History Main / NewRulesAsThePlotDemands

26th Apr '16 4:03:21 PM TVRulezAgain
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* An episode of the live-action kids drama ''{{Zoey 101}}'' had a ''Series/BattleBots''-style remote-controlled robot war, where the main characters lose to the [[HollywoodNerd stereotypical nerds]] after their bot destroys the other with a hammer. When the main character's best friend comes in with her own tiny bot, the nerds laugh at it until it fires a huge ''laser'' at the other bot, completely destroying it and winning the match. Apparently, there [[LoopholeAbuse Ain't No Rule]] saying you can't use military lasers in the competition.

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* An episode of the live-action kids drama ''{{Zoey ''Series/{{Zoey 101}}'' had a ''Series/BattleBots''-style remote-controlled robot war, where the main characters lose to the [[HollywoodNerd stereotypical nerds]] after their bot destroys the other with a hammer. When the main character's best friend comes in with her own tiny bot, the nerds laugh at it until it fires a huge ''laser'' at the other bot, completely destroying it and winning the match. Apparently, there [[LoopholeAbuse Ain't No Rule]] saying you can't use military lasers in the competition.
24th Apr '16 5:19:18 AM MajinAkuma
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* Bakura tends to do this more often than not as his entire strategy. In Battle City, Dark Necrofear works to summon a Field card called Dark Sanctuary, which seems to be activated by the system reading his mind to see what card he designated the target without anyone else knowing. How this could actually be enforced under any situation, period, is not entirely clear though it is worth noting that this is not the case in the Japanese version. And in his final appearance, he manages to be in three places simultaneously and completely flouting the rules in all three. As Zorc, he ignores the effects of four separate all-destroying attacks. As Honda-Bakura, he uses a strategy that works purely by making his graveyard go away. The cards aren't removed from play and don't go to his deck or hand, which is the only place they can go, but the graveyard just... goes away. And as the game master, [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem he explicitly said he's making up the rules as he feels like it]].

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* Bakura tends to do this more often than not as his entire strategy. In Battle City, Dark Necrofear works to summon a Field card called Dark Sanctuary, which seems to be activated by the system reading his mind to see what card he designated the target without anyone else knowing. How this could actually be enforced under any situation, period, is not entirely clear though it is worth noting that this is not the case in the Japanese version. And in his final appearance, he manages to be in three places simultaneously and completely flouting the rules in all three. As Zorc, he ignores the effects of four separate all-destroying attacks. As Honda-Bakura, he uses a strategy that works purely by making his graveyard go away. The cards aren't removed from play banished and don't go to his deck or hand, which is the only place they can go, but the graveyard just... goes away. And as the game master, [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem he explicitly said he's making up the rules as he feels like it]].



* During his Duel with Mako, Jonouchi's Alligator Sword is inside the Fairy Box, but when Umi is played, the monster almost drowns. Aside from the FridgeLogic that alligators cannot be drown that easily, Umi has no effect that would harm monster cards that cannot breath underwater, a mechanic that only works with the hologram system, or negate effects of other cards, such as Fairy Box.

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* During his Duel with Mako, Kajiki, Jonouchi's Alligator Sword is inside the Fairy Box, but when Umi is played, the monster almost drowns. Aside from the FridgeLogic that alligators cannot be drown that easily, Umi has no effect that would harm monster cards that cannot breath underwater, a mechanic that only works with the hologram system, or negate effects of other cards, such as Fairy Box.
24th Apr '16 5:16:40 AM MajinAkuma
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* Bakura tends to do this more often than not as his entire strategy. In Battle City, Dark Necrofear works to summon a Field card called Dark Sanctuary, which seems to be activated by the system reading his mind to see what card he designated the target without anyone else knowing. How this could actually be enforced under any situation, period, is not entirely clear though it is worth noting that this is not the case in the Japanese version. And in his final appearance, he manages to be in three places simultaneously and completely flouting the rules in all three. As Zorc, he ignores the effects of four separate all-destroying attacks. As Tristan-Bakura, he uses a strategy that works purely by making his graveyard go away. The cards aren't removed from play and don't go to his deck or hand, which is the only place they can go, but the graveyard just... goes away. And as the game master, [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem he explicitly said he's making up the rules as he feels like it]].

to:

* Bakura tends to do this more often than not as his entire strategy. In Battle City, Dark Necrofear works to summon a Field card called Dark Sanctuary, which seems to be activated by the system reading his mind to see what card he designated the target without anyone else knowing. How this could actually be enforced under any situation, period, is not entirely clear though it is worth noting that this is not the case in the Japanese version. And in his final appearance, he manages to be in three places simultaneously and completely flouting the rules in all three. As Zorc, he ignores the effects of four separate all-destroying attacks. As Tristan-Bakura, Honda-Bakura, he uses a strategy that works purely by making his graveyard go away. The cards aren't removed from play and don't go to his deck or hand, which is the only place they can go, but the graveyard just... goes away. And as the game master, [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem he explicitly said he's making up the rules as he feels like it]].
24th Apr '16 5:09:39 AM MajinAkuma
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* Bandit Keith's machine monsters were immune to magic attacks to give him an advantage over Jonouchi, even though Yugi's Dark Magician was able to destroy the Paradox Brother's Labyrinth Tank in an earlier episode.

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* Bandit Keith's machine Machine-Type monsters were immune to magic attacks to give him an advantage over Jonouchi, even though Yugi's Dark Magician was able to destroy the Paradox Meikyu Brother's Labyrinth Tank in an earlier episode.



** The turn Kaiba summons Blue-Eyes Shining Dragon, it gets 1500 ATK due its effect: it gets 300 ATK for each Dragon-type monster in his graveyard (three Blue-Eyes White Dragons, Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon, and Rare Metal Dragon). Kaiba (and the writers) forgets that Paladin of White Dragon is also in the graveyard. So the ATK of Blue-Eyes Shining Dragon should have increased by 1800, which would have been more than enough to destroy Sorcerer of Dark Magic, causing Yugi to lose the duel.
** While in the English dub, Anubis tenfolds Theinen the Great Sphinx's ATK with [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveSupernaturalPowers magical powers]], in the Japanese dub, Anubis activate Theinen's (anime) effect. Theinen gains the ATK of all monsters that are in Anubis graveyard. Doing the math, Paladin of White Dragon must be counted so the 31,500 ATK gain can be correct.[[note]]3x Blue-Eyes White Dragon (3x3000), Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon (4500), Blue-Eyes Shining Dragon (3000), Familiar Knight (1200), Rare Metal Dragon (2400), Des Feral Imp (1600), Paladin of White Dragon (1900), Peten the Dark Clown (500, two of the three are banished), Spear Dragon (1900), Andro Sphinx (3000) and Sphinx Teleia (2500).[[/note]]

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** The turn Kaiba summons Blue-Eyes Shining Dragon, it gets 1500 ATK due its effect: it gets 300 ATK for each Dragon-type monster in his graveyard (three Blue-Eyes White Dragons, Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon, and Rare Metal Dragon). Kaiba (and the writers) forgets that Paladin of White Dragon is also in the graveyard. So the ATK of Blue-Eyes Shining Dragon should have increased by 1800, which would have been more than enough to destroy Sorcerer of Dark Magic, causing Yugi to lose the duel.
** While in the English dub, Anubis tenfolds Theinen the Great Sphinx's ATK with [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveSupernaturalPowers magical powers]], in the Japanese dub, Anubis activate Theinen's (anime) effect. Theinen gains the ATK of all monsters that are in Anubis graveyard. Doing the math, Paladin graveyard, a total amount of White Dragon must be counted so the 31,500 ATK gain can be correct.ATK.[[note]]3x Blue-Eyes White Dragon (3x3000), Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon (4500), Blue-Eyes Shining Dragon (3000), Familiar Knight (1200), Rare Metal Dragon (2400), Des Feral Imp (1600), Paladin of White Dragon (1900), Peten the Dark Clown (500, two of the three are banished), Spear Dragon (1900), Andro Sphinx (3000) and Sphinx Teleia (2500).[[/note]]
24th Apr '16 5:02:43 AM MajinAkuma
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*** The 2000-point intrusion penalty is also inconsistently applied across the board. Overwhelmingly it's the protagonists who get hit by it while the bad guys don't even in situations where they should. It gets to the point where it starts affecting one specific character only ''after'' he undergoes a HeelFaceTurn, confirming beyond a shadow of a doubt that it only exists to put the good guys at a disadvantage.

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*** The 2000-point 2000 Life Points intrusion penalty is also inconsistently applied across the board. Overwhelmingly it's the protagonists who get hit by it while the bad guys don't even in situations where they should. It gets to the point where it starts affecting one specific character only ''after'' he undergoes a HeelFaceTurn, confirming beyond a shadow of a doubt that it only exists to put the good guys at a disadvantage. And then later, the enemies are also affected by his, just so they would lose easily.
19th Mar '16 9:21:55 AM ComicX6
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Added DiffLines:

*** The 2000-point intrusion penalty is also inconsistently applied across the board. Overwhelmingly it's the protagonists who get hit by it while the bad guys don't even in situations where they should. It gets to the point where it starts affecting one specific character only ''after'' he undergoes a HeelFaceTurn, confirming beyond a shadow of a doubt that it only exists to put the good guys at a disadvantage.
3rd Mar '16 11:16:20 AM Hobgoblin
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** Duelist Kingdom standardized it to 30%, resulting in weird things like Panik's Castle of Dark Illusions having 250'''9''' defense points.
* In the fifteenth episode of the second series anime, Yugi uses a monster called Catapult Turtle to launch a Fusion Monster, Gaia the Dragon Champion, at another monster, Panik's Castle of Dark Illusions. This destroys the Dragon Champion on impact, causing Yugi to lose most of his Life Points (going from 1606 to 300 for no apparent reason) and the castle's flotation-ring to fall off, but it seemingly doesn't destroy the castle... until Yugi mentions that the Castle is now being held up by Yugi's Swords of Revealing Light. Yugi ends his turn, ending the effect of [=SoRL=], thus causing the destruction of the Castle... and all of Panik's monsters, which were underneath and, due to Panik's Chaos Shield, couldn't get out of the way in time. If these had been real, physical creatures engaged in a battle, this would be reasonably creative and entirely valid. But they're just cards in a card game, [[MagicAIsMagicA subject to the rules thereof]], so Yugi's trick had ''absolutely no basis in the rules'' ([[RuleOfCool but it looked cool]]).

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** Duelist Kingdom standardized it to 30%, resulting in weird things like Panik's [=PaniK=]'s Castle of Dark Illusions having 250'''9''' defense points.
* In the fifteenth episode of the second series anime, Yugi uses a monster called Catapult Turtle to launch a Fusion Monster, Gaia the Dragon Champion, at another monster, Panik's [=PaniK=]'s Castle of Dark Illusions. This destroys the Dragon Champion on impact, causing Yugi to lose most of his Life Points (going from 1606 to 300 for no apparent reason) and the castle's flotation-ring to fall off, but it seemingly doesn't destroy the castle... until Yugi mentions that the Castle is now being held up by Yugi's Swords of Revealing Light. Yugi ends his turn, ending the effect of [=SoRL=], thus causing the destruction of the Castle... and all of Panik's [=PaniK=]'s monsters, which were underneath and, due to Panik's [=PaniK=]'s Chaos Shield, couldn't get out of the way in time. If these had been real, physical creatures engaged in a battle, this would be reasonably creative and entirely valid. But they're just cards in a card game, [[MagicAIsMagicA subject to the rules thereof]], so Yugi's trick had ''absolutely no basis in the rules'' ([[RuleOfCool but it looked cool]]).
** However, if Catapult Turtle's anime effect applies, then Yugi's victory can be considered legitimate, as [=PaniK=] actually lost because of that particular anime-only effect of Catapult Turtle which states that a player could increase the ATK of a monster by 600, then Tribute it, to inflict damage equal to half of its ATK to their opponent. Since Gaia the Dragon Champion had 3200 ATK, [=PaniK=] would have lost 1600 LP going down to 0.
26th Feb '16 9:22:00 AM pablo360
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** The forums spent many a thread stating out [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0639.html Familicide]]. On the one hand, it could genuinely be done by epic spellcasting rules. On the other hand, initial estimates measured its Spellcraft DC by the hundreds, which may have been technically possible (it was researched by an epic level wizard, and cast by a wizard with the power of ''three'' epic level casters) but was insanely unfeasible and unlikely. [[ZigZaggedTrope On the third hand]], if you're willing to [[GameBreaker seriously cheese the rules]] (and your GM lets you get away with it), there ''is'' a notorious bug in epic spellcasting which allows one to build arbitrarily powerful spells for a small fixed cost. In any case, it's unlikely Rich bothered to come up with actual stats for the spell.

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** The forums spent many a thread stating statting out [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0639.html Familicide]]. On the one hand, it could genuinely be done by epic spellcasting rules. On the other hand, initial estimates measured its Spellcraft DC by the hundreds, which may have been technically possible (it was researched by an epic level wizard, and cast by a wizard with the power of ''three'' epic level casters) but was insanely unfeasible and unlikely. [[ZigZaggedTrope On the third hand]], if you're willing to [[GameBreaker seriously cheese the rules]] (and your GM lets you get away with it), there ''is'' a notorious bug in epic spellcasting which allows one to build arbitrarily powerful spells for a small fixed cost. In any case, it's unlikely Rich bothered to come up with actual stats for the spell.
26th Feb '16 9:14:44 AM pablo360
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However, sometimes the story isn't paying attention. This trope is where the rules of a game within a given work are made so vague or complex that there is no possible way they can be understood. Sometimes, the story [[KudzuPlot just makes things up as it goes along]]. Hopefully, the improvisation will make sense.

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However, sometimes the story isn't paying attention. This trope is where the rules of a game within a given work are made so vague or complex that there is no possible way they can be understood. Sometimes, the story [[KudzuPlot just makes things up as it goes along]].along. Hopefully, the improvisation will make sense.
20th Feb '16 11:18:53 AM gophergiggles
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* [[SocietyMarchesOn As society is constantly changing]], the law needs to be constantly revised, resulting in constant new laws introduced, and changes to original laws. Due to the obvious potential for abuse, many countries have a law banning or restricting ''ex post facto'' laws (also known as a Grandfather Clause), which makes laws unable to be applied retroactively (in other words, you can't prosecute someone if whatever they did was legal at the time).[[/folder]]

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* [[SocietyMarchesOn As society is constantly changing]], the law needs to be constantly revised, resulting in constant new laws introduced, and changes to original laws. Due to the obvious potential for abuse, many countries have a law banning or restricting ''ex post facto'' laws (also known as a Grandfather Clause), which makes laws unable to be applied retroactively (in other words, you can't prosecute someone if whatever they did was legal at the time).time).
* The code for buildings, electricians, plumbers, etc is ''constantly'' being revised and changed to meet with new technology or to address things that were later realized to be not restrictive enough or ''too'' restrictive. Keeping up with these code changes is a major part of these peoples jobs. Like above, there is also a Grandfather Clause which states an installation that was up to code upon installation is ''still'' up to code even if such a thing would be prohibited nowadays, unless of course it is so blatantly dangerous that it is an active hazard (knob and tube wiring, lead piping for potable water, and friable asbestos being three major examples of things that ''must'' be removed upon discovery).
[[/folder]]
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