History Main / NoConservationOfEnergy

19th Jan '16 11:42:59 AM nombretomado
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* Several mass-changing characters actually need to absorb mass from outside themselves; Stronghold of Creator/ValiantComics, a StaticShock villain, etc. Most just "get heavier".
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* Several mass-changing characters actually need to absorb mass from outside themselves; Stronghold of Creator/ValiantComics, a StaticShock ''WesternAnimation/StaticShock'' villain, etc. Most just "get heavier".
19th Jan '16 10:25:35 AM HumanTorch2
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* In the episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' where the teachers go on strike, Lisa eventually builds a perpetual motion machine, which prompts this quote:
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* In the episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' where the teachers go on strike, Lisa eventually snaps and builds a perpetual motion machine, machine in a failed attempt to cope, which prompts this quote:
15th Jan '16 6:11:16 AM Morgenthaler
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* TheFantasyTrip has magic being powered from the wizard's physical energy reserves. Effectively, casting spells tires out the wizard, similar to the way magic works in the Literature/InheritanceCycle.
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* TheFantasyTrip TabletopGame/TheFantasyTrip has magic being powered from the wizard's physical energy reserves. Effectively, casting spells tires out the wizard, similar to the way magic works in the Literature/InheritanceCycle.
22nd Nov '15 4:15:19 PM SteelEdge
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* ''BobAndGeorge'' operates on RuleOfFunny, so this is played with back and forth. One character claims that they've violated every law of physics, but somehow George manages to exploit the law on energy conservation. George claims that his lightning based powers is powered by the sheer amount of ice cream he eats, but then [[UnreliableNarrator admits that he was just making an excuse for his love of ice cream]]. George later somehow exploits the conservation of energy by forcing too much energy through [[spoiler: the Helmeted Author]]'s magical shrinking box, even stating the law outright.
1st Nov '15 1:11:29 AM Llygodenfawr
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*** On the other hand, it does. Turning a stone around takes less effort and energy if you simply get it rolling by pushing at the top than it does if you lift it up, turn it around and then drop it upside down, which leaves you both incredibly tired and ''pushed down into the ground by the opposite reaction of it's weight'' if you don't brace yourself. Moving air gradually takes less energy than moving it all into a storm-strong wind in an instant and even then it's taxing enough to leave the very experienced person who does it passed out from exhaustion. Creating something new usually involves taking something that's similar in some way (like the type of matter or the right shape) and changing that (and still takes a great deal of effort) and unless you've got about several thousand years of practice or a handy near inexhaustible supply of power in the form of an orb most things are very taxing. Though the Malloreon tends more towards this trope. * The ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' books [[HandWave address]] this - when they shrink down to cockroach size, their extra mass is shifted into Z-Space, the same dimension that FTL starships travel in. Likewise, when they morph something larger than themselves, the extra mass comes from the same place.
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*** On the other hand, it does. Turning a stone around takes less effort and energy if you simply get it rolling by pushing at the top than it does if you lift it up, turn it around and then drop it upside down, which leaves you both incredibly tired and ''pushed down into the ground by the opposite reaction of it's its weight'' if you don't brace yourself. Moving air gradually takes less energy than moving it all into a storm-strong wind in an instant and even then it's taxing enough to leave the very experienced person who does it passed out from exhaustion. Creating something new usually involves taking something that's similar in some way (like the type of matter or the right shape) and changing that (and still takes a great deal of effort) and unless you've got about several thousand years of practice or a handy near inexhaustible supply of power in the form of an orb most things are very taxing. Though the Malloreon tends more towards this trope. * The ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' books [[HandWave address]] this - when they shrink down to cockroach size, their extra mass is shifted into Z-Space, the same dimension that FTL starships travel in. Likewise, when they morph into something larger than themselves, the extra mass comes from the same place.

-->'''Ponder:''' Er- It's not as simple as that.
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-->'''Ponder:''' Er- Er -- It's not as simple as that.
20th Sep '15 5:41:25 AM ScorpiusOB1
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** The [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero-energy_universe Zero-energy Universe theory]] suggests the energy of the Universe contained in matter is canceled by the energy present in the form of gravitation. Such an Universe could have been born from a quantum fluctuation in the middle of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ex_nihilo#Modern_physics nothingness]] and requires the Universe to be flat[[note]]With no measurable space curvature[[/note]], in line with current observations.
7th Sep '15 11:02:53 PM merotoker
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* ''DragonBallZ'': These people can destroy PLANETS. They can casually shoot beams from their hands that level mountains. Aside from a somewhat [[BigEater large appetite]] (and only in the case of the Saiyans), this is never explained. * In ''GurrenLagann'', it's a key plot point that Spiral Power does not conserve matter or energy. [[spoiler:Overuse of Spiral Power is projected to eventually cause the creation of the "Spiral Nemesis", a supermassive black hole large enough to destroy the entire universe]].
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* ''DragonBallZ'': ''Anime/DragonBallZ'': These people can destroy PLANETS. They can casually shoot beams from their hands that level mountains. Aside from a somewhat [[BigEater large appetite]] (and only in the case of the Saiyans), this is never explained. * In ''GurrenLagann'', ''Anime/TengenToppaGurrenLagann'', it's a key plot point that Spiral Power does not conserve matter or energy. [[spoiler:Overuse of Spiral Power is projected to eventually cause the creation of the "Spiral Nemesis", a supermassive black hole large enough to destroy the entire universe]].

* In ''ZettaiKarenChildren'', the PsychicPowers are explicitly stated to violate the conservation of energy and not bound by normal physics therefore allow the protagonists to ScrewDestiny.
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* In ''ZettaiKarenChildren'', ''Manga/ZettaiKarenChildren'', the PsychicPowers are explicitly stated to violate the conservation of energy and not bound by normal physics therefore allow the protagonists to ScrewDestiny.

* ''Anime/CodeGeass'' has their own version of a nuke known as the F.L.E.I.J.A (pronounced [[NorseMythology "Freya"]] [[JapaneseRanguage because the Japanese can get away with that sort of thing]]). Instead of releasing a fast amount of energy, the Freya creates an [[SphereOfDestruction expanding energy field]], which after a few seconds implodes and leaves only a void. It has never been explained what happened to all the matter that suddenly disappeared into thin air. * ''[[RanmaOneHalf Ranma 1/2]]'', being a SupernaturalMartialArts {{Shonen}} series, is [[IncrediblyLamePun naturally]] rife with this, but a very special mention goes to the final enemy in the series, ThePhoenix King Saffron:
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* ''Anime/CodeGeass'' has their own version of a nuke known as the F.L.E.I.J.A (pronounced [[NorseMythology [[Myth/NorseMythology "Freya"]] [[JapaneseRanguage because the Japanese can get away with that sort of thing]]). Instead of releasing a fast amount of energy, the Freya creates an [[SphereOfDestruction expanding energy field]], which after a few seconds implodes and leaves only a void. It has never been explained what happened to all the matter that suddenly disappeared into thin air. * ''[[RanmaOneHalf Ranma 1/2]]'', ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf'', being a SupernaturalMartialArts {{Shonen}} series, is [[IncrediblyLamePun [[{{Pun}} naturally]] rife with this, but a very special mention goes to the final enemy in the series, ThePhoenix King Saffron:


* This is so standard for super powers it almost goes unnoticed. Nearly every SuperHero and SuperVillain with powers produces far more energy than their body contains. Occasionally you'll see a HandWave like Cyclops' or {{Superman}}'s "solar power" or Havok of the Comicbook/{{X-Men}}'s "powered by cosmic rays", although if you do the math on their demonstrated energy usage, it doesn't really add up. It also means that with so much potential energy stored in their bodies, every time they get their powers [[PowerNullifier neutralized]], they should explode like atomic bombs. ** In ''ComicBook/UltimateFantasticFour'', Ellis ''tries'' to avoid this; he still has Reed "eating" air. Invisible Woman's explanation consists of a LampshadeHanging, and Ben's power goes unmentioned. The Human Torch's bio-fusion is highly implausible but at least gives a HollywoodScience HandWave to his energy source. Every other book in UltimateMarvel, well, decidedly less so.
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* This is so standard for super powers it almost goes unnoticed. Nearly every SuperHero and SuperVillain with powers produces far more energy than their body contains. Occasionally you'll see a HandWave like Cyclops' ComicBook/{{Cyclops}}' or {{Superman}}'s Franchise/{{Superman}}'s "solar power" or Havok of the Comicbook/{{X-Men}}'s Comicbook/XMen's "powered by cosmic rays", although if you do the math on their demonstrated energy usage, it doesn't really add up. It also means that with so much potential energy stored in their bodies, every time they get their powers [[PowerNullifier neutralized]], they should explode like atomic bombs. ** In ''ComicBook/UltimateFantasticFour'', Ellis ''tries'' to avoid this; he still has Reed "eating" air. Invisible Woman's explanation consists of a LampshadeHanging, and Ben's power goes unmentioned. The Human Torch's bio-fusion is highly implausible but at least gives a HollywoodScience HandWave to his energy source. Every other book in UltimateMarvel, ComicBook/UltimateMarvel, well, decidedly less so.

* Several mass-changing characters actually need to absorb mass from outside themselves; Stronghold of ValiantComics, a StaticShock villain, etc. Most just "get heavier". * Of the [[Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica Justice League's]] "Big Seven", only {{Superman}} and ComicBook/MartianManhunter still run afoul of this trope. WonderWoman, TheFlash, and GreenLantern are all explicitly powered by Phlebotinum or magic. Comicbook/{{Aquaman}} is pushing it with his ability to swim at 100 miles per hour. * Done in ''SteelgripStarkeyAndTheAllPurposePowerTool''. The tool is driven by "technalchemy", which allows it to run with no visible power source, synthesize new components and materials out of thin air, and is apparently indestructible. [[spoiler:Justified as it's implied that technalchemy is a form of magic.]]
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* Several mass-changing characters actually need to absorb mass from outside themselves; Stronghold of ValiantComics, Creator/ValiantComics, a StaticShock villain, etc. Most just "get heavier". * Of the [[Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica Justice League's]] "Big Seven", only {{Superman}} Franchise/{{Superman}} and ComicBook/MartianManhunter still run afoul of this trope. WonderWoman, TheFlash, Franchise/WonderWoman, Franchise/TheFlash, and GreenLantern Franchise/GreenLantern are all explicitly powered by Phlebotinum or magic. Comicbook/{{Aquaman}} is pushing it with his ability to swim at 100 miles per hour. * Done in ''SteelgripStarkeyAndTheAllPurposePowerTool''.''ComicBook/SteelgripStarkeyAndTheAllPurposePowerTool''. The tool is driven by "technalchemy", which allows it to run with no visible power source, synthesize new components and materials out of thin air, and is apparently indestructible. [[spoiler:Justified as it's implied that technalchemy is a form of magic.]]

* Parodied in ''Film/GalaxyQuest'', when the crew has to land on a hostile planet to retrieve a "Beryllium Sphere", because it supposedly powers the ship, for reasons completely unexplained and unknown, except that it happened on the TV show. ** This is a direct parody of the Dilithium Crystal that somehow makes warp drive possible in ''Franchise/StarTrek''. It is there to "mediate" the matter-{{antimatter}} reaction and create a pair of tuned plasma streamers. This is only explained that way in official material ''outside'' of the show, which makes this AllThereInTheManual.
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* Parodied in ''Film/GalaxyQuest'', when the crew has to land on a hostile planet to retrieve a "Beryllium Sphere", because it supposedly powers the ship, for reasons completely unexplained and unknown, except that it happened on the TV show. ** show. This is a direct parody of the Dilithium Crystal that somehow makes warp drive possible in ''Franchise/StarTrek''. It is there to "mediate" the matter-{{antimatter}} reaction and create a pair of tuned plasma streamers. This is only explained that way in official material ''outside'' of the show, which makes this AllThereInTheManual.

* In ''HoneyIShrunkTheKids,'' the principle behind the shrink ray is explained thus: atoms and molecules are made up largely of empty space between the subatomic particles.[[note]]This is true; the distance from the nucleus of an atom to its electron cloud is on par with the distance from the Sun to Pluto, relative to its size[[/note]] The ray shrinks an object by reducing this empty space. However, this should mean that a shrunk object retains its mass. Ergo, the shrunk children should be just as heavy and ''just as strong'' as they were at full-size. There should be no plot, because there's no way they could get swept up in the garbage by accident, and they should have the strength to jump up and activate the machine themselves - assuming their incredible density didn't make them fall straight through the floor.
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* In ''HoneyIShrunkTheKids,'' ''Film/HoneyIShrunkTheKids,'' the principle behind the shrink ray is explained thus: atoms and molecules are made up largely of empty space between the subatomic particles.[[note]]This is true; the distance from the nucleus of an atom to its electron cloud is on par with the distance from the Sun to Pluto, relative to its size[[/note]] The ray shrinks an object by reducing this empty space. However, this should mean that a shrunk object retains its mass. Ergo, the shrunk children should be just as heavy and ''just as strong'' as they were at full-size. There should be no plot, because there's no way they could get swept up in the garbage by accident, and they should have the strength to jump up and activate the machine themselves - assuming their incredible density didn't make them fall straight through the floor.

* Averted in AnneMcCaffrey's [[Literature/TowerAndTheHive Talent series]], which explains that the power necessary for the telekinetics to hurl spaceships around like toys comes from ''massive'' generators. Psychic activity (with or without a generator gestalt) also burns ''a lot'' of calories, meaning that, while a telekinetic with no generator handy can get the job done quicker, he's still doing the same amount of work as someone doing it by hand. Many of the telekinetics are shown eating some pretty high-calorie meals and snacks throughout the day to keep their strength up, and get extremely fatigued after teleporting very large objects (even with the generators helping).
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* Averted in AnneMcCaffrey's Creator/AnneMcCaffrey's [[Literature/TowerAndTheHive Talent series]], which explains that the power necessary for the telekinetics to hurl spaceships around like toys comes from ''massive'' generators. Psychic activity (with or without a generator gestalt) also burns ''a lot'' of calories, meaning that, while a telekinetic with no generator handy can get the job done quicker, he's still doing the same amount of work as someone doing it by hand. Many of the telekinetics are shown eating some pretty high-calorie meals and snacks throughout the day to keep their strength up, and get extremely fatigued after teleporting very large objects (even with the generators helping).

** Also averted in ''TheShipWho Won''. A brainship finds a world where magic actually works, complete with all the standard NoConservationOfEnergy tropes. Then they discover that [[spoiler:there's actually a huge generator complex powering all this, which the magicians have completely wrecked by using it for stupid things like fireballs and levitation]].
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** Also averted in ''TheShipWho ''Literature/TheShipWho Won''. A brainship finds a world where magic actually works, complete with all the standard NoConservationOfEnergy no conservation of energy tropes. Then they discover that [[spoiler:there's actually a huge generator complex powering all this, which the magicians have completely wrecked by using it for stupid things like fireballs and levitation]].

* ''WildCards'' shapeshifters often have a HandWave of "virtual particles", basically acting in ways that in no way resemble the virtual particles of real-world physics.
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* ''WildCards'' ''Literature/WildCards'' shapeshifters often have a HandWave of "virtual particles", basically acting in ways that in no way resemble the virtual particles of real-world physics.

* In ''TheDragonAndTheGeorge'', the trope is either slightly inverted or subverted. Speaking on the subject of the power available to mages, the wizard Carolinus irritatedly says (paraphrased), "Just because a number's infinite doesn't mean you can use it to get something for nothing." (This may be true in this universe, as he's apparently referring to Cantor's hierarchy of infinities, and spells may require infinite expenditures.) As with the ''YoungWizards'' series above, later books note in the background the development of ways to tap new sources of power, some of which probably provide infinite energy, but which still avert the trope. * DanBrown's ''AngelsAndDemons'' is based around the female protagonist/her dead father pumping vast quantities of energy into the LHC to form {{antimatter}}, which they can then annihilate with normal matter to provide 'clean, sustainable energy for all' (instead of the bomb it inevitably becomes). It somehow never occurs to either of these highly trained scientists that they would have to put more in energy to create the antimatter than they could ever get out (though note that even in-universe, characters seem awed by the quantities they made; it might be safe to assume they found a way past or around this problem).
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* In ''TheDragonAndTheGeorge'', ''[[Literature/TheDragonKnight The Dragon and the George]]'', the trope is either slightly inverted or subverted. Speaking on the subject of the power available to mages, the wizard Carolinus irritatedly says (paraphrased), "Just because a number's infinite doesn't mean you can use it to get something for nothing." (This may be true in this universe, as he's apparently referring to Cantor's hierarchy of infinities, and spells may require infinite expenditures.) As with the ''YoungWizards'' ''Literature/YoungWizards'' series above, later books note in the background the development of ways to tap new sources of power, some of which probably provide infinite energy, but which still avert the trope. * DanBrown's Creator/DanBrown's ''AngelsAndDemons'' is based around the female protagonist/her dead father pumping vast quantities of energy into the LHC to form {{antimatter}}, which they can then annihilate with normal matter to provide 'clean, sustainable energy for all' (instead of the bomb it inevitably becomes). It somehow never occurs to either of these highly trained scientists that they would have to put more in energy to create the antimatter than they could ever get out (though note that even in-universe, characters seem awed by the quantities they made; it might be safe to assume they found a way past or around this problem).

* Creator/AlanDeanFoster[='=]s ''HumanxCommonwealth'' series has a brain-bending use of this trope in its mechanism for FTLTravel, which involves generating a small black hole in front of your ship and letting it "pull" you along until it evaporates, at which point you generate a new black hole, and so on. The first novel in which it's introduced even {{lampshades}} it by having the viewpoint character struggle with the concept. * Moorcock's series ''The Dancers At The End Of Time'' averts it: one million years in the future the advanced technology of mankind has turned the remaining members of our species into undying [[RealityWarper Reality Warping]] {{Physical God}}s. Except that this technology cost so much energy that the Degenerate Era (an era that should occur 100 ''trillion'' years from now) has already began: in other words, by achieving godhood, mankind has divided by ''one hundred million'' the lifetime of the universe. [[spoiler:of course, since it happens in Moorcock's Multiverse, one man eventually realizes that with an infinity of universes, there is an endless pool of energy to draw from, which allows the dancers to flip one off at Thermodynamics by the end of the story.]]
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* Creator/AlanDeanFoster[='=]s ''HumanxCommonwealth'' ''Literature/HumanxCommonwealth'' series has a brain-bending use of this trope in its mechanism for FTLTravel, which involves generating a small black hole in front of your ship and letting it "pull" you along until it evaporates, at which point you generate a new black hole, and so on. The first novel in which it's introduced even {{lampshades}} {{lampshade|Hanging}}s it by having the viewpoint character struggle with the concept. * Moorcock's series ''The Dancers At The End Of Time'' averts it: one million years in the future the advanced technology of mankind has turned the remaining members of our species into undying [[RealityWarper Reality Warping]] {{Reality Warp|er}}ing {{Physical God}}s. Except that this technology cost so much energy that the Degenerate Era (an era that should occur 100 ''trillion'' years from now) has already began: in other words, by achieving godhood, mankind has divided by ''one hundred million'' the lifetime of the universe. [[spoiler:of course, since it happens in Moorcock's Multiverse, one man eventually realizes that with an infinity of universes, there is an endless pool of energy to draw from, which allows the dancers to flip one off at Thermodynamics by the end of the story.]]


*** {{Hand wave}}d at one point; Changelings like Odo are a kind of partial EnergyBeing whose form overlaps with normal space and subspace, allowing them to draw their mass into or out of normal space. They can also become FIRE and other energy forms with practice.
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*** {{Hand wave}}d at one point; Changelings like Odo are a kind of partial EnergyBeing {{Energy Being|s}} whose form overlaps with normal space and subspace, allowing them to draw their mass into or out of normal space. They can also become FIRE and other energy forms with practice.

* {{Hand wave}}d at once on ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer''. Most of the time, magic works like this. But once, Willow said something about rearranging elemental forces. Making a fire caused a rainstorm. ** Having said that, the jury is still out on whether said rainstorm was Willow goofing up, or Dracula.
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* {{Hand wave}}d at once on ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer''. Most of the time, magic works like this. But once, Willow said something about rearranging elemental forces. Making a fire caused a rainstorm. ** rainstorm. Having said that, the jury is still out on whether said rainstorm was Willow goofing up, or Dracula.

* ''Series/{{Space1999}}'':
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* ''Series/{{Space1999}}'':''Series/{{Space 1999}}'':

* Averted in ''{{Geneforge}}''. To make creations, you have to keep up your essence, and to get essence, you have to drink from essence pools, which are filled by whoever is tasked with making essence in a long, highly dangerous process.
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* Averted in ''{{Geneforge}}''.''VideoGame/{{Geneforge}}''. To make creations, you have to keep up your essence, and to get essence, you have to drink from essence pools, which are filled by whoever is tasked with making essence in a long, highly dangerous process.

* Surprisingly, SuperMarioBros somewhat averts this. Some of the characters are described as drawing power from stars inside them, which would provide more than enough energy for the things they do. There's still no explanation for how this works; and it's still played straight otherwise.
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* Surprisingly, SuperMarioBros Franchise/SuperMarioBros somewhat averts this. Some of the characters are described as drawing power from stars inside them, which would provide more than enough energy for the things they do. There's still no explanation for how this works; and it's still played straight otherwise.

* The Resident Evil series pretty much stopped caring about conservation of mass when it comes to extreme transformation since VideoGame/ResidentEvil4, what with the Las Plagas, Urouboros and C-Virus. The latter two especially, where the former even when it takes in a couple of body piles manages to grow into a a towering tentacle monster that required a satellite laser to kill it, and the latter, where it is entirely possible for [[spoiler: Simmons to transform into a grotesque T-Rex as well as a creature that has a natural railgun that shoot bone fragments (said fragments are replaced through regeneration)]] * The [[Franchise/MetalGear Metal Gear series]] is a major offender of this, with several instances throughout (despite the [[ShownTheirWork scientific accuracy regarding nuclear power, weapons, and decay]]). Expect [[VideoGame/MetalGearSolid psychics controlling people]], [[VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3 people generating an electrical current]], and [[VideoGame/MetalGearRisingRevengeance cyborgs blocking 300 tonne tanks]].
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* The Resident Evil ''Franchise/ResidentEvil'' series pretty much stopped caring about conservation of mass when it comes to extreme transformation since VideoGame/ResidentEvil4, ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil4'', what with the Las Plagas, Urouboros and C-Virus. The latter two especially, where the former even when it takes in a couple of body piles manages to grow into a a towering tentacle monster that required a satellite laser to kill it, and the latter, where it is entirely possible for [[spoiler: Simmons to transform into a grotesque T-Rex as well as a creature that has a natural railgun that shoot bone fragments (said fragments are replaced through regeneration)]] * The [[Franchise/MetalGear Metal Gear series]] ''Franchise/MetalGear'' series is a major offender of this, with several instances throughout (despite the [[ShownTheirWork scientific accuracy regarding nuclear power, weapons, and decay]]). Expect [[VideoGame/MetalGearSolid psychics controlling people]], [[VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3 [[VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater people generating an electrical current]], and [[VideoGame/MetalGearRisingRevengeance cyborgs blocking 300 tonne tanks]].

* ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'', is an RPGMechanicsVerse and magic is a big part of the comic, so conservation is ignored if it's better for the story. It is still {{lampshaded}} (especially as everyone has MediumAwareness), as are other laws of physics.
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* ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'', is an RPGMechanicsVerse and magic is a big part of the comic, so conservation is ignored if it's better for the story. It is still {{lampshaded}} {{lampshade|Hanging}}d (especially as everyone has MediumAwareness), as are other laws of physics.

* The WhateleyUniverse makes a few attempts to HandWave this, comic book style. For example, magic users need a suitable power source (Fey draws upon ley lines for this purpose and has trouble when those get disrupted badly enough) or else have to cast their spells from their limited personal supply of 'essence'. Energizers tend to be {{big eater}}s, although it's implied that the real source of their power may be outside themselves -- Earth's magnetic field has been brought up at least once. Tennyo's body apparently produces antimatter naturally (inasmuch as the term applies to what seems to have evolved into some form of highly advanced android body by now), which sort of explains where she gets the power for her destructive blasts and energy sword from. As with most comic book examples, though, it's still best not to poke ''too'' hard at the finer points of the 'science' behind it all.
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* The WhateleyUniverse Literature/WhateleyUniverse makes a few attempts to HandWave this, comic book style. For example, magic users need a suitable power source (Fey draws upon ley lines for this purpose and has trouble when those get disrupted badly enough) or else have to cast their spells from their limited personal supply of 'essence'. Energizers tend to be {{big eater}}s, although it's implied that the real source of their power may be outside themselves -- Earth's magnetic field has been brought up at least once. Tennyo's body apparently produces antimatter naturally (inasmuch as the term applies to what seems to have evolved into some form of highly advanced android body by now), which sort of explains where she gets the power for her destructive blasts and energy sword from. As with most comic book examples, though, it's still best not to poke ''too'' hard at the finer points of the 'science' behind it all.

* From the ''SCPFoundation'', items labelled with the "[[http://www.scp-wiki.net/system:page-tags/tag/ectoentropic ectoentropic]]" tag specifically involve this trope as it means the object can generate matter and/or energy in manner that violates the laws of thermodynamics.
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* From the ''SCPFoundation'', ''Wiki/SCPFoundation'', items labelled with the "[[http://www.scp-wiki.net/system:page-tags/tag/ectoentropic ectoentropic]]" tag specifically involve this trope as it means the object can generate matter and/or energy in manner that violates the laws of thermodynamics.

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4th Sep '15 7:29:14 AM MechWarrior
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It is generally more acceptable in {{Fantasy}} settings, especially with ArtMajorPhysics, although more thorough authors will try to explain where the power for magic comes from. Some author try to maintain conservation by invoking a law of EquivalentExchange, with varying degrees of success depending on how well it's thought out.
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It is generally more acceptable in {{Fantasy}} settings, especially with ArtMajorPhysics, ArtisticLicensePhysics, although more thorough authors will try to explain where the power for magic comes from. Some author try to maintain conservation by invoking a law of EquivalentExchange, with varying degrees of success depending on how well it's thought out.
4th Sep '15 7:27:04 AM MechWarrior
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This can lead to weird results when you start AbusingTheKardashevScaleForFunAndProfit.
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This can lead to weird results when you start AbusingTheKardashevScaleForFunAndProfit. JustForFun/AbusingTheKardashevScaleForFunAndProfit.
4th Sep '15 7:26:33 AM MechWarrior
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[[TropesAreNotBad Of course, it could be argued that any use of energy which is unequivocally already supernatural to begin with,]] [[JustifiedTrope just by definition doesn't necessarily have to follow physical laws anyway.]]
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[[TropesAreNotBad [[TropesAreTools Of course, it could be argued that any use of energy which is unequivocally already supernatural to begin with,]] [[JustifiedTrope just by definition doesn't necessarily have to follow physical laws anyway.]]
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