History Main / NewRulesAsThePlotDemands

22nd Mar '18 12:47:37 PM MajinAkuma
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* Bakura tends to do this more often than not as his entire strategy. In Battle City, Dark Necrofear works to summon a Field card called Dark Sanctuary, which seems to be activated by the system reading his mind to see what card he designated the target without anyone else knowing. How this could actually be enforced under any situation, period, is not entirely clear though it is worth noting that this is not the case in the Japanese version. And in his final appearance, he manages to be in three places simultaneously and completely flouting the rules in all three. As Zorc, he ignores the effects of four separate all-destroying attacks. As Honda-Bakura, he uses a strategy that works purely by making his graveyard go away. The cards aren't banished and don't go to his deck or hand, which is the only place they can go, but the graveyard just... goes away. And as the game master, [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem he explicitly said he's making up the rules as he feels like it]].

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* Bakura tends to do this more often than not as his entire strategy. In Battle City, Dark Necrofear works to summon a Field card called Dark Sanctuary, which seems to be activated by the system reading his mind to see what card he designated the target without anyone else knowing. How this could actually be enforced under any situation, period, is not entirely clear though it is worth noting that this is not the case in the Japanese version. And in his final appearance, he manages to be in three places simultaneously and completely flouting the rules in all three. As Zorc, he ignores the effects of four separate all-destroying attacks. As Honda-Bakura, he uses a strategy that works purely by making his graveyard go away. The cards aren't banished and don't go to his deck or hand, which is the only place they can go, but the graveyard Graveyard just... goes away. And as the game master, [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem he explicitly said he's making up the rules as he feels like it]].



* In Tea's duel against Crump, Tea activates a Spell card that summons a Dark Magician to the field. But she didn't have Dark Magician in her deck, so she just magically steals it from Yugi's deck, who was merely watching at the time.
* Another aversion, a similar case like the Toon Monsters above, Yugi first believed that Noah is violating the rules when he introduces Spirit Monsters. Noah explains that the Spirit Monsters are legal cards that are secretly created by Pegasus, but since nobody has ever heard of them, they are a completely new type of Monster Cards in this game.
* Noah's duel with Kaiba/Yugi. Kaiba loses due to a card effect without running out of life points, at which point Noah turns him to stone. At which point, everyone seems to forget that Kaiba had ''lost'', and acts as if he is simply unable to play on, so Yugi takes over from where Kaiba was the previous turn, and on top of that is for some reason allowed to mix his own deck with Kaiba's remaining cards for the rest of the match. Justified, however, in that Noah [[CheatersNeverProsper flagrantly cheated,]] and Yugi points out that Kaiba would have been able to win or force a draw otherwise. Noah rolls with Yugi's challenge because he wants to prove he's stronger, and because Yugi continuing where Kaiba left off means he's at a colossal disadvantage.

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* In Tea's Anzu/Téa's duel against Crump, Tea OtakiCrump, Anzu activates a Spell card that summons a Dark Magician to the field. But she didn't have Dark Magician in her deck, so she just magically steals it from Yugi's deck, who was merely watching at the time.
* Another aversion, a similar case like the Toon Monsters above, Yugi first believed that Noah Noa/Noah is violating the rules when he introduces Spirit Monsters. Noah Noa explains that the Spirit Monsters are legal cards that are secretly created by Pegasus, but since nobody has ever heard of them, they are a completely new type of Monster Cards in this game.
* Noah's Noa's duel with Kaiba/Yugi. Kaiba loses due to a card effect without running out of life points, Life Points, at which point Noah Noa turns him to stone. At which point, everyone seems to forget that Kaiba had ''lost'', and acts as if he is simply unable to play on, continue the duel, so Yugi takes over from where Kaiba was at the previous turn, and on top of that he is for some reason allowed to mix his own deck with Kaiba's remaining cards for the rest of the match. duel. Justified, however, in that Noah Noa [[CheatersNeverProsper flagrantly cheated,]] frequently cheated]], and Yugi points out that Kaiba would have been able to win or force a draw otherwise. Noah Noa rolls with Yugi's challenge because he wants to prove he's stronger, and because Yugi continuing where Kaiba left off means he's at a colossal disadvantage.
22nd Mar '18 12:40:21 PM MajinAkuma
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* In the first season, Duel Monsters was played on a large field with multiple areas of attack. Different monsters had different field advantages depending on where they were played that it was never possible to keep track of with the limited information given. Often the bonus would vary wildly from doubling a monster's stats to tripling them to raising them by 50%. Duelist Kingdom standardized it to 30%, resulting in weird things like [=PaniK=]'s Castle of Dark Illusions having 250'''9''' DEF.
* In the fifteenth episode of the second series anime, Yugi uses a monster called Catapult Turtle to launch a Fusion Monster, Gaia the Dragon Champion, at another monster, [=PaniK=]'s Castle of Dark Illusions. This destroys the Dragon Champion on impact, causing Yugi to lose most of his Life Points (going from 1606 to 300 for no apparent reason) and the castle's flotation-ring to fall off, but it seemingly doesn't destroy the castle... until Yugi mentions that the Castle is now being held up by Yugi's Swords of Revealing Light. Yugi ends his turn, ending the effect of [=SoRL=], thus causing the destruction of the Castle... and all of [=PaniK=]'s monsters, which were underneath and, due to [=PaniK=]'s Chaos Shield, couldn't get out of the way in time. If these had been real, physical creatures engaged in a battle, this would be reasonably creative and entirely valid. But they're just cards in a card game, [[MagicAIsMagicA subject to the rules thereof]], so Yugi's trick had ''absolutely no basis in the rules'' ([[RuleOfCool but it looked cool]]).

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* In the first season, Duel Monsters was played on a large field with multiple areas of attack. Different monsters had different field advantages depending on where they were played that it was never possible to keep track of with the limited information given. Often the bonus would vary wildly from doubling a monster's stats to tripling them to raising them by 50%. Duelist Kingdom standardized it to 30%, resulting in weird things like [=PaniK=]'s the Player Killer of Darkness's Castle of Dark Illusions having 250'''9''' DEF.
* In the fifteenth episode of the second series anime, Yugi uses a monster called Catapult Turtle to launch a Fusion Monster, Gaia the Dragon Champion, at another monster, [=PaniK=]'s the Player Killer's Castle of Dark Illusions. This destroys the Dragon Champion on impact, causing Yugi to lose most of his Life Points (going from 1606 to 300 for no apparent reason) and the castle's flotation-ring to fall off, but it seemingly doesn't destroy the castle... until Yugi mentions that the Castle is now being held up by Yugi's Swords of Revealing Light. Yugi ends his turn, ending the effect of [=SoRL=], thus causing the destruction of the Castle... and all of [=PaniK=]'s the Player Killer's monsters, which were underneath and, due to [=PaniK=]'s the Player Killer's Chaos Shield, couldn't get out of the way in time. If these had been real, physical creatures engaged in a battle, this would be reasonably creative and entirely valid. But they're just cards in a card game, [[MagicAIsMagicA subject to the rules thereof]], so Yugi's trick had ''absolutely no basis in the rules'' ([[RuleOfCool but it looked cool]]).


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* Speaking of the Swords of Revealing Light, they had a different effect in the first episode. They held only the monsters back that were present during the card's activation. But whenever Kaiba summoned another monster, the new monster was capable of attacking, while in all subsequent appearances, the Swords of Revealing Light will hold all opposing monsters back.
22nd Mar '18 12:35:49 PM MajinAkuma
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* In the first season, Duel Monsters was played on a large field with multiple areas of attack. Different monsters had different field advantages depending on where they were played that it was never possible to keep track of with the limited information given. Often the bonus would vary wildly from doubling a monster's stats to tripling them to raising them by 50%. Duelist Kingdom standardized it to 30%, resulting in weird things like [=PaniK=]'s Castle of Dark Illusions having 250'''9''' defense points.

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* In the first season, Duel Monsters was played on a large field with multiple areas of attack. Different monsters had different field advantages depending on where they were played that it was never possible to keep track of with the limited information given. Often the bonus would vary wildly from doubling a monster's stats to tripling them to raising them by 50%. Duelist Kingdom standardized it to 30%, resulting in weird things like [=PaniK=]'s Castle of Dark Illusions having 250'''9''' defense points.DEF.



* In the same episode as the above, the flying castle itself has the effect of hiding the villain's monsters in darkness, so Yugi can only attack the darkness and get his monsters killed by cards he can't see. How exactly is that supposed to work ''without'' holographic technology? 'You're attacking my monster. Sorry, it has higher attack points than yours. No, I can't prove it, that would defeat the whole purpose of the shrouding darkness. Just take my word for it, will you?'

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* In the same episode as the above, the flying castle itself has the effect of hiding the villain's monsters in darkness, so Yugi can only attack the darkness and get his monsters killed by cards he can't see. How exactly is that supposed to work ''without'' holographic technology? 'You're attacking my monster. Sorry, it has higher attack points ATK than yours. No, I can't prove it, that would defeat the whole purpose of the shrouding darkness. Just take my word for it, will you?'



* Each time The Winged Dragon of Ra is played it has a new power. First, there is that special writing which can only be seen under the light of the God (and that means the hologram). When Mai summons it, it doesn't work, since you need to read the text (that is written in Egyptian) to activate it. Marik promptly reads the text, taking Ra to his side of the field and activating it. Next battle, it has two new abilities: it can increase/decrease its attack points by decreasing/increasing his owner Life Points at the owner's will, and it can attack at the same turn as it has been summoned. And against Jonouchi, Ra has a Phoenix Mode that allows Marik to destroy all monsters of the opponent at the cost of 1000 LP, and it cannot be harmed in this mode. And this is all before the battle is against Yugi, when it shows its real power.
* In the duel between Yugi and Marik, the latter uses all his Life Points but one to add to The Winged Dragon of Ra's attack points. Because Marik has made this duel a Shadow Game, this manifests itself as all of Marik's body except one eye becoming part of Ra. Because of this, Marik is able to later use the card De-Fusion to separate himself from Ra and restore his life points. One problem with this: Marik isn't a monster, or even a card. Unless Kaiba's holograms are good enough to hide his entire body and make it appear somewhere else, Marik only appeared to be 'fused' to Ra because of the Shadow Game, so 'de-fusing' shouldn't have been possible within the Duel Monsters game (as they were never actually fused in the first place).

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* Each time The Winged Dragon of Ra is played it has a new power. First, there is that special writing which can only be seen under the light of the God (and that means the hologram). When Mai summons it, it doesn't work, since you need to read the text (that is written in Egyptian) to activate it. Marik promptly reads the text, taking Ra to his side of the field and activating it. Next battle, it has two new abilities: it can increase/decrease its attack points ATK by decreasing/increasing his owner Life Points at the owner's will, and it can attack at the same turn as it has been summoned. And against Jonouchi, Ra has a Phoenix Mode that allows Marik to destroy all monsters of the opponent at the cost of 1000 LP, and it cannot be harmed in this mode. And this is all before the battle is against Yugi, when it shows its real power.
* In the duel between Yugi and Marik, the latter uses all his Life Points but one to add to The Winged Dragon of Ra's attack points.ATK. Because Marik has made this duel a Shadow Game, this manifests itself as all of Marik's body except one eye becoming part of Ra. Because of this, Marik is able to later use the card De-Fusion to separate himself from Ra and restore his life points. One problem with this: Marik isn't a monster, or even a card. Unless Kaiba's holograms are good enough to hide his entire body and make it appear somewhere else, Marik only appeared to be 'fused' to Ra because of the Shadow Game, so 'de-fusing' shouldn't have been possible within the Duel Monsters game (as they were never actually fused in the first place).



* In the anime, the Egyptian God Cards cannot be affected by any card effect apart from each other's, and in Ra's case, not even that. However, in the first duel with The Seal Of Orichalos, it does raise Obelisk's Attack Points. Apparently, because the Orichalcos is more ancient, it has more power than the Egyptian Gods. This in and on itself makes little sense as at the end of the arc the Egyptain Gods battle the Great Leviathan, essentially the God of the Orichalcos, and kick its' ass.
* The duel against Dartz has quite a bit of this. First, it is said that The Seal Of Orichalos can't be made to leave the field by any means. However, Dartz does remove it, in order to activate an enhanced version, which is later replaced by an even more enhanced version. Then when the Pharaoh summons the Legendary Knights, they destroy the Orichalos anyway. When one of Dartz monsters is destroyed, he pays all of his Life Points to summon Divine Serpent, a monster with infinite Attack Points, and an effect that makes him able to continue, even though he has no Life Points. Unsurprisingly, despite being hit by an attack with infinite power behind it, [[PlotArmor the Pharaoh still doesn't lose]], and uses a card that also makes unable to lose, as long as he keeps his Dark Magician Girl in play. Then the Pharaoh has two of his Legendary Knights attack Divine Serpent, and make their attacks constantly reflect each other, until their Attack Points raise to infinity. Then he suddenly sacrifices them in the middle of an attack, so as to summon a fused form of the Legendary Knights, which gains the infinite Attack Points, and then is able to destroy Divine Serpent, and win the duel.

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* In the anime, the Egyptian God Cards cannot be affected by any card effect apart from each other's, and in Ra's case, not even that. However, in the first duel with The Seal Of Orichalos, it does raise Obelisk's Attack Points.ATK. Apparently, because the Orichalcos is more ancient, it has more power than the Egyptian Gods. This in and on itself makes little sense as at the end of the arc the Egyptain Gods battle the Great Leviathan, essentially the God of the Orichalcos, and kick its' ass.
* The duel against Dartz has quite a bit of this. First, it is said that The Seal Of Orichalos can't be made to leave the field by any means. However, Dartz does remove it, in order to activate an enhanced version, which is later replaced by an even more enhanced version. Then when the Pharaoh summons the Legendary Knights, they destroy the Orichalos anyway. When one of Dartz monsters is destroyed, he pays all of his Life Points to summon Divine Serpent, a monster with infinite Attack Points, ATK, and an effect that makes him able to continue, even though he has no Life Points. Unsurprisingly, despite being hit by an attack with infinite power behind it, [[PlotArmor the Pharaoh still doesn't lose]], and uses a card that also makes unable to lose, as long as he keeps his Dark Magician Girl in play. Then the Pharaoh has two of his Legendary Knights attack Divine Serpent, and make their attacks constantly reflect each other, until their Attack Points ATK raise to infinity. Then he suddenly sacrifices them in the middle of an attack, so as to summon a fused form of the Legendary Knights, which gains the infinite Attack Points, ATK, and then is able to destroy Divine Serpent, and win the duel.
21st Feb '18 3:36:45 AM Kazmahu
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* ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' actually embraces this as a core design philosophy. Official manuals stress that when the rules and a card effect conflict, the card takes priority, and the main thing the manual explains is the order of operations for resolving cards played against each other (and even that can be changed by some cards). This does lead to combinations creating loops and paradoxes, for which official tournaments have erreta, and casual players agree on (or argue over) a case-by-case interpretation.
26th Jan '18 6:28:10 PM merotoker
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Also compare HowUnscientific, NewPowersAsThePlotDemands, GameplayAndStorySegregation, ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem, and AintNoRule. GoldenSnitch is a subtrope. Be sure to stop by SeriousBusiness on your way out.

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Also compare HowUnscientific, NewPowersAsThePlotDemands, GameplayAndStorySegregation, ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem, and AintNoRule.LoopholeAbuse. GoldenSnitch is a subtrope. Be sure to stop by SeriousBusiness on your way out.



* Flying monsters could not be attacked by ground monsters. This is {{Retconned}} later, since all monsters are able to levitate anyway.

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* Flying monsters could not be attacked by ground monsters. This is {{Retconned}} {{retcon}}ned later, since all monsters are able to levitate anyway.



* The duel against Dartz has quite a bit of this. First, it is said that The Seal Of Orichalos can't be made to leave the field by any means. However, Dartz does remove it, in order to activate an enhanced version, which is later replaced by an even more enhanced version. Then when the Pharaoh summons the Legendary Knights, they destroy the Orichalos anyway. When one of Dartz monsters is destroyed, he pays all of his Life Points to summon Divine Serpent, a monster with infinite Attack Points, and an effect that makes him able to continue, even though he has no Life Points. Unsurprisingly, despite being hit by an attack with infinite power behind it, [[PlotArmour the Pharaoh still doesn't lose]], and uses a card that also makes unable to lose, as long as he keeps his Dark Magician Girl in play. Then the Pharaoh has two of his Legendary Knights attack Divine Serpent, and make their attacks constantly reflect each other, until their Attack Points raise to infinity. Then he suddenly sacrifices them in the middle of an attack, so as to summon a fused form of the Legendary Knights, which gains the infinite Attack Points, and then is able to destroy Divine Serpent, and win the duel.

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* The duel against Dartz has quite a bit of this. First, it is said that The Seal Of Orichalos can't be made to leave the field by any means. However, Dartz does remove it, in order to activate an enhanced version, which is later replaced by an even more enhanced version. Then when the Pharaoh summons the Legendary Knights, they destroy the Orichalos anyway. When one of Dartz monsters is destroyed, he pays all of his Life Points to summon Divine Serpent, a monster with infinite Attack Points, and an effect that makes him able to continue, even though he has no Life Points. Unsurprisingly, despite being hit by an attack with infinite power behind it, [[PlotArmour [[PlotArmor the Pharaoh still doesn't lose]], and uses a card that also makes unable to lose, as long as he keeps his Dark Magician Girl in play. Then the Pharaoh has two of his Legendary Knights attack Divine Serpent, and make their attacks constantly reflect each other, until their Attack Points raise to infinity. Then he suddenly sacrifices them in the middle of an attack, so as to summon a fused form of the Legendary Knights, which gains the infinite Attack Points, and then is able to destroy Divine Serpent, and win the duel.



* In the second/third Rangers Apprentice book, [[spoiler:Hal is banished from Araluen, but only for 1 year]] Lampshaded by the advisors around them.

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* In the second/third Rangers Apprentice Literature/RangersApprentice book, [[spoiler:Hal is banished from Araluen, but only for 1 year]] year]]. Lampshaded by the advisors around them.



** Royal Rumble matches. Especially in early years, whether or not someone could eliminate themselves or whether they had to be propelled by someone else was totally inconsistent. A rule about not being able to eliminate yourself was made up on the spot to cover for Macho Man botching. Also, the Royal Rumble twice ended in a draw. Once, they were both declared winners. Once, the remaining two fought it out until there was only one winner. Again, this was to cover a botch.
** WCW was quite notorious for a while for totally ignoring the rules of their matches, like brawling outside in a cage match, or scoring a win by pinfall in a match type that couldn't be won by pinfall.

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** Royal Rumble Wrestling/RoyalRumble matches. Especially in early years, whether or not someone could eliminate themselves or whether they had to be propelled by someone else was totally inconsistent. A rule about not being able to eliminate yourself was made up on the spot to cover for Macho Man botching. Also, the Royal Rumble twice ended in a draw. Once, they were both declared winners. Once, the remaining two fought it out until there was only one winner. Again, this was to cover a botch.
** WCW Wrestling/{{WCW}} was quite notorious for a while for totally ignoring the rules of their matches, like brawling outside in a cage match, or scoring a win by pinfall in a match type that couldn't be won by pinfall.



** The forums spent many a thread statting out [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0639.html Familicide]]. On the one hand, it could genuinely be done by epic spellcasting rules. On the other hand, initial estimates measured its Spellcraft DC by the hundreds, which may have been technically possible (it was researched by an epic level wizard, and cast by a wizard with the power of ''three'' epic level casters) but was insanely unfeasible and unlikely. [[ZigZaggedTrope On the third hand]], if you're willing to [[GameBreaker seriously cheese the rules]] (and your GM lets you get away with it), there ''is'' a notorious bug in epic spellcasting which allows one to build arbitrarily powerful spells for a small fixed cost. In any case, it's unlikely Rich bothered to come up with actual stats for the spell.
** And inevitably [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] when Durkon employs [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0352.html Control Weather]] to generate thunder as a [[MakeMeWannaShout sonic attack]]. The following strip opens with an angel questioning the use of the spell thus, and Thor basically telling him to mind his own beeswax and not contradict the thunder god.

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** The forums spent many a thread statting out [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0639.html Familicide]]. On the one hand, it could genuinely be done by epic spellcasting rules. On the other hand, initial estimates measured its Spellcraft DC by the hundreds, which may have been technically possible (it was researched by an epic level wizard, and cast by a wizard with the power of ''three'' epic level casters) but was insanely unfeasible and unlikely. [[ZigZaggedTrope [[ZigZaggingTrope On the third hand]], if you're willing to [[GameBreaker seriously cheese the rules]] (and your GM lets you get away with it), there ''is'' a notorious bug in epic spellcasting which allows one to build arbitrarily powerful spells for a small fixed cost. In any case, it's unlikely Rich bothered to come up with actual stats for the spell.
** And inevitably [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] {{lampshade|Hanging}}d when Durkon employs [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0352.html Control Weather]] to generate thunder as a [[MakeMeWannaShout sonic attack]]. The following strip opens with an angel questioning the use of the spell thus, and Thor basically telling him to mind his own beeswax and not contradict the thunder god.



* In ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddparents'', the fairy bible "Da Rules" provides frequent examples of this trope. One being that new sub-points of certain rules are added so that the plot can't be magically fixed. For example, magic can't interfere with love (i.e. wishing a partner to move away to [[MurderTheHypotenuse eliminate a rival]]). In a later episode, they add that the rule doesn't mean both parties have to be [[StalkerWithACrush in love with each other]]. It has also been hinted that new rules to avoid some wishes appear every time a wish goes horribly wrong.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddparents'', ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'', the fairy bible "Da Rules" provides frequent examples of this trope. One being that new sub-points of certain rules are added so that the plot can't be magically fixed. For example, magic can't interfere with love (i.e. wishing a partner to move away to [[MurderTheHypotenuse eliminate a rival]]). In a later episode, they add that the rule doesn't mean both parties have to be [[StalkerWithACrush in love with each other]]. It has also been hinted that new rules to avoid some wishes appear every time a wish goes horribly wrong.



* The [=NFL=] has some rules that are so obscure that even coaches are not generally aware of them. Sometimes they are called attention to in playoff games, which leads to accusations that the league is manipulating the outcome to allow the more popular team to advance to the SuperBowl. Infamous examples include the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuck_rule tuck rule]], which changed the outcome of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuck_rule_game 2002 [=AFC=] Divisional Playoff Game]], and the "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bert_Emanuel Bert Emanuel]]" rule, so named when the Tampa Bay Buccaneers had an apparent pass reception overturned by officials in the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/19992000_NFL_playoffs#NFC_Championship:_St._Louis_Rams_11.2C_Tampa_Bay_Buccaneers_6 2000 [=NFC=] Divisional Championship Game]]. The latter ensured that the "Greatest Show on Turf" offense of the St. Louis Rams, considered to be more ratings-friendly than the Buccaneers' stifling defense, would reach the championship; while the former extended the chances of the New England Patriots and Tom Brady's star power. A non-playoff example occurred during a 2010 game between the Detroit Lions and Chicago Bears, in which a potentially game-winning touchdown catch was overturned when officials ruled that Lions receiver Calvin Johnson failed to maintain control of the ball because [[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/09/12/calvin-johnson-touchdown-_n_713897.html he set it down too quickly after catching it]].

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* The [=NFL=] UsefulNotes/{{N|ationalFootballLeague}}FL has some rules that are so obscure that even coaches are not generally aware of them. Sometimes they are called attention to in playoff games, which leads to accusations that the league is manipulating the outcome to allow the more popular team to advance to the SuperBowl.UsefulNotes/SuperBowl. Infamous examples include the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuck_rule tuck rule]], which changed the outcome of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuck_rule_game 2002 [=AFC=] Divisional Playoff Game]], and the "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bert_Emanuel Bert Emanuel]]" rule, so named when the Tampa Bay Buccaneers had an apparent pass reception overturned by officials in the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/19992000_NFL_playoffs#NFC_Championship:_St._Louis_Rams_11.2C_Tampa_Bay_Buccaneers_6 2000 [=NFC=] Divisional Championship Game]]. The latter ensured that the "Greatest Show on Turf" offense of the St. Louis Rams, considered to be more ratings-friendly than the Buccaneers' stifling defense, would reach the championship; while the former extended the chances of the New England Patriots and Tom Brady's star power. A non-playoff example occurred during a 2010 game between the Detroit Lions and Chicago Bears, in which a potentially game-winning touchdown catch was overturned when officials ruled that Lions receiver Calvin Johnson failed to maintain control of the ball because [[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/09/12/calvin-johnson-touchdown-_n_713897.html he set it down too quickly after catching it]].
23rd Jan '18 6:44:04 PM Excelsior123
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* In ''WesternAnimation/ReadyJetGo'', Mindy's overprotective mother has a rule that she can't go past Jet's yard. In "Constellation Prize", however, Mindy says that there's a new rule that she can go to the Deep Space Array as long as she's with Jet, Sean, and Sydney.
10th Jan '18 9:20:14 PM Loekman3
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* Summoned Skull also gets an effect in the duel with the Rare Hunter, where it charges up Alpha the Magnet Warrior's attack by 200 points. Throughout the series, Summoned Skull is implied to attack with [[LightningCanDoAnything electricity, which is used to give him a huge variety of added abilities]] (additional ATK points, greater range, etc). Furthermore, the first time Yugi uses Summoned Skull (when dueling Pegasus [[TheTapeKnewYouWouldSayThat through the video tape]]), Summoned Skull attacks physically, which is why it can't attack Pegasus quickly enough to win Yugi the duel. Of course, it could easily have attacked quickly enough with electricity.

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* Summoned Skull also gets an effect in the duel with the Rare Hunter, where it charges up Alpha the Magnet Warrior's attack by 200 points.points [[note]]He doesn't even need to do that to win, he could have just attacked Exodia with Alpha then have Chimera and Summoned Skull finish him off in one turn[[/note]]. Throughout the series, Summoned Skull is implied to attack with [[LightningCanDoAnything electricity, which is used to give him a huge variety of added abilities]] (additional ATK points, greater range, etc). Furthermore, the first time Yugi uses Summoned Skull (when dueling Pegasus [[TheTapeKnewYouWouldSayThat through the video tape]]), Summoned Skull attacks physically, which is why it can't attack Pegasus quickly enough to win Yugi the duel. Of course, it could easily have attacked quickly enough with electricity.
3rd Oct '17 11:18:50 AM x_countryguy
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*** Sora also disappears in the middle of the duel, so it becomes back to 1-on-1. This is still a weird situation for a duel. Again though, Sora didn't withdraw so much as he was forcibly teleported [[spoiler: back to his own dimension]], so the magical/sci-fi element isn't exactly something we have rules for in real life. Yuri's duel with Yuzu is also ended without a winner or a surrender when the same thing happens to him.

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*** Sora also disappears in the middle of the duel, so it becomes back to 1-on-1. This is still a weird situation for a duel. Again though, Sora didn't withdraw so much as he was forcibly teleported [[spoiler: back [[spoiler:back to his own dimension]], so the magical/sci-fi element isn't exactly something we have rules for in real life. Yuri's duel with Yuzu is also ended without a winner or a surrender when the same thing happens to him.



* In ''Film/TheHungerGames'', the rules are changed midgame to allow two winners, if they are from the same district. When Katniss and Peeta are the last two standing, a voice over rescinds that rule, meaning one of them would have to kill the other. [[spoiler: Rather than bow to the wishes of the evil government, they decide to eat poisonous berries and deny them ''any'' winner. Government relents and names them both victors.]]

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* In ''Film/TheHungerGames'', the rules are changed midgame to allow two winners, if they are from the same district. When Katniss and Peeta are the last two standing, a voice over rescinds that rule, meaning one of them would have to kill the other. [[spoiler: Rather [[spoiler:Rather than bow to the wishes of the evil government, they decide to eat poisonous berries and deny them ''any'' winner. Government relents and names them both victors.]]



* In the second/third Rangers Apprentice book, [[spoiler: Hal is banished from Araluen, but only for 1 year]] Lampshaded by the advisors around them.

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* In the second/third Rangers Apprentice book, [[spoiler: Hal [[spoiler:Hal is banished from Araluen, but only for 1 year]] Lampshaded by the advisors around them.



** The second time is even weirder when you fight [[CopyCatSue Llednar]], who is actually invincible.[[spoiler: Cid says Llednar's Omega spell is too dangerous to use, and throws an advanced law at him to prevent him from using it. Except it doesn't prevent anything, after a short time Llednar will start to cast the spell, but Cid sends him to jail before he finishes it. Technically speaking, Llednar never managed to break the law since he was sent to jail before that, but thanks to that you can win the battle.]]
** [[spoiler: And lastly, there is an advanced law called "Fortune" created by the last boss and given to Llednar that makes him completely invincible. This goes against everything you learned so far, being immortal isn't a breakable rule and only Judgemaster should be able to use advanced laws. The last boss just says ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem]]

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** The second time is even weirder when you fight [[CopyCatSue Llednar]], who is actually invincible.[[spoiler: Cid [[spoiler:Cid says Llednar's Omega spell is too dangerous to use, and throws an advanced law at him to prevent him from using it. Except it doesn't prevent anything, after a short time Llednar will start to cast the spell, but Cid sends him to jail before he finishes it. Technically speaking, Llednar never managed to break the law since he was sent to jail before that, but thanks to that you can win the battle.]]
** [[spoiler: And [[spoiler:And lastly, there is an advanced law called "Fortune" created by the last boss and given to Llednar that makes him completely invincible. This goes against everything you learned so far, being immortal isn't a breakable rule and only Judgemaster should be able to use advanced laws. The last boss just says ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem]]



* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'''s Spira is to death [[NarniaTime what Narnia was to time travel]]. Things start simple enough: when someone dies, their spirit must be "sent" (that is, [[{{Psychopomp}} magically transported]]) to the Farplane, Spira's version of the afterlife, and those not sent eventually transform into monstrous, feral creatures called fiends. Things get complicated later with the "Unsent," [[UnfinishedBusiness strong-willed]] (read: plot important) people who die but aren't sent, effectively tangible ghosts, and can pass on either by willingly fading away or by being defeated and then sent. (Whether an Unsent can actually be around a sending without suffering any "ill" effects is also inconsistently portrayed.) Still later, we see zombie-like Bevelle soldiers wandering the ruins of Zanarkand, humans in appearance but fiends in mind and spirit. [[spoiler: Seymour]] is just the opposite: he dies multiple times, becoming an unsent after the first time, achieving progressively more powerful fiend-like powers each time he returns but never losing his human identity, in contrast to [[spoiler:Auron]] who is also an Unsent but never receives any fiend powers. Then there's the Fayth, people who willingly gave themselves up to animate Aeons, who can be tied to one person's Aeon or everyone's. Plus, there's [[spoiler: Tidus and Dream Zanarkand, memories of people who ''may'' have existed maintained by the Fayth]]. Finally, there's [[spoiler: Yu Yevon]], who is more of a WalkingSpoiler than the rest here.

to:

* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'''s Spira is to death [[NarniaTime what Narnia was to time travel]]. Things start simple enough: when someone dies, their spirit must be "sent" (that is, [[{{Psychopomp}} magically transported]]) to the Farplane, Spira's version of the afterlife, and those not sent eventually transform into monstrous, feral creatures called fiends. Things get complicated later with the "Unsent," [[UnfinishedBusiness strong-willed]] (read: plot important) people who die but aren't sent, effectively tangible ghosts, and can pass on either by willingly fading away or by being defeated and then sent. (Whether an Unsent can actually be around a sending without suffering any "ill" effects is also inconsistently portrayed.) Still later, we see zombie-like Bevelle soldiers wandering the ruins of Zanarkand, humans in appearance but fiends in mind and spirit. [[spoiler: Seymour]] [[spoiler:Seymour]] is just the opposite: he dies multiple times, becoming an unsent after the first time, achieving progressively more powerful fiend-like powers each time he returns but never losing his human identity, in contrast to [[spoiler:Auron]] who is also an Unsent but never receives any fiend powers. Then there's the Fayth, people who willingly gave themselves up to animate Aeons, who can be tied to one person's Aeon or everyone's. Plus, there's [[spoiler: Tidus [[spoiler:Tidus and Dream Zanarkand, memories of people who ''may'' have existed maintained by the Fayth]]. Finally, there's [[spoiler: Yu [[spoiler:Yu Yevon]], who is more of a WalkingSpoiler than the rest here.



** Of course, in that particular example, [[spoiler: it wasn't exactly ''forcecage''; it was ''Xykon's Moderately Escapable Forcecage'', since Xykon [[BatmanGambit planned for Miko to escape anyway]].]] However, it's entirely possible that this was a hasty {{retcon}} by Rich Burlew in response to the abovementioned forum posters.

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** Of course, in that particular example, [[spoiler: it [[spoiler:it wasn't exactly ''forcecage''; it was ''Xykon's Moderately Escapable Forcecage'', since Xykon [[BatmanGambit planned for Miko to escape anyway]].]] However, it's entirely possible that this was a hasty {{retcon}} by Rich Burlew in response to the abovementioned forum posters.



* In ''Webcomic/{{Erfworld}}'', the DM set up an unwinnable scenario, flat-out saying that the only the players could have won was to cheat. After the DM ends up stuck in the scenario, he does that: he [[spoiler: uses necromancy to reanimate a ''[[FantasticNuke volcano]]'']].

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* In ''Webcomic/{{Erfworld}}'', the DM set up an unwinnable scenario, flat-out saying that the only the players could have won was to cheat. After the DM ends up stuck in the scenario, he does that: he [[spoiler: uses [[spoiler:uses necromancy to reanimate a ''[[FantasticNuke volcano]]'']].
4th Sep '17 3:03:28 PM BillyMT
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Added DiffLines:

** Why this happens? Because Roy is flagged with neutral karma. ''Even after comitting genocide on a whole tower full of people'', snobbish as they were. The biggest offense however is when you find out that one of his victims is Herbert "Daring" Dashwood, famous for his Galaxy News Radio's story snippets, who unlike most of the apathetic residents of the building, is merely enjoying his retirement on a comfortable place, and clearly an CoolOldGuy with good karma on his name. And Roy ''stays neutral'' even after this, meaning that you cannot exact revenge without tanking your own karma, and having Three Dog, host and owner of the same radio who broadcasts Daring's adventures, calling you out ''personally'' and ''publicly'' on this.
29th Aug '17 12:43:53 PM HalcyonDayz
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* Similar to Rule 0, mentioned above, RuleOfCool is often invoked in less serious campaigns (or even more serious ones, if the said thing is ''really cool''). While this is sort of a subversion Rule 0 (breaking the rules as the PLAYERS' plot demands it, not the GM's), being that most tabletop RPGs are considered collaborative storytelling, it still applies.

to:

* Similar to Rule 0, mentioned above, RuleOfCool is often invoked in less serious campaigns (or even more serious ones, if the said thing is ''really cool''). While this is sort of a subversion Rule 0 (breaking the rules as the PLAYERS' plot demands it, not the GM's), being that most tabletop RPGs {{Role Playing Game}}s are considered collaborative storytelling, it still applies.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.NewRulesAsThePlotDemands