1 Days Left to Support a Troper-Created Project : Personal Space (discuss)

History Main / Networks

24th Apr '16 4:54:17 PM Lirodon
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* Joytv, a multi-faith religious station in Vancouver (okay, actually Fraser Valley/Abbotsford, but close enough) and formerly Winnipeg, which have a very similar format to the Omni stations, but with religious and family-oriented syndicated fare. In fact, they ''were'' Omni stations for a period: the Fraser Valley station was originally owned by the non-profit Trinity Television, known as [=NowTV=], and supported by both donations and advertising. Facing financial issues, Trinity sold it (along with a yet-to-have-launched Winnipeg station) to Rogers, who re-purposed the Omni brand from its Toronto stations on them. When Rogers bought Citytv in 2007, it was forced to sell these two stations because they now owned more than one English-language station in Winnipeg and Vancouver (you can usually only own more than one station in a market [[/index]] [[LoopholeAbuse if they broadcast in different languages]], [[index]] like the Toronto Omni stations). They were eventually sold to the non-profit [=S-VOX=] (who also owned Vision TV), who re-branded them under a similar format as Joytv in September 2008 (they had branded using their call letters as an interim measure). S-VOX later sold its broadcasting outlets to Moses Znaimer's Zoomer Media.

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* Joytv, a multi-faith religious station in Vancouver (okay, actually Fraser Valley/Abbotsford, but close enough) and formerly Winnipeg, which have a very similar format to the Omni stations, but with religious and family-oriented syndicated fare. In fact, they ''were'' Omni stations for a period: the Fraser Valley station was originally owned by the non-profit Trinity Television, known as [=NowTV=], and supported by both donations and advertising. Facing financial issues, Trinity sold it (along with a yet-to-have-launched Winnipeg station) to Rogers, who re-purposed the Omni brand from its Toronto stations on them. When Rogers bought Citytv in 2007, it was forced to sell these two stations because they now owned more than one English-language station in Winnipeg and Vancouver (you can usually (duopolies are only own more than one station allowed in a single market [[/index]] [[LoopholeAbuse if they that primarily broadcast in different languages]], [[index]] like the Toronto Omni stations). [[index]], meaning that Rogers can only get away with Omni/City duopolies if they are multicultural). They were eventually sold to the non-profit [=S-VOX=] (who also owned (owners of cable channel Vision TV), who re-branded them under a similar format as Joytv in September 2008 (they had (the stations branded using their call letters as an interim measure). S-VOX later sold its broadcasting outlets to Moses Znaimer's Zoomer Media.



** In September 2013, the Winnipeg station dropped all non-religious programming and re-branded as Hope TV. Conveniently, two of Canada's religious networks (Miracle Channel and Grace TV) had effectively affiliated with Creator/{{TBN}} and Creator/{{Daystar}}, so there may have been method to that madness.
* [=YesTV=], formerly CTS (Crossroads Television System) (as of September 1, 2014). Basically the Canadian equivalent of ION Television, in a way, with a mix of religious and secular programming. Operates one station in Ontario (Hamilton, with transmitters in Ottawa and London) and two in Alberta (Calgary and Edmonton). The channel's owner chose to rebrand as YesTV to focus on more positive programming, as well as obtaining the rights to [[/index]]''Series/WheelOfFortune'', ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', ''Series/AmericanIdol'', and many overflow RealityTV and {{Game Show}}s[[index]] formerly held by other networks. Its flagship religious program is ''100 Huntley Street''.

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** In September 2013, the Winnipeg station dropped all non-religious programming and re-branded as Hope TV. Conveniently, TV, essentially becoming a 24/7 televangelist channel. Around the same time, two of Canada's religious networks (Miracle Channel and Grace TV) had effectively affiliated themselves with Creator/{{TBN}} and Creator/{{Daystar}}, so there may have been method to that madness.
* [=YesTV=], Yes TV, formerly CTS (Crossroads the Crossroads Television System) (as System (CTS), which is operated by Crossroads Christian Communications (best-known as the producer of September 1, 2014). Basically the long-running ''100 Huntley Street''). It is basically the Canadian equivalent of ION Television, PAX (pre-Ion, anyway), in a way, with a mix of religious and secular secular, family-friendly programming. Operates It consists of one station in Ontario (Hamilton, with transmitters in Ottawa and London) and two in Alberta (Calgary and Edmonton). The channel's owner chose In September 2014, the stations re-launched as Yes TV in an effort to rebrand as YesTV to embrace positivism, and mark a programming strategy with a more aggressive focus on more positive programming, as well as obtaining the rights to [[/index]]''Series/WheelOfFortune'', ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', ''Series/AmericanIdol'', and many picking up overflow RealityTV and RealityTV, {{Game Show}}s[[index]] formerly held by Show}}s, and U.S. syndicated fare that the other networks. Its flagship religious program is ''100 Huntley Street''.
networks didn't want.



* Société de Radio-Canada Télévision (SRC), the French arm of Creator/{{CBC}}.

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* Société de Radio-Canada Télévision (SRC), Télévision, the French arm of Creator/{{CBC}}.Creator/{{CBC}}. Their main network is Ici Radio-Canada Tél&e.



* V, a network that literally called itself the [[/index]]BlackSheep[[index]] (and was the closest French equivalent to CITY-TV) when it was known as TQS (Télévision Quatre-Saisons), before its bankruptcy and sale to Remstar in 2009. In the past, it was owned by the Pouliot family (who owned Montreal's CTV affiliate), Videotron Cable (who was quickly forced to sell it because they already owned TVA), Quebecor (who was forced to sell it when ''they'' bought Videotron because they already owned TVA), and a joint venture between Cogeco and [=CTVglobemedia=].

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* V, a network that literally called itself the [[/index]]BlackSheep[[index]] (and was the closest French equivalent to CITY-TV) when it was known as TQS (Télévision Quatre-Saisons), before its bankruptcy and sale to Remstar in 2009.2009 (to fund its purchase of [=MusiquePlus=], stakes in V's holding company have since been sold to others). In the past, it was owned by the Pouliot family (who owned Montreal's CTV affiliate), Videotron Cable (who was quickly forced to sell it because they already owned TVA), Quebecor (who was forced to sell it when ''they'' bought Videotron because they already owned TVA), and a joint venture between Cogeco and [=CTVglobemedia=].



* Télé-Québec (educational network owned by the Quebec government)
* TFO (the French equivalent of TVO, owned by the Ontario government; they used to be run jointly, but have since separated). Mostly on cable in Ontario, with over the air transmitters only available in areas of Eastern and Northeastern Ontario. Also available on some cable systems in New Brunswick.

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* Télé-Québec (educational network owned by the Quebec government)
Télé-Québec, Quebec's province-owned public broadcaster.
* TFO (the French equivalent (Télévision française de l'Ontario), Ontario's French-language public broadcaster. Originally launching in 1987 as La Chaîne Française--a branch of TVO, owned by the Ontario government; they used to be run jointly, but have it has since separated). Mostly on cable in Ontario, with over the air been operated by an autonomous crown corporation. It formerly operated OTA transmitters only available in areas regions of Eastern and Northeastern Ontario. Also the province with sizable Francophone populations, but since 2012 it's been cable-only (while transmitters were being built out, TVO briefly continued with its practice of airing French-language programming on Sundays to ensure OTA availability. On the other hand, La Chaîne aired English programming.) It is available on some cable systems in New Brunswick.Brunswick and Manitoba (the latter catering to the native Métis population), and the network also partnered with Louisiana's PBS system to provide French-language children's programs.
24th Apr '16 4:14:01 PM Lirodon
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-->In Canada, while there are major broadcast networks recognized by the CRTC (either that, or big enough to just be called networks by the media), there are also smaller groups of commonly-owned stations referred to as "television systems", which carry similar brands and share programming (but may not have a single consistent lineup between markets). The distinction has since become blurred from a regulatory standpoint (especially given that unlike in America, there are relatively fewer "affiliates" in Canada's major networks, and CTV is not even legally a licensed "network" in CRTC terms), but smaller groups of this nature are typically considered systems.

* CTV Two, a [[/index]][[CaptainObvious secondary network to CTV]][[index]]. Its stations were originally known as "The New ''XX''" (last two letters of the callsign, such as "The New VR" for flagship CKVR, and "The New WI" for CHWI in Windsor. They were known internally as the [=NewNet=] stations) when formed by CHUM as a spin-off of CITY-TV in Toronto. Took on the A-Channel brand in 2005 after CHUM switched the A-Channel chain in Western Canada (which it had obtained through its purchase of Craig Media) to Citytv, was acquired by CTV in 2007 and later re-launched as just A and later CTV Two.
** Also formerly ASN (a cable channel in Atlantic Canada, once the region's version of [=CityTV=]) and Access (an educational TV channel in Alberta).

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-->In Canada, while there are major broadcast networks recognized by the CRTC (either that, or big enough to just be called networks by the media), there are also smaller groups of commonly-owned stations referred to as "television systems", which carry similar brands and may share programming (but may and brands, bit not have a single consistent lineup between markets).be as rigidly centralized as the major networks. The distinction has since become blurred from a regulatory standpoint (especially given that unlike in America, there are relatively fewer "affiliates" in Canada's major networks, and CTV is not even legally a licensed "network" in CRTC terms), but smaller groups of this nature are typically considered systems.

* ** CTV Two, a [[/index]][[CaptainObvious secondary network to CTV]][[index]]. Its Formerly a system (see below), its stations were originally known as "The New ''XX''" (last two letters of the callsign, such as "The New VR" for flagship CKVR, and "The New WI" for CHWI in Windsor. They were known internally as the [=NewNet=] stations) when formed by CHUM as a spin-off of CITY-TV in Toronto. Took on the A-Channel brand in 2005 after CHUM switched the A-Channel chain in Western Canada (which it had obtained through its purchase of Craig Media) to Citytv, was acquired by CTV in 2007 and later re-launched as just A. In 2011, alongside the transition to digital television, A and later re-launched as CTV Two.
** Also formerly ASN (a
Two. The system also includes the former Atlantic Satellite Network (ASN, a cable channel in Atlantic Canada, once the region's version of [=CityTV=]) Canada that served as a partial [=CityTV=] affiliate) and Access (an educational TV channel service in Alberta).
2nd Apr '16 4:36:08 AM MarcoPolo250
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* Creator/GlobalTelevisionNetwork, formerly owned by the now-bankrupt media company Canwest before being sold in late 2010 to the Calgary-based cable and telecommunications company Shaw, who in turn as of early 2016 is selling their entire media division to Corus Entertainment. Tends to be quite popular in the west, especially in British Columbia, thanks to Canwest's 2000 acquisition of Vancouver's charter CTV affiliate BCTV, and its [[DisasterDominoes subsequent switch to Global]] in 2001.

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* Creator/GlobalTelevisionNetwork, formerly owned by the now-bankrupt media company Canwest before being sold in late 2010 to the Calgary-based cable and telecommunications company Shaw, who in turn as of early 2016 is selling sold their entire media division to Corus Entertainment.Entertainment in 2016. Tends to be quite popular in the west, especially in British Columbia, thanks to Canwest's 2000 acquisition of Vancouver's charter CTV affiliate BCTV, and its [[DisasterDominoes subsequent switch to Global]] in 2001.



* YesTV, formerly CTS (Crossroads Television System) (as of September 1, 2014). Basically the Canadian equivalent of ION Television, in a way, with a mix of religious and secular programming. Operates one station in Ontario (Hamilton, with transmitters in Ottawa and London) and two in Alberta (Calgary and Edmonton). The channel's owner chose to rebrand as YesTV to focus on more positive programming, as well as obtaining the rights to [[/index]]''Series/WheelOfFortune'', ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', ''Series/AmericanIdol'', and many overflow RealityTV and {{Game Show}}s[[index]] formerly held by other networks. Its flagship religious program is ''100 Huntley Street''.

to:

* YesTV, [=YesTV=], formerly CTS (Crossroads Television System) (as of September 1, 2014). Basically the Canadian equivalent of ION Television, in a way, with a mix of religious and secular programming. Operates one station in Ontario (Hamilton, with transmitters in Ottawa and London) and two in Alberta (Calgary and Edmonton). The channel's owner chose to rebrand as YesTV to focus on more positive programming, as well as obtaining the rights to [[/index]]''Series/WheelOfFortune'', ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', ''Series/AmericanIdol'', and many overflow RealityTV and {{Game Show}}s[[index]] formerly held by other networks. Its flagship religious program is ''100 Huntley Street''.



** Showcase, the channel that brought us ''[[Series/{{TrailerParkBoys}} Trailer Park Boys]]'', ''[[Series/{{KennyVsSpenny}} Kenny vs. Spenny]]'', ''[[Series/{{LostGirl}} Lost Girl]]'', ''Series/{{Haven}}'' (which was co-produced with Syfy) and ''Series/{{Continuum}}''.



* Showcase, the channel that brought us ''[[Series/{{TrailerParkBoys}} Trailer Park Boys]]'', ''[[Series/{{KennyVsSpenny}} Kenny vs. Spenny]]'', ''[[Series/{{LostGirl}} Lost Girl]]'', ''Series/{{Haven}}'' (which was co-produced with Syfy) and ''Series/{{Continuum}}''. Owned by Shaw and currently in the process of being sold to Corus.
26th Mar '16 9:20:02 PM lizaphile
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* [[/index]]MusicVideo[[index]] networks like [=TheCoolTV=] (which specializes in a eclectic blend of music videos) and ZUUS Country (nothing but country videos) which take advantage of the [[/index]] NetworkDecay [[index]] prevalent with MTV and CMT. (Unfortunately, [=TheCoolTV=] is now only carried by a small handful of stations.)

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* [[/index]]MusicVideo[[index]] networks like [=TheCoolTV=] (which specializes in a eclectic blend of music videos) and ZUUS Country (nothing but country videos) which take advantage of the [[/index]] NetworkDecay [[index]] prevalent with MTV and CMT. (Unfortunately, [=TheCoolTV=] is However, both networks also made little money and had few viewers, and are now only carried by airing on a small handful number of stations.)stations from their 2012 peaks.
12th Mar '16 10:26:14 PM chaokiwi
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->(With vast marketing campaigns, they often advertise themselves as networks in their own right with original content. See also CableSatelliteMudslinging.)

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->(With vast marketing campaigns, they often advertise themselves as networks in their own right with original content. See also CableSatelliteMudslinging.)
9th Mar '16 4:46:41 PM MarcoPolo250
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* Movie Central (formerly Superchannel; Western Canada only; owned by Corus Entertainment) and The Movie Network (TMN; formerly First Choice; Eastern Canada only; owned by Bell Media), Canada's designated pay-TV services. At one point in their early years, both were marketed as one service. In 2016, Bell will expand TMN to the west coast, while Movie Central shuts down.
** Creator/{{HBO}} Canada, a joint venture between Bell Media and Corus Entertainment that operates as individual multiplex channels for The Movie Network and Movie Central. After Movie Central shuts down in 2016, Bell's feed will take over.

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* Movie Central (formerly Superchannel; Western Canada only; owned by Corus Entertainment) and The Movie Network (TMN; formerly First Choice; Eastern Canada only; owned by Bell Media), Canada's designated pay-TV services. At one point in their early years, both were marketed as one service. In 2016, Movie Central was closed as Bell will expand expanded TMN to the west coast, while Movie Central shuts down.
coast.
** Creator/{{HBO}} Canada, Canada: Once a joint venture between Bell Media and Corus Entertainment Entertainment, that operates operated as individual multiplex channels for The Movie Network and Movie Central. After Movie Central shuts down closed in 2016, Bell's feed will take took over.
1st Mar '16 11:25:22 AM BuddyBoy600alt
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Added DiffLines:

* Radio/RadioDisney
20th Feb '16 6:06:44 AM BuddyBoy600alt
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Added DiffLines:

** Creator/NickelodeonGAS
20th Feb '16 3:23:48 AM BuddyBoy600alt
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* Creator/{{Sprout}}

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* Creator/{{Sprout}}Creator/{{Sprout}} (formerly known as PBS Kids Sprout)
18th Feb '16 1:30:39 PM MarcoPolo250
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*** Lifetime Movie
* Creator/ABCFamily

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*** Lifetime Movie
LMN
* Creator/ABCFamilyCreator/ABCFamily (now Freeform)



* Creator/TechTV (now G4)

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* Creator/TechTV (now (merged with G4)



* Creator/TheComedyNetwork, [[Main/ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin a network that airs comedies.]] Known for airing numerous shows from Creator/ComedyCentral.
* Creator/{{Corus Entertainment}} cable networks, which include:
** Creator/{{Teletoon}}, essentially Canada's answer to Creator/CartoonNetwork. Its parent companies, a partnership of Corus and Astral Media, had incidentally launched [[http://www.cartoonnetwork.ca/ a Canadian version]] of Cartoon Network (and Creator/AdultSwim) in 2012. After Astral was acquired by Bell, Corus bought the former's ownership stake (which include it's offshoots, Teletoon Retro and CN Canada, as well as the french-language version), officially making it sister to YTV.
** Creator/TreehouseTV, 24/7 network catering to preschool audiences.
** Creator/{{YTV}}, originally the "de facto" Canadian Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}; Corus is also the owner of Nick's actual domestic counterpart. Yes, [[Main/MegaCorp Corus Entertainment owns Nickelodeon, Cartoon Network and Disney Channel in Canada]].



* Creator/TheComedyNetwork, a network owned by Bell [[Main/ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin that airs comedies.]] Airs numerous shows from Creator/ComedyCentral.
* Family Channel (has no connection to Creator/ABCFamily) a family-oriented Pay TV channel that operates as a specialty network. Until September 1, 2015, it was the ''de facto'' Canadian Creator/DisneyChannel. Originally owned by Astral Media (who also owned The Movie Network and half of Teletoon), it was sold to Creator/DHXMedia (a.k.a. that one company that gobbled up [[Creator/CookieJarEntertainment Cookie Jar]] and [[Creator/DiCEntertainment DiC]]) in 2014 after Bell bought out the company. The next year, DHX cut Family's ties with Disney as [[http://www.corusent.com/home/Corporate/PressReleases/tabid/1697/Default.aspx?Id=2967 Corus Entertainment announced it will launch a domestic version Disney Channel]] (Family will continue to air Disney shows up to the start of the new year).

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* Creator/TheComedyNetwork, a network owned by Bell [[Main/ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin that airs comedies.]] Airs numerous shows from Creator/ComedyCentral.
* Family Channel (has no connection to Creator/ABCFamily) a family-oriented Pay TV pay-TV channel that operates as a specialty network. Until September 1, 2015, it was the ''de facto'' Canadian Creator/DisneyChannel. Originally owned by Astral Media (who also owned The Movie Network and half of Teletoon), it was sold to Creator/DHXMedia (a.k.a. that one company that gobbled up [[Creator/CookieJarEntertainment Cookie Jar]] and [[Creator/DiCEntertainment DiC]]) in 2014 after Bell bought out the company. The next year, DHX cut Family's ties with Disney as [[http://www.corusent.com/home/Corporate/PressReleases/tabid/1697/Default.aspx?Id=2967 Disney, while Corus Entertainment announced it will launch launched a domestic version of Disney Channel]] (Family will continue to air Disney shows up to the start of the new year).Channel.



** Family CHRGD ([[/index]][[Main/IHaveManyNames or "CHRGD, Powered by Family", or just "CHRGD"]][[index]]) a specialty channel aimed at boys that originally launched as a Canadian version of Creator/DisneyXD

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** Family CHRGD ([[/index]][[Main/IHaveManyNames or aka "CHRGD, Powered by Family", or just "CHRGD"]][[index]]) a specialty channel aimed at boys that originally launched as a Canadian version of Creator/DisneyXD



* Super Channel, A pay-TV service owned by Allarco Entertainment. It is not to be confused with Movie Central, although Allarco was the original owner of that service. Super Channel is known for airing numerous American cable dramas, Creator/{{Starz}} original series and, briefly, Main/{{Anime}}.



** [=M3=], Like Much, but trying to skew more towards more older viewers with a "Hot Adult Contemporary"-type music slant and more "mature" dramas and sitcoms. Formerly [=MuchMoreMusic=] and [=MuchMore=].

to:

** [=M3=], Like Much, but trying to skew more towards more older viewers with a "Hot Adult Contemporary"-type music slant and more "mature" dramas and sitcoms. Formerly [=MuchMoreMusic=] and [=MuchMore=].Originally known as [=MuchMoreMusic=].



* Creator/{{Corus Entertainment}} cable networks, which include:
** Creator/{{Teletoon}}, essentially Canada's answer to Creator/CartoonNetwork. Its parent companies, a partnership of Corus and Astral Media, had incidentally launched [[http://www.cartoonnetwork.ca/ a Canadian version]] of Cartoon Network (and Creator/AdultSwim) in 2012. After Astral was acquired by Bell, Corus bought the former's ownership stake (which include it's offshoots, Teletoon Retro and CN Canada, as well as the french-language version), officially making it sister to YTV.
** Creator/TreehouseTV, 24/7 network catering to preschool audiences.
** Creator/{{YTV}}, originally the "de facto" Canadian Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}; Corus is also the owner of Nick's actual domestic counterpart. Yes, [[Main/MegaCorp Corus Entertainment owns Nickelodeon, Cartoon Network and Disney Channel in Canada]].

to:

* Creator/{{Corus Entertainment}} cable networks, which include:
** Creator/{{Teletoon}}, essentially Canada's answer
Super Channel, A pay-TV service owned by Allarco Entertainment. It is not to Creator/CartoonNetwork. Its parent companies, a partnership of Corus and Astral Media, had incidentally launched [[http://www.cartoonnetwork.ca/ a Canadian version]] of Cartoon Network (and Creator/AdultSwim) in 2012. After Astral be confused with Movie Central, although Allarco was acquired by Bell, Corus bought the former's ownership stake (which include it's offshoots, Teletoon Retro and CN Canada, as well as the french-language version), officially making it sister to YTV.
** Creator/TreehouseTV, 24/7 network catering to preschool audiences.
** Creator/{{YTV}}, originally the "de facto" Canadian Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}; Corus is also the
original owner of Nick's actual domestic counterpart. Yes, [[Main/MegaCorp Corus Entertainment owns Nickelodeon, Cartoon Network and Disney that service. Super Channel in Canada]]. is known for airing numerous American cable dramas, Creator/{{Starz}} original series and, briefly, Main/{{Anime}}.
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