History Main / Nepotism

10th Apr '17 10:06:41 PM Vios
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* One of John G. Hemry's 'JAG In Space' books (Burden Of Proof) has a rising star officer as the chief suspect after an explosion aboard a spaceship. The problem is that he is the son of a vice admiral and, despite evidence of his incompetence and laziness, pursuing a case against him could potentially wreck the protagonist's career.

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* One of [[Creator/JohnHemry John G. Hemry's 'JAG Hemry]]'s '[[Literature/PaulSinclair JAG In Space' Space]]' books (Burden Of Proof) has a rising star officer as the chief suspect after an explosion aboard a spaceship. The problem is that he is the son of a vice admiral and, despite evidence of his incompetence and laziness, pursuing a case against him could potentially wreck the protagonist's career.
3rd Apr '17 1:37:23 PM ironballs16
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Very much TruthInTelevision, and sometimes a way for the relative to get their feet wet in the business, especially if they're being groomed to take over the business when the current owner retires, or is otherwise unable to make decisions.

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Very much TruthInTelevision, [[TropesAreTools and sometimes a way for the relative to get their feet wet in the business, business]], especially if they're being groomed to take over the business when the current owner retires, or is otherwise unable to make decisions.
3rd Apr '17 1:32:52 PM ironballs16
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Fun fact: This trope, when applied to friends instead of relatives, is known as cronyism - after all, "It's not what you know, it's ''[[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections who]]'' you know."

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Fun fact: This trope, when applied to friends instead of relatives, is known as cronyism - after all, "It's not what you know, it's ''[[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections who]]'' ''who'' you know."
3rd Apr '17 1:32:26 PM ironballs16
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Very much TruthInTelevision, and sometimes a way for the relative to get their feet wet in the business, especially if they're being groomed to take over the business when the current owner retires, or is otherwise unable to make decisions. It also isn't exclusive to blood relations, as evidenced by the phrase "It's not what you know, it's ''[[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections who]]'' you know."

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Very much TruthInTelevision, and sometimes a way for the relative to get their feet wet in the business, especially if they're being groomed to take over the business when the current owner retires, or is otherwise unable to make decisions. It also isn't exclusive to blood relations, as evidenced by the phrase "It's not what you know, it's ''[[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections who]]'' you know."
decisions.



Fun fact: This trope, when applied to friends instead of relatives, is known as cronyism.

to:

Fun fact: This trope, when applied to friends instead of relatives, is known as cronyism.
cronyism - after all, "It's not what you know, it's ''[[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections who]]'' you know."
3rd Apr '17 1:31:46 PM ironballs16
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Very much TruthInTelevision, and sometimes a way for the relative to get their feet wet in the business, especially if they're being groomed to take over the business when the current owner retires, or is otherwise unable to make decisions.

to:

Very much TruthInTelevision, and sometimes a way for the relative to get their feet wet in the business, especially if they're being groomed to take over the business when the current owner retires, or is otherwise unable to make decisions.
decisions. It also isn't exclusive to blood relations, as evidenced by the phrase "It's not what you know, it's ''[[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections who]]'' you know."
31st Mar '17 6:45:04 PM BattleMaster
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* Played with in ''VideoGame/MassEffect3''. Primarch Victus' son, Lieutenant Victus, was a so-so officer was given a big assignment, [[spoiler: disarming a centuries-old turian bomb on Tuchanka]], which he screwed up horribly at first. His failure worked both ways: it looked horrible for the Lieutenant for failing his mission, and bad for his father because he's accused of this trope (promoting a relative without merit is a grave misstep in [[SpaceRomans the Turian Heirarchy]]).

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* Played with in ''VideoGame/MassEffect3''. Primarch Victus' son, Lieutenant Victus, was a so-so officer was given a big assignment, [[spoiler: disarming a centuries-old turian bomb on Tuchanka]], which he screwed up horribly at first. His failure worked both ways: it looked horrible for the Lieutenant for failing his mission, and bad for his father because he's accused of this trope (promoting someone to a relative without merit position they're unsuited for is considered to be a grave misstep failure on the part of the promoter in [[SpaceRomans the Turian Heirarchy]]).
31st Mar '17 4:54:46 PM kome360
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** Nunally was appointed Governor of Tokyo by her father, but NOT because he wanted her to be safe or empowered in any way - it was so [[IHaveYourWife her face on the news every month, just out of reach, would tick Lelouch off]].
20th Mar '17 4:00:21 PM ngh93
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* The main plot of the "Benchwarmer" episode of ''WesternAnimation/HeyArnold'' is the basketball coach's insistence that the other players give all of the most important roles to his son, even when he was not the best at them or if it meant a less surefire victory. In fact, Arnold gets benched for several games just because he passed the ball to Gerald as Tucker wasn't open, despite the fact that they scored. Thus most of their drilling revolved around learning how to "get the ball to Tucker."

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* The main plot of the "Benchwarmer" episode of ''WesternAnimation/HeyArnold'' is the basketball coach's Coach Wittenberg's insistence that the other players give all of the most important roles to his son, son Tucker, even when he was not the best at them or if it meant a less surefire victory. In fact, Arnold gets benched for several games just because he passed the ball to Gerald as Tucker wasn't open, despite the fact that they scored. Thus most of their drilling revolved around learning how to "get the ball to Tucker."
18th Mar '17 5:59:59 PM nombretomado
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Not to be confused with {{Nephewism}}, although the word "nepotism" comes from the Latin word "nepos" which means "nephew" (the term originated from the tendency of Medieval and Renaissance-era churchmen to appoint their "nephews" -- who were often their unacknowledged bastard sons -- to comfortable sinecures). [[IReadThatAs Also not to be confused with]] [[{{Neopets}} Neopetism]].

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Not to be confused with {{Nephewism}}, although the word "nepotism" comes from the Latin word "nepos" which means "nephew" (the term originated from the tendency of Medieval and Renaissance-era churchmen to appoint their "nephews" -- who were often their unacknowledged bastard sons -- to comfortable sinecures). [[IReadThatAs Also not to be confused with]] [[{{Neopets}} [[{{Website/Neopets}} Neopetism]].
16th Mar '17 4:29:22 PM morenohijazo
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!!Examples

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!!Examples
!!Examples:


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* ''ComicBook/{{Iznogoud}}'': As "Scandal in Baghdad" opens, the scandalmonger who offers his services to Iznogoud demonstrates his abilities by sniffing out the fact that the guard on duty got his job through family connections. It quickly emerges that almost all of the palace guards are related to each other somehow, and all got their jobs that way!
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.Nepotism