History Main / NoDubForYou

25th Apr '17 11:09:14 AM Saurubiker
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* ''Manga/FistOfTheNorthStar'' - Only the first 36 episodes of the TV series were dubbed by Creator/MangaEntertainment due to underperforming sales when they were released on VHS in 1999 (this was just before DVD started to catch on as the standard home video format).[[note]]In fact, only the first 24 of the 36 dubbed episodes were actually released on VHS. The rest aired on Showtime Beyond in the U.S. and the Sci-Fi Channel in the U.K. before getting a proper home media release on DVD in 2003.[[/note]] The remainder of the series would be released subbed only via digital distribution in the late 2000's, eventually getting a DVD release from Discotek Media. As for the movies and [=OVAs=], only the 1986 movie (dubbed by Streamline Pictures) and the ''New Fist of the North Star'' trilogy from 2003 were dubbed. The ''True Savior'' pentalogy from 2006-2008 have yet to be licensed.

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* ''Manga/FistOfTheNorthStar'' - Only The 1986 movie was dubbed in the early 90's by Creator/StreamlinePictures, selling reasonably well on home video, which inspired Creator/MangaEntertainment to later pick the TV series. However, only the first 36 episodes of the TV series were dubbed by Creator/MangaEntertainment due to underperforming underwhelming sales when they were released on VHS in 1999 (this was back when VHS was still the standard home video format and just before DVD started to catch on as the standard home video format).on).[[note]]In fact, only the first 24 of the 36 dubbed episodes were actually released on VHS. The rest aired on Showtime Beyond in the U.S. and the Sci-Fi Channel in the U.K. before getting a proper home media release on DVD in 2003.[[/note]] The remainder of the series would be released subbed only via digital distribution in the late 2000's, eventually getting a DVD release from Discotek Media. As for the movies and [=OVAs=], only the 1986 movie (dubbed by Streamline Pictures) and the The 2003 ''New Fist of the North Star'' trilogy OVA series received a dub from 2003 were dubbed. The ''True ADV Films, but the later five-part ''Legends of the True Savior'' pentalogy film/OVA series from 2006-2008 have yet to be licensed.2005-2008 [[NoExportForYou were never licensed for the English-language market.]]
22nd Apr '17 12:04:23 PM luisedgarf
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* ''WesternAnimation/SausageParty'' will be released in this format in Japan, making it one of the rare movies released in Japan without a dub.
20th Apr '17 5:28:24 PM Saurubiker
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* ''Manga/FistOfTheNorthStar'' - Creator/MangaEntertainment dubbed the first 36 episodes of the TV series when they were releasing anime on VHS back in the late 90's, but only 24 were actually released on tapes (the rest aired on Showtime Beyond in the US and the Sci-Fi Channel in the UK). The remainder of the series would be released subbed only via digital distribution in the late 2000's, eventually getting a DVD release from Discotek Media. As for the movies and [=OVAs=], only the 1986 movie (dubbed by Streamline Pictures) and the ''New Fist of the North Star'' trilogy from 2003 were dubbed. The ''True Savior'' pentalogy from 2006-2008 have yet to be licensed.

to:

* ''Manga/FistOfTheNorthStar'' - Creator/MangaEntertainment dubbed Only the first 36 episodes of the TV series were dubbed by Creator/MangaEntertainment due to underperforming sales when they were releasing anime released on VHS back in 1999 (this was just before DVD started to catch on as the late 90's, but standard home video format).[[note]]In fact, only the first 24 of the 36 dubbed episodes were actually released on tapes (the VHS. The rest aired on Showtime Beyond in the US U.S. and the Sci-Fi Channel in the UK). U.K. before getting a proper home media release on DVD in 2003.[[/note]] The remainder of the series would be released subbed only via digital distribution in the late 2000's, eventually getting a DVD release from Discotek Media. As for the movies and [=OVAs=], only the 1986 movie (dubbed by Streamline Pictures) and the ''New Fist of the North Star'' trilogy from 2003 were dubbed. The ''True Savior'' pentalogy from 2006-2008 have yet to be licensed.


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* ''Legends of the Dark King'' (a.k.a. ''Ten no Haoh'') - A spinoff of ''Manga/FistOfTheNorthStar'', the initial 2009 DVD release by Sentai Filmworks was subbed only, but it was later reissued in 2010 (on both, DVD and Blu-ray) with an English dub included.
20th Apr '17 3:03:51 PM Saurubiker
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* ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'' -- Only ''KOF XII'' and the ''Maximum Impact'' games have dual voice tracks.

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* ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'' -- Only ''KOF XII'' and the ''Maximum Impact'' games have dual voice tracks. However, Wolfgang Krauser in ''KOF '96'' was voiced by Michigan native [[https://youtu.be/JYZJl9V8FHM?t=170 B.J. Love]] (who also voiced him in ''Real Bout Special'' and ''Real Bout 2'').
20th Apr '17 12:56:44 PM Saurubiker
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* The uncut versions of ''Manga/SailorMoon'' and ''Sailor Moon R'' - When ADV released the uncut versions of the first two seasons on DVD, it was released without an English dub (a rarity for ADV), due to the show being sub-licensed from Creator/DiC, producers of the edited dub. When Creator/VizMedia got the license to the entire series (including the later 3 three seasons, ''S'', ''Super S'', and ''Sailor Stars''), they were able to dub the uncut versions of the original series.

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* The uncut versions of ''Manga/SailorMoon'' and ''Sailor Moon R'' ''Manga/SailorMoon'' - When ADV released the uncut versions of the first two seasons original series and ''Sailor Moon R'' on DVD, it was they were released without an English dub (a rarity for ADV), due to the show being sub-licensed from Creator/DiC, producers of the edited dub. When Creator/VizMedia got the license to the entire series (including the later 3 three seasons, shows, ''S'', ''Super S'', and ''Sailor Stars''), they were able to dub the uncut versions of the original series.
20th Apr '17 12:51:29 PM Saurubiker
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* ''Anime/{{Free}}'': Creator/DiscotekMedia's home vaideo release of Season 1 is sub-only (Website/{{Crunchyroll}} currently has a dubbed version of it on its website, using [=FUNimation=]'s cast), but [=FUNimation=]'s home video release of the second season, ''Eternal Summer'', has a dub. Website/{{Crunchyroll}}'s home video release of Season 1 will have the dub.

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* ''Anime/{{Free}}'': Creator/DiscotekMedia's home vaideo video release of Season 1 is sub-only (Website/{{Crunchyroll}} currently has a dubbed version of it on its website, using [=FUNimation=]'s cast), but [=FUNimation=]'s home video release of the second season, ''Eternal Summer'', has a dub. Website/{{Crunchyroll}}'s home video release of Season 1 will have the dub.
20th Apr '17 12:45:50 PM Saurubiker
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* ''Franchise/MetalGear'' -- The original ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' had versions voiced in German, French, Italian and Spanish for the PAL region in addition to English, which was a pretty unprecedented move for video game localizations at the time. Despite this, Konami didn't continue this practice for subsequent entries, opting to simply release only English-voiced versions for the European market and have just the text and subtitles translated in other languages instead. In Japan on the other hand, the series has always been voiced in its native language with the notable exception of ''Twin Snakes'', the [=GameCube=]-exclusive remake of the original ''Metal Gear Solid''.

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* ''Franchise/MetalGear'' -- The original ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' had versions voiced in German, French, Italian and Spanish for the PAL region in addition to English, which was a pretty unprecedented move for video game localizations at the time. Despite this, Konami didn't continue this practice for subsequent entries, opting to simply release only English-voiced versions for the European market and have just market, having only the text and subtitles translated in other languages instead. In Japan on On the other hand, the series has games have always been voiced in its their native language Japanese with the notable exception of ''Twin Snakes'', the [=GameCube=]-exclusive remake of the original ''Metal Gear Solid''.
20th Apr '17 11:58:22 AM Saurubiker
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** For games in which the announcer mentions the name of each fighter (such as ''VideoGame/XMenVsStreetFighter'' or the console ports of ''Alpha 2''), different voice clips are used for characters [[DubNameChange whose names differ between regions]] (such as Charlie and Akuma, who are named Nash and Gouki respectively in Japan). In the case of ''Capcom vs. SNK 2'', the export version doesn't have the announcer use the character names due to the fact that they refer to the boxer character as "Mike Bison" in full rather than just Bison as has been traditionally done since ''Super Street Fighter II''.

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** For games in which the announcer mentions the name names of each fighter (such as ''VideoGame/XMenVsStreetFighter'' or the console ports of ''Alpha 2''), different voice clips are used for characters [[DubNameChange whose names differ were changed between regions]] (such as (specifically Charlie and Akuma, who are named known as Nash and Gouki respectively in Japan). In the case of ''Capcom vs. SNK 2'', the export version doesn't have removed the announcer use the character names name calls due to the fact that they refer the announcer refers to the boxer "[[FanNickname boxer]]" character as "Mike Bison" in full rather than just Bison "Bison", as has been traditionally done since ''Super Street Fighter II''.II'', making the usual name switching a bit impossible in this instance.



* ''Franchise/MetalGear'' -- The original ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' was released with voice tracks in six different languages (Japanese, English, French, Italian, German and Spanish), but the sequels were only given Japanese and English voices, having subtitles and text localizations done for other languages. ''Twin Snakes'' was released only with English voices.

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* ''Franchise/MetalGear'' -- The original ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' was released with voice tracks had versions voiced in six different languages (Japanese, German, French, Italian and Spanish for the PAL region in addition to English, French, Italian, German and Spanish), but the sequels were only given Japanese and English voices, having subtitles and text which was a pretty unprecedented move for video game localizations done at the time. Despite this, Konami didn't continue this practice for subsequent entries, opting to simply release only English-voiced versions for the European market and have just the text and subtitles translated in other languages. languages instead. In Japan on the other hand, the series has always been voiced in its native language with the notable exception of ''Twin Snakes'' was released only with English voices. Snakes'', the [=GameCube=]-exclusive remake of the original ''Metal Gear Solid''.



* ''Franchise/ResidentEvil'' - The newer games in the series has been getting multiple voice tracks (in Japanese, French, Italian, German and Spanish in addition to English), starting with ''VideoGame/ResidentEvilRevelations'' and then with ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil6'' (with the Japanese voices being available as DLC on the [=PS3=] and Xbox 360 versions). Prior to that, the games were voiced only in English with subtitles for spoken dialogue in non-English versions, even in its native Japan.[[note]]The very first game had a Japanese voice track recorded for it, but the developers ultimately went with English voices to make the American setting feel more authentic for domestic players.[[/note]] When the ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil1'' remake and ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil0'' were ported to PC and non-Nintendo consoles, they were retroactively given Japanese voice tracks for these new releases.

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* ''Franchise/ResidentEvil'' - The newer games in the series has been getting multiple voice tracks (in Japanese, French, Italian, German and Spanish in addition to English), starting with ''VideoGame/ResidentEvilRevelations'' and then with ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil6'' (with the Japanese voices being available as DLC on the [=PS3=] and Xbox 360 versions). Prior to that, that the games were voiced only in English with subtitles for spoken dialogue in non-English versions, even in its native Japan.[[note]]The very first game had a Japanese voice track recorded for it, but the developers ultimately went with English voices to make the American setting feel more authentic for domestic players.[[/note]] When the ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil1'' remake and ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil0'' were ported to PC and non-Nintendo consoles, they were retroactively given Japanese voice tracks for these new releases.
19th Apr '17 11:39:50 PM Saurubiker
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** For games in which the announcer mentions the name of each fighter (such as ''VideoGame/XMenVsStreetFighter'', ''[[VideoGame/CapcomVsSNK Capcom vs. SNK 2]]'' or the console ports of ''Alpha 2''), different voice clips are used for characters [[DubNameChange whose names differ between regions]] (such as Charlie and Akuma, who are named Nash and Gouki respectively in Japan).

to:

** For games in which the announcer mentions the name of each fighter (such as ''VideoGame/XMenVsStreetFighter'', ''[[VideoGame/CapcomVsSNK Capcom vs. SNK 2]]'' ''VideoGame/XMenVsStreetFighter'' or the console ports of ''Alpha 2''), different voice clips are used for characters [[DubNameChange whose names differ between regions]] (such as Charlie and Akuma, who are named Nash and Gouki respectively in Japan).Japan). In the case of ''Capcom vs. SNK 2'', the export version doesn't have the announcer use the character names due to the fact that they refer to the boxer character as "Mike Bison" in full rather than just Bison as has been traditionally done since ''Super Street Fighter II''.
19th Apr '17 11:00:56 PM Saurubiker
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* ''Franchise/StreetFighter'' -- The series didn't start receiving dual voice tracks until the console versions of ''VideoGame/StreetFighterIV''. This was never much of an issue in prior games due to their arcade nature though, as voice work mostly amounted to grunts, kias, [[CallingYourAttack special moves yells]] and the occasional simple phrases during victory animations, while endings and post-match quotes were text-only. However there were some cases where voice clips were changed between regional releases:
** ''VideoGame/StreetFighterI'' changed the names of Ryu and Ken's signature moves for the export versions. So instead of saying ''Tatsumaki Senpū Kyaku'', ''Shoryūken'' and ''Hadōken'' while performing them, they instead yell "Hurricane Kick", "Dragon Punch" and "[[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness Psycho Fire]]". Despite this, all the other voice clips in the game, including the post-match speeches (which were already in English), were kept unchanged.

to:

* ''Franchise/StreetFighter'' -- The series didn't start receiving dual voice tracks until the console versions of ''VideoGame/StreetFighterIV''. This was never much of an issue in prior games due to their arcade nature though, as voice work mostly amounted to grunts, kias, [[CallingYourAttack special moves yells]] and the occasional simple phrases during victory animations, while endings and post-match quotes were always text-only. However there were some cases where voice clips were changed between regional releases:
** ''VideoGame/StreetFighterI'' changed the names of voice clips for Ryu and Ken's signature moves for the export versions. So instead of saying ''Tatsumaki Senpū Kyaku'', ''Shoryūken'' and ''Hadōken'' while performing them, ''Hadōken'', they instead yell "Hurricane Kick", "Dragon Punch" and "[[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness Psycho Fire]]". Despite this, all the other voice clips in the game, including the post-match speeches (which were already in English), were kept unchanged.



** A a different TitleScream is used for the Japanese and Asian versions of the ''VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha'' games , as the series is titled ''[[MarketBasedTitle Street Fighter ZERO]]'' in those territories. Likewise, for games in which the announcer mention the names of the fighters (such as ''VideoGame/XMenVsStreetFighter'' and ''VideoGame/CapcomVsSNK2'' or the console ports of ''Alpha 2''), different voice clips are used for characters [[DubNameChange whose names differ between regions]] (such as Charlie and Akuma, who are named Nash and Gouki respectively in Japan).
** Some of the characters in the ''VideoGame/StreetFighterIII'' series were voiced by actual English-speaking actors in lieu of the usual Japanese actors, giving them much more natural sounding voices free of the usual Engrish accent. In ''New Generation'' and ''[=2nd Impact=]'', Michael Sommers voiced Alex and Necro, while Bruce Robertson voiced Dudley and Gill. For ''[=3rd=] Strike'', Patrick Gallagan and Francis Diakewsky took over as Alex and Dudley respectively, Len Carlson voiced Hugo and Q, and Lawrence Bayne voiced Necro, Gill, Urien and Twelve.

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** A a different TitleScream is used for the Japanese and Asian versions of the ''VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha'' games , as the series is titled ''[[MarketBasedTitle Street Fighter ZERO]]'' in those territories. Likewise, for territories.
** For
games in which the announcer mention mentions the names name of the fighters each fighter (such as ''VideoGame/XMenVsStreetFighter'' and ''VideoGame/CapcomVsSNK2'' ''VideoGame/XMenVsStreetFighter'', ''[[VideoGame/CapcomVsSNK Capcom vs. SNK 2]]'' or the console ports of ''Alpha 2''), different voice clips are used for characters [[DubNameChange whose names differ between regions]] (such as Charlie and Akuma, who are named Nash and Gouki respectively in Japan).
** Some of the characters in the ''VideoGame/StreetFighterIII'' series were voiced by actual English-speaking actors in lieu of the usual Japanese actors, giving them much more natural sounding voices free of the usual Engrish accent. In ''New Generation'' and ''[=2nd Impact=]'', Michael Sommers voiced Alex and Necro, while Bruce Robertson voiced Dudley and Gill. For ''[=3rd=] Strike'', Patrick Gallagan and Francis Diakewsky took over as Alex and Dudley respectively, Len Carlson voiced Hugo and Q, and Lawrence Bayne voiced Necro, Gill, Urien and Twelve.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.NoDubForYou