for a while before she made it clear it was meant to be "d'mee". A surprisingly large number of people regarded this as an absurd pretension along the lines of Marias who insist on "ma-rye-ah" or Alices who insist on "a-lease", despite the fact that this is pretty much the only time anyone has ever heard this name.
** Exaserbated by Demi Lovato, whose name is pronounced "demmy", and who is now arguably the more well known Demi.
** "Ma-rye-ah" is the ''older'' pronunciation of the name in English. "Ma-ree-ah" is the Spanish and Italian version which has only recently taken over the English-speaking world, as well, with the former version only being used nowadays when there's an "h" on the end of the name, such as Mariah Carey.
* Sir Edmund Halley of comet fame is sometimes pronounced "Hayley" (as in Bill Haley and his Comets), but nowadays you're more likely to find fellow scientists insisting that it's supposed to rhyme with "galley". A few diehards, however, insist that it's actually "Hawley".
** And those diehards would only be partially right. Halley lived more than 300 years ago, so his name would have been pronounced as roughly "Hawley" in his lifetime, but the English language has changed enough since then that the pronunciation rhyming with "galley" is now correct. Unless they want to pronounce his first name as "Edmoond", they are wrong.
* Eoin Colfer, author of the Artemis Fowl series. It is so bad that the first question he is usually asked in interviews is how to pronounce it.
--> "It's pronounced 'Owen', so stop making that noise like a car wooshing past you at the Grand Prix." - Neil Gaiman
* Pasta magnate Ettore Boiardi averted this trope with his canned products, by spelling his name phonetically as "Boyardee" on the packaging.
* Eva Braun's surname is pronounced "brown". Anything else is wrong.
* Geologist George William Featherstonhaugh, whose last name is pronounced "FAN-shaw."
* Creator/GuguMbathaRaw might trip up some English speakers. Her last name is pronounced "M'bahta- Raw", with the "th" sounding like a solitary "t"
* The chef Heston Blumenthal pronounces his own name with "th" taking its usual English value (like in "menthol"), but most other people affect a Germanic pronunciation - even the narrators of Heston's own documentaries (when he isn't doing his own voiceovers).
* Isaac Asimov's name has presented innumerable difficulty to science fiction fans, both trying to remember how to spell it and trying to figure out how to pronounce it. (This includes his first name, which frequently comes up as "Issac", despite being relatively common.) Notable example: Joel Robinson never manages to pronounce Asimov correctly (or even fluently) when the Good Doctor is mentioned in early episodes of ''[[Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000 MST3K]]''. Which may be one reason why they eventually dropped the Asimov jokes.
** Isaac Asimov himself devoted an entire editorial in his magazine to the proper pronunciation and spelling of his name.
** The usual English pronunciation has the stress on the first syllable; in Russian, (Озимов) it's on the second, so a-ZEE-muf.
*** A similar thing happens in translations of Chuck Palahniuk's works into Russian and Ukrainian. They spell his last name "Паланик" (Palanik) and "Поланiк" (Polanik) respectively, even though the original spelling in both languages is "Палагнюк".
* Many people still think the ''Row'' in [[Literature/HarryPotter J. K. Rowling]] rhymes with ''cow''. Actually, her last name is pronounced "rolling".
* Kim Basinger. Long or short A? Hard or soft G? [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in TheSimpsons, when Homer calls her "Kim BASS-in-jer" and she responds "It's BAY-singer!"
* Kyle Hebert ("Hey-''bear''") has the same problem. Worse, it's so close to "Herbert", it's sometimes misspelled as well.
* One guest on ''Series/MockTheWeek'' referred to Mahmoud Ahmadinejad as "Where's me dinner Dad" presumably because he couldn't pronounce the actual name.
** In the American media, "I'm a dinner jacket" has been used. The pronunciation is really something along the lines of "ACH-mah-din-uh-jad".
* Professional golfer Louis Oosthuizen once did a [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=plo2aW7lnNY commercial]] for Ping clubs that lampshaded how people can't get his quirky Afrikaans surname correct. ("It's 'UIST-hay-zen', by the way.") A year later, he's asked about this by a Golf Channel reporter and gives a different pronounciation, closer to 'Ust-hyezen'. In general, if you're not fluent in Dutch or Afrikaans and you pronounce it 'Ust-hayzen' or 'Oost-hayzen' everyone will know who you mean.
* Creator/MattGroening. Pronounced GRAY-ning, not "Groaning". (His ancestors in Germany would have pronounced it to rhyme fairly closely with "churning".) Probably doesn't help he spells it "Groaning" in the Treehouse of Horror episodes.
** [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in ''VideoGame/TheSimpsonsGame''.
-->'''Groening (into intercom)''': Doris! Activate the super-tuned defense systems!\\
'''Doris (over intercom)''': Yes, mister Groening ("GROW-ning")...\\
'''Groening''': It's GRAY-ning!\\
'''Doris (condecendingly)''': Are you sure?\\
'''Groening (sadly)''': No...



* Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o. It looks harder than it really is.
* Many people are caught off guard by Ralph Fiennes (probably best known as [[Film/HarryPotter Lord Voldemort]] or [[Film/SchindlersList Amon Goeth]]) as, despite appearing to be spoken close to "Ralf Fee-nez", it's actually pronounced "Ray-f Fines".
** In general, in a certain region "Ralph" rhymes with "safe".
* Rene Auberjonois' name is so frequently reduced to hash that part of his convention shtick involves tutoring fans on how to pronounce it. For the record, it's a French pronunciation with emphasis on the second syllable: "aw-BEAR-zhon-wa".
* While FDR pronounced his name "ROSE-a-velt", earlier President Teddy (a distant cousin) pronounced it "ROOS-a-velt."
* St. Augustine, both the 4th-century Christian thinker and the Floridian city named in his honor, is pronounced "AW-gus-teen" (the month of August, plus "teen"). Nevertheless, some maintain the pronunciation of "aw-GUS-teen" or "uh-GUS-tin" or variants.
* Creator/SaoirseRonan. Poor girl probably had to constantly correct people on the pronunciation of her first name her whole life. It's pronounced 'Sur-sha'. When she was a guest on ''Series/TheLateShowWithStephenColbert'', Colbert had her read several Irish names that would likely be mangled by Anglophones.
* Penn Jillette claimed on his vlog that Dr. Seuss should be pronounced as if it's in German. Theodore Geisel himself used to say "Seuss rhymes with voice," while a collaborator of Seuss's [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dr._Seuss#Pen_names_and_pronunciations wrote of him:]]
-->You're wrong as the deuce
-->And you shouldn't rejoice
-->If you're calling him Seuss
-->He pronounces it Soice
* The late, great TV writer and producer Creator/StephenJCannell (rhymes with "channel")
* Likewise, you're likely to mostly see "Creator/SteveBlum" printed out, and probably not realize it's supposed to be pronounced "bloom".
* Tone Lōc: Perplexingly averted. The confusion over how to pronounce his name is rather baffling. Isn't the guide ''in his name?''
** Not for the majority of English speakers, whose language has almost no such pronunciation marks. We see them so rarely that when we see them, we don't know what they are, so they don't register. For this reason, people now spell "résumé" without the accent marks and "Naïve" without the diaeresis.
* To anyone familiar with Wrestling/{{WCW}}, it's made perfectly clear how head announcer Wrestling/TonySchiavone's name is pronounced ("Shu-VAHN-ee"), but people less familiar with him often mispronounce it as either "Shu-VOAN" or "skee-AH-voan".
* Will Meugniot, comic book artist/creator and producer of such cartoons as ''WesternAnimation/{{Exosquad}}'', ''WesternAnimation/XMen'' and ''WesternAnimation/SpiderManUnlimited'', has a notoriously difficult to pronounce last name. It's "Min-ee-ot"; you can hear it in the latter series because the editor of the Daily Byte was modelled and named after him.
* Creator/VicMignogna. It's "min-''yon''-uh," for the record, but you'd never guess that if you've only seen his name in credits.
** As Vic himself once put it, "Sort of like 'tomorrow' in Spanish." (Mañana)
** Or as Creator/LittleKuriboh puts it, "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vaFp2MwE9Qs Vic McDerpaderp!]]"



* Music/{{Bjork}}. The umlaut on 'o' is NOT gratuitous.
* "Meme" is pronounced as one syllable, "meem", by the inventor of the word and concept Richard Dawkins. Yet many advocate a Japanese-influenced two-syllable pronunciation of "me me", "may may", or other variants.
** Or the same as French ''même'' which happens to mean "same".
** Incidentally, the word is supposed to rhyme with "gene", since the definition of "meme" is a "cultural gene".
* Cambridge, the University city in Cambridgeshire, is pronounced "came bridge". Cambridge, the village in Gloucestershire, is pronounced "cam bridge". And Gloucestershire is pronounced "GLOS-ter-sheer". Similarly, "Leicester" is simply pronounced "Lester".
* When the river in question is within the state of Arkansas it is pronounced the "ar-kan-saw" river. When the river in question is within the state of Kansas, it is pronounced the "ar-kansas" river.
* The UsefulNotes/{{UNIX}} editor ''vi'' is not pronounced as "vye", but "vee".
** Actually, it's even ''vee-eye'' - it literally being two letters as a shorthand (v.i., for Visual Interface).
** Linux in general is rife with mispronunciations. There's ''line-ux'' and ''leenux'' for the kernel. ''Deebian'' for Debian - named as a portmanteau of its creators Debra and Ian Murdock. ''You Bantu'' for Ubuntu - pronounced "Uh-boon-too". SUSE, per WordOfGod, is pronounced "Sooz-uh", like John Phillips ''Sousa''. Libreoffice tends to shift between the Spanish "Lee-bray" and the (correct) French "Lee-bruh" - confounding the matter is Richard Stallman's slogan to "think in Spanish" and distinguish between ''gratis'' (free as in beer) and ''libre'' (free as in speech).
** GNU is pronounced, per WordOfGod, "as one syllable with a hard G, like 'grew' but with the letter 'N' instead of 'R' " - like "new" with a hard 'G' sound. Despite this, letters are often individually pronounced to reflect the (official) acronym ''[[RecursiveAcronym GNU's Not UNIX]]''. ''Gah-noo'' is not unheard of, either.
* The entire Hungarian language. You ever tried studying it? It has 14 vowels, with only very subtle differences between many of them. Even with a native speaker helping out, it's very hard to get it right.
** Dutch has more vowel sounds than that, including several that don't exist in other languages (don't even try pronouncing the "ui" or the "ij". You'll fail [[note]]If you still want to try, though, a good place to start for ''ij'' is a sound between ''sane'' and ''sign''. For ''ui'', you can say the ''a'' in ''cat'' and then follow it up with the sound of ''ü'' in German or ''u'' in French[[/note]] ).
*** To be precise, Dutch has 13 "pure" vowels and 4 "pure" diphthongs, however phonetically Dutch has 29 vowels (vowels and diphthongs combined). To make it even more confusing, there are two diphthongs that can be spelt in two different ways but still sound the same[[note]]"au" and "ou" which sound like "ow" and "ei" and "ij" which sound like described above[[/note]], although depending on one's dialect they may be pronounced like two different vowels. And let's not start about local dialects.

to:

[[/folder]]
[[folder:Real Life - Other]]
* Music/{{Bjork}}. The umlaut on 'o' is NOT gratuitous.
* "Meme" is pronounced
There are far too many people who pronounce "Adobe" as one syllable, "meem", by the inventor Uh-Doeb. Some even go as far as to make fun of the word and concept Richard Dawkins. Yet many advocate a Japanese-influenced two-syllable people who pronounce it correctly! ([[IncrediblyLamePun PS:]] correct pronunciation of "me me", "may may", or other variants.
** Or the same as French ''même'' which happens to mean "same".
** Incidentally, the word is supposed to rhyme with "gene", since the definition of "meme" is a "cultural gene".
* Cambridge, the University city in Cambridgeshire, is pronounced "came bridge". Cambridge, the village in Gloucestershire, is pronounced "cam bridge". And Gloucestershire is pronounced "GLOS-ter-sheer". Similarly, "Leicester" is simply pronounced "Lester".
* When the river in question is within the state of Arkansas it is pronounced the "ar-kan-saw" river. When the river in question is within the state of Kansas, it is pronounced the "ar-kansas" river.
* The UsefulNotes/{{UNIX}} editor ''vi'' is not pronounced as "vye", but "vee".
** Actually, it's even ''vee-eye'' - it literally being two letters as a shorthand (v.i., for Visual Interface).
** Linux in general is rife with mispronunciations. There's ''line-ux'' and ''leenux'' for the kernel. ''Deebian'' for Debian - named as a portmanteau of its creators Debra and Ian Murdock. ''You Bantu'' for Ubuntu - pronounced "Uh-boon-too". SUSE, per WordOfGod, is pronounced "Sooz-uh", like John Phillips ''Sousa''. Libreoffice tends to shift between the Spanish "Lee-bray" and the (correct) French "Lee-bruh" - confounding the matter is Richard Stallman's slogan to "think in Spanish" and distinguish between ''gratis'' (free as in beer) and ''libre'' (free as in speech).
** GNU is pronounced, per WordOfGod, "as one syllable with a hard G, like 'grew' but with the letter 'N' instead of 'R' " - like "new" with a hard 'G' sound. Despite this, letters are often individually pronounced to reflect the (official) acronym ''[[RecursiveAcronym GNU's Not UNIX]]''. ''Gah-noo'' is not unheard of, either.
* The entire Hungarian language. You ever tried studying it? It has 14 vowels, with only very subtle differences between many of them. Even with a native speaker helping out, it's very hard to get it right.
** Dutch has more vowel sounds than that, including several that don't exist in other languages (don't even try pronouncing the "ui" or the "ij". You'll fail [[note]]If you still want to try, though, a good place to start for ''ij'' is a sound between ''sane'' and ''sign''. For ''ui'', you can say the ''a'' in ''cat'' and then follow it up with the sound of ''ü'' in German or ''u'' in French[[/note]] ).
*** To be precise, Dutch has 13 "pure" vowels and 4 "pure" diphthongs, however phonetically Dutch has 29 vowels (vowels and diphthongs combined). To make it even more confusing, there are two diphthongs that can be spelt in two different ways but still sound the same[[note]]"au" and "ou" which sound like "ow" and "ei" and "ij" which sound like described above[[/note]], although depending on one's dialect they may be pronounced like two different vowels. And let's not start about local dialects.
= "ah-''[[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons D'OH]]''-bee.")



* The late, great TV writer and producer Creator/StephenJCannell (rhymes with "channel")
* Al-Qaida. In the US, it seems, it's usually pronounced "Al KYE-duh" or "Al KYE-uh-duh" (emphasized syllable rhyming with "dye"). In Britain, the media usually pronounces it "Al Kah-EE-duh." Just don't say "al-kayder". Please.
** The American pronunciation, especially the one that adds a short, neutral vowel in the middle, is closer; the Arabic has four syllables and contains both /q/ (a uvular sound that doesn't exist in English and is very hard for English-speakers to pronounce, and /ʕ/ (or /ʢ/, depending on dialect), a pharyngeal (or epiglottal) sound which also doesn't exist in English and is virtually ''impossible'' for English-speakers to pronounce. Arabic names in general tend to be awful for English speakers, since they contain many sounds that don't exist in English, including (besides the ones mentioned) the ''h'' in ''Muhammad'' (like an English ''h'', but more from the throat - and definitely '''not''' like a German ''ch'') and the "S" in "Saddam" (which involves constricting the airflow through your pharynx while saying "s"--''much'' harder than it sounds, since most people hardly realize that they can control their pharynx). Another tough one is the name of Muammar al-Qaddafi/Gaddafi, [[SpellMyNameWithAnS which nobody seems to be sure how to spell it either]] (both are acceptable: [[UsefulNotes/ArabicLanguage the "Q" spelling reflects Standard Arabic, while the "G" spelling reflects Libyan Arabic]]).
* One guest on ''Series/MockTheWeek'' referred to Mahmoud Ahmadinejad as "Where's me dinner Dad" presumably because he couldn't pronounce the actual name.
** In the American media, "I'm a dinner jacket" has been used. The pronunciation is really something along the lines of "ACH-mah-din-uh-jad".
* Do not expect any non-scientists (or even some scientists) to pronounce the Latin-derived[[note]]Though these days Greek and indigenous languages are used much more often[[/note]] scientific names of organisms correctly. One of the worst cases is probably ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Troodon]]'', which almost everybody pronounces "TRUE-don" instead of "TROW-uh-don" which is correct.[[note]]Originally, it was spelled "Troödon," with a diaeresis, which indicates that the vowels are pronounced separately. Unless one mistakes it for an umlaut.[[/note]]
** It doesn't help that there really isn't a one true way to pronounce Latin, as, historically, all countries that used it as a scholarly language ended up using it slightly differently, bending the pronounciation to fit their own language better.
** Also Nqwebasaurus [[note]]the "nq" is actually a click, and the "weba" is pronounced "WAY-ba", not "weh-ba"[[/note]] and Piatnitzkysaurus.
* The Vietnamese alphabet has been around for more than 300 years and changed very little, not to mention all the peculiar rules that have been there from the beginning, so beware of Vietnamese words and names - they might not be what they look like.
** For example, in Vietnamese, [[http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/be/Ph%E1%BB%9F.oga the word "pho" is pronounced with an unrounded vowel]], so "fuh" is the closest English approximation. It's not "foe" or "faw". Places like [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar Pho King]] have the right idea.
* Houston Street in New York City, is not pronounced like the city in Texas, but is pronounced "HOW-ston" instead.[[note]]"Houston", as in the street, is a corruption of its namesake's real family name of Houstoun.[[/note]]
** Just like how Rodeo Drive is pronounced Ro-DAY-o Drive and not Ro-DEE-o Drive.
*** The Texan accent plays hell on names that originate in Mexico (of which there are many, since it was first a Mexican settlement). The river Guadalupe is often given a long 'u' and silent 'e', for instance, and in Austin there is a road called Manchaca which is locally pronounced 'man-shack', with residents rolling their eyes at the idiocy of anyone who tries to say it phonetically.
*** To make things worse, Manchaca is also pronounced "man-chack" by some locals, and the bus system pronounces it "man-chock-uh," which is closer, but still wrong. Another road called San Jacinto is pronounced "san juh-sin-toh" or "san juh-sin-oh," where "san" rhymes with "man".
*** And then there's the town of Refugio, locally pronounced "re-FURY-oh", even in Spanish.[[note]]This came about because the town received a large group of Irish settlers in the 1830s who had trouble with the Spanish pronunciation.[[/note]]
** Houston County, Georgia is also pronounced "HOW-ston". Georgia also has Vienna (Vye-inna), Cairo (Kay-row), Omega (O-me-guh), and Albany (All-benny).
* Americans tend to emphasize the last syllable in names ending with "-ham". Brits are always amused to hear Americans talking about "[=BuckingHAYum=] Palace", when the native pronunciation is more like "Bucking'm".
** English places ending with "-bury" have the same issue. Many an American musician has announced how excited they are to be playing [=GlastonBERRY=] festival to stifled laughs from the crowd. The local pronunciation is more like Glaston-bree.
*** On the other hand, anything with the word "berry" in it (e.g., strawberry, blueberry, raspberry, etc.) is also pronounced the same way in the U.K..
** Also occurs with many places in Australia, including the state capitals of Melbourne ("Melb'n" vs "Mel-BORN") and Brisbane ("Brisb'n" vs "Bris-BAYN"). Jerry Holkins of Webcomic/PennyArcade noted this in one of his news posts when visiting Melbourne for PAX Australia:
--> '''Jerry:''' Melbourne is actually pronounced Mel-Byn, as though it were a wizard.
** Tip: Pronounce the word ten times really fast and by the end you'll get a likely approximation of how it's said. And yes, for the record, that is how these places got less-than-obvious pronunciations: people slurring words / being lazy.
* Sir Edmund Halley of comet fame is sometimes pronounced "Hayley" (as in Bill Haley and his Comets), but nowadays you're more likely to find fellow scientists insisting that it's supposed to rhyme with "galley". A few diehards, however, insist that it's actually "Hawley".
** And those diehards would only be partially right. Halley lived more than 300 years ago, so his name would have been pronounced as roughly "Hawley" in his lifetime, but the English language has changed enough since then that the pronunciation rhyming with "galley" is now correct. Unless they want to pronounce his first name as "Edmoond", they are wrong.
* Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania (best known for its namesake, Bryn Mawr College), pronounced "brin mar". The original Welsh pronunciation is more similar to "brin mowr".
** Other Welsh-derived town names in the area include Tredyffrin ([=TruhDIFFrihn=]), and Bala Cynwyd (Bahla [=KINwood=]). These towns are part of a whole "Welsh Tract" west of UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} (mostly in Montgomery County, but also extending into Chester and Delaware Counties), originally settled by Welsh colonists.[[note]]Pennsylvania was of course originally the Quaker colony, and Quakerism was quite popular in 17th-century Wales. William Penn had originally considered "New Wales" as a name for his colony, along with Sylvania, but Charles II insisted that the colony be named "Pennsylvania" in honour of Penn's father, Admiral Sir William Penn, who had helped Charles win back his throne.[[/note]] The names have long since been anglicized (Lower Gwynedd Township is pronounced like "gwen-ed" not "gwin-eth"), and indeed some names are not even really Welsh (e.g. Gladwyne), as the Welsh names of some of the older Main Line towns (e.g. Merion, Radnor, Haverford, and the aforementioned Bala Cynwyd) were seen as rather stylish in the 1850s and 60s.
*** The Welsh language in general often seems to have been deliberately designed with the aim of confusing the English, as a TakeThat for Edward I's conquest.
* Almost anything from pre-1500s America, including Tlaloc, Quetzalcoatl, Huitzilopochtli, Nezhualcoyotl, Twantinsuyu, and any other name of a Native American god
** I see your Huitzilopochtli and I raise you a Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli ("tlahuizcalli" = dawn, "pan" = in, "tecuhtli" = lord), so "Lord in Dawn").
** Almost any Mesoamerican name, for that matter.
*** Oaxaca, anyone?[[labelnote:note]]It's "Wha-HA-ka".[[/labelnote]]
* The English town of Southwell has people (even locals) disagreeing over whether it should be pronounced "South-Well" or "Suth-ell", with people claiming that the one they don't use is posh. Apparently (according to a local radio feature on pronunciation) even the BBC doesn't have an "official" answer and tells presenters to use whichever version they would usually.
* Washington State has several cities and towns with names that are either Native American words or derived from such. Two of the more irritating ones are the city of Puyallup and Sequim. People from out of state tend to pronounce them "poo-YAA-lup" and "see-kwim" (think "sequin"). They're really pronounced "pyu-AH-lup" and "skwim."

to:

* The late, great TV writer and producer Creator/StephenJCannell (rhymes with "channel")
* Al-Qaida. In the US, it seems, it's usually pronounced "Al KYE-duh" or "Al KYE-uh-duh" (emphasized syllable rhyming with "dye"). In Britain, the media usually pronounces it "Al Kah-EE-duh." Just don't say "al-kayder". Please.
CelticMythology:
** The American pronunciation, especially [[PublicDomainArtifact legendary sword]] ''Claíomh Solais'' shows up in videogames a lot, where it confuses the one that adds a short, neutral vowel in the middle, is closer; the Arabic has four syllables and contains both /q/ (a uvular sound that hell out of anyone who doesn't exist in English and is very hard for English-speakers to pronounce, and /ʕ/ (or /ʢ/, depending on dialect), a pharyngeal (or epiglottal) sound which also doesn't exist in English and is virtually ''impossible'' for English-speakers to pronounce. Arabic names in general tend to be awful for English speakers, since they contain many sounds that don't exist in English, including (besides the ones mentioned) the ''h'' in ''Muhammad'' (like an English ''h'', but more from the throat - and definitely '''not''' like a German ''ch'') and the "S" in "Saddam" (which involves constricting the airflow through your pharynx while saying "s"--''much'' harder than it sounds, since most people hardly realize that they can control their pharynx). Another tough one is the name of Muammar al-Qaddafi/Gaddafi, [[SpellMyNameWithAnS which nobody seems to be sure how to spell it either]] (both are acceptable: [[UsefulNotes/ArabicLanguage the "Q" spelling reflects Standard Arabic, while the "G" spelling reflects Libyan Arabic]]).
* One guest on ''Series/MockTheWeek'' referred to Mahmoud Ahmadinejad as "Where's me dinner Dad" presumably because he couldn't pronounce the actual name.
** In the American media, "I'm a dinner jacket" has been used.
speak Irish. The correct pronunciation is really something along the lines of "ACH-mah-din-uh-jad".
* Do not expect any non-scientists (or even some scientists) to pronounce the Latin-derived[[note]]Though these days Greek and indigenous languages are used much more often[[/note]] scientific names of organisms correctly. One of the worst cases is probably ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Troodon]]'', which almost everybody pronounces "TRUE-don" instead of "TROW-uh-don" which is correct.[[note]]Originally, it was spelled "Troödon," with a diaeresis, which indicates that the vowels are pronounced separately. Unless one mistakes it for an umlaut.[[/note]]
"CLEE-(u)v SULL-is".
** It doesn't help that there really isn't a one true way to pronounce Latin, as, historically, all countries that used it as a scholarly language ended up using it slightly differently, bending the pronounciation to fit their own language better.
** Also Nqwebasaurus [[note]]the "nq" is actually a click, and the "weba"
Also, Cú Chulainn. The first word is pronounced "WAY-ba", not "weh-ba"[[/note]] "Koo", and Piatnitzkysaurus.
* The Vietnamese alphabet has been around for more than 300 years and changed very little, not to mention all
the peculiar rules that have been there from the beginning, so beware of Vietnamese words and names - they might not be what they look like.
** For example, in Vietnamese, [[http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/be/Ph%E1%BB%9F.oga the word "pho" is pronounced with an unrounded vowel]], so "fuh"
second is the closest English approximation. It's not "foe" or "faw". Places like [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar Pho King]] have Irish form of "Cullen" (though with the right idea.
''c'' modified into ''ch'', giving it a guttural "kh" sound). In particular, most Japanese media transliterates it as "Kuu Hurin". ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII'' gets somewhat more creative with "Kyukurein".
* Houston Street in New York City, is not pronounced like the city in Texas, The Dachshund dog breed. Sure, if you know German, it's easy as hell, but is pronounced "HOW-ston" instead.[[note]]"Houston", as in the street, is you still hear "dash-hound"/ "dawk-suhnd" a corruption of its namesake's real family name of Houstoun.[[/note]]
lot.
** Just like how Rodeo Drive is pronounced Ro-DAY-o Drive and not Ro-DEE-o Drive.Actually, if you ''are'' German, you'll probably say "Dackel" anyway.
*** The Texan accent plays hell on names that originate ** [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keeshond Keeshonden]] is much more commonly mispronounced. It is usually said to be "keesh-hound", but, technically, it's something close to "kays-hund".
** In a similar vein, Xoloitzcuintles have their breed name mispronounced constantly. It's SHOW-low-eats-QUEEN-lee, and people usually have more trouble spelling it than saying it.
* From the early days of the internet through to the present: [=GIFs=], the old standard for indexed color stills and animated graphics. Do you say it with a hard "G" as
in Mexico (of which there are many, since "graphics", or a soft one, as in "jiffy". As this one was used in text as an acronym far more than it was first a Mexican settlement). The river Guadalupe is often given a spoken, its usage was codified long 'u' before its pronunciation.
** Hard G - JIFF/JIF is another image format based on JPEG,
and silent 'e', "jif" is also short for instance, and in Austin there is a road called Manchaca "jiffy", which is locally an [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jiffy_(time) amount of time]]. Not to mention that G stands for "graphic" so the acronym should also have a hard G.
** Soft G - On the flip side, the original developers of GIF
pronounced 'man-shack', with residents rolling their eyes at the idiocy of anyone who tries to say it phonetically.
*** To make things worse, Manchaca is also pronounced "man-chack" by some locals, and the bus system pronounces it "man-chock-uh," which is closer, but still wrong. Another road called San Jacinto is pronounced "san juh-sin-toh" or "san juh-sin-oh," where "san" rhymes with "man".
***
"jif", often saying "choosy developers choose GIF." And then there's the town of Refugio, locally pronounced "re-FURY-oh", even in Spanish.[[note]]This came about because the town received a large group of Irish settlers in the 1830s who had trouble with the Spanish pronunciation.[[/note]]
** Houston County, Georgia is also pronounced "HOW-ston". Georgia also has Vienna (Vye-inna), Cairo (Kay-row), Omega (O-me-guh), and Albany (All-benny).
* Americans tend to emphasize the last syllable in names ending with "-ham". Brits are always amused to hear Americans talking about "[=BuckingHAYum=] Palace", when the native pronunciation is more like "Bucking'm".
** English places ending with "-bury" have
the same issue. Many an American musician has announced how excited they are to argument can be playing [=GlastonBERRY=] festival to stifled laughs from the crowd. made for JPEG; The local pronunciation is more like Glaston-bree.
*** On the other hand, anything with the word "berry" in it (e.g., strawberry, blueberry, raspberry, etc.) is also pronounced the same way in the U.K..
** Also occurs with many places in Australia, including the state capitals of Melbourne ("Melb'n" vs "Mel-BORN") and Brisbane ("Brisb'n" vs "Bris-BAYN"). Jerry Holkins of Webcomic/PennyArcade noted this in one of his news posts when visiting Melbourne
P stands for PAX Australia:
--> '''Jerry:''' Melbourne is actually pronounced Mel-Byn, as though it were a wizard.
** Tip: Pronounce the word ten times really fast and by the end you'll get a likely approximation of how it's said. And yes, for the record, that is how these places got less-than-obvious pronunciations: people slurring words / being lazy.
* Sir Edmund Halley of comet fame is sometimes pronounced "Hayley" (as in Bill Haley and his Comets), but nowadays you're more likely to find fellow scientists insisting that it's supposed to rhyme with "galley". A few diehards, however, insist that it's actually "Hawley".
** And those diehards would only be partially right. Halley lived more than 300 years ago, so his name would have been pronounced as roughly "Hawley" in his lifetime, but the English language has changed enough since then that the pronunciation rhyming with "galley" is now correct. Unless they want to pronounce his first name as "Edmoond", they are wrong.
* Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania (best known for its namesake, Bryn Mawr College), pronounced "brin mar". The original Welsh pronunciation is more similar to "brin mowr".
** Other Welsh-derived town names in the area include Tredyffrin ([=TruhDIFFrihn=]), and Bala Cynwyd (Bahla [=KINwood=]). These towns are part of a whole "Welsh Tract" west of UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} (mostly in Montgomery County, but also extending into Chester and Delaware Counties), originally settled by Welsh colonists.[[note]]Pennsylvania was of course originally the Quaker colony, and Quakerism was quite popular in 17th-century Wales. William Penn had originally considered "New Wales" as a name for his colony, along with Sylvania, but Charles II insisted that the colony be named "Pennsylvania" in honour of Penn's father, Admiral Sir William Penn, who had helped Charles win back his throne.[[/note]] The names have long since been anglicized (Lower Gwynedd Township is pronounced like "gwen-ed" not "gwin-eth"), and indeed some names are not even really Welsh (e.g. Gladwyne), as the Welsh names of some of the older Main Line towns (e.g. Merion, Radnor, Haverford, and the aforementioned Bala Cynwyd) were seen as rather stylish in the 1850s and 60s.
*** The Welsh language in general often seems to have been deliberately designed with the aim of confusing the English, as a TakeThat for Edward I's conquest.
* Almost anything from pre-1500s America, including Tlaloc, Quetzalcoatl, Huitzilopochtli, Nezhualcoyotl, Twantinsuyu, and any other name of a Native American god
** I see your Huitzilopochtli and I raise you a Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli ("tlahuizcalli" = dawn, "pan" = in, "tecuhtli" = lord), so "Lord in Dawn").
** Almost any Mesoamerican name, for that matter.
*** Oaxaca, anyone?[[labelnote:note]]It's "Wha-HA-ka".[[/labelnote]]
* The English town of Southwell has people (even locals) disagreeing over whether
"Photographic" which means it should be pronounced "South-Well" or "Suth-ell", "jay-fegg."
** It's weird to hear "PNG" pronounced as anything other than "pee-en-gee", but the [[http://www.libpng.org/pub/png/#history official pronunciation is "ping"]]. Not to be confused
with the network diagnostic tool, but it's hard to imagine any situation in which that confusion would arise in practice.
** The prefix "giga-" is always pronounced with a hard G today, but, at one point, (when consumer technology was not yet sufficiently advanced for it to be in the lexicon of the average person) it could alternatively be pronounced with a soft "g". ''Film/BackToTheFuture'' famously uses this pronunciation when referring to "1.21 jigawatts", as it's the pronunciation used by a physicist that Robert Zemeckis consulted.
* Also, the [[{{Golem}} Clay Warrior]] of legend who has been adapted into both Pokémon and many forms of fantasy (most notably D&D). "Golum" (the typical US pronunciation), or "Go-lem" (the British)? There's a [[AccentDepundent joke based on this]] in ''Literature/TheSecretsOfTheImmortalNicholasFlamel''. Flamel apparently uses the US pronunciation, because Sophie asks him, "Golem? Like in ''Literature/LordOfTheRings''?"
* There was the little girl of perhaps ten or eleven, on a Saturday morning zoo show on British TV, who was innocent of the subtleties of French pronunciation. Given a link to do concerning the afternoon's sporting attractions, she read off the autocue
--> And this afternoon at two, we go to Murray Walker who will commentate on the Grand Pricks of South Africa..
--> ''(Producer)'' I think you'll find it's pronounced "Grond Pree"...
--> ''(Little Girl, after a second's consideration)'' Well, it says "Grand Pricks" here!
* ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' stars Creator/MiloVentimiglia and Creator/HaydenPanettiere have trouble with their last names, both pronouncing ''and'' [[SpellMyNameWithAnS spelling]]. For the record, it's Vent-eh-meal-yah and Pan-ah-tee-air. Their costar Creator/MasiOka occasionally confuses interviewers with his first name; it's pronounced Mah-see, not [[HollywoodPudgy Massy]].
* [[OurLichesAreDifferent The word for an undead spellcaster]] sometimes gives rise to mispronunciations. It rhymes with "witch".
* "Lingerie" is almost universally pronounced ("lahn-zhuh-RAY") in the English-speaking world. "Lan-zhe-REE" (first syllable rhyming with "can") is about as close as an anglicisation is going to get, but most
people claiming that pronounce the one they don't use is posh. Apparently (according to a local radio feature on pronunciation) even the BBC doesn't have an "official" answer and tells presenters to use whichever version they would usually.
* Washington State has several cities and towns
first syllable with names that are either Native American words or derived from such. Two of the more irritating ones are the city of Puyallup and Sequim. People from out of state tend a long "ah", with some going on to pronounce them "poo-YAA-lup" and "see-kwim" (think "sequin"). They're really the third as [[ItIsPronouncedTroPAY "ray" with emphasis]]. ''Lengery'' rhyming with ''revengery'' (if that were a word) would work, too.
* Also from the internet: is it LudicrousGibs as in "giblets", or "gibbons"? Gib is short for giblet; this pronunciation is used in the tutorial level for the original ''VideoGame/UnrealTournament''.
* "Meme" is
pronounced "pyu-AH-lup" as one syllable, "meem", by the inventor of the word and "skwim."concept Richard Dawkins. Yet many advocate a Japanese-influenced two-syllable pronunciation of "me me", "may may", or other variants.
** Or the same as French ''même'' which happens to mean "same".
** Incidentally, the word is supposed to rhyme with "gene", since the definition of "meme" is a "cultural gene".
* The official pronunciation of RFID (a tiny chip present in many employee [=IDs=] and clothing items in stores) is "are-eff-eye-dee", although people frequently mispronounce it as "ARE-fid" or "RIFF-id".
* Anytime the word "Shaman" appears. Someone is going to argue whether the first syllables has a long or soft "A". The terrible part? Both are technically correct.
* "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sovremenny_class_destroyer Sovremenny]]" is pronounced, approximately, "Suv-reh-MEN-niy". The final y actually stands for two sounds, the first being a hard "i" which does not exist in most dialects of English, and the second like the y in "may". Since the hard i is also transliterated as "y", such words are most commonly transliterated with just one y, instead of "iy".



* The English town of Shrewsbury is notorious for disagreement over whether it should be pronounced as spelt, or as "Shrovesbury". So notorious, in fact, that whenever the town is mentioned on radio or TV, this is almost guaranteed to be the first thing that gets brought up. On the whole, the locals don't actually care.
** This is also true of Pontefract (traditionally 'Pumfrit', a bastardisation of the original French pronunciation, nowadays more commonly 'Pon-te-fract') and Cirencester (traditionally 'Sissister' nowadays more commonly 'Sirensester').
* Geologist George William Featherstonhaugh, whose last name is pronounced "FAN-shaw."
* The chef Heston Blumenthal pronounces his own name with "th" taking its usual English value (like in "menthol"), but most other people affect a Germanic pronunciation - even the narrators of Heston's own documentaries (when he isn't doing his own voiceovers).
* Many Hebrew names can lead to this, so many editions of the [[Literature/TheBible King James Bible]] spell the names out phonetically, with the syllables separated by hyphens. This is often referenced by parodies written InTheStyleOf the KJV, such as ''PrivateEye''`s take on contemporary news from the Middle East:
--> "And lo, Shar-on journeyeth into the land of Us, to the House that is White, there to meet with the King of Us, which is called [[UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush Dub-ya]]."
* Serbo-Croatian languages zig-zag around this trope. Bosnian and Serbian neatly avoids this by having everything spelled as it is pronounced, e.g. Music/PaulMcCartney would be Pol Mekartni. (Warning: Do not try to back-spell into original language. Results in phonetic equivalent of BlindIdiotTranslation.) This is often ignored nowadays for languages that are well understood by the populace, mostly German and English.
** Croatian on the other hand largely sticks with the original spelling for Romance and Germanic languages (Paul [=McCartney=] would still be Paul [=McCartney=]), while foreign Slavic names are adjusted for Croatian. This even applies for some exotic languages like East Asian languages where the spelling is either English or Croatian, depending on the translator (e.g. "Deng Xiaoping" and "Deng Šaoping" are both usable).
** As for foreigners pronouncing Serbo-Croatian words and names, a couple basic rules: The sound English speaking folks recognize as "J" is written as "Dž" or if softer "Đ" in Bosnian, "Ž" is the "G" in "genre" the Bosnian "J" is pronounced as "Y", Š = Sch, Č = Ch, Ć = Ch (soft), "C" is always pronounced as "TZ" in "blitzkrieg" - never as "K", "Lj" and "Nj" are separate letters and pronounced as very soft "Ly" and "Ny" (they are a common feature of Serbo-Croatian baby speak.) The vowels are never pronounced as you think and you're probably accenting them too much- [[http://usmilitary.about.com/library/miljokes/blvowels.htm also there are preciously few around for English/American ears]]. One more thing, "*cough*" and "*spit*" are not letters of the Serbo-Croatian alphabet - no matter what many foreigners seem to think.
* Creator/SaoirseRonan. Poor girl probably had to constantly correct people on the pronunciation of her first name her whole life. It's pronounced 'Sur-sha'. When she was a guest on ''Series/TheLateShowWithStephenColbert'', Colbert had her read several Irish names that would likely be mangled by Anglophones.
* [[UsefulNotes/ChineseLanguage Chinese Characters]]. To be fair, most characters follow a standard part x next to part y formula, where the character relates to x in meaning and is pronounced something like y, but this doesn't apply to all characters, and there's no way to tell if a character is working on this system, or which part is phonetic. To make matters worse, a character formed this way used in Japanese, for example, using native pronounciation and not borrowing the pronounciation directly from chinese, will not be pronounced the way the phonetic component would have you believe, making it look entirely like an arbitrary, nonphonetic symbol.
* Nearly all Japanese words that have been added to the English language are mispronounced. The most common offender is to use the wrong vowel sound for trailing "e"s. "Karate" ("ka-rah-teh") and "sake" ("sa-keh"), for example. Karaoke is one of the worst offenders; it should be "ka-rah-oh-keh". A good rule of thumb is to think of all "e"s as having an accent on them, especially if it's a trailing "e". "Karaté," "saké," "karaoké," etc. It's also true with "kamikaze" (it's actually "ka-mee-ka-zeh").
** Another very subtle but important facet of the Japanese language that is utterly absent in English (and, thus, almost indiscernible to an English ear) is the practice of lengthening vowels on specific words by holding the sound just a split-second longer, which can change their meaning. A famous Rakugo comedian, Katsura Sunshine, often Lampshades this for laughs with a few examples: Obasan [[note]] Literally "Aunt", but used colloquially like "Madam" to refer respectfully to a middle-aged woman[[/note]] and Obaasan [[note]] Literally "Grandmother", used more generally to refer to senior-aged women and implies you think the listener is old[[/note]]; shujin [[note]]Husband[[/note]] and shuujin [[note]]Prisoner[[/note]]; komon [[note]]Adviser[[/note]] and koumon [[note]]Asshole[[/note]].
* Nobody seems to be sure if the fossa's name is pronounced 'foosa' (as seen in the film WesternAnimation/{{Madagascar}}), or with a short 'o' like how it's spelled.
* Many people are caught off guard by Ralph Fiennes (probably best known as [[Film/HarryPotter Lord Voldemort]] or [[Film/SchindlersList Amon Goeth]]) as, despite appearing to be spoken close to "Ralf Fee-nez", it's actually pronounced "Ray-f Fines".
** In general, in a certain region "Ralph" rhymes with "safe".
* Missouri residents remain [[http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/13/us/politics/missouree-missouruh-to-be-politic-in-missouri-say-both.html?_r=0 bitterly divided]] over whether their state's name should end in an "ee" sound or an "uh" sound. ''Literature/DaveBarrySleptHere'' jokingly refers to this division as the Missouri Compromise, though unlike the actual Missouri Compromise there is no clear dividing line.
* Greenlandic is infamous for this. To someone who has never seen the language before something like "Inuit tamarmik inunngorput nammineersinnaassuseqarlutik assigiimmillu ataqqinassuseqarlutillu pisinnaatitaaffeqarlutik" doesn't even look like a real sentence. God forbid if you're non Greenlandic and you actually have to say it.
* There was the little girl of perhaps ten or eleven, on a Saturday morning zoo show on British TV, who was innocent of the subtleties of French pronunciation. Given a link to do concerning the afternoon's sporting attractions, she read off the autocue
--> And this afternoon at two, we go to Murray Walker who will commentate on the Grand Pricks of South Africa..
--> ''(Producer)'' I think you'll find it's pronounced "Grond Pree"...
--> ''(Little Girl, after a second's consideration)'' Well, it says "Grand Pricks" here!
* Foreign diplomatic families assigned to Moscow found the Cyrillic alphabet confusing. Seeing the Russian word for "resturant" written down as PECTOPAH, there was a distinct tendency to pronounce it as though it were in the Latin alphabet. This became a running joke at the British Embassy: "What time does the pectopah open? Which pectopah shall we dine at tonight?" et c.
** Even the Slavic languages that use the Latin alphabet tend to be confusing for English speakers because they have consonant blends that don't exist in other languages. The "sh" and "ch" sounds are spelled, "sz" and "cz," respectively, while the "j" sound is spelled "dz".
* Professional golfer Louis Oosthuizen once did a [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=plo2aW7lnNY commercial]] for Ping clubs that lampshaded how people can't get his quirky Afrikaans surname correct. ("It's 'UIST-hay-zen', by the way.") A year later, he's asked about this by a Golf Channel reporter and gives a different pronounciation, closer to 'Ust-hyezen'. In general, if you're not fluent in Dutch or Afrikaans and you pronounce it 'Ust-hayzen' or 'Oost-hayzen' everyone will know who you mean.
* The city of Cairo is pronounced like "Ky-roh", different from how it looks. Unless you're talking about the one in Illinois, where the locals say "Kay-roh".
* Native Maine residents refer to the city of Bangor as "Bang-gore" despite everyone outside of the state (including in Wales where the name originated) referring to it as "Bang-er". There's also the town of Calais, pronounced exactly the way it's spelt ... in English. Cal-is.
* Mississippi has a lot of these. The city of Biloxi, on the Gulf Coast is pronounced like "Bi-LUX-ee" not "Bi-LOX-ee", The local river, Tchoutacabouffa River, is pronounced, "TOO-ta-ca-BUFF-a". Gautier, a small town 20 miles east of Biloxi is pronounced , "GO-shay" or sometimes, "GO-chay". Saucier, a small town 20 miles west of Biloxi is pronounced, "SO-sure".
* In Latin, there is no soft C sound, all Cs are read like Ks. Cue every Latin student ever pronouncing cinnis (ash) as Sin-us, not Kin-is. Likewise, V's were pronounced as W's. This means that Caesars famous line "Veni, vidi vici" is actually pronounced as "Way-nee, wee-dee, wee-kee". Which sounds considerably less cool than the way people usually say it.
** ''Classical'' Latin. High Church Latin introduced the soft C, and also the sound "vuh" for V.
* ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' stars Creator/MiloVentimiglia and Creator/HaydenPanettiere have trouble with their last names, both pronouncing ''and'' [[SpellMyNameWithAnS spelling]]. For the record, it's Vent-eh-meal-yah and Pan-ah-tee-air. Their costar Creator/MasiOka occasionally confuses interviewers with his first name; it's pronounced Mah-see, not [[HollywoodPudgy Massy]].
* The pronunciation of Antifa, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement who's ideas will not be elaborated on]], is almost more controversial than the group. Some pronounce it Ant I Fah but Anteefuh is just as common with Anit-Fash [[note]]Antifa is an abbreviation for anti-facist[[/note]]and even Aunti-fah-dah also occasionally being heard. It doesn't help matters at all that, despite being known for protest/riots, the group coordinates online and rarely meets outside of their rallies. So even within the group there are some arguments about pronunciation.
* Will Meugniot, comic book artist/creator and producer of such cartoons as ''WesternAnimation/{{Exosquad}}'', ''WesternAnimation/XMen'' and ''WesternAnimation/SpiderManUnlimited'', has a notoriously difficult to pronounce last name. It's "Min-ee-ot"; you can hear it in the latter series because the editor of the Daily Byte was modelled and named after him.
* St. Augustine, both the 4th-century Christian thinker and the Floridian city named in his honor, is pronounced "AW-gus-teen" (the month of August, plus "teen"). Nevertheless, some maintain the pronunciation of "aw-GUS-teen" or "uh-GUS-tin" or variants.
* The French tire manufacturer Michelin. Is supposed to be pronounced "Meesh-lan". Amusingly, people will often get it right (or at least a lot closer than "Mitchell-in") when talking about Michelin star restaurants. Presumably there's not much crossover between people who talk about high-class restaurants and people who talk about tires - even though the tire manufacturers are the same company who publish the Michelin Guide (the point of the Guide, which first appeared in 1900, was to show people interesting places they could go by road in these newfangled automobiles--the further people go in their cars, the more they'll wear their tires out, the more they'll need to buy new tires).
* Worcester, Massachusetts. It's not Warchester, it's not Warsister, it's ''[[HollywoodNewEngland Woostah]]'' - think "Worce-ster".
* Gloucester is Glosstah. Leicester is Lesstah. Rochester is pronounced ([[UsefulNotes/AmericanAccents mostly]]) how it looks, however.
* Eva Braun's surname is pronounced "brown". Anything else is wrong.
* The official pronunciation of RFID (a tiny chip present in many employee [=IDs=] and clothing items in stores) is "are-eff-eye-dee", although people frequently mispronounce it as "ARE-fid" or "RIFF-id".
* Many interviewers pronounce Creator/CateBlanchett's surname incorrectly, it's ''Blan''chett, not Blan''chette'', pretty obviously because there is no E on the end. It's perhaps understandable seeing as Blanchett is a surname with French origin, but Cate herself has confirmed many times that ''Blan''chett is the correct pronounciation.
* Creator/GuguMbathaRaw might trip up some English speakers. Her last name is pronounced "M'bahta- Raw", with the "th" sounding like a solitary "t"
* To anyone familiar with Wrestling/{{WCW}}, it's made perfectly clear how head announcer Wrestling/TonySchiavone's name is pronounced ("Shu-VAHN-ee"), but people less familiar with him often mispronounce it as either "Shu-VOAN" or "skee-AH-voan".
* Gotham, England. No, not "Goth-am", it's "Got-ham", similar to cities like Nottingham and Birmingham. Oh, and it's not actually "got-ham" either, it's "goat-um".
* Even people ''within'' the city written as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kakamigahara,_Gifu 各務原]] in Japan can't be sure how the city's name should be pronounced. The city hall uses "Kakamigahara," the two rail operators that serve the city have their own way of calling it; JR calls it Kagamigahara while Meitetsu calls it Kagamihara. What's more, the local schools decides it's Kakamihara.

to:

* The English town of Shrewsbury UsefulNotes/{{UNIX}} editor ''vi'' is notorious for disagreement over whether it should be not pronounced as spelt, or "vye", but "vee".
** Actually, it's even ''vee-eye'' - it literally being two letters
as "Shrovesbury". So notorious, a shorthand (v.i., for Visual Interface).
** Linux
in fact, that whenever general is rife with mispronunciations. There's ''line-ux'' and ''leenux'' for the town is mentioned on radio or TV, this is almost guaranteed to be the first thing that gets brought up. On the whole, the locals don't actually care.
** This is also true
kernel. ''Deebian'' for Debian - named as a portmanteau of Pontefract (traditionally 'Pumfrit', a bastardisation of the original French pronunciation, nowadays more commonly 'Pon-te-fract') its creators Debra and Cirencester (traditionally 'Sissister' nowadays more commonly 'Sirensester').
* Geologist George William Featherstonhaugh, whose last name
Ian Murdock. ''You Bantu'' for Ubuntu - pronounced "Uh-boon-too". SUSE, per WordOfGod, is pronounced "FAN-shaw."
* The chef Heston Blumenthal pronounces his own name with "th" taking its usual English value (like in "menthol"), but most other people affect a Germanic pronunciation - even the narrators of Heston's own documentaries (when he isn't doing his own voiceovers).
* Many Hebrew names can lead to this, so many editions of the [[Literature/TheBible King James Bible]] spell the names out phonetically, with the syllables separated by hyphens. This is often referenced by parodies written InTheStyleOf the KJV, such as ''PrivateEye''`s take on contemporary news from the Middle East:
--> "And lo, Shar-on journeyeth into the land of Us, to the House that is White, there to meet with the King of Us, which is called [[UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush Dub-ya]]."
* Serbo-Croatian languages zig-zag around this trope. Bosnian and Serbian neatly avoids this by having everything spelled as it is pronounced, e.g. Music/PaulMcCartney would be Pol Mekartni. (Warning: Do not try to back-spell into original language. Results in phonetic equivalent of BlindIdiotTranslation.) This is often ignored nowadays for languages that are well understood by the populace, mostly German and English.
** Croatian on the other hand largely sticks with the original spelling for Romance and Germanic languages (Paul [=McCartney=] would still be Paul [=McCartney=]), while foreign Slavic names are adjusted for Croatian. This even applies for some exotic languages
"Sooz-uh", like East Asian languages where John Phillips ''Sousa''. Libreoffice tends to shift between the spelling is either English or Croatian, depending on Spanish "Lee-bray" and the translator (e.g. "Deng Xiaoping" and "Deng Šaoping" are both usable).
** As for foreigners pronouncing Serbo-Croatian words and names, a couple basic rules: The sound English speaking folks recognize as "J" is written as "Dž" or if softer "Đ" in Bosnian, "Ž" is
(correct) French "Lee-bruh" - confounding the "G" in "genre" the Bosnian "J" is pronounced as "Y", Š = Sch, Č = Ch, Ć = Ch (soft), "C" is always pronounced as "TZ" in "blitzkrieg" - never as "K", "Lj" and "Nj" are separate letters and pronounced as very soft "Ly" and "Ny" (they are a common feature of Serbo-Croatian baby speak.) The vowels are never pronounced as you think and you're probably accenting them too much- [[http://usmilitary.about.com/library/miljokes/blvowels.htm also there are preciously few around for English/American ears]]. One more thing, "*cough*" and "*spit*" are not letters of the Serbo-Croatian alphabet - no matter what many foreigners seem is Richard Stallman's slogan to think.
* Creator/SaoirseRonan. Poor girl probably had to constantly correct people on the pronunciation of her first name her whole life. It's pronounced 'Sur-sha'. When she was a guest on ''Series/TheLateShowWithStephenColbert'', Colbert had her read several Irish names that would likely be mangled by Anglophones.
* [[UsefulNotes/ChineseLanguage Chinese Characters]]. To be fair, most characters follow a standard part x next to part y formula, where the character relates to x
"think in meaning Spanish" and is pronounced something like y, but this doesn't apply to all characters, distinguish between ''gratis'' (free as in beer) and there's no way to tell if a character is working on this system, or which part is phonetic. To make matters worse, a character formed this way used ''libre'' (free as in Japanese, for example, using native pronounciation and not borrowing the pronounciation directly from chinese, will not be pronounced the way the phonetic component would have you believe, making it look entirely like an arbitrary, nonphonetic symbol.
* Nearly all Japanese words that have been added to the English language are mispronounced. The most common offender is to use the wrong vowel sound for trailing "e"s. "Karate" ("ka-rah-teh") and "sake" ("sa-keh"), for example. Karaoke is one of the worst offenders; it should be "ka-rah-oh-keh". A good rule of thumb is to think of all "e"s as having an accent on them, especially if it's a trailing "e". "Karaté," "saké," "karaoké," etc. It's also true with "kamikaze" (it's actually "ka-mee-ka-zeh").
** Another very subtle but important facet of the Japanese language that is utterly absent in English (and, thus, almost indiscernible to an English ear) is the practice of lengthening vowels on specific words by holding the sound just a split-second longer, which can change their meaning. A famous Rakugo comedian, Katsura Sunshine, often Lampshades this for laughs with a few examples: Obasan [[note]] Literally "Aunt", but used colloquially like "Madam" to refer respectfully to a middle-aged woman[[/note]] and Obaasan [[note]] Literally "Grandmother", used more generally to refer to senior-aged women and implies you think the listener is old[[/note]]; shujin [[note]]Husband[[/note]] and shuujin [[note]]Prisoner[[/note]]; komon [[note]]Adviser[[/note]] and koumon [[note]]Asshole[[/note]].
* Nobody seems to be sure if the fossa's name is pronounced 'foosa' (as seen in the film WesternAnimation/{{Madagascar}}), or with a short 'o' like how it's spelled.
* Many people are caught off guard by Ralph Fiennes (probably best known as [[Film/HarryPotter Lord Voldemort]] or [[Film/SchindlersList Amon Goeth]]) as, despite appearing to be spoken close to "Ralf Fee-nez", it's actually pronounced "Ray-f Fines".
** In general, in a certain region "Ralph" rhymes with "safe".
* Missouri residents remain [[http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/13/us/politics/missouree-missouruh-to-be-politic-in-missouri-say-both.html?_r=0 bitterly divided]] over whether their state's name should end in an "ee" sound or an "uh" sound. ''Literature/DaveBarrySleptHere'' jokingly refers to this division as the Missouri Compromise, though unlike the actual Missouri Compromise there is no clear dividing line.
* Greenlandic is infamous for this. To someone who has never seen the language before something like "Inuit tamarmik inunngorput nammineersinnaassuseqarlutik assigiimmillu ataqqinassuseqarlutillu pisinnaatitaaffeqarlutik" doesn't even look like a real sentence. God forbid if you're non Greenlandic and you actually have to say it.
speech).
* There was the little girl of perhaps ten or eleven, on a Saturday morning zoo show on British TV, who was innocent of the subtleties of French pronunciation. Given a link to do concerning the afternoon's sporting attractions, she read off the autocue
--> And this afternoon at two, we go to Murray Walker who will commentate on the Grand Pricks of South Africa..
--> ''(Producer)'' I think you'll find it's pronounced "Grond Pree"...
--> ''(Little Girl, after a second's consideration)'' Well, it says "Grand Pricks" here!
* Foreign diplomatic families assigned to Moscow found the Cyrillic alphabet confusing. Seeing the Russian word for "resturant" written down as PECTOPAH, there was a distinct tendency to pronounce it as though it were in the Latin alphabet. This became a running joke at the British Embassy: "What time does the pectopah open? Which pectopah shall we dine at tonight?" et c.
** Even the Slavic languages that use the Latin alphabet tend to be confusing for English speakers because they have consonant blends that don't exist in other languages. The "sh" and "ch" sounds are spelled, "sz" and "cz," respectively, while the "j" sound is spelled "dz".
* Professional golfer Louis Oosthuizen once did a [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=plo2aW7lnNY commercial]] for Ping clubs that lampshaded how people can't get his quirky Afrikaans surname correct. ("It's 'UIST-hay-zen', by the way.") A year later, he's asked about this by a Golf Channel reporter and gives a different pronounciation, closer to 'Ust-hyezen'. In general, if you're not fluent in Dutch or Afrikaans and you pronounce it 'Ust-hayzen' or 'Oost-hayzen' everyone will know who you mean.
* The city of Cairo is pronounced like "Ky-roh", different from how it looks. Unless you're talking about the one in Illinois, where the locals say "Kay-roh".
* Native Maine residents refer to the city of Bangor as "Bang-gore" despite everyone outside of the state (including in Wales where the name originated) referring to it as "Bang-er". There's also the town of Calais, pronounced exactly the way it's spelt ... in English. Cal-is.
* Mississippi has a lot of these. The city of Biloxi, on the Gulf Coast is pronounced like "Bi-LUX-ee" not "Bi-LOX-ee", The local river, Tchoutacabouffa River,
GNU is pronounced, "TOO-ta-ca-BUFF-a". Gautier, per WordOfGod, "as one syllable with a small town 20 miles east hard G, like 'grew' but with the letter 'N' instead of Biloxi is 'R' " - like "new" with a hard 'G' sound. Despite this, letters are often individually pronounced , "GO-shay" or sometimes, "GO-chay". Saucier, a small town 20 miles west of Biloxi to reflect the (official) acronym ''[[RecursiveAcronym GNU's Not UNIX]]''. ''Gah-noo'' is pronounced, "SO-sure".
* In Latin, there is no soft C sound, all Cs are read like Ks. Cue every Latin student ever pronouncing cinnis (ash) as Sin-us,
not Kin-is. Likewise, V's were pronounced as W's. This means that Caesars famous line "Veni, vidi vici" is actually pronounced as "Way-nee, wee-dee, wee-kee". Which sounds considerably less cool than the way people usually say it.
** ''Classical'' Latin. High Church Latin introduced the soft C, and also the sound "vuh" for V.
* ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' stars Creator/MiloVentimiglia and Creator/HaydenPanettiere have trouble with their last names, both pronouncing ''and'' [[SpellMyNameWithAnS spelling]]. For the record, it's Vent-eh-meal-yah and Pan-ah-tee-air. Their costar Creator/MasiOka occasionally confuses interviewers with his first name; it's pronounced Mah-see, not [[HollywoodPudgy Massy]].
* The pronunciation of Antifa, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement who's ideas will not be elaborated on]], is almost more controversial than the group. Some pronounce it Ant I Fah but Anteefuh is just as common with Anit-Fash [[note]]Antifa is an abbreviation for anti-facist[[/note]]and even Aunti-fah-dah also occasionally being heard. It doesn't help matters at all that, despite being known for protest/riots, the group coordinates online and rarely meets outside of their rallies. So even within the group there are some arguments about pronunciation.
* Will Meugniot, comic book artist/creator and producer of such cartoons as ''WesternAnimation/{{Exosquad}}'', ''WesternAnimation/XMen'' and ''WesternAnimation/SpiderManUnlimited'', has a notoriously difficult to pronounce last name. It's "Min-ee-ot"; you can hear it in the latter series because the editor of the Daily Byte was modelled and named after him.
* St. Augustine, both the 4th-century Christian thinker and the Floridian city named in his honor, is pronounced "AW-gus-teen" (the month of August, plus "teen"). Nevertheless, some maintain the pronunciation of "aw-GUS-teen" or "uh-GUS-tin" or variants.
* The French tire manufacturer Michelin. Is supposed to be pronounced "Meesh-lan". Amusingly, people will often get it right (or at least a lot closer than "Mitchell-in") when talking about Michelin star restaurants. Presumably there's not much crossover between people who talk about high-class restaurants and people who talk about tires - even though the tire manufacturers are the same company who publish the Michelin Guide (the point of the Guide, which first appeared in 1900, was to show people interesting places they could go by road in these newfangled automobiles--the further people go in their cars, the more they'll wear their tires out, the more they'll need to buy new tires).
* Worcester, Massachusetts. It's not Warchester, it's not Warsister, it's ''[[HollywoodNewEngland Woostah]]'' - think "Worce-ster".
* Gloucester is Glosstah. Leicester is Lesstah. Rochester is pronounced ([[UsefulNotes/AmericanAccents mostly]]) how it looks, however.
* Eva Braun's surname is pronounced "brown". Anything else is wrong.
* The official pronunciation of RFID (a tiny chip present in many employee [=IDs=] and clothing items in stores) is "are-eff-eye-dee", although people frequently mispronounce it as "ARE-fid" or "RIFF-id".
* Many interviewers pronounce Creator/CateBlanchett's surname incorrectly, it's ''Blan''chett, not Blan''chette'', pretty obviously because there is no E on the end. It's perhaps understandable seeing as Blanchett is a surname with French origin, but Cate herself has confirmed many times that ''Blan''chett is the correct pronounciation.
* Creator/GuguMbathaRaw might trip up some English speakers. Her last name is pronounced "M'bahta- Raw", with the "th" sounding like a solitary "t"
* To anyone familiar with Wrestling/{{WCW}}, it's made perfectly clear how head announcer Wrestling/TonySchiavone's name is pronounced ("Shu-VAHN-ee"), but people less familiar with him often mispronounce it as either "Shu-VOAN" or "skee-AH-voan".
* Gotham, England. No, not "Goth-am", it's "Got-ham", similar to cities like Nottingham and Birmingham. Oh, and it's not actually "got-ham" either, it's "goat-um".
* Even people ''within'' the city written as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kakamigahara,_Gifu 各務原]] in Japan can't be sure how the city's name should be pronounced. The city hall uses "Kakamigahara," the two rail operators that serve the city have their own way of calling it; JR calls it Kagamigahara while Meitetsu calls it Kagamihara. What's more, the local schools decides it's Kakamihara.
unheard of, either.



16th Apr '18 9:10:16 PM BreadBull
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* Creator/VincentVanGogh: IPA [fan χoχ]. The "g" and "gh" are exactly the same, a rough guttural. The "o" is short, like in "lot". The "a" in "van" sounds like the "a" in "dawn", only a bit shorter. And the "v" is a bit sharp, sounding closer to an "f" sound, but still voiced. Incidentally, it's a lower case "v" (Except when the first name is left out - it's "Vincent van Gogh" - lowercase v, but "Mr. Van Gogh" - capital V). Oh, and the "e" in "Vincent" is not a schwa, but sounds like the ''first'' "e" in "letter".

to:

* Creator/VincentVanGogh: IPA [fan χoχ]. The "g" and "gh" are exactly the same, a rough guttural. The "o" is short, like in "lot". The "a" in "van" sounds like the "a" in "dawn", only a bit shorter. And the "v" is a bit sharp, sounding closer to an "f" sound, but still voiced. Incidentally, If you know Klingon, it's a lower case "v" (Except when ''van ghoH''. And if you don't, the first name is left out - it's "Vincent van Gogh" - lowercase v, but "Mr. Van Gogh" - capital V). Oh, and the "e" in "Vincent" is not a schwa, but sounds funky &#967 letters are pronounced like the ''first'' "e" in "letter".one is clearing their throat.
16th Apr '18 8:52:27 PM BreadBull
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* Creator/MattGroening. Pronounced GRAY-ning, not "Groaning". (His ancestors in Germany would have pronounced it to rhyme fairly closely with "churning".) [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in ''VideoGame/TheSimpsonsGame''.

to:

* Creator/MattGroening. Pronounced GRAY-ning, not "Groaning". (His ancestors in Germany would have pronounced it to rhyme fairly closely with "churning".) [[LampshadeHanging ) Probably doesn't help he spells it "Groaning" in the Treehouse of Horror episodes.
**[[LampshadeHanging
Lampshaded]] in ''VideoGame/TheSimpsonsGame''.
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