History Main / NeverSayDie

24th Nov '16 1:17:08 AM CaptainTedium
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* CodeLyoko wavers back and forth on this trope depending on the situation and/or who's speaking, with the humans either subverting this trope or cutting themselves off and the computer virus XANA using alternate terms.

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* CodeLyoko ''WesternAnimation/CodeLyoko'' wavers back and forth on this trope depending on the situation and/or who's speaking, with the humans either subverting this trope or cutting themselves off and the computer virus XANA using alternate terms.terms.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Bonkers}}'' usually avoided this trope, even going so far as to mention homicide in "The Good, The Bad, and The Kanifky", but it is played straight in "Toon for a Day" when Miranda Wright explains to Bonkers why it's a bad thing that Sergeant Grating thinks he's a toon.
-->'''Miranda:''' He could get hurt...permanently!
22nd Nov '16 6:11:08 AM FromtheWordsofBR
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* ''Anime/DigimonAdventure'':
** The series starts with it being an ironclad rule: the first die-related word uttered is Myotismon saying of the Eighth Child, "and when we do find him, then he must die!" The fandom was in total shock at it. Each successive season gets a little more comfortable with it - by the last arc of Tamers and the first arc of Frontier, hearing death words (in an ''actual end-of-life context,'' not "Mom's gonna kill me if I don't get home in time for dinner!") ceases to be remarkable, only for it to return full force in ''[[Anime/DigimonSavers Digimon: Data Squad]].''

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* ''Anime/DigimonAdventure'':
Zigzagged around by ''Franchise/{{Digimon}}'':
** The series ''Anime/DigimonAdventure'' starts with it being an ironclad rule: the first die-related word uttered is Myotismon saying of the Eighth Child, "and when we do find him, then he must die!" The fandom was in total shock at it. Each successive season gets a little more comfortable with it - by the last arc of Tamers and the first arc of Frontier, hearing death words (in an ''actual end-of-life context,'' not "Mom's gonna kill me if I don't get home in time for dinner!") ceases to be remarkable, only for it to return full force in ''[[Anime/DigimonSavers Digimon: Data Squad]].''
21st Nov '16 8:16:52 PM jormis29
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* In the Victorian farce ''The Wrong Box'', young idlers Morris and John (Peter Cook and Dudley Moore) need to procure a death certificate to cover up an untimely demise; they get a lot of mileage out of the word 'thing':

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* In the Victorian farce ''The Wrong Box'', ''Film/TheWrongBox'', young idlers Morris and John (Peter Cook and Dudley Moore) need to procure a death certificate to cover up an untimely demise; they get a lot of mileage out of the word 'thing':
20th Nov '16 10:03:16 AM Korodzik
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* ''VideoGame/{{NARC}}'' is a strange case. Throughout the famously violent game you bloodily massacre hundreds of people, either gunning them down or blowing them up into bloody body parts... but ''dogs'' don't die. Nope. If shot or blown up, they merely turn into puppies (?!) and run off the screen.
18th Nov '16 4:41:21 PM Gosicrystal
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* The words "death", "dead" etc. were formally banned from all Creator/{{Nintendo}} games for many years as part of their policy for family-friendly content, back in the early days. Abandoned in later years, of course, though ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series in particular still insists on describing enemies as being "defeated" after you slice the hell out of them. One of the bosses in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaLinksAwakening'' even {{lampshade|Hanging}} this. He sends a variety of minions at you, and after you're finished with them, he yells "You K-K-K-Beat my Brothers!!!" Ironically, two of Nintendo's own titles got away with it in the [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem SNES era]]. ''VideoGame/FZero'' got to keep its Death Wind courses, and ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast'' retained Death Mountain even in the American version. Some third-party games for the NES and SNES, like ''VideoGame/FridayThe13th'', do use the D and K words. It's simply averted in [[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaCDiGames the Zelda Phillips CD-I games]] licensed by Nintendo, though like the rest of the game it's simply subject to MemeticMutation:

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* The words "death", "dead" etc. were formally banned from all Creator/{{Nintendo}} games for many years as part of their policy for family-friendly content, back in the early days. Abandoned in later years, of course, though ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series in particular still insists on describing enemies as being "defeated" after you slice the hell out of them. One of the bosses in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaLinksAwakening'' even {{lampshade|Hanging}} {{lampshade|Hanging}}s this. He sends a variety of minions at you, and after you're finished with them, he yells "You K-K-K-Beat my Brothers!!!" Ironically, two of Nintendo's own titles got away with it in the [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem SNES era]]. ''VideoGame/FZero'' got to keep its Death Wind courses, and ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast'' retained Death Mountain even in the American version. Some third-party games for the NES and SNES, like ''VideoGame/FridayThe13th'', do use the D and K words. It's simply averted in [[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaCDiGames the Zelda Phillips CD-I games]] licensed by Nintendo, though like the rest of the game it's simply subject to MemeticMutation:



--> '''TIME:''' Still, American kids like Pokémon, even without the blood.
--> '''Tajiri:''' I was really careful in making monsters faint rather than die. I think that young people playing games have an abnormal concept about dying. They start to lose and say, "I'm dying." It's not right for kids to think about a concept of death that way. They need to treat death with more respect.

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--> ---> '''TIME:''' Still, American kids like Pokémon, even without the blood.
--> ---> '''Tajiri:''' I was really careful in making monsters faint rather than die. I think that young people playing games have an abnormal concept about dying. They start to lose and say, "I'm dying." It's not right for kids to think about a concept of death that way. They need to treat death with more respect.



--->"The man's Pokemon went off to war. Time passed. [[spoiler:And then, one day, the man was ''given a tiny box''.]]"[[note]]In the image, the "box" is unmistakably a coffin, which almost makes the line ''more'' heartbreaking than if the word "death" was used.[[/note]]

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--->"The man's Pokemon went off to war. Time passed. [[spoiler:And then, one day, the man was ''given a tiny box''.]]"[[note]]In ]]" [[note]]In the image, the "box" is unmistakably a coffin, which almost makes the line ''more'' heartbreaking than if the word "death" was used.[[/note]]
18th Nov '16 12:54:32 PM Darthrai
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** Modern games use the word "death" infrequently, even using it in a euphemism for the verb "kill" ("bring to death").

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** Modern The Generation V and VI games use the word "death" infrequently, even using it in a euphemism for the verb "kill" ("bring to death").death").
** Averted in ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon''; "death" and similar terms are used freely, as are religious terms such as "god" and "demon" for the first time in the series (presumably because of their use in similar family-friendly games such as ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda''), and Type:Null is even referred to as the "Beast Killer".
12th Nov '16 8:47:57 PM JMQwilleran
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* Similarly, the children's picture book ''A Terrible Thing Happened'' notes in its Parents and Caregivers section that it's really best to avoid the use of euphemisms in real life when speaking with a child who has witnessed death or any type of traumatic event. Though it might seem comforting to adults, it's only likely to confuse the child that may already be having trouble processing their feelings about what they witnessed.

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* Similarly, the children's picture book ''A Terrible Thing Happened'' notes in its Parents and Caregivers section that it's really best to avoid the use of euphemisms in real life when speaking with a child who has witnessed death or any type of traumatic event. Though it might seem comforting to adults, it's only likely to confuse the child that may already be having trouble processing their feelings about what they witnessed. ''Helping Children Cope With Grief'', by Creator/RosemaryWells, also specifically advises against the use of euphemisms.
12th Nov '16 8:27:19 PM JMQwilleran
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* The children's picture / comic book ''Benny and Penny in How to Say Goodbye'' is about death and averts this in that right in the beginning scene, Benny is jumping on leaves and Penny tells him on to because he'll hurt them, but Benny says that he can't because they're already dead. Penny wonders how long the leaves will be dead and Benny tells her "a long time." In the very next scene, Penny discovers a dead salamander and says that she thinks he's dead.
30th Oct '16 4:39:01 PM nombretomado
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* The word slipped through a couple of times, but the early years of ''Toys/{{Bionicle}}'' mostly used "destroy" and "defeat". This changed later years, however. Its replacement, ''Franchise/HeroFactory'', being much LighterAndSofter, seems to play the trope straight again, though even it seems to be veering away from this slowly. The German release of the third ''BIONICLE'' [[DirectToVideo Direct-To-DVD]] movie cut the bit when Roodaka expresses her need for the corpses of the Toa, even though it's the whole point of the rest of the scene, and the first movie's German said die.

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* The word slipped through a couple of times, but the early years of ''Toys/{{Bionicle}}'' mostly used "destroy" and "defeat". This changed later years, however. Its replacement, ''Franchise/HeroFactory'', ''Toys/HeroFactory'', being much LighterAndSofter, seems to play the trope straight again, though even it seems to be veering away from this slowly. The German release of the third ''BIONICLE'' [[DirectToVideo Direct-To-DVD]] movie cut the bit when Roodaka expresses her need for the corpses of the Toa, even though it's the whole point of the rest of the scene, and the first movie's German said die.
23rd Oct '16 12:29:08 PM nombretomado
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** In FUNimation's original 1996 dub, dialogue was arbitrarily changed to turn "kill" into "send to another dimension". This could get quite unwieldy: "My next attack is so powerful, it will destroy this planet and send everyone on it to another dimension!" or "Yeah, Frieza's attack sent me to another dimension, and I need you to wish me back with the Dragon Balls!" The censors initially didn't even allow the use of the next most common euphemism, "destroy". The afterlife was also referred to only as "another dimension" for a sizable chunk of the series. Since the series' {{uncancel|ed}}ling, the censorship was lessened. Often a good source of comedy in any case because the replacement words are so ridiculous. This got especially hilarious in the ''Garlic Jr.'' Movie, where they actually did defeat the bad guy by sending him to another dimension. In contrast, the name of both the movie (which aired on the same channel and often in a similar time slot as the tv series) and the dimension that said bad guy was sent to is ''The Dead Zone''. Also, the word "die" is used in the commercial spots that aired during the tv series to advertise the movie, as well.

to:

** In FUNimation's Creator/FUNimation's original 1996 dub, dialogue was arbitrarily changed to turn "kill" into "send to another dimension". This could get quite unwieldy: "My next attack is so powerful, it will destroy this planet and send everyone on it to another dimension!" or "Yeah, Frieza's attack sent me to another dimension, and I need you to wish me back with the Dragon Balls!" The censors initially didn't even allow the use of the next most common euphemism, "destroy". The afterlife was also referred to only as "another dimension" for a sizable chunk of the series. Since the series' {{uncancel|ed}}ling, the censorship was lessened. Often a good source of comedy in any case because the replacement words are so ridiculous. This got especially hilarious in the ''Garlic Jr.'' Movie, where they actually did defeat the bad guy by sending him to another dimension. In contrast, the name of both the movie (which aired on the same channel and often in a similar time slot as the tv series) and the dimension that said bad guy was sent to is ''The Dead Zone''. Also, the word "die" is used in the commercial spots that aired during the tv series to advertise the movie, as well.



** After Creator/{{FUNimation}} moved the series from syndication to Cartoon Network's Toonami, all this fear of using these words ceased (presumably due to the more lenient standards of Cable Television). On the edited Toonami dub, references to death would remain intact, although the word "kill" was only used in the uncut dub and usually edited to "defeat" or "beat." Meanwhile in the UK, the Canadian actors from FUNimation's censored 1996 dub got hired to do an alternate English dub for Episode 108 onward. This dub aired on the UK's version of Toonami (and later Canada's YTV). In this case, the words "kill", "dead", and "die" are never mentioned, being replaced with "hurt" (which gets ridiculous in many situations, but "destroy" is used in some cases), "gone", and "leave". An exception to this was a figure of speech used by Krillin near the end of the World Tournament Saga. In Episode 236, when Gotenks races off to fight Buu, Piccolo says "If he gets killed now, all our efforts are in vain." From here, the words "kill", "die", "dead", and "death" are used as frequently as in the [=FUNimation=] dub, and are never replaced again.

to:

** After Creator/{{FUNimation}} moved the series from syndication to Cartoon Network's Toonami, all this fear of using these words ceased (presumably due to the more lenient standards of Cable Television). On the edited Toonami dub, references to death would remain intact, although the word "kill" was only used in the uncut dub and usually edited to "defeat" or "beat." Meanwhile in the UK, the Canadian actors from FUNimation's [=FUNimation=]'s censored 1996 dub got hired to do an alternate English dub for Episode 108 onward. This dub aired on the UK's version of Toonami (and later Canada's YTV). In this case, the words "kill", "dead", and "die" are never mentioned, being replaced with "hurt" (which gets ridiculous in many situations, but "destroy" is used in some cases), "gone", and "leave". An exception to this was a figure of speech used by Krillin near the end of the World Tournament Saga. In Episode 236, when Gotenks races off to fight Buu, Piccolo says "If he gets killed now, all our efforts are in vain." From here, the words "kill", "die", "dead", and "death" are used as frequently as in the [=FUNimation=] dub, and are never replaced again.
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