History Main / Neologism

26th Jun '16 9:07:05 PM PaulA
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* The narrator of Dostoevsky's novel ''Demons'' coins the term "Shigalyovism" (''"Shigalyovschina"'', in Russian), describing the ideology of a minor character. A member of the town's secret cadre of nihilists, who range from laughable idiots to terrifying psychopaths, Shigalyov argues that [[PoweredByAForsakenChild it is legitimate to subject 90% of humanity to abject slavery in order that the remaining 10% may enjoy a utopian paradise]]. The term came into common usage in Russia during the Stalinist era, for obvious reasons.

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* The narrator of Dostoevsky's novel ''Demons'' ''Literature/{{Demons}}'' coins the term "Shigalyovism" (''"Shigalyovschina"'', in Russian), describing the ideology of a minor character. A member of the town's secret cadre of nihilists, who range from laughable idiots to terrifying psychopaths, Shigalyov argues that [[PoweredByAForsakenChild it is legitimate to subject 90% of humanity to abject slavery in order that the remaining 10% may enjoy a utopian paradise]]. The term came into common usage in Russia during the Stalinist era, for obvious reasons.
21st May '16 12:05:05 PM erforce
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* Harold Ramis notes on the ''Film/{{Ghostbusters}}'' commentary track, "I take full credit for turning 'slime' into a verb."

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* Harold Ramis Creator/HaroldRamis notes on the ''Film/{{Ghostbusters}}'' ''Film/{{Ghostbusters 1984}}'' commentary track, "I take full credit for turning 'slime' into a verb."
29th Apr '16 12:33:53 AM Sugao
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* Creator/BuckminsterFuller was so prone to creating these that even TheOtherWiki felt the need to include [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckminster_Fuller#Language_and_neologisms a fairly substantial section about it]] in his article.
14th Mar '16 1:40:28 PM MasoTey
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* Edward Lear and 'runcible'... whose definition he never hinted at. 'Runcible spoon' from "The Owl and the Pussycat" has been adopted as a phrase, but no one can agree on whether a runcible spoon is a spork, a spork with a knife edge on the handle, or some other kind of cool spoon. None of these can be right anyway, since he used 'runcible' to modify other nouns, so whatever it meant isn't spoon-exclusive.

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* Edward Lear and 'runcible'... whose definition he never hinted at. 'Runcible spoon' from "The Owl and the Pussycat" has been adopted as a phrase, but no one can agree on whether a runcible spoon is a any spork, or specifically a spork with wide, outward-curving tines, or a spork with a knife edge on the handle, or some other kind of cool spoon. None of these can be right anyway, since he used 'runcible' to modify other nouns, so whatever it meant isn't spoon-exclusive.
9th Mar '16 2:21:57 PM Josef5678
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* The [[VideoGame/DeadlyRoomsOfDeath DROD]] series extends "once, twice, thrice" as follows: quarce, quince, sence, septence, octence, novence. All of these combine Latin numeric prefixes with the "-ce" ending of the first three. They have begun to show up in other places outside the series.

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* The [[VideoGame/DeadlyRoomsOfDeath DROD]] ''VideoGame/DeadlyRoomsOfDeath'' series extends "once, twice, thrice" as follows: quarce, quince, sence, septence, octence, novence. All of these combine Latin numeric prefixes with the "-ce" ending of the first three. They have begun to show up in other places outside the series.
9th Mar '16 9:45:05 AM MegaMarioMan
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* The [[DeadlyRoomsOfDeath DROD]] series extends "once, twice, thrice" as follows: quarce, quince, sence, septence, octence, novence. All of these combine Latin numeric prefixes with the "-ce" ending of the first three. They have begun to show up in other places outside the series.

to:

* The [[DeadlyRoomsOfDeath [[VideoGame/DeadlyRoomsOfDeath DROD]] series extends "once, twice, thrice" as follows: quarce, quince, sence, septence, octence, novence. All of these combine Latin numeric prefixes with the "-ce" ending of the first three. They have begun to show up in other places outside the series.
21st Feb '16 12:19:28 PM MIBuddy
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* ''Literature/DreamHighSchool'' on Page 35: "Her eyes saucericize."
* Much like the "flange of baboons" example above, [=RPGMP3=] is attempting to popularize "shower" as the collective term for a group of bastards. Perhaps after this exchange in an episode of ''Series/FatherTed''? ("Shower" is common Irish slang.)
-->'''Father Ted:''' What was it he used to say about the needy? He had a term for them...\\
'''Father Dougal:''' A shower of bastards.



* Woot. Not as famous as Google, but it has found its way into a number of dictionaries. WOOT [[FunWithAcronyms purportedly stands for]] We Own the Other Team. Alternatively, it's a portmanteau of "Wow, loot!"



* Much like the "flange of baboons" example above, [=RPGMP3=] is attempting to popularize "shower" as the collective term for a group of bastards. Perhaps after this exchange in an episode of ''Series/FatherTed''? ("Shower" is common Irish slang.)
-->'''Father Ted:''' What was it he used to say about the needy? He had a term for them...\\
'''Father Dougal:''' A shower of bastards.
* Website/{{Twitter}}: "Tweet". There's currently a battle of wills going on at the ''New York Times'' to decide whether to use it as a verb in stories referring to Twitter, or just go on saying that someone "said on their Twitter account" blah blah blah. Just as long as they don't use "twat" for the past tense form. Unless they do it [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar intentionally]]. See also the question "how many tweets make a twat?" which only really works in British English.... On the other hand, "Tweet" has an older meaning as an onomatopoeia for a weak chirping sound, so it's not exactly a new word.


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* Website/{{Twitter}}: "Tweet". There's currently a battle of wills going on at the ''New York Times'' to decide whether to use it as a verb in stories referring to Twitter, or just go on saying that someone "said on their Twitter account" blah blah blah. Just as long as they don't use "twat" for the past tense form. Unless they do it [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar intentionally]]. See also the question "how many tweets make a twat?" which only really works in British English.... On the other hand, "Tweet" has an older meaning as an onomatopoeia for a weak chirping sound, so it's not exactly a new word.
* Woot. Not as famous as Google, but it has found its way into a number of dictionaries. WOOT [[FunWithAcronyms purportedly stands for]] We Own the Other Team. Alternatively, it's a portmanteau of "Wow, loot!"
3rd Feb '16 6:01:39 AM Morgenthaler
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* James Fenimore Cooper is generally credited with either inventing or widely popularizing the name "Cora" in his novel ''TheLastOfTheMohicans.''

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* James Fenimore Cooper is generally credited with either inventing or widely popularizing the name "Cora" in his novel ''TheLastOfTheMohicans.''Literature/TheLastOfTheMohicans.''



* SteveMiller spoke of the "Pompatus of Love" in "The Joker" and the earlier, less well-known song "Enter Maurice." This word, spelled "pompitous" in the printed lyrics of "Enter Maurice," was a corruption of "puppetutes" (a {{portmanteau}} of "puppet" and "prostitutes"), which was used in the Medallions' 1954 hit "The Letter."

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* SteveMiller Music/SteveMiller spoke of the "Pompatus of Love" in "The Joker" and the earlier, less well-known song "Enter Maurice." This word, spelled "pompitous" in the printed lyrics of "Enter Maurice," was a corruption of "puppetutes" (a {{portmanteau}} of "puppet" and "prostitutes"), which was used in the Medallions' 1954 hit "The Letter."
20th Jan '16 2:41:21 PM Josef5678
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** Acording to the Oxford English Dictionary he also coined "positronic" as an analogue to "electronic" (as in the "positronic brains" of his robots) and "psychohistory", in the usage of predicting the future through mathmatics and the reactions of human masses. You would have to read his books to understand that last one. ( I am aware it has another use, namly the psychological history of people. He coined it as I have described it, however.)
20th Jan '16 2:40:52 PM Josef5678
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* ''PeterPan'': Introduced the name 'Wendy', which was not a common English name before J. M. Barrie's character (it might have been an occasional shortening of the Welsh name "Gwendolyn," which is usually shortened to "Gwen" nowadays). It was derived from a toddler's inability to pronounce the letter ''R'' properly, so when she called JMB her "friendy," it became "fwendy-wendy."

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* ''PeterPan'': ''Literature/PeterPan'': Introduced the name 'Wendy', which was not a common English name before J. M. Barrie's character (it might have been an occasional shortening of the Welsh name "Gwendolyn," which is usually shortened to "Gwen" nowadays). It was derived from a toddler's inability to pronounce the letter ''R'' properly, so when she called JMB her "friendy," it became "fwendy-wendy."



* The term "''[[TheGrinch grinch]]''" has entered public lexicon thanks to ''Literature/HowTheGrinchStoleChristmas''. The term means someone who hates a holiday (particularly Christmas), and tries to make it miserable for everybody else.



* {{Google}}. [[PersonAsVerb Its usage as a verb has become so widespread that it is now in the dictionary.]]

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* {{Google}}.Website/{{Google}}. [[PersonAsVerb Its usage as a verb has become so widespread that it is now in the dictionary.]]



* The term "''[[TheGrinch grinch]]''" has entered public lexicon thanks to ''WesternAnimation/HowTheGrinchStoleChristmas''. The term means someone who hates a holiday (particularly Christmas), and tries to make it miserable for everybody else.
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