History Main / NeurodiversityIsSupernatural

26th Sep '16 6:22:01 PM StrixObscuro
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* Series/GameOfThrones has Jojen Reed, a teenager who can see the future, but has bouts of what can be clearly identified as Epilepsy to a modern audience. According to his sister, his epilepsy is a direct effect of his powers.

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* Series/GameOfThrones ''Series/GameOfThrones'' has Jojen Reed, a teenager who can see the future, but has bouts of what can be clearly identified as Epilepsy to a modern audience. According to his sister, his epilepsy is a direct effect of his powers.powers.
** In the sixth season, it's revealed that [[spoiler:Hodor used to be entirely functional, but his mind was destroyed when Bran warged him in the past.]]




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* In the first episode of ''Series/TheExorcist'', it's left ambiguous whether Henry Rance's declining mental health is the result of early-onset Alzheimer's or the demonic presence in his house.
14th Sep '16 9:47:37 PM jormis29
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* ''EliStone'':

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* ''EliStone'':''Series/EliStone'':



* All ''{{Alphas}}'' have some kind of [[DisabilitySuperpower mental or physical disability]] to accompany their abilities. Gary for instance is autistic and able to sense and translate radio waves, he's also immune to Nina's CompellingVoice because his brain is too "rigid".

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* All ''{{Alphas}}'' ''Series/{{Alphas}}'' have some kind of [[DisabilitySuperpower mental or physical disability]] to accompany their abilities. Gary for instance is autistic and able to sense and translate radio waves, he's also immune to Nina's CompellingVoice because his brain is too "rigid".



* An episode of ''{{Series/Sanctuary}}'' plays with and subverts this when it features an autistic boy with a supernatural power and at the end brings in his neurotypical brother with the same power, showing that the power is unconnected to his autism.

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* An episode of ''{{Series/Sanctuary}}'' ''Series/{{Sanctuary}}'' plays with and subverts this when it features an autistic boy with a supernatural power and at the end brings in his neurotypical brother with the same power, showing that the power is unconnected to his autism.



* Creator/StephenKing committed this trope in his screenplay for the miniseries ''Rose Red''. Annie Wheaton is an autistic with extreme telekinetic powers, and her ArtInitiatesLife -- when she does pictures of rocks falling on a neighbor's home, they do. [[note]]King also used rocks falling on a house in ''Carrie'', inspired by an incident in Creator/ShirleyJackson's ''Literature/TheHauntingOfHillHouse''. ''Rose Red'' was originally supposed to be a modern takeoff on Jackson's work, and King thought it failed primarily because it was a collaboration with Creator/StephenSpielberg and his insistence on more unsubtle action sequences.[[/note]] Many of the supposed ghostly activities in the house are actually Annie's doing. They also find out that she's telepathic and communicates perfectly well that way.

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* Creator/StephenKing committed this trope in his screenplay for the miniseries ''Rose Red''.''Series/RoseRed''. Annie Wheaton is an autistic with extreme telekinetic powers, and her ArtInitiatesLife -- when she does pictures of rocks falling on a neighbor's home, they do. [[note]]King also used rocks falling on a house in ''Carrie'', inspired by an incident in Creator/ShirleyJackson's ''Literature/TheHauntingOfHillHouse''. ''Rose Red'' was originally supposed to be a modern takeoff on Jackson's work, and King thought it failed primarily because it was a collaboration with Creator/StephenSpielberg and his insistence on more unsubtle action sequences.[[/note]] Many of the supposed ghostly activities in the house are actually Annie's doing. They also find out that she's telepathic and communicates perfectly well that way.
14th Sep '16 9:18:35 PM CaptEquinox
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* Creator/StephenKing committed this trope in his screenplay for the miniseries ''Rose Red''. Annie Wheaton is an autistic with extreme telekinetic powers, and her ArtInitiatesLife -- when she does pictures of rocks falling on a neighbor's home, they do. [[note]]King also used rocks falling on a house in ''Carrie'', inspired by an incident in Creator/ShirleyJackson's ''Literature/TheHauntingOfHillHouse''. ''Rose Red'' was originally supposed to be a modern takeoff on Jackson's work, and King thought it failed primarily because it was a collaboration with Creator/StephenSpielberg and his insistence on more unsubtle action sequences.[[/note]] Many of the supposed ghostly activities in the house are actually Annie's doing. They also find out that she's telepathic and communicates perfectly well that way.
9th Sep '16 12:15:05 PM Sharysa
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* Many psychologists and doctors have noted that historical portrayals of TheFairFolk, and especially [[ChangelingTale part-fairy changelings]], have traits that sound like autism or Asperger's Syndrome.
7th Sep '16 12:21:38 AM marcoasalazarm
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Can overlap with TheSoulless in regard to [[TheSociopath sociopathy]]. See also MadOracle and ByTheEyesOfTheBlind. If the character gets something useful out of their supernatural connection, it's also a case of DisabilitySuperpower. If the application of this "something useful" changes people's lives for the better in a dramatic fashion, it also makes the characters InspirationallyDisadvantaged. If applied badly, this Trope can create UnfortunateImplications and a BrokenAesop (if insane people are supernaturally awesome and people trying to help them through therapy or medicine are all allies of whichever evil is roaming around, then doesn't that means that therapy and/or medication are evil? Or if the reason for your depression is literally the ghost of your loved one having UnfinishedBusiness and not plain grief, then why bother spending time and money getting counsel, anyway?).

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Can overlap with TheSoulless in regard to [[TheSociopath sociopathy]]. See also MadOracle and ByTheEyesOfTheBlind. If the character gets something useful out of their supernatural connection, it's also a case of DisabilitySuperpower. If the application of this "something useful" changes people's lives for the better in a dramatic fashion, it also makes the characters InspirationallyDisadvantaged. If applied badly, this Trope can create UnfortunateImplications and a BrokenAesop (if insane people are supernaturally awesome and people trying to help them through therapy or medicine are all allies of whichever evil is roaming around, then doesn't that means that therapy and/or medication are evil? evil ([[NoMedicationForMe and better off not taken]])? Or if the reason for your depression is literally the ghost of your loved one having UnfinishedBusiness and not plain grief, then why bother spending time and money getting counsel, anyway?).
12th Aug '16 8:46:29 PM radiantPatrician
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* Some people involved with the New Age belief system believe children with autism, ADHD, and other disorders are [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigo_children indigo children]], children with indigo auras sent to heal the world.

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* Some people involved with the New Age belief system believe Autistic children, as well as children with autism, ADHD, ADHD and other disorders neurodivergences, are [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigo_children indigo children]], children with indigo auras sent to heal the world.
9th Aug '16 3:21:29 AM marcoasalazarm
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Can overlap with TheSoulless in regard to [[TheSociopath sociopathy]]. See also MadOracle and ByTheEyesOfTheBlind. If the character gets something useful out of their supernatural connection, it's also a case of DisabilitySuperpower. If the application of this "something useful" changes people's lives for the better in a dramatic fashion, it also makes the characters InspirationallyDisadvantaged. If applied badly, this Trope can create UnfortunateImplications and a BrokenAesop (if insane people are supernaturally awesome and people trying to help them through therapy or medicine are all allies of whichever evil is roaming around, then doesn't that means that therapy and/or medication are evil?).

to:

Can overlap with TheSoulless in regard to [[TheSociopath sociopathy]]. See also MadOracle and ByTheEyesOfTheBlind. If the character gets something useful out of their supernatural connection, it's also a case of DisabilitySuperpower. If the application of this "something useful" changes people's lives for the better in a dramatic fashion, it also makes the characters InspirationallyDisadvantaged. If applied badly, this Trope can create UnfortunateImplications and a BrokenAesop (if insane people are supernaturally awesome and people trying to help them through therapy or medicine are all allies of whichever evil is roaming around, then doesn't that means that therapy and/or medication are evil?).
evil? Or if the reason for your depression is literally the ghost of your loved one having UnfinishedBusiness and not plain grief, then why bother spending time and money getting counsel, anyway?).
9th Aug '16 3:18:10 AM marcoasalazarm
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Can overlap with TheSoulless in regard to [[TheSociopath sociopathy]]. See also MadOracle and ByTheEyesOfTheBlind. If the character gets something useful out of their supernatural connection, it's also a case of DisabilitySuperpower.

to:

Can overlap with TheSoulless in regard to [[TheSociopath sociopathy]]. See also MadOracle and ByTheEyesOfTheBlind. If the character gets something useful out of their supernatural connection, it's also a case of DisabilitySuperpower.
DisabilitySuperpower. If the application of this "something useful" changes people's lives for the better in a dramatic fashion, it also makes the characters InspirationallyDisadvantaged. If applied badly, this Trope can create UnfortunateImplications and a BrokenAesop (if insane people are supernaturally awesome and people trying to help them through therapy or medicine are all allies of whichever evil is roaming around, then doesn't that means that therapy and/or medication are evil?).
4th Aug '16 8:03:18 AM Morgenthaler
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* In TheOmen remake, Damien shows signs of having [[AmbiguousDisorder some sort of developmental disorder]], and it's bizarre how his modern, 2006 mother automatically subscribes to this trope instead of having him tested. The fact she's right doesn't lessen the unrealistic oddness of her reactions.

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* In TheOmen ''Film/TheOmen2006'' remake, Damien shows signs of having [[AmbiguousDisorder some sort of developmental disorder]], and it's bizarre how his modern, 2006 mother automatically subscribes to this trope instead of having him tested. The fact she's right doesn't lessen the unrealistic oddness of her reactions.



* In ''[[Literature/{{Dexter}} Dexter in the Dark]]'', all sociopaths are possessed by beings implied to be the children of {{Satan}}.

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* In ''[[Literature/{{Dexter}} Dexter in the Dark]]'', ''Literature/DexterInTheDark'', all sociopaths are possessed by beings implied to be the children of {{Satan}}.



* In ''[[YoungWizards A Wizard Alone]]'' by Diane Duane, Darryl becomes autistic [[spoiler:in an attempt to withdraw from the sensations of being malignantly observed by the [[BigBad Lone Power]]]]. It's portrayed very differently from the experiences of real-world autistics, though it looks similar from the outside. [[spoiler:In which case it's subverted in that it's not really autism, just resembles it from the outside.]]

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* In ''[[YoungWizards ''[[Literature/YoungWizards A Wizard Alone]]'' by Diane Duane, Darryl becomes autistic [[spoiler:in an attempt to withdraw from the sensations of being malignantly observed by the [[BigBad Lone Power]]]]. It's portrayed very differently from the experiences of real-world autistics, though it looks similar from the outside. [[spoiler:In which case it's subverted in that it's not really autism, just resembles it from the outside.]]



* In ''{{Everworld}},'' [[VillainProtagonist Senna]] believes that crazy people are at least partially aware of supernatural things, much like [[WitchSpecies witches like her]]. They can also hear her when she's using AstralProjection, while talking to normal people requires the more taxing effort of creating an illusionary form.

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* In ''{{Everworld}},'' ''Literature/{{Everworld}},'' [[VillainProtagonist Senna]] believes that crazy people are at least partially aware of supernatural things, much like [[WitchSpecies witches like her]]. They can also hear her when she's using AstralProjection, while talking to normal people requires the more taxing effort of creating an illusionary form.
1st Aug '16 3:19:42 PM nogard8910
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* Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu's short story "Green Tea" from the anthology ''In a Glass Darkly'' depicts clinical depression as harassment from an evil monkey spirit. People who don't have their third eyes open to be capable of perceiving spirits just see it as a medical condition.
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