History Main / NoOShACompliance

19th Aug '17 7:28:49 PM AnonFangeekGirl
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* The [[UsefulNotes/RMSTitanic RMS]] ''[[UsefulNotes/RMSTitanic Titanic]]'' was actually a subversion of this, despite what CommonKnowledge might tell you. Safety (along with luxury) was a selling point of the ''Olympic'' class of liners, so the ''Titanic'' was tricked out with every safety measure the builders could think of, and while it's true that she did not have enough lifeboats for all her passengers, she was carrying four more than the law required (maritime regulations called for 16 lifeboats in ships over 10,000 tonnes, and the ''Titanic'' had those plus four collapsibles. Problem was, the ''Titanic'' happened to be over 50,000 tonnes, so it still wasn't enough). The real problem in the ''Titanic'' disaster was the regulations themselves- aside from the well-known problem with the lifeboats, no lifeboat drills were required (and the ''Titanic'' never had any), round-the-clock wireless operation was not required (''Titanic'', being a giant passenger ship, had two operators for round-the-clock duty, but neither the ''Californian'' or the ''Carpathia'' did- the ''Carpathia'' was very lucky to catch the ''Titanic'''s distress signal), wireless operators were employees of Marconi Wireless and instructed to prioritize passenger messages over weather reports (The ''Titanic'' received and basically ignored several iceberg warnings), and iceberg warnings were treated as advisories instead of major hazards. That along with the fact that iceberg-sideswipe damage was not among the foreseen dangers ''Titanic'' could withstand was what really turned the ''Titanic'''s maiden voyage into a tragedy. Frankly, with the state of maritime safety, ''some'' massive disaster was pretty much inevitable, and the ''Titanic'' drew the metaphorical short straw.

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* The [[UsefulNotes/RMSTitanic RMS]] ''[[UsefulNotes/RMSTitanic Titanic]]'' was actually a subversion of this, despite what CommonKnowledge might tell you. Safety (along with luxury) was a selling point of the ''Olympic'' class of liners, so the ''Titanic'' was tricked out with every safety measure the builders could think of, and while it's true that she did not have enough lifeboats for all her passengers, she was carrying four more than the law required (maritime regulations called for 16 lifeboats in ships over 10,000 tonnes, and the ''Titanic'' had those plus four collapsibles. Problem was, the ''Titanic'' happened to be over 50,000 tonnes, so it still wasn't enough). The real problem in the ''Titanic'' disaster was the regulations themselves- aside from the well-known problem with the lifeboats, no lifeboat drills were required (and the ''Titanic'' never had any), round-the-clock wireless operation was not required (''Titanic'', being a giant passenger ship, had two operators for round-the-clock duty, but neither the ''Californian'' or the ''Carpathia'' did- the ''Carpathia'' was very lucky to catch the ''Titanic'''s ''Titanic's'' distress signal), the meaning of fired rockets was not clearly 'immediate and severe distress', wireless operators were employees of Marconi Wireless and instructed to prioritize passenger messages over weather reports (The ''Titanic'' received and basically ignored several iceberg warnings), and iceberg warnings were treated as advisories instead of major hazards. That along with the fact that iceberg-sideswipe damage was not among the foreseen dangers ''Titanic'' could withstand was what really turned the ''Titanic'''s ''Titanic's'' maiden voyage into a tragedy. Frankly, with the state of maritime safety, ''some'' massive disaster was pretty much inevitable, and the ''Titanic'' drew the metaphorical short straw.
19th Aug '17 7:25:24 PM AnonFangeekGirl
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* The [[UsefulNotes/RMSTitanic RMS]] ''[[UsefulNotes/RMSTitanic Titanic]]'' was actually a subversion of this. The ship was in full compliance with the maritime safety regulations of the day. Ships of over 10,000 tons required sixteen liftboats and ''Titanic'' actually carried four more than required. However, the problem was that said regulations had last been updated eighteen years prior, and failed to take into account the size-increase in shipbuilding. Thomas Andrews, the ship's builder, had lobbied the White Star Line to double the number of the ship's lifeboats, but was unsuccessful.

to:

* The [[UsefulNotes/RMSTitanic RMS]] ''[[UsefulNotes/RMSTitanic Titanic]]'' was actually a subversion of this. The ship was in full compliance this, despite what CommonKnowledge might tell you. Safety (along with the maritime safety regulations luxury) was a selling point of the day. Ships ''Olympic'' class of over 10,000 tons required sixteen liftboats and liners, so the ''Titanic'' actually carried was tricked out with every safety measure the builders could think of, and while it's true that she did not have enough lifeboats for all her passengers, she was carrying four more than required. However, the problem was that said law required (maritime regulations called for 16 lifeboats in ships over 10,000 tonnes, and the ''Titanic'' had last been updated eighteen years prior, and failed to take into account those plus four collapsibles. Problem was, the size-increase ''Titanic'' happened to be over 50,000 tonnes, so it still wasn't enough). The real problem in shipbuilding. Thomas Andrews, the ship's builder, had lobbied ''Titanic'' disaster was the White Star Line to double regulations themselves- aside from the number of well-known problem with the ship's lifeboats, no lifeboat drills were required (and the ''Titanic'' never had any), round-the-clock wireless operation was not required (''Titanic'', being a giant passenger ship, had two operators for round-the-clock duty, but neither the ''Californian'' or the ''Carpathia'' did- the ''Carpathia'' was unsuccessful.very lucky to catch the ''Titanic'''s distress signal), wireless operators were employees of Marconi Wireless and instructed to prioritize passenger messages over weather reports (The ''Titanic'' received and basically ignored several iceberg warnings), and iceberg warnings were treated as advisories instead of major hazards. That along with the fact that iceberg-sideswipe damage was not among the foreseen dangers ''Titanic'' could withstand was what really turned the ''Titanic'''s maiden voyage into a tragedy. Frankly, with the state of maritime safety, ''some'' massive disaster was pretty much inevitable, and the ''Titanic'' drew the metaphorical short straw.
16th Aug '17 4:38:26 PM DarkHunter
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** ''Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay'' averts this, as the smelting factory here has plenty of guardrails, with the only spot without them intended for lowering objects into a vat.

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** ''Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay'' averts this, as the smelting factory here has plenty of guardrails, with the only spot without them intended for lowering objects into a vat. The factory is also evacuated when a helium tanker crashes into it, with one worker hitting the alarm and everyone immediately running for it.
3rd Aug '17 3:56:38 PM Kadorhal
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* ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'': Barrels of toxic waste strewn all over the place. And the pits of toxic waste, later lava, and blood. The Radiation Suit entry in the ''VideoGame/DoomIIHellOnEarth'' strategy guide calls this trope out almost word-for-word: "OSHA may not like it, but to get the job done, you're going to have to handle a little toxic waste."
** Mocked(?) by the ''Comicbook/{{Doom}}'' comic, when the Marine falls into a vat of toxic waste. He then climbs out and gives an out-of-nowhere fullpanel monologue about the world we're leaving for our children.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'': Barrels of toxic waste strewn all over the place. And the pits of toxic waste, later lava, and blood. The Radiation Suit entry in the ''VideoGame/DoomIIHellOnEarth'' ''Doom II'' strategy guide calls this trope out almost word-for-word: "OSHA may not like it, but to get the job done, you're going to have to handle a little toxic waste."
** Mocked(?) by the ''Comicbook/{{Doom}}'' comic, when the Marine falls into a vat of toxic waste. He then climbs out and gives an out-of-nowhere fullpanel monologue about the world we're leaving for our children.children - only to get distracted with the realization of a much worse issue, that being his gun is out of ammo.



* In ''[[VideoGame/EVEOnline EVE Online]]'' one of the commodoties that players can manufacture, trade, and use in assembling other items are "construction blocks", the description for which reads ''"Metal girders, plasteel concrete, and fiber blocks are all common construction materials used in almost every large-scale building or manufacturing project throughout New Eden."'... The blueprint for them consists entirely of toxic metals and reactive metals. In other words, the most ubiquitous structural components in New Eden are made out of lead and lithium.

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* In ''[[VideoGame/EVEOnline EVE Online]]'' ''VideoGame/EVEOnline'' one of the commodoties that players can manufacture, trade, and use in assembling other items are "construction blocks", the description for which reads ''"Metal girders, plasteel concrete, and fiber blocks are all common construction materials used in almost every large-scale building or manufacturing project throughout New Eden."'... The blueprint for them consists entirely of toxic metals and reactive metals. In other words, the most ubiquitous structural components in New Eden are made out of lead and lithium.



** By contrast, the Origin Facility in ''VideoGame/FirstEncounterAssaultRecon''. Pits with low handrails (if they're there ''at all''), exposed machinery, electrical circuits out in the open... Armacham certainly cut their budget on safety there. Multiple areas which would be difficult to even work in, much less be safe in. One of the worst examples is the cleaning closet with one door that opens onto an elevator shaft, and another that opens onto a standard office area. ''Both doors are unlocked''.

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** By contrast, the Origin Facility in ''VideoGame/FirstEncounterAssaultRecon''.the first game. Pits with low handrails (if they're there ''at all''), exposed machinery, electrical circuits out in the open... Armacham certainly cut their budget on safety there. Multiple areas which would be difficult to even work in, much less be safe in. One of the worst examples is the cleaning closet with one door that opens onto an elevator shaft, and another that opens onto a standard office area. ''Both doors are unlocked''.



* In ''[[VideoGame/DarkForcesSaga Jedi Outcast]]'', there are two levels (one on a space station, another on a spaceship) where the player can deactivate the energy shields which keep hangars pressurized. The result? All enemies in the hangar immediately go flying out to meet their swift, unexpected, horrific, and [[TheJoysOfTorturingMooks honestly quite amusing]] deaths. But in retrospect, you'd think there would be some kind of deliberate delay time between the pushing of the button and the dropping of the shields, allowing time for people to evacuate the hangar, preventing exactly this sort of thing from happening.

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* In ''[[VideoGame/DarkForcesSaga Jedi Outcast]]'', ''VideoGame/JediKnightIIJediOutcast'', there are two levels (one on a space station, another on a spaceship) where the player can deactivate the energy shields which keep hangars pressurized. The result? All enemies in the hangar immediately go flying out to meet their swift, unexpected, horrific, and [[TheJoysOfTorturingMooks honestly quite amusing]] deaths. But in retrospect, you'd think there would be some kind of deliberate delay time between the pushing of the button and the dropping of the shields, allowing time for people to evacuate the hangar, preventing exactly this sort of thing from happening.



* ''Literature/ShadowsOfTheEmpire'' for the N64 asks us to believe the Rebels forgot to install safety railings for much of the basement level of their Hoth base. And it's just one bar where there are railings. Cue Stormtroopers falling to a hideous death when blasted...

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* ''Literature/ShadowsOfTheEmpire'' for the N64 asks us to believe the Rebels forgot to install safety railings for much of the basement level of their Hoth base. And it's just one bar where there are railings. Cue Stormtroopers falling to a hideous death when blasted...blasted.



* Justified in ''VideoGame/UnrealTournament'' where the various industrial buildings ''were'' shut down for ignoring various safety protocols, but were then repurposed by Liandri and are intentionally kept as dangerous as possible for entertainment purposes.
** Played straight in ''VideoGame/{{Unreal}}'', the expansion lampshades it at one point in a Skaarj facility with a run through spiked doors near a message:

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* Justified with a side order of LampshadeHanging in ''VideoGame/UnrealTournament'' and [[VideoGame/UnrealTournament2004 its]] [[VideoGame/UnrealTournament3 sequels]], where the various industrial buildings ''were'' shut down for ignoring various safety protocols, but were then repurposed by Liandri as arenas for the Tournament, and are intentionally kept as dangerous as possible for the challenge and entertainment purposes.
** Played straight in ''VideoGame/{{Unreal}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Unreal|I}}'', the expansion lampshades it at one point in a Skaarj facility with a run through spiked doors near a message:
27th Jul '17 6:21:04 AM Jhonny
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Added DiffLines:

** Notably US railroads follow rules that are ''very'' different from those followed by most in Asia and virtually all in Europe. Whether that is a good or a bad thing (and whether some rules are actually good for safety) is SeriousBusiness among rail enthusiast circles.
26th Jul '17 8:34:15 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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** And those electronic locks? Can't be operated by hand. One of the most tense scenes near the end of the film becomes ludicrous when the FridgeLogic hits you that a manual deadbolt could have solved the entire "boot up the system/keep out the raptor" dilemma much more easily. Lampshaded by Music/WeirdAlYankovic on the ''Podcast/Rifftrax'' commentary:

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** And those electronic locks? Can't be operated by hand. One of the most tense scenes near the end of the film becomes ludicrous when the FridgeLogic hits you that a manual deadbolt could have solved the entire "boot up the system/keep out the raptor" dilemma much more easily. Lampshaded by Music/WeirdAlYankovic on the ''Podcast/Rifftrax'' ''Podcast/{{Rifftrax}}'' commentary:
26th Jul '17 8:33:54 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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** And those electronic locks? Can't be operated by hand. One of the most tense scenes near the end of the film becomes ludicrous when the FridgeLogic hits you that a manual deadbolt could have solved the entire "boot up the system/keep out the raptor" dilemma much more easily.

to:

** And those electronic locks? Can't be operated by hand. One of the most tense scenes near the end of the film becomes ludicrous when the FridgeLogic hits you that a manual deadbolt could have solved the entire "boot up the system/keep out the raptor" dilemma much more easily. Lampshaded by Music/WeirdAlYankovic on the ''Podcast/Rifftrax'' commentary:
--> "Y'know, my bathroom door has a button on the knob. Ya press it, AND IT '''LOCKS'''."
25th Jul '17 3:38:31 PM IceMaster
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* Military combat engineers, in most armies, are expected to make very careful records of where they put landmines and little surprises designed to make life tricky for attackers. This is sound practice, as when the war is over or the front line moves on, you need to clean up afterwards, to prevent collateral damage and to retrieve and deactivate the munitions. In the Falklands Islands, British military engineers charged with clean-up after the war were less than happy that their Argentinian counterparts, in defiance of good practice, had set up minefields in a haphazard, random way and had not kept any sort of record as to where, or as to how many mines they'd used and of what type. To this day [[BaaBomb sheep still go "bang"]] in parts of East Falkland.
** While what the Argentinians did was bad, it's nothing compared to some idiots back in UsefulNotes/WorldWarI who invented ''glass'' mines (which cannot be detected by metal detectors) buried them somewhere and then conveniently forgot where they put them. Over a century later some regions on the former Western Front are still inaccessible due to that and UsefulNotes/TheLawsAndCustomsOfWar were actually amended to specifically outlaw any type of mine that cannot be detected (i.e. those made from glass plastic or the likes). Let's hope [[EvenEvilHasStandards nobody is ever stupid enough to break this rule]].

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* Military combat engineers, in most armies, are expected to make very careful records of where they put landmines and little surprises designed to make life tricky for attackers. This is sound practice, as when the war is over or the front line moves on, you need to clean up afterwards, to prevent collateral damage and to retrieve and deactivate the munitions. In the Falklands Islands, British military engineers charged with clean-up after the war were less than happy that their Argentinian counterparts, in defiance of good practice, had set up minefields in a haphazard, random way way, and had not kept any sort of record as to where, or as to how many mines they'd used and of what type. To this day day, [[BaaBomb sheep still go "bang"]] in parts of East Falkland.
** While what the Argentinians did was bad, it's nothing compared to some idiots back in UsefulNotes/WorldWarI who invented ''glass'' mines (which cannot be detected by metal detectors) detectors), buried them somewhere somewhere, and then conveniently forgot where they put them. Over a century later some regions on the former Western Front are still inaccessible due to that that, and UsefulNotes/TheLawsAndCustomsOfWar were actually amended to specifically outlaw any type of mine that cannot be detected (i.e. those made from glass plastic or the likes). Let's hope [[EvenEvilHasStandards nobody is ever stupid enough to break this rule]].



** United Airlines also removed the engine and the pylon as a unit, but they used an overhead hoist that made the correct positioning of the parts much easier, and, indeed, no United DC-10 showed any damage to pylons, while for American and Continental the damage was endemical. It's a mystery why this much safer and easier procedure wasn't adopted by all airlines, especially as using a forklift was a chore and was universally hated by the maintenance workers.

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** United Airlines also removed the engine and the pylon as a unit, but they used an overhead hoist that made the correct positioning of the parts much easier, and, indeed, no United DC-10 showed any damage to pylons, while for American and Continental the damage was endemical. It's a mystery why this much safer and easier procedure wasn't adopted by all airlines, especially as using a forklift was a chore chore, and was universally hated by the maintenance workers.



* Somewhat inverted with the dangerous but somehow nonfatal paternoster, or "cyclic elevator", an elevator invented in the late 1800s in England. The paternoster is named after the first two words of the Lord's Prayer in Latin (Our Father) in reference to rosary beads, which the paternoster's string of cars resembles. The paternoster consists of a string of cars that are attached to a chain that circulates around two elevator shafts, [[http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/85/Paternoster_animated.gif one going up and the other going down]]The elevator cars do not flip over at the top or bottom - they instead stay upright and cycle over to the shaft going the other direction. The paternoster's main claims to infamy are its lack of doors and the fact that it ''never stops''. Yet despite its frightening setup, the paternoster elevator has killed just five people from 1970 to the present day. However, frightened governments have banned the construction of new paternosters and many building managers have phased out existing ones. Today only around 40 paternosters are left, with none in the US.

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* Somewhat inverted with the dangerous but somehow nonfatal paternoster, or "cyclic elevator", an elevator invented in the late 1800s in England. The paternoster is named after the first two words of the Lord's Prayer in Latin (Our Father) in reference to rosary beads, which the paternoster's string of cars resembles. The paternoster consists of a string of cars that are attached to a chain that circulates around two elevator shafts, [[http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/85/Paternoster_animated.gif one going up and the other going down]]The down]]. The elevator cars do not flip over at the top or bottom - they instead stay upright and cycle over to the shaft going the other direction. The paternoster's main claims to infamy are its lack of doors and the fact that it ''never stops''. Yet despite its frightening setup, the paternoster elevator has killed just five people from 1970 to the present day. However, frightened governments have banned the construction of new paternosters paternosters, and many building managers have phased out existing ones. Today only around 40 paternosters are left, with none in the US.



* The [[UsefulNotes/RMSTitanic RMS]] ''[[UsefulNotes/RMSTitanic Titanic]]'' was actually a subversion of this. The ship was in full compliance with the maritime safety regulations of the day. Ships of over 10,000 tons required sixteen liftboats and ''Titanic'' actually carried four more than required. However, the problem was that said regulations had last been updated eighteen years prior and failed to take into account the size-increase in shipbuilding. Thomas Andrews, the ship's builder, had lobbied the White Star Line to double the number of the ship's lifeboats but was unsuccessful.

to:

* The [[UsefulNotes/RMSTitanic RMS]] ''[[UsefulNotes/RMSTitanic Titanic]]'' was actually a subversion of this. The ship was in full compliance with the maritime safety regulations of the day. Ships of over 10,000 tons required sixteen liftboats and ''Titanic'' actually carried four more than required. However, the problem was that said regulations had last been updated eighteen years prior prior, and failed to take into account the size-increase in shipbuilding. Thomas Andrews, the ship's builder, had lobbied the White Star Line to double the number of the ship's lifeboats lifeboats, but was unsuccessful.
25th Jul '17 3:31:24 PM IceMaster
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* The Russian Mayak radiochemical plant is probably even ''more'' unstable than the Hanford site. Because the Soviet Union was far behind the US in nuclear science in the 1940s, the plant was built with the main goal of producing enough plutonium ''yesterday'' and little regard for workplace or environmental safety, dumping radioactive wastes into nearby bodies of water. Little was known at the time about the properties of nuclear materials, leading to a series of nuclear accidents that culminated in 1957 with the so-called "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kyshtym_disaster Kyshtym disaster]]", an explosion of stored nuclear waste which released a huge cloud of radioactive particles.
** Even prior to the Kyshtym disaster, about 2/3 of the population in villages immediately near the Mayak cite had chronic radiation sickness. Doctors called it "the special disease". Specifically, Soviet authorities forbade doctors from diagnosing anyone with any type of radiation poisoning, because of their "nothing to see here, radiation is perfectly safe" PR campaigns. The doctors knew what was wrong, but they weren't allowed to tell anyone, and they were pretty much only allowed to use placebo treatments, instead of treatments that could've actually helped. "Special disease" was a code that was a sort of "open secret" among the doctors.
** Starting in 1951, waste from Mayak was dumped in a nearby lake, Lake Karachay. The plan had been to sieve the waste back out and dump it into vats at Mayak - but it was ''too radioactive to do that safely''. The radioactivity goes down with time, and for a while the waste was contained to the lake. But starting in the 1960s, the lake began to dry out. Result: Wind-blown radioactive dust. So in the 1980s the lake bottom was covered by dumping a large assemblage of concrete blocks into it - with the workers staying inside the trucks. As of 1990, there were ''still'' a few spots so radioactive that an unshielded human would get a lethal dose of radiation in an hour.

to:

* The Russian Mayak radiochemical plant is probably even ''more'' unstable than the Hanford site. Because the Soviet Union was far behind the US in nuclear science in the 1940s, the plant was built with the main goal of producing enough plutonium ''yesterday'' plutonium, and held little regard for workplace or environmental safety, dumping radioactive wastes into nearby bodies of water. Little was known at the time about the properties of nuclear materials, leading to a series of nuclear accidents that culminated in 1957 with the so-called "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kyshtym_disaster Kyshtym disaster]]", an explosion of stored nuclear waste which released a huge cloud of radioactive particles.
** Even prior to the Kyshtym disaster, about 2/3 2/3rds of the population in villages immediately near the Mayak cite had chronic radiation sickness. Doctors called it "the special disease". Specifically, Soviet authorities forbade doctors from diagnosing anyone with any type of radiation poisoning, because of their "nothing to see here, radiation is perfectly safe" PR campaigns. The doctors knew what was wrong, but they weren't allowed to tell anyone, and they were pretty much only allowed to use placebo treatments, instead of treatments that could've actually helped. "Special disease" was a code that was a sort of "open secret" among the doctors.
** Starting in 1951, waste from Mayak was dumped in a nearby lake, Lake Karachay. The plan had been to sieve the waste back out and dump it into vats at Mayak - but it was ''too radioactive to do that safely''. The radioactivity goes down decreases with time, and for a while the waste was contained to the lake. But starting in the 1960s, the lake began to dry out. Result: Wind-blown radioactive dust. So in the 1980s the lake bottom was covered by dumping a large assemblage of concrete blocks into it - with the workers staying inside the trucks. As of 1990, there were ''still'' a few spots so radioactive that an unshielded human would get a lethal dose of radiation in an hour.



* There's growing concern in Britain that health and safety regulations are being taken to ludicrous extremes not so much to protect the worker as to protect management against litigation, to satisfy insurance companies, or to make work for lawyers. A legitimate criticism is that when every conceivable procedure requires a risk assessment -- even things as trivial as replacing a dud light bulb where surely common sense should apply -- people will assume that all regulations are equally trivial and neglect the really important measures. [[http://www.simplesensiblesafety.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&id=4&Itemid=92 This]] is a list of Health and Safety decisions that appear to go too far.

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* There's growing concern in Britain that health and safety regulations are being taken to ludicrous extremes extremes, not so much to protect the worker as to protect management against litigation, to satisfy insurance companies, or to make work for lawyers. A legitimate criticism is that when every conceivable procedure requires a risk assessment -- even things as trivial as replacing a dud light bulb where surely common sense should apply -- people will assume that all regulations are equally trivial and neglect the really important measures. [[http://www.simplesensiblesafety.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&id=4&Itemid=92 This]] is a list of Health and Safety decisions that appear to go too far.



** It probably does not get much more {{egregious}} than the following example from the sports world: A player got a concussion in a high profile match and was visibly dizzy and in no state to know where he was, let alone play soccer at any level. The match was carried on television and the commentator on German TV actually praised the player for "soldiering on". Apparently neither the commentator, nor the trainer nor anybody on the medical staff were aware that playing with a concussion or worse yet getting hit again can result in brain damage up to and including death. The player got the concussion in minute 17 and did not get replaced until minute 31. You think this happened in some exhibition game in the DorkAge of soccer decades ago in some minor league in Lampukhistan? Wrong. It happened in the World Cup. In 2014. In the final. No concussion awareness does not begin to describe this reckless endangerment of not only the life of the player himself but millions in front of the screens who might emulate his stupid example.

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** It probably does not get much more {{egregious}} than the following example from the sports world: A player got a concussion in a high profile match and was visibly dizzy and in no state to know where he was, let alone play soccer at any level. The match was carried broadcast on television and the commentator on German TV actually praised the player for "soldiering on". Apparently neither the commentator, nor the trainer trainer, nor anybody on the medical staff were aware that playing with a concussion or worse yet getting hit again can result in brain damage up to and including death. The player got the concussion in minute 17 and did not get replaced until minute 31. You think this happened in some exhibition game in the DorkAge of soccer decades ago in some minor league in Lampukhistan? Wrong. It happened in the World Cup. In 2014. In the final. No concussion awareness does not begin to describe this reckless endangerment of not only the life of the player himself himself, but millions in front of the screens who might emulate his stupid example.



* The short lived Group B class of rally cars had serious safety issues due to the laissez-fair approach on safety, vehicle preformance as well as poor crowd control by event organizers, leading to multiple fatalities in the 1986 World Rally Championship. The cars have become so infamous for this that they are sometimes called ''Killer B's''.
** At first there weren't any problems, but by 1986, cars on the class had gotten way too powerful for rally courses which was already foreshadowed by the almost fatal crash by Ari Vatanen in Argentina. For reference in 1981, the winning rally cars produced approximately 250hp but by 1986 some cars were reported to produce ''well over 500hp''. Additionally many of the cars used flammable materials in order to cut down excesses weight, essentially turning them into ''[[EveryCarIsAPinto 500hp Pintos]]''.
** Rally de Portugal even in the past had serious issues with crowd control or the lack thereof. Throughout 70's and 80's, many spectators were known to stand around on the roadway even when cars were driving past them and near-collisions were frequently reported. Ultimately In the 1986 WRC this lead to predictable results after Ford rally driver Joaquim Santos lost control of his car on a corner. 3 people were killed and over 30 were injured. All the top teams pulled out of the rally in the aftermath.
** The last nail in the coffin for Group B cars came in Tour de Corse when Lancia driver and the championship favorite Henri Toivonen and his co-driver Sergio Cresto died in a fatal crash. Another Lancia driver Attilio Bettega had already died in a crash on the same course a year earlier, but at the time it was blamed on the harsh conditions rather than the car. Toivonen and many other rally drivers had already expressed concerns about the safety of Group B cars on a difficult course like Tour de Corse. Additionally, Toivonen insisted on driving despite being in poor health due to a fever and was taking medicine at the time of the rally and according to fellow driver Malcolm Wilson had been suffering from blackouts due to a neck injury. Toivonen crashed his car on a tight left corner and the car exploded just seconds after the crash. Due to the flammable materials, only the space frame of the car survived after emergency teams put out the fire and soon after the 1986 championship, Group B cars were permanently banned from WRC.

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* The short lived Group B class of rally cars had serious safety issues due to the laissez-fair approach on safety, vehicle preformance performance, as well as poor crowd control by event organizers, leading to multiple fatalities in the 1986 World Rally Championship. The cars have become so infamous for this that they are sometimes called ''Killer B's''.
** At first there weren't any problems, but by 1986, cars on the class had gotten way too powerful for rally courses which was already foreshadowed by the almost fatal crash by Ari Vatanen in Argentina. For reference in 1981, the winning rally cars produced approximately 250hp 250hp, but by 1986 some cars were reported to produce ''well over 500hp''. Additionally many of the cars used flammable materials in order to cut down excesses on excess weight, essentially turning them into ''[[EveryCarIsAPinto 500hp Pintos]]''.
** Rally de Portugal even in the past had serious issues with crowd control or the lack thereof. Throughout 70's and 80's, many spectators were known to stand around on the roadway even when cars were driving past them and near-collisions were frequently reported. Ultimately Ultimately, In the 1986 WRC this lead to predictable results after Ford rally driver Joaquim Santos lost control of his car on a corner. 3 people were killed and over 30 were injured. All the top teams pulled out of the rally in the aftermath.
** The last nail in the coffin for Group B cars came in Tour de Corse when Lancia driver and the championship favorite favorite, Henri Toivonen Toivonen, and his co-driver co-driver, Sergio Cresto Cresto, died in a fatal crash. Another Lancia driver driver, Attilio Bettega Bettega, had already died in a crash on the same course a year earlier, but at the time it was blamed on the harsh conditions rather than the car. Toivonen and many other rally drivers had already expressed concerns about the safety of Group B cars on a difficult course like Tour de Corse. Additionally, Toivonen insisted on driving despite being in poor health due to a fever and was taking medicine at the time of the rally and rally, and, according to fellow driver Malcolm Wilson Wilson, had been suffering from blackouts due to a neck injury. Toivonen crashed his car on a tight left corner and the car exploded just seconds after the crash. Due to the flammable materials, only the space frame of the car survived after emergency teams put out the fire and soon after the 1986 championship, Group B cars were permanently banned from WRC.



* Military combat engineers, in most armies, are expected to make very careful records of where they put landmines and little surprises designed to make life tricky for attackers. This is sound practice as when the war is over or the front line moves on, you need to make safe and clear up afterwards, to prevent collateral damage and to retrieve and make safe the munitions. In the Falklands Islands, British military engineers charged with making safe after the war were less than enchanted that their Argentinian counterparts, in defiance of good practice, had set up minefields in a haphazard random way and had not kept any sort of record as to where, or as to how many mines they'd used and of what type. To this day [[BaaBomb sheep still go "bang"]] in parts of East Falkland.

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* Military combat engineers, in most armies, are expected to make very careful records of where they put landmines and little surprises designed to make life tricky for attackers. This is sound practice practice, as when the war is over or the front line moves on, you need to make safe and clear clean up afterwards, to prevent collateral damage and to retrieve and make safe deactivate the munitions. In the Falklands Islands, British military engineers charged with making safe clean-up after the war were less than enchanted happy that their Argentinian counterparts, in defiance of good practice, had set up minefields in a haphazard haphazard, random way and had not kept any sort of record as to where, or as to how many mines they'd used and of what type. To this day [[BaaBomb sheep still go "bang"]] in parts of East Falkland.
25th Jul '17 3:11:35 PM IceMaster
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* China: where electronic equipment waste goes to die, be dismantled, and burn, exposing workers to loads of horrible toxic materials, and then be made into children's toys shipped back to the US. China still permits certain products that are strictly illegal in Europe and North America, such as lead pigments and battery cells without any kind of fail-safe.
* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhopal_disaster Union Carbide's chemical plant in Bhopal, India, site of the worst industrial disaster in history]]. The initial accident was caused by rusty pipes and lack of a chemical scrubber allowing water to enter a vessel containing chemicals that are safe only when dry. The effects of the accident were compounded because the plant was processing chemicals far more volatile than it had been designed to handle, UC International had ordered safety measures that UC India had not implemented but Indian government inspectors signed off on the plant anyway, management kept firing the most experienced workers and most of their replacements were hired without proper training, and the plant was built next to a major population center without an emergency evacuation plan. Union Carbide claims to this day that the leak was caused by a [[ImplausibleDeniability disgruntled worker's act of sabotage]]. The CEO of Union Carbide, Warren Anderson, [[DirtyCoward fled back to the US to avoid prosecution]] or [[TorchesAndPitchforks vigilante reprisals]]. Even if the sabotage theory were true, this trope would still apply as no major chemical plant should ever be designed so that a single low-level employee can cause catastrophic damage.

to:

* China: where electronic equipment waste goes to die, be dismantled, and burn, burned, exposing workers to loads of horrible toxic materials, and then be made into children's toys shipped back to the US. China still permits certain products that are strictly illegal in Europe and North America, such as lead pigments and battery cells without any kind of fail-safe.
* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhopal_disaster Union Carbide's chemical plant in Bhopal, India, site of the worst industrial disaster in history]]. The initial accident was caused by rusty pipes and lack of a chemical scrubber scrubber, allowing water to enter a vessel containing chemicals that are safe only when dry. The effects of the accident were compounded because the plant was processing chemicals far more volatile than it had been designed to handle, UC International had ordered safety measures that UC India had not implemented implemented, but Indian government inspectors signed off on the plant anyway, management kept firing the most experienced workers and most of their replacements were hired without proper training, and the plant was built next to a major population center without an emergency evacuation plan. Union Carbide claims to this day that the leak was caused by a [[ImplausibleDeniability disgruntled worker's act of sabotage]]. The CEO of Union Carbide, Warren Anderson, [[DirtyCoward fled back to the US to avoid prosecution]] or [[TorchesAndPitchforks vigilante reprisals]]. Even if the sabotage theory were true, this trope would still apply as no major chemical plant should ever be designed so that a single low-level employee can cause catastrophic damage.



* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exxon_Valdez_oil_spill The Exxon Valdez oil spill]] was a disaster waiting to happen. At the time, all the oil companies were ignoring regulations with impunity. Several glaring problems were present including the fact that the vessel's crew had not been given their mandatory rest period after the last shift, the radar on the ship had been broken for more than a year and deemed too expensive to repair, and iceberg monitoring equipment had been promised but never installed.
** Although he was off-watch at the time of the accident, the ship's captain had a known alcohol problem and a history of drinking on the job --and indeed, the night of the spill he was sleeping off ''five'' double vodka tonics. While he was NOT the one directly responsible for the accident, the fact that he was still in charge of an oil tanker says a lot about the company's approach to safety.
* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas_City_Refinery_(BP) Texas City Refinery Explosion]] was a textbook case judging by the 300 OSHA violations cited ex post facto (and the $21 million fine). Coincidentally, or not, it was and still is owned by BP. A system used for increasing the octane rating for gasoline overflowed, causing vapors to cover the area, because an [[FailsafeFailure overflow alarm was disabled]]. When the workers realized something was wrong, they opened a discharge valve, which overheated the material released, which sent a large gas bubble back into the tower that had overflowed, which caused further liquid and vapor spills. The final straw was when a contractor [[TooDumbToLive tried to start his new truck several times]], which, when the hydrocarbon level got low enough for ignition, created a spark that caused the fumes to ignite in a ball of fire that killed 17 people. Several measures that could have prevented, or at least reduced the scope of, the disaster were not taken, including replacing the ventilation system with one that would safely burn off the gasses and using a [[WhatAnIdiot mobile home parked right next to the unit as a control room]] when standards called for double-walled cinderblock buildings a hundred feet away.
** Decades before, in 1947, Texas City had an even larger explosion. It started like this: A Liberty ship moored to a pier was loading sacks of ammonium nitrate intended as fertiliser. It wasn't even fully loaded yet, and it had ''2500 tons'' aboard piled up in huge stacks of sacks — no compartmentation, no distribution of the mass into separate bodies. Nobody at the scene understood the explosive nature of ammonium nitrate (despite a history of ammonium nitrate explosions). Ammonium nitrate, in humid air, can begin to self-ignite, which this load began to do. So the captain followed a time-honoured procedure: he had the holds sealed and pumped full of live steam to extinguish the fire. Not only did he not know the explosive nature of what he was carrying, he didn't know (even though chemists could have told him it was old news) that the resulting combination of heat, pressure, and moisture would make the nitrate even more unstable. So … *boom*. Oh, it gets worse. Texas City was a massive conglomeration of just about every possible industrial product that could burn or explode, with safety precautions and procedures being about as rigorous as cooked noodles. The pier that the ''Grandcamp'' was moored to? Only a couple of hundred feet from the fence line of a petroleum refinery, and a few hundred yards from a tank farm. Oh, and the warehouse from which it was being loaded? Conveniently right next to the dock, with $DEITY only knows how much nitrate standing there in sacks. On the other side? A paint factory loaded with all kinds of volatile solvents. Next pier? ''Another'' freighter chock full of ammonium nitrate…

to:

* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exxon_Valdez_oil_spill The Exxon Valdez oil spill]] was a disaster waiting to happen. At the time, all the oil companies were ignoring regulations with impunity. Several glaring problems were present present, including the fact that the vessel's crew had not been given their mandatory rest period after the last shift, the radar on the ship had been broken for more than a year and deemed too expensive to repair, and iceberg monitoring equipment had been promised but never installed.
** Although he was off-watch at the time of the accident, the ship's captain had a known alcohol problem and a history of drinking on the job --and -- and indeed, the night of the spill he was sleeping off ''five'' double vodka tonics. While he was NOT the one directly responsible for the accident, the fact that he was still in charge of an oil tanker says a lot about the company's approach to safety.
* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas_City_Refinery_(BP) Texas City Refinery Explosion]] was a textbook case judging by the 300 OSHA violations cited ex post facto (and the $21 million fine). Coincidentally, or not, it was and still is owned by BP. A system used for increasing the octane rating for gasoline overflowed, causing vapors to cover the area, because an [[FailsafeFailure overflow alarm was disabled]]. When the workers realized something was wrong, they opened a discharge valve, which overheated the material released, which sent a large gas bubble back into the tower that had overflowed, which caused further liquid and vapor spills. The final straw was when a contractor [[TooDumbToLive tried to start his new truck several times]], which, when the hydrocarbon level got low enough for ignition, created a spark that caused the fumes to ignite in a ball of fire that killed 17 people. Several measures that could have prevented, or at least reduced the scope of, the disaster were not taken, including replacing the ventilation system with one that would safely burn off the gasses gases and using a [[WhatAnIdiot mobile home parked right next to the unit as a control room]] when standards called for double-walled cinderblock buildings a hundred feet away.
** Decades before, in 1947, Texas City had an even larger explosion. It started like this: A Liberty ship moored to a pier was loading sacks of ammonium nitrate intended as fertiliser. It wasn't even fully loaded yet, and it had ''2500 ''2,500 tons'' aboard piled up in huge stacks of sacks — no compartmentation, no distribution of the mass into separate bodies. Nobody at the scene understood the explosive nature of ammonium nitrate (despite a history of ammonium nitrate explosions). Ammonium nitrate, in humid air, can begin to self-ignite, which this load began to do. So the captain followed a time-honoured procedure: he had the holds sealed and pumped full of live steam to extinguish the fire. Not only did he not know the explosive nature of what he was carrying, he didn't know (even though chemists could have told him it was old news) that the resulting combination of heat, pressure, and moisture would make the nitrate even more unstable. So … *boom*. Oh, it gets worse. Texas City was a massive conglomeration of just about every possible industrial product that could burn or explode, with safety precautions and procedures being about as rigorous as cooked noodles. The pier that the ''Grandcamp'' was moored to? Only a couple of hundred feet from the fence line of a petroleum refinery, and a few hundred yards from a tank farm. Oh, and the warehouse from which it was being loaded? Conveniently right next to the dock, with $DEITY who only knows how much nitrate standing there in sacks. On the other side? A paint factory loaded with all kinds of volatile solvents. Next pier? ''Another'' freighter chock full of ammonium nitrate…



* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamlet_chicken_processing_plant_fire Hamlet Chicken Processing Plant Fire]] in Hamlet, NC was an accident waiting to happen. Almost every door to the outside was locked to prevent theft, the fire alarms didn't sound through the entire building, there were no sprinkler systems and the plant had ''never'' had a safety inspection. Twenty-five people died and many more were injured because they had no way to escape the smoke and fire, making it North Carolina's worst ever industrial disaster. And lest you think this is yet another example of old-time industry gone wrong, it happened in ''1991''.

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* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamlet_chicken_processing_plant_fire Hamlet Chicken Processing Plant Fire]] in Hamlet, NC was an accident waiting to happen. Almost every door to the outside was locked to prevent theft, the fire alarms didn't sound through the entire building, there were no sprinkler systems systems, and the plant had ''never'' had a safety inspection. Twenty-five people died and many more were injured because they had no way to escape the smoke and fire, making it North Carolina's worst ever industrial disaster. And lest you think this is yet another example of old-time industry gone wrong, it happened in ''1991''.



** The saddest thing there is the absolute futility of this whole industry. Nowadays there are so much sulfur produced as a byproduct of the oil industry[[note]]Sulfur is an ''extremely'' common contaminant in the crude oil, and most modern technologies require the desulfurization of the crude before the further processing.[[/note]] that the market isn't just saturated, but plainly flooded with pure elemental sulfur,[[note]]The existing stocks are so large that it starts to be a problem just because it takes so much ''space''. Unfortunately, we don't actually know how to ''use'' so much sulfur, leading to the attempts to use it as a cement for the road pavement.[[/note]] so the prices are extremely low, and the business actually teeters on the verge of bankruptcy.

to:

** The saddest thing there is the absolute futility of this whole industry. Nowadays there are is so much sulfur produced as a byproduct of the oil industry[[note]]Sulfur is an ''extremely'' common contaminant in the crude oil, and most modern technologies require the desulfurization of the crude before the further processing.[[/note]] that the market isn't just saturated, but plainly flooded ''flooded'' with pure elemental sulfur,[[note]]The existing stocks are so large that it starts to be a problem just because it takes so much ''space''. Unfortunately, we don't actually know how to ''use'' so much sulfur, leading to the attempts to use it as a cement for the road pavement.[[/note]] so the prices are extremely low, and the business actually teeters on the verge of bankruptcy.



* Production "facilities" for illegal objects or substances rarely have the safety of their employees or customers in mind. Since everyone would be arrested if they were found making the stuff, why follow any government regulations? The customers can't go to any agency to complain about quality control, and the primary ingredients are probably already dangerous enough, who cares what other substances you throw into the product?

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* Production "facilities" for illegal objects or substances rarely have the safety of their employees or customers in mind. Since everyone would be arrested if they were found making the stuff, why follow any government regulations? The customers can't go to any agency to complain about quality control, and the primary ingredients are probably already dangerous enough, so who cares what other substances you throw into the product?



* In 1921, a silo storing about 50,000 tons to ammonium sulfate (that thing people use to make high explosives out of) exploded at a BASF plant in Oppau, Germany, leveling the entire town. How did this happen? The workers had been using small sticks of dynamite to clean the holding tanks (the chemical absorbs water to form a single rock-hard mass). It was a miracle that the plant managed to survive for 10 years.

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* In 1921, a silo storing about 50,000 tons to of ammonium sulfate (that thing people use to make high explosives out of) exploded at a BASF plant in Oppau, Germany, leveling the entire town. How did this happen? The workers had been using small sticks of dynamite to clean the holding tanks (the chemical absorbs water to form a single rock-hard mass). It was a miracle that the plant managed to survive for 10 years.



** [[SubvertedTrope However, it's now believed that]] [[http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/05/11/477664124/deadly-texas-fertilizer-plant-fire-was-intentionally-set-authorities-say foul play was involved.]] Doesn't make the massive amount of ammonium nitrate and lack of inspections any less of examples of the trope.

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** [[SubvertedTrope However, it's now believed that]] [[http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/05/11/477664124/deadly-texas-fertilizer-plant-fire-was-intentionally-set-authorities-say foul play was involved.]] Doesn't make the massive amount of ammonium nitrate and lack of inspections any less of examples of the trope.an example.
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