History Main / NoFourthWall

5th Feb '16 12:39:07 AM rafi
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reordered. ZCE
* ''Series/AlloAllo'': Rene would regularly explain his ongoing predicament at the start, and make asides at the Audience regarding other people's leading statements. * On ''Series/AndyRichterControlsTheUniverse'', Andy's voice-over narration would frequently address the audience directly. * The {{Narrator}} in ''Series/ArrestedDevelopment'' addresses the audience, responds to things the characters say, criticizes the narration of other TV shows, and observes after a remark about "arrested development," "[[TitleDrop Hey! That's the name of this show!]]" * The characters on ''Series/TheBasilBrushShow'' probably never went an episode with the fourth wall intact. They would frequently pick up a copy of the script and read ahead, get to places quickly by cutting across the set, and on one memorable occasion total disaster was averted by the appearance of a director rushing in to explain to the marauding pirates that they'd wandered onto the wrong set. Another incident involved the camera man quitting after the cast gets cream on the lens, only for the guest star of the week to offer to operate the equipment. * In ''Series/TheBernieMacShow,'' Bernie frequently goes to his garage to sit facing the camera and address "America." * Ted, of ''Series/BetterOffTed'', talks to the camera ''a lot''. * ''Series/BostonLegal'': If there were a FourthWall for this show, [[LargeHam Denny]] [[WilliamShatner Crane]] couldn't exist. ** (During the Alan/Denny Balcony Scene): --->'''Denny''': There should be a show about us. --->'''Alan''': We could promote it. --->'''Denny''': No, there's [[ScrewedByTheNetwork probably a law against promoting us]].

* Occurs frequently on ''Series/TheRedSkeltonShow.'' ** Red often [[LampshadeHanging makes jokes about flubbed lines and similar mistakes]], and informs the audience about things that have gone wrong. ** Very common in a literal form during episodes focused on Freddie the Freeloader: Freddie would be unable to open his front door for one reason or another, and would simply walk around the front wall into his house. * The 1952 ''Tales of Tomorrow'' episode "The Window" has a live drama show being interrupted by spontaneous images from an apartment somewhere in the city, where a woman is conspiring with her boyfriend to murder her husband. [[http://lileks.com/bleat/?p=6300 Watch here]].
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* Occurs frequently on ''Series/TheRedSkeltonShow.'' ** Red often [[LampshadeHanging ''Series/ClarissaExplainsItAll'' was pretty much the queen of this trope. The title character would open every episode with a monologue directly to the camera, and she would also address the audience after a major plot point in the episode, which usually happens around 5 times an episode. She also makes jokes the occasional facial reaction directly to the camera during a scene. * The ''Series/ColgateComedyHour''. Though sometimes the performers would build one and then knock it down again, just for fun. * In ''Series/EerieIndiana,'' there was a entire episode about flubbed lines Marshall's life suddenly becoming a television show, and similar mistakes]], finding out that he isn't even Marshall Teller at all, but somebody they keep calling 'Omri Katz' (which is, of course, the real name of the actor playing Marshall). Dash X is still a villain in the tv-show world rather than his actor, but acknowledges that the only reason he is one is because he's a fictional character. * ''Series/ElleryQueen'' (Creator/{{NBC}}, 1975) always had ''one'' No Fourth Wall moment [[OnceAnEpisode every episode]]. Immediately following Ellery's mandatory EurekaMoment, he would turn to the audience, briefly review the key evidence for the viewers, and informs ask them if they'd figured out who the culprit was -- right before going to a commercial. (See AllInHand.) ** This was a trademark of the radio show as well. * The British sketch show, ''Series/TheFastShow'', has three recurring characters that directly address the viewer: The Fourth Duke of Wimbledon (who remarks to the viewer on his compromising situation) an unnamed character played by Mark Williams (who is shown engaging in suspicious activity before noticing the camera and saying, "You ain't seen me, right?") and Unlucky Alf (who sadly reflects to camera about his bad luck, before falling victim to it). * ''Series/TheFreshPrinceofBelAir'' broke the fourth wall quite often, but the moment that evaporated it came during the premier of the fifth season. The previous season had ended with Will deciding to remain with his mother in Philadelphia, leaving viewers expecting some sort of emotional catharsis. Instead, the next episode opened with an NBC executive approaching and informing him in no uncertain terms that the show was called "The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air," and that was where he was going to be. And then kidnapping him. ** And then there's the episode that has Carlton running screaming through several sets for the episode and then ''into the audience''. ** Will asking "If we're so rich, why we can't afford no ceiling?" ... as the camera pans up to show the studio lights. * Season 2 of the musical comedy ''Series/{{Galavant}}'' in general. ** The opening number of the first episode of Season 2 is the single most self-referential moment of the entire show. ** The finale makes multiple references to the fact that it will be highly unlikely that the show gets to be renewed for a third season as well as The Jester referencing season 1 ending on a cliffhanger and wondering if they will make the same for season 2 (they don't). * Australian mockumentary ''Series/TheGames'' played with the trope on several levels. The characters break the fourth wall, but it's the fourth wall of the InUniverse documentary that is the FramingDevice for the show, ''not'' the real television show in our reality. However, one of the characters, Tim, does seem to be aware and remarks about how they are in a scripted tv show. * Israeli sitcom ''HaPijamot'', every episode. * In Episode 10 of ''Series/HikoninSentaiAkibaranger'', Akibared, Nobuo, becomes aware of the fourth wall. He convinces the rest of the characters of this and this trope is in full effect for the rest of season 1 as the final episodes revolve around the Akibarangers trying to thwart attempts from the producers to end the show. Season 1 ends with The heroes fighting the end credits * The BBC series ''Series/{{Hustle}}'' includes at least one fourth wall-breaking moment in every episode, in which one or more of the main characters will address the audience about things that have gone wrong. ** Very common in a literal form during the con currently underway, sometimes as time freezes around them. Some episodes focused on are more subtle, having a character perhaps wink at the camera. * The ''Series/ICarly'' online content (as opposed to the in-universe webshow) often breaks the fourth wall, by way of a 40 year old man filling in for Sam, and a clip of Freddie informing the Freeloader: Freddie would be unable to open his front door 'Baby Spencer' character (who is played by Jerry Trainor), that Jerry Trainor was nominated for one reason or another, and would simply walk around the front wall into his house. * The 1952 ''Tales of Tomorrow'' episode "The Window" has a live drama show being interrupted by spontaneous images from an apartment somewhere in the city, where a woman is conspiring with her boyfriend to murder her husband. [[http://lileks.com/bleat/?p=6300 Watch here]].award.

* ''Series/TheMonkees'' is a primary example for this trope, as [[MediumAwareness the group's television personas somehow "knew" and expressed the fact that they were on a TV show]], while they remained within their wacky {{sitcom}} universe. Whereas, gags of this type are aplenty in nearly every episode: making direct remarks and asides to the audience, funny (often times, ad-libbed) comments about [[WhoWritesThisCrap scripts]], acting, production, censorship, even adding [[HilariousOuttakes outtakes]] into actual scenes.

* ''Series/TheManyLovesOfDobieGillis'' * ''Series/AlloAllo'': Rene would regularly explain his ongoing predicament at the start, and make asides at the Audience regarding other people's leading statements. * Two words: Frankie Howerd. Anything he did. * On ''Series/AndyRichterControlsTheUniverse'', Andy's voice-over narration would frequently address the audience directly. * In Episode 10 of ''Series/HikoninSentaiAkibaranger'', Akibared, Nobuo, becomes aware of the fourth wall. He convinces the rest of the characters of this and this trope is in full effect for the rest of season 1 as the final episodes revolve around the Akibarangers trying to thwart attempts from the producers to end the show. Season 1 ends with The heroes fighting the end credits * ''Series/BostonLegal'': If there were a FourthWall for this show, [[LargeHam Denny]] [[WilliamShatner Crane]] couldn't exist. ** (During the Alan/Denny Balcony Scene): --->'''Denny''': There should be a show about us. --->'''Alan''': We could promote it. --->'''Denny''': No, there's [[ScrewedByTheNetwork probably a law against promoting us]].
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* %%* ''Series/TheManyLovesOfDobieGillis'' * ''Series/AlloAllo'': Rene would regularly explain his ongoing predicament ''Series/TheMightyBoosh'' spits on your fourth wall! They not only look at the start, camera and talk to the audience, they make in-episode references to the show's premise, the actors playing multiple characters, that episode's costumes and special effects, even the show's channel and time slot. %%* ''Series/MisterRogersNeighborhood'' * ''Series/TheMonkees'' is a primary example for this trope, as [[MediumAwareness the group's television personas somehow "knew" and expressed the fact that they were on a TV show]], while they remained within their wacky {{sitcom}} universe. Whereas, gags of this type are aplenty in nearly every episode: making direct remarks and asides at to the Audience regarding other people's leading statements. audience, funny (often times, ad-libbed) comments about [[WhoWritesThisCrap scripts]], acting, production, censorship, even adding [[HilariousOuttakes outtakes]] into actual scenes. * Two words: Frankie Howerd. Anything ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'' was famous for breaking the fourth wall; but one unfortunate example was actually forced on them by ExecutiveMeddling . A sketch that the team wanted to do, about undertakers asking a man if he did. wanted to eat his mother's corpse instead of burying it or burning it, was only allowed by the BBC if they showed the studio audience reacting with distaste and invading the set during the sketch. ** And of course, everyone's favorite RunningGag character, Colonel Mustache. "Quite right, quite right, stop this sketch, it's getting entirely too silly." ** And here's the clincher: offenses against the "Getting out of sketches without using a proper punchline" Act, four, namely, simply ending every bleedin' sketch by just having a policeman come in and... wait a minute... %%* ''Series/{{Moonlighting}}'' used this trope quite often. * On ''Series/AndyRichterControlsTheUniverse'', Andy's voice-over narration In ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'', the crew of the Satellite of Love were apparently broadcasting their skits to the Mads and us. In every skit, Joel, Mike, or one of the 'bots would frequently talk to the camera, addressing either the Mads or the audience. (The Mads also talked to the camera, but almost always to address the audience directly. * In Episode 10 SOL crew.) The camera itself was a character (a robot named Cambot), albeit one who never spoke, rarely interacted with the others (beyond filming them), and was only seen during the opening theme. And the Magic Voice's main job on the Satellite of ''Series/HikoninSentaiAkibaranger'', Akibared, Nobuo, becomes aware Love was to announce the start of the fourth wall. He convinces first commercial break. ** This is explained very early on as that Dr. Forrester is selling the rest tapes of Joel and the characters bots to Comedy Central. Several of this and this trope is in full effect for the rest of season 1 as the final episodes Forrester's bits revolve around the Akibarangers trying to thwart attempts increase their ratings. (Introducing Timmy Bobby Rusty, giving them a drug to turn them into the cast of {{Renegade}}, etc.) ** TheMovie reversed this, with Dr. Forrester addressing the audience while Mike and the 'bots ignore the fourth wall. * ''Series/NedsDeclassifiedSchoolSurvivalGuide'' was famous for this. In the "Guide to Girls", Ned had nothing to offer and asked Moze to give some tips. After a false start, he stops her and produces a CD player from under the table to play the "tips" BGM. * In ''Series/NowhereMan,'' in episode The Spider Webb, a writer/producer makes "The Lenny Little Show", a program basically Nowhere Man with really bad reenactments of scenes from the producers to end the show. Season 1 ends with The heroes fighting the end credits * ''Series/BostonLegal'': If there were a FourthWall for this show, [[LargeHam Denny]] [[WilliamShatner Crane]] couldn't exist. ** (During and gets really trippy when they are filming scenes he is doing at the Alan/Denny Balcony Scene): --->'''Denny''': There should be same time, until he becomes really [[GenreSavvy genre savvy]] and reverses what is written/filmed to outsmart the [[BigBad writer/producer]]. * Brazilian sitcom ''Series/OsNormais'' had the two protagonists frequently [[InnerMonologue monologuing]] to the audience. Once a show about us. --->'''Alan''': We could promote it. --->'''Denny''': No, there's [[ScrewedByTheNetwork probably couple the protagonists were visiting noticed the cut to a law against promoting us]].FlashBack, and did one themselves (complete with the husband asking "[[AudienceWhatAudience who filmed this?]]" as the flashback ended). * PJ Katie often spoke right to the viewer on ''Series/PJKatiesFarm''.

* ''Series/TheManyLovesOfDobieGillis'' * ''Series/AlloAllo'': Rene would regularly explain his ongoing predicament at the start, and make asides at the Audience regarding other people's leading statements. * Two words: Frankie Howerd. Anything he did. * On ''Series/AndyRichterControlsTheUniverse'', Andy's voice-over narration would frequently address the audience directly. * In Episode 10 The story arc of ''Series/HikoninSentaiAkibaranger'', Akibared, Nobuo, becomes aware ''Series/RedDwarf -- Back to Earth'' consists of the fourth wall. He convinces intrepid four discovering that they're just characters in a TV series, and trying to track down the rest writers to find out how long they have left. [[spoiler: Subverted, as it was actually a group hallucination brought on by the ink of a psychedelic squid.]] * ''Series/TheRedGreenShow'': The majority of the Lodge's escapades are exposed almost exclusively through the characters directly talking to the audience. One recurring skit, "North of this 40", has Red talking right to the audience about problems that middle-aged men face. * Occurs frequently on ''Series/TheRedSkeltonShow.'' ** Red often [[LampshadeHanging makes jokes about flubbed lines and this trope is in full effect for similar mistakes]], and informs the rest of season 1 as the final audience about things that have gone wrong. ** Very common in a literal form during episodes revolve focused on Freddie the Freeloader: Freddie would be unable to open his front door for one reason or another, and would simply walk around the Akibarangers trying to thwart attempts from the producers to end the show. Season 1 ends front wall into his house. * The first season of Roger Moore's TV series ''Series/TheSaint'' began each episode with The heroes fighting Simon Templar addressing the end credits * ''Series/BostonLegal'': If there were a FourthWall audience and setting the scene for each week's adventure. After the show moved to color production, this show, [[LargeHam Denny]] [[WilliamShatner Crane]] couldn't exist. ** (During the Alan/Denny Balcony Scene): --->'''Denny''': There should be a show about us. --->'''Alan''': We could promote it. --->'''Denny''': No, there's [[ScrewedByTheNetwork probably a law against promoting us]].was replaced by narration.

* ''Series/ElleryQueen'' (Creator/{{NBC}}, 1975) always had ''one'' No Fourth Wall moment [[OnceAnEpisode every episode]]. Immediately following Ellery's mandatory EurekaMoment, he would turn to the audience, briefly review the key evidence for the viewers, and ask them if they'd figured out who the culprit was -- right before going to a commercial. (See AllInHand.) ** This was a trademark of the radio show as well.

* Also from the UK, ''Series/TheYoungOnes'' regularly made reference to their being characters on a sitcom. In one episode, Neil's mother visits to complain about his working on a program with such shoddy production values, smashing a chair as an example; Mike points out that the chair is a breakaway prop Rik was going to be struck on the head with. Sure enough, Rik gets clobbered with a chair a few minutes later ... and is knocked unconscious, because his attacker unwittingly uses a normal chair instead of the ruined prop! ** {{SpiritualSuccessor}}s to ''The Young Ones'' are ''Series/FilthyRichAndCatflap'' and ''{{Bottom}}'', in which the main characters ''constantly'' address the camera/audience. * In ''Series/EerieIndiana,'' there was a entire episode about Marshall's life suddenly becoming a television show, and finding out that he isn't even Marshall Teller at all, but somebody they keep calling 'Omri Katz' (which is, of course, the real name of the actor playing Marshall). Dash X is still a villain in the tv-show world rather than his actor, but acknowledges that the only reason he is one is because he's a fictional character. * In ''Series/NowhereMan,'' in episode The Spider Webb, a writer/producer makes "The Lenny Little Show", a program basically Nowhere Man with really bad reenactments of scenes from the show, and gets really trippy when they are filming scenes he is doing at the same time, until he becomes really [[GenreSavvy genre savvy]] and reverses what is written/filmed to outsmart the [[BigBad writer/producer]].
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* Also from ''Series/SecretDiaryOfACallGirl''. Belle talks to the UK, ''Series/TheYoungOnes'' regularly made reference audience at least as much as she talks to their being characters on a sitcom. In one episode, Neil's mother visits to complain about his working on a program with such shoddy production values, smashing a chair as an example; Mike points out that the chair is a breakaway prop Rik was going to be struck on the head with. Sure enough, Rik gets clobbered with a chair a few minutes later ... and is knocked unconscious, because his attacker unwittingly uses a normal chair instead of the ruined prop! ** {{SpiritualSuccessor}}s to ''The Young Ones'' are ''Series/FilthyRichAndCatflap'' and ''{{Bottom}}'', in which the main characters ''constantly'' address the camera/audience. * In ''Series/EerieIndiana,'' there was a entire episode about Marshall's life suddenly becoming a television show, and finding out that he isn't even Marshall Teller at all, but somebody they keep calling 'Omri Katz' (which is, of course, the real name of the actor playing Marshall). Dash X is still a villain in the tv-show world rather than his actor, but acknowledges that the only reason he is one is because he's a fictional character. * In ''Series/NowhereMan,'' in episode The Spider Webb, a writer/producer makes "The Lenny Little Show", a program basically Nowhere Man with really bad reenactments of scenes from the show, and gets really trippy when they are filming scenes he is doing at the same time, until he becomes really [[GenreSavvy genre savvy]] and reverses what is written/filmed to outsmart the [[BigBad writer/producer]].anyone on-screen.

* In ''Series/{{Titus}}'' (A sitcom starring comedian Creator/ChristopherTitus), the main character addresses the audience from a small room with one light bulb, viewed through a black-and white filter. On one occasion, when he was drunk, there were three light bulbs. ** His father Ken and girlfriend Erin both addressed the audience from that same small room on occasions where Chris was unable to make it or when their narration was thematically important. * In ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'', the crew of the Satellite of Love were apparently broadcasting their skits to the Mads and us. In every skit, Joel, Mike, or one of the 'bots would talk to the camera, addressing either the Mads or the audience. (The Mads also talked to the camera, but almost always to address the SOL crew.) The camera itself was a character (a robot named Cambot), albeit one who never spoke, rarely interacted with the others (beyond filming them), and was only seen during the opening theme. And the Magic Voice's main job on the Satellite of Love was to announce the start of the first commercial break. ** This is explained very early on as that Dr. Forrester is selling the tapes of Joel and the bots to Comedy Central. Several of Forrester's bits revolve around trying to increase their ratings. (Introducing Timmy Bobby Rusty, giving them a drug to turn them into the cast of {{Renegade}}, etc.) ** TheMovie reversed this, with Dr. Forrester addressing the audience while Mike and the 'bots ignore the fourth wall. * ''Series/{{Moonlighting}}'' used this trope quite often. * In ''Series/TheBernieMacShow,'' Bernie frequently goes to his garage to sit facing the camera and address "America." * The {{Narrator}} in ''Series/ArrestedDevelopment'' addresses the audience, responds to things the characters say, criticizes the narration of other TV shows, and observes after a remark about "arrested development," "[[TitleDrop Hey! That's the name of this show!]]"

* ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'' was famous for breaking the fourth wall; but one unfortunate example was actually forced on them by ExecutiveMeddling . A sketch that the team wanted to do, about undertakers asking a man if he wanted to eat his mother's corpse instead of burying it or burning it, was only allowed by the BBC if they showed the studio audience reacting with distaste and invading the set during the sketch. ** And of course, everyone's favorite RunningGag character, Colonel Mustache. "Quite right, quite right, stop this sketch, it's getting entirely too silly." ** And here's the clincher: offenses against the "Getting out of sketches without using a proper punchline" Act, four, namely, simply ending every bleedin' sketch by just having a policeman come in and... wait a minute... * ''Series/TheFreshPrinceofBelAir'' broke the fourth wall quite often, but the moment that evaporated it came during the premier of the fifth season. The previous season had ended with Will deciding to remain with his mother in Philadelphia, leaving viewers expecting some sort of emotional catharsis. Instead, the next episode opened with an NBC executive approaching and informing him in no uncertain terms that the show was called "The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air," and that was where he was going to be. And then kidnapping him. ** And then there's the episode that has Carlton running screaming through several sets for the episode and then ''into the audience''. ** Will asking "If we're so rich, why we can't afford no ceiling?" ... as the camera pans up to show the studio lights. * The story arc of ''Series/RedDwarf -- Back to Earth'' consists of the intrepid four discovering that they're just characters in a TV series, and trying to track down the writers to find out how long they have left. [[spoiler: Subverted, as it was actually a group hallucination brought on by the ink of a psychedelic squid.]] * Brazilian sitcom ''Series/OsNormais'' had the two protagonists frequently [[InnerMonologue monologuing]] to the audience. Once a couple the protagonists were visiting noticed the cut to a FlashBack, and did one themselves (complete with the husband asking "[[AudienceWhatAudience who filmed this?]]" as the flashback ended). * ''Series/TheMightyBoosh'' spits on your fourth wall! They not only look at the camera and talk to the audience, they make in-episode references to the show's premise, the actors playing multiple characters, that episode's costumes and special effects, even the show's channel and time slot. * The ''Series/ICarly'' online content (as opposed to the in-universe webshow) often breaks the fourth wall, by way of a 40 year old man filling in for Sam, and a clip of Freddie informing the 'Baby Spencer' character (who is played by Jerry Trainor), that Jerry Trainor was nominated for an award. * ''Series/NedsDeclassifiedSchoolSurvivalGuide'' was famous for this. In the "Guide to Girls", Ned had nothing to offer and asked Moze to give some tips. After a false start, he stops her and produces a CD player from under the table to play the "tips" BGM. * ''Series/ClarissaExplainsItAll'' was pretty much the queen of this trope. The title character would open every episode with a monologue directly to the camera, and she would also address the audience after a major plot point in the episode, which usually happens around 5 times an episode. She also makes the occasional facial reaction directly to the camera during a scene.
to:
* ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'' The 1952 ''Tales of Tomorrow'' episode "The Window" has a live drama show being interrupted by spontaneous images from an apartment somewhere in the city, where a woman is conspiring with her boyfriend to murder her husband. [[http://lileks.com/bleat/?p=6300 Watch here]]. * Almost every Episode of ''Series/{{That Mitchell and Webb Look}}'' features a sketch where members of the cast sit around on set between takes, usually wearing costumes from other sketches, having humourous conversations. In one such sketch, Robert Webb was famous for breaking astonished to find that these sketches were scripted as well, being shown a script describing the fourth wall; conversation he thought he was having spontaneously. Other sketches have involved debating guest stars, (they hired The Queen, but one unfortunate example was actually forced on them by ExecutiveMeddling . A wanted Helen Mirren) and lampshading the conventions of sketch that comedy, such as the team wanted to do, about undertakers asking a man if he wanted to eat his mother's corpse instead inconvenience of burying it or burning it, was only allowed by the BBC if they showed the studio audience reacting with distaste and invading the set during the sketch. ** And of course, everyone's favorite RunningGag character, Colonel Mustache. "Quite right, quite right, stop this sketch, it's getting entirely too silly." ** And here's the clincher: offenses against the "Getting out of sketches without using a proper punchline" Act, four, namely, simply ending every bleedin' sketch by just having a policeman come in and... wait a minute... * ''Series/TheFreshPrinceofBelAir'' broke the fourth wall quite often, but the moment that evaporated it came during the premier of the fifth season. The previous season had ended with Will deciding to remain with his mother in Philadelphia, leaving viewers expecting some sort of emotional catharsis. Instead, the next episode opened with an NBC executive approaching write and informing him film 50% deliberately unfunny material, in no uncertain terms that the show was called "The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air," order to qualify as 'hit and that was where he was going to be. And then kidnapping him. miss'. ** And then there's the episode that has Carlton running screaming through several sets for the episode and then ''into the audience''. ** Will asking "If we're so rich, why we can't afford no ceiling?" ... as the camera pans up to show the studio lights. * The story arc of ''Series/RedDwarf -- Back to Earth'' consists of the intrepid four discovering that they're just characters in a TV series, and trying to track down the writers to find out how long they have left. [[spoiler: Subverted, as it was actually a group hallucination brought on by the ink of a psychedelic squid.They also produced [[http://youtu.be/frenyYk3jIA this gem.]] * Brazilian In ''Series/{{Titus}}'' (A sitcom ''Series/OsNormais'' had starring comedian Creator/ChristopherTitus), the two protagonists frequently [[InnerMonologue monologuing]] to the audience. Once a couple the protagonists were visiting noticed the cut to a FlashBack, and did one themselves (complete with the husband asking "[[AudienceWhatAudience who filmed this?]]" as the flashback ended). * ''Series/TheMightyBoosh'' spits on your fourth wall! They not only look at the camera and talk to the audience, they make in-episode references to the show's premise, the actors playing multiple characters, that episode's costumes and special effects, even the show's channel and time slot. * The ''Series/ICarly'' online content (as opposed to the in-universe webshow) often breaks the fourth wall, by way of a 40 year old man filling in for Sam, and a clip of Freddie informing the 'Baby Spencer' main character (who is played by Jerry Trainor), that Jerry Trainor was nominated for an award. * ''Series/NedsDeclassifiedSchoolSurvivalGuide'' was famous for this. In the "Guide to Girls", Ned had nothing to offer and asked Moze to give some tips. After a false start, he stops her and produces a CD player from under the table to play the "tips" BGM. * ''Series/ClarissaExplainsItAll'' was pretty much the queen of this trope. The title character would open every episode with a monologue directly to the camera, and she would also address addresses the audience after from a major plot point in small room with one light bulb, viewed through a black-and white filter. On one occasion, when he was drunk, there were three light bulbs. ** His father Ken and girlfriend Erin both addressed the episode, which usually happens around 5 times an episode. She also makes the occasional facial reaction directly audience from that same small room on occasions where Chris was unable to the camera during a scene.make it or when their narration was thematically important.

* ''Series/MisterRogersNeighborhood'' * The BBC series ''Series/{{Hustle}}'' includes at least one fourth wall-breaking moment in every episode, in which one or more of the main characters will address the audience about the con currently underway, sometimes as time freezes around them. Some episodes are more subtle, having a character perhaps wink at the camera. * The first season of Roger Moore's TV series ''Series/TheSaint'' began each episode with Simon Templar addressing the audience and setting the scene for each week's adventure. After the show moved to color production, this was replaced by narration. * ''Series/SecretDiaryOfACallGirl''. Belle talks to the audience at least as much as she talks to anyone on-screen. * PJ Katie often spoke right to the viewer on ''Series/PJKatiesFarm''. * The British sketch show, ''Series/TheFastShow'', has three recurring characters that directly address the viewer: The Fourth Duke of Wimbledon (who remarks to the viewer on his compromising situation) an unnamed character played by Mark Williams (who is shown engaging in suspicious activity before noticing the camera and saying, "You ain't seen me, right?") and Unlucky Alf (who sadly reflects to camera about his bad luck, before falling victim to it). * The ''Series/ColgateComedyHour''. Though sometimes the performers would build one and then knock it down again, just for fun. * Israeli sitcom ''HaPijamot'', every episode. * The characters on ''Series/TheBasilBrushShow'' probably never went an episode with the fourth wall intact. They would frequently pick up a copy of the script and read ahead, get to places quickly by cutting across the set, and on one memorable occasion total disaster was averted by the appearance of a director rushing in to explain to the marauding pirates that they'd wandered onto the wrong set. Another incident involved the camera man quitting after the cast gets cream on the lens, only for the guest star of the week to offer to operate the equipment. * Ted, of ''Series/BetterOffTed'', talks to the camera ''a lot''. * Almost every Episode of ''Series/{{That Mitchell and Webb Look}}'' features a sketch where members of the cast sit around on set between takes, usually wearing costumes from other sketches, having humourous conversations. In one such sketch, Robert Webb was astonished to find that these sketches were scripted as well, being shown a script describing the conversation he thought he was having spontaneously. Other sketches have involved debating guest stars, (they hired The Queen, but actually wanted Helen Mirren) and lampshading the conventions of sketch comedy, such as the inconvenience of having to write and film 50% deliberately unfunny material, in order to qualify as 'hit and miss'. ** They also produced [[http://youtu.be/frenyYk3jIA this gem.]] * Australian mockumentary ''Series/TheGames'' played with the trope on several levels. The characters break the fourth wall, but it's the fourth wall of the InUniverse documentary that is the FramingDevice for the show, ''not'' the real television show in our reality. However, one of the characters, Tim, does seem to be aware and remarks about how they are in a scripted tv show. * ''Series/TheRedGreenShow'': The majority of the Lodge's escapades are exposed almost exclusively through the characters directly talking to the audience. One recurring skit, "North of 40", has Red talking right to the audience about problems that middle-aged men face.
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* ''Series/MisterRogersNeighborhood'' * The BBC series ''Series/{{Hustle}}'' includes at least From the UK, ''Series/TheYoungOnes'' regularly made reference to their being characters on a sitcom. In one fourth wall-breaking moment in every episode, Neil's mother visits to complain about his working on a program with such shoddy production values, smashing a chair as an example; Mike points out that the chair is a breakaway prop Rik was going to be struck on the head with. Sure enough, Rik gets clobbered with a chair a few minutes later ... and is knocked unconscious, because his attacker unwittingly uses a normal chair instead of the ruined prop! ** {{SpiritualSuccessor}}s to ''The Young Ones'' are ''Series/FilthyRichAndCatflap'' and ''{{Bottom}}'', in which one or more of the main characters will ''constantly'' address the audience about the con currently underway, sometimes as time freezes around them. Some episodes are more subtle, having a character perhaps wink at the camera. * The first season of Roger Moore's TV series ''Series/TheSaint'' began each episode with Simon Templar addressing the audience and setting the scene for each week's adventure. After the show moved to color production, this was replaced by narration. * ''Series/SecretDiaryOfACallGirl''. Belle talks to the audience at least as much as she talks to anyone on-screen. * PJ Katie often spoke right to the viewer on ''Series/PJKatiesFarm''. * The British sketch show, ''Series/TheFastShow'', has three recurring characters that directly address the viewer: The Fourth Duke of Wimbledon (who remarks to the viewer on his compromising situation) an unnamed character played by Mark Williams (who is shown engaging in suspicious activity before noticing the camera and saying, "You ain't seen me, right?") and Unlucky Alf (who sadly reflects to camera about his bad luck, before falling victim to it). * The ''Series/ColgateComedyHour''. Though sometimes the performers would build one and then knock it down again, just for fun. * Israeli sitcom ''HaPijamot'', every episode. * The characters on ''Series/TheBasilBrushShow'' probably never went an episode with the fourth wall intact. They would frequently pick up a copy of the script and read ahead, get to places quickly by cutting across the set, and on one memorable occasion total disaster was averted by the appearance of a director rushing in to explain to the marauding pirates that they'd wandered onto the wrong set. Another incident involved the camera man quitting after the cast gets cream on the lens, only for the guest star of the week to offer to operate the equipment. * Ted, of ''Series/BetterOffTed'', talks to the camera ''a lot''. * Almost every Episode of ''Series/{{That Mitchell and Webb Look}}'' features a sketch where members of the cast sit around on set between takes, usually wearing costumes from other sketches, having humourous conversations. In one such sketch, Robert Webb was astonished to find that these sketches were scripted as well, being shown a script describing the conversation he thought he was having spontaneously. Other sketches have involved debating guest stars, (they hired The Queen, but actually wanted Helen Mirren) and lampshading the conventions of sketch comedy, such as the inconvenience of having to write and film 50% deliberately unfunny material, in order to qualify as 'hit and miss'. ** They also produced [[http://youtu.be/frenyYk3jIA this gem.]] * Australian mockumentary ''Series/TheGames'' played with the trope on several levels. The characters break the fourth wall, but it's the fourth wall of the InUniverse documentary that is the FramingDevice for the show, ''not'' the real television show in our reality. However, one of the characters, Tim, does seem to be aware and remarks about how they are in a scripted tv show. * ''Series/TheRedGreenShow'': The majority of the Lodge's escapades are exposed almost exclusively through the characters directly talking to the audience. One recurring skit, "North of 40", has Red talking right to the audience about problems that middle-aged men face.camera/audience.
3rd Feb '16 3:45:36 PM AlienPatch
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Corrected a typo.
** One could venture that that the entirety of ''LightNovel/{{Slayers}}'' novel-verse has no fourth wall, as they are first person, Lina's point of view. She frequently pauses to address the audience, often reacting as if she's been called on her sometimes (often) less-than-ethical actions where assaulting local banditry is concerned. This usually results in her denial before readers are given the details of what actually happened to cause ten armed men to chase her.
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** One could venture that that the entirety of ''LightNovel/{{Slayers}}'' novel-verse has no fourth wall, as they are told in first person, person from Lina's point of view. She frequently pauses to address the audience, often reacting as if she's been called on her sometimes (often) less-than-ethical actions where assaulting local banditry is concerned. This usually results in her denial before readers are given the details of what actually happened to cause ten armed men to chase her.
1st Feb '16 6:42:08 AM EarlOfSandvich
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* ''NoMoreHeroes''. Right off the bat in the intro. "Just push the 'A' Button!" Then slowly chipped them away one by one until the last mission and then completely destroyed at the end ("I would expect you and your players would expect a twist or some kind!").
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* ''NoMoreHeroes''.''VideoGame/NoMoreHeroes''. Right off the bat in the intro. "Just push the 'A' Button!" Then slowly chipped them away one by one until the last mission and then completely destroyed at the end ("I would expect you and your players would expect a twist or some kind!").
30th Jan '16 5:06:50 AM DannWoolf
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** [[FinaglesLaw It got worse]] : the Psycho-Pirate, the character who became aware of the fourth wall first, at one point goes "We are the creations of sick minds. Yes. I've seen... and there's something worse... the creators... ''they're not real either...''"
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** [[FinaglesLaw It got worse]] : worse]]: the Psycho-Pirate, the character who became aware of the fourth wall first, at one point goes "We are the creations of sick minds. Yes. I've seen... and there's something worse... the creators... ''they're not real either...''"
26th Jan '16 4:37:38 AM Adept
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* ''DragonHalf''. At one point in the second episode, a new character appears to proclaim the main heroine his implacable rival. He gives an impressive rant about what she's supposedly done to him... and she has no idea what he's talking about. He pulls out a TV set and a tape of the first episode to show her, only to find that all his scenes were cut by the editor. This prompts another rant.
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* ''DragonHalf''.''Manga/DragonHalf''. At one point in the second episode, a new character appears to proclaim the main heroine his implacable rival. He gives an impressive rant about what she's supposedly done to him... and she has no idea what he's talking about. He pulls out a TV set and a tape of the first episode to show her, only to find that all his scenes were cut by the editor. This prompts another rant.
20th Jan '16 7:59:54 PM GrammarNavi
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** The fight with the third demon, [[spoiler:Asomodeus.EXE, is NOTHING but this as he tries to trick you into looking away from the game window. This includes faking a {{Steam}} friend message, playing social media notification sounds at random, and intentionally causing a program stall that you have to "wait for the program to respond" on.]]
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** The fight with the third demon, [[spoiler:Asomodeus.EXE, is NOTHING but this as he tries to trick you into looking away from the game window. This includes faking a {{Steam}} {{UsefulNotes/Steam}} friend message, playing social media notification sounds at random, and intentionally causing a program stall that you have to "wait for the program to respond" on.]]
15th Jan '16 2:53:43 PM morenohijazo
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Added DiffLines:
* ''VideoGame/PonyIsland'': ** If you decide to mess around with the game's save data, [[spoiler:Lucifer will bluntly tell you to knock it off the next time you load up a game. He also remembers the player if they start a NewGamePlus and changes his opening speech accordingly.]] ** If all the tickets are collected during a NewGamePlus, [[spoiler:the Lost Soul determines that you must be looking for the GoldenEnding and challenges you to a "cathartic" final battle. Once the fight is done, he tells you to close the game because there's nothing else to see.]] ** [[spoiler:The Lost Soul outright encourages the player to delete the core files as it's "the only way to advance the plot".]] ** The fight with the third demon, [[spoiler:Asomodeus.EXE, is NOTHING but this as he tries to trick you into looking away from the game window. This includes faking a {{Steam}} friend message, playing social media notification sounds at random, and intentionally causing a program stall that you have to "wait for the program to respond" on.]]
15th Jan '16 1:51:57 PM Anddrix
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* Pro wrestling's version of this is called breaking {{Kayfabe}}: the performers acknowledge for once that what they're doing ''isn't'' real, [[ViewersAreMorons as if we didn't already know that]]. Most notably, whenever a wrestler dies or makes a memorable exit from a company, the other wrestlers will temporarily put aside the fact that they "hate" each others' guts and come out to the ring together for a CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming.
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* Pro wrestling's version of this is called breaking {{Kayfabe}}: the performers acknowledge for once that what they're doing ''isn't'' real, [[ViewersAreMorons as if we didn't already know that]].that. Most notably, whenever a wrestler dies or makes a memorable exit from a company, the other wrestlers will temporarily put aside the fact that they "hate" each others' guts and come out to the ring together for a CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming.
12th Jan '16 5:31:53 PM nombretomado
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* Website/DeviantART based comic ''The Grind'' takes place in the game RuneScape, and the characters are players in the game. As such, all of the characters know they are in a game...except for the main character, who is the only one who doesn't know what he is actually doing, sort of an anti-FourthWallObserver.
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* Website/DeviantART based comic ''The Grind'' takes place in the game RuneScape, ''VideoGame/RuneScape'', and the characters are players in the game. As such, all of the characters know they are in a game...except for the main character, who is the only one who doesn't know what he is actually doing, sort of an anti-FourthWallObserver.
11th Jan '16 5:15:15 PM Justadoo444
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* ''WesternAnimation/EdEddNEddy'' does this from time-to-time, saying things like "End of first sequence and fade to black" or "an Iris-In would be appropriate, don't you think?", quickly followed by whatever was just mentioned. Then there was that absolutely ''ridiculous'' episode where they play around with cartoon physics, including having another character turn into a puddle of talking color when they remove his outline.
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* ''WesternAnimation/EdEddNEddy'' does do this from time-to-time, saying things like "End of first sequence and fade to black" or "an Iris-In would be appropriate, don't you think?", quickly followed by whatever was just mentioned. Then there was that absolutely ''ridiculous'' episode ("One + One = Ed") where they the Eds play around with cartoon physics, including having another character Jimmy turn into a puddle of talking color when they remove his outline.
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