History Main / MyopicArchitecture

16th Oct '17 3:58:16 AM Ulrik54
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Riven}}'', you will end up at a wooden door locked with a padlock, and searching for a key in the massive age will prove futile. The solution? [[spoiler: Crawl under the door.]]
27th Aug '17 11:34:05 AM TheBigBopper
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* After a long and bloody siege that they had pretty well held off up to that point, Constantinople finally fell when someone left a small supply gate open, allowing the invading army to come in.
25th Aug '17 7:01:13 PM BattleMaster
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*** And the euphemism "lead-pipe cryptanalysis" (or "rubber-hose cryptanalysis", based on the idea that the weakest part of any security system is the squishy one that types the passwords.)

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*** And the euphemism "lead-pipe cryptanalysis" (or "rubber-hose cryptanalysis", based on the idea that the weakest part of any security system is the squishy one that types the passwords.) passwords), as demonstrated by [[https://www.xkcd.com/538/ this xkcd strip]].
30th Jul '17 1:22:07 PM HalcyonDayz
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* A running gag in the ''ComicBook/LuckyLuke'' album "The Daily Star" resolves around a sherrif who takes great pride in the fact that the bars of the cell in his office are unbreakable, which he claims will prevent any escape attempts. Although he is right about the strength of the bars, the rest of the office is not that strong so itís still very much a CardBoardPrison. At the end of the story, the entire sheriff office is destroyed with only the bars still standing.

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* A running gag in the ''ComicBook/LuckyLuke'' album "The Daily Star" resolves around a sherrif sheriff who takes great pride in the fact that the bars of the cell in his office are unbreakable, which he claims will prevent any escape attempts. Although he is right about the strength of the bars, the rest of the office is not that strong so itís still very much a CardBoardPrison. At the end of the story, the entire sheriff office is destroyed with only the bars still standing.



* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCarribeanAtWorldsEnd'' has a return of the half-barrel hinge on a jail door, enabling Jack to extricate himself again after one of his hallucinated doppelgangers notices it, and he remembers "leverage".

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* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCarribeanAtWorldsEnd'' ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd'' has a return of the half-barrel hinge on a jail door, enabling Jack to extricate himself again after one of his hallucinated doppelgangers notices it, and he remembers "leverage".



** In ''Discworld/WyrdSisters'' Nanny Ogg is a guest in Duke Felmet's torture chamber, on the wrong side of a semingly impregnable oak door with five-inch planks and a very big lock. Junior witch Magrat Garlick is faced with the problem of opening it. Magrat focuses. And gets in tune with the wood of the planks, reminding the old seasoned oak of happier days growing in the forest. There is a sudden eruption of oak tree in full green bloom, and suddenly there is no door. This gets Magrat a rare word of praise from Granny Weatherwax, who has also been contemplating the same problem.[[note]]Although Granny mildly remarks she'd have worked on the stones of the wall, and reminded them of the old days when they were all hot and runny underground.[[/note]]

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** In ''Discworld/WyrdSisters'' Nanny Ogg is a guest in Duke Felmet's torture chamber, on the wrong side of a semingly seemingly impregnable oak door with five-inch planks and a very big lock. Junior witch Magrat Garlick is faced with the problem of opening it. Magrat focuses. And gets in tune with the wood of the planks, reminding the old seasoned oak of happier days growing in the forest. There is a sudden eruption of oak tree in full green bloom, and suddenly there is no door. This gets Magrat a rare word of praise from Granny Weatherwax, who has also been contemplating the same problem.[[note]]Although Granny mildly remarks she'd have worked on the stones of the wall, and reminded them of the old days when they were all hot and runny underground.[[/note]]



** Foch's Operational Plan stank. He foresook the French Army's strengths (taking and holding well-prepared lines) and tried to use it for something it was never designed for - an Operation of rapid movement. There was a good strategic rationale for this, given the logic behind preserving Dutch and Belgian industry, but it was still a risky move for an Army not designed or suited to execute it to attempt it against an Army that very much was. [[note]] German pre-war and WWII German doctrine was known as ''Bewegungskrieg'' (Manoeuvre Warfare). ''Blitzkrieg'' bears no relation, being a catchy term coined by English-language journalists during WWII to describe the new warfare of rapid movement [[/note]]

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** Foch's Operational Plan stank. He foresook forsook the French Army's strengths (taking and holding well-prepared lines) and tried to use it for something it was never designed for - an Operation of rapid movement. There was a good strategic rationale for this, given the logic behind preserving Dutch and Belgian industry, but it was still a risky move for an Army not designed or suited to execute it to attempt it against an Army that very much was. [[note]] German pre-war and WWII German doctrine was known as ''Bewegungskrieg'' (Manoeuvre Warfare). ''Blitzkrieg'' bears no relation, being a catchy term coined by English-language journalists during WWII to describe the new warfare of rapid movement [[/note]]



* On the topic of warships, warship armor protection evolved due to this trope. Originally, it was common for ships to have the thickest armor around the sides, bow, and stern, to protect from direct enemy gunfire. Improvements in artillery and rangefinding lead to the addition of armor protection against "[[DeathFromAbove plunging fire]]", as the longest ranged artillery would be fired on a ballistic trajectory. The introduction of sea mines and torpedoes necessitated armor protection ''under'' the waterline as well, and improvements in weapons technology lead to "All-or-Nothing" armor protection, where all of the ship's most vital bits were packed together and encased in a heavy armored citadel, while the rest of the ship (galleys, living spaces, cargo holds, etc.), necessary to her operation but not to her surviving combat, was left almost entirely unprotected to leave the ship light enough to avoid speed and range penalties. Eventually, ship designers [[KnowWhenToFoldThem gave up on armor protection]] for the most part and now build lightly armored warships that are [[MacrossMissileMassacre armed with massive batteries of anti-ship and anti-air misisles]] instead.

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* On the topic of warships, warship armor protection evolved due to this trope. Originally, it was common for ships to have the thickest armor around the sides, bow, and stern, to protect from direct enemy gunfire. Improvements in artillery and rangefinding range-finding lead to the addition of armor protection against "[[DeathFromAbove plunging fire]]", as the longest ranged artillery would be fired on a ballistic trajectory. The introduction of sea mines and torpedoes necessitated armor protection ''under'' the waterline as well, and improvements in weapons technology lead to "All-or-Nothing" armor protection, where all of the ship's most vital bits were packed together and encased in a heavy armored citadel, while the rest of the ship (galleys, living spaces, cargo holds, etc.), necessary to her operation but not to her surviving combat, was left almost entirely unprotected to leave the ship light enough to avoid speed and range penalties. Eventually, ship designers [[KnowWhenToFoldThem gave up on armor protection]] for the most part and now build lightly armored warships that are [[MacrossMissileMassacre armed with massive batteries of anti-ship and anti-air misisles]] missiles]] instead.
27th Jul '17 2:35:40 PM TheBigBopper
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* Happens more often than you think in Tabletop {{Role Playing Game}}s; savvy players always check hinges, floors and walls when attempting a DungeonBypass, and inexperienced [=GMs=] don't always plan for this (though some crafty [=GMs=] may actually invoke this, ''especially'' when dealing with a group of savvy players). The oldest standby is the fighter as the back up lockpicker. If the thief can't make his lock picking check, the fighter can always bash down the door. Of course, a well-designed dungeon will make sure the noise alerts monsters and sets up ambushes.

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* Happens more often than you think in Tabletop {{Role Playing Game}}s; savvy players always check hinges, floors and walls when attempting a DungeonBypass, and inexperienced [=GMs=] don't always plan for this (though some crafty [=GMs=] may actually invoke this, this to lead the players into a trap, ''especially'' when dealing with a group of savvy players). The oldest standby is the fighter as the back up lockpicker. If the thief can't make his lock picking check, the fighter can always bash down the door. Of course, a well-designed dungeon will make sure the noise alerts monsters and sets up ambushes.
27th Jul '17 2:33:32 PM TheBigBopper
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** On the plus side, they depict the culvert in the Deeping Wall with a great big iron grille which mentioned in the book, but this is more than negated by the fact that the culvert in the movie is so enormous that orcs can enter two at a time, carrying bombs, without even having to duck their heads! Such a huge opening seems like total overkill to let out a stream that is only shown as being up to the orcs' ankles, and even if the designers of the fortress hadn't known of gunpowder, they should have at least expected that sappers would have tried to enter the culvert with picks and chip away enough rock to dislodge the single iron grille. Also just like in the book, they don't think to block up the culvert with rubble before the enemy arrives or pay enough attention to defending it until it's too late and the Uruk-hai blast their way in.
** While the book describes the parapets as being high enough that only a tall man could look over them, while the spaces between them allow for the shooting of arrows, the merlons of the crennelations in the film reach only up to mid-chest at most, exposing them to the attackers' arrows. Also, the fact that the Deeping Wall has only a single tower along its considerable length, and the battlements aren't machicolated to allow the defenders to shoot directly beneath them, means there would be blind spots and hardly any ability to hit the attackers with flanking fire.

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** On the plus side, they depict the culvert in the Deeping Wall with a great big iron grille which mentioned in the book, grille, but this is more than negated by the fact that the culvert in the movie is so enormous that orcs can enter two at a time, carrying bombs, bombs between them, without even having to duck their heads! Such a huge opening seems like total overkill to let out a stream that is only shown as being up to the orcs' ankles, and even if the designers of the fortress hadn't known of gunpowder, they should have at least expected that sappers would have tried to enter the culvert with picks and chip away enough rock to dislodge the single iron grille. Also just like in the book, they don't the garrison doesn't think to block up the culvert with rubble before the enemy arrives or pay arrives. They don't give enough attention to defending it until it's too late and the Uruk-hai blast their way in.
** While the book describes the parapets as being high enough that only a tall man could look over them, while the with spaces between them that allow for the shooting of arrows, the merlons of the crennelations battlements in the film reach only up to mid-chest at most, exposing them to the attackers' arrows. Also, the fact that the Deeping Wall has only a single tower along its considerable length, and the battlements aren't machicolated to allow the defenders to shoot directly beneath them, means there would be blind spots and hardly any ability to hit the attackers with flanking fire. Granted, the wall curves inward in a way that eliminates the visual blind spot, but it is long enough that effective flanking fire with bows of limited range would be rather difficult.
27th Jul '17 2:28:09 PM TheBigBopper
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** As for the Hornburg, it is accessed by a high causeway that helpfully forces the enemy to come a few at a time under the defender's fire. However, the fact that the builders didn't go the extra mile and put in a drawbridge makes this defense much less effective, and contributes to the orcs being able to bust their way in with rams and explosives.

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** As for the Hornburg, it is accessed by a high causeway that helpfully forces the enemy to come a few at a time under the defender's defenders' fire. However, the fact that the builders didn't go the extra mile and put in a drawbridge makes this defense much less effective, and contributes to the orcs being able to bust their way in with rams and explosives.
27th Jul '17 2:25:20 PM TheBigBopper
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** A wide culvert runing right through the bottom of the wall allows the Deeping-stream to pass out. Having this weak point is a pretty enormous oversight, and since the builders of the fortress were clearly capable of great feats of engineering there should have been more than one way for them to avoid this: one would be for them to divert the stream through underground pipes; another which might have actually enhanced the defensibility of the walls would have been to dig a proper moat for the stream to fill up and let the culvert be underwater with iron bars blocking it. However there is no moat, the culvert is accessible from the surface, and if there are any bars across the opening then the author doesn't mention them, making it sound like it's wide enough for an orc to fit through. While most of the attacking orcs with scaling ladders and grappling hooks are keeping the defenders focused on the top of the wall, some of them creep like rats through the culvert and get inside, requiring the Westfold-men to block up the inside of the culvert with stones under Gimli's direction as soon as they can. Why they didn't take the opportunity to block it up with rubble ''before'' the battle when they had the chance is left as an exercise for the reader. The rubble keeps the orcs out for a little while, but then the orcs blast through the blockage using the "fire of Orthranc" (presumably some kind of bomb), which also makes the hole much larger. The attacking hordes stream in and take the wall, forcing its defeneders to either fall back to the Hornburg if they can, or retreat into the Deep if they can't.

to:

** A wide culvert runing right through the bottom of the wall allows the Deeping-stream to pass out. Having this weak point is a pretty enormous oversight, and since the builders of the fortress were clearly capable of great feats of engineering there should have been more than one way for them to avoid this: one would be for them to divert the stream through underground pipes; another which might have actually enhanced the defensibility of the walls would have been to dig a proper moat for the stream to fill up and let the culvert be underwater with iron bars blocking it. However there is no moat, the culvert is accessible from the surface, and if there are any bars across the opening then the author doesn't mention them, making it sound like it's wide enough for an orc to fit through. While most of the attacking orcs with scaling ladders and grappling hooks are keeping the defenders focused on the top of the wall, some of them creep like rats through the culvert and get inside, requiring the Westfold-men to block up the inside of the culvert with stones under Gimli's direction as soon as they can. Why they didn't take the opportunity to block it up with rubble ''before'' the battle when they had the chance is left as an exercise for the reader. The rubble keeps the orcs out for a little while, but then the orcs blast through the blockage using the "fire of Orthranc" (presumably some kind of bomb), which also makes the hole much larger. The attacking hordes stream in and take the wall, forcing its defeneders defenders to either fall back to the Hornburg if they can, or retreat into the Deep if they can't.
27th Jul '17 2:22:06 PM TheBigBopper
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** A wide culvert runing right through the bottom of the wall allows the Deeping-stream to pass out. Having this weak point is a pretty enormous oversight, and since the builders of the fortress were clearly pretty great engineers there should have been more than one way for them to avoid this: one would be for them to divert the stream through underground pipes; another which might have actually enhanced the defensibility of the walls would have been to dig a proper moat for the stream to fill up and let the culvert be underwater with iron bars blocking it. However there is no moat, the culvert is accessible from the surface, and if there are any bars across the opening then the author doesn't mention them, making it sound like it's wide enough for an orc to fit through. While most of the attacking orcs with scaling ladders and grappling hooks are keeping the defenders focused on the top of the wall, some of them creep like rats through the culvert and get inside, requiring the Westfold-men to block up the inside of the culvert with stones under Gimli's direction as soon as they can. Why they didn't take the opportunity to block it up with rubble ''before'' the battle when they had the chance is left as an exercise for the reader. The rubble keeps the orcs out for a little while, but then the orcs blast through the blockage using the "fire of Orthranc" (presumably some kind of bomb), which also makes the hole much larger. The attacking hordes stream in and take the wall, forcing its defeneders to either fall back to the Hornburg if they can, or retreat into the Deep if they can't.

to:

** A wide culvert runing right through the bottom of the wall allows the Deeping-stream to pass out. Having this weak point is a pretty enormous oversight, and since the builders of the fortress were clearly pretty capable of great engineers feats of engineering there should have been more than one way for them to avoid this: one would be for them to divert the stream through underground pipes; another which might have actually enhanced the defensibility of the walls would have been to dig a proper moat for the stream to fill up and let the culvert be underwater with iron bars blocking it. However there is no moat, the culvert is accessible from the surface, and if there are any bars across the opening then the author doesn't mention them, making it sound like it's wide enough for an orc to fit through. While most of the attacking orcs with scaling ladders and grappling hooks are keeping the defenders focused on the top of the wall, some of them creep like rats through the culvert and get inside, requiring the Westfold-men to block up the inside of the culvert with stones under Gimli's direction as soon as they can. Why they didn't take the opportunity to block it up with rubble ''before'' the battle when they had the chance is left as an exercise for the reader. The rubble keeps the orcs out for a little while, but then the orcs blast through the blockage using the "fire of Orthranc" (presumably some kind of bomb), which also makes the hole much larger. The attacking hordes stream in and take the wall, forcing its defeneders to either fall back to the Hornburg if they can, or retreat into the Deep if they can't.
27th Jul '17 2:20:43 PM TheBigBopper
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This is CripplingOverspecialization applied to architecture. A designer puts immense effort and resources into a structure, most often a defensive point such as a wall, door, or window, but fails to notice a large weakness in the design that makes all of this easy to circumvent. The most common flaw being that for all that the door itself is indestructible, the wall around it is less so. This is especially so in Chinese and Japanese media where many walls are made out of paper. Often, the floor will also be vulnerable to burrowing. The door itself may not be that hard to open, especially if WeHaveTheKeys. Often played for laughs if the way through the apparently impenetrable defense is particularly obvious or easy. Sometimes serves as a RealityEnsues moment.

A common justification in-universe, and most RealLife examples as well, are cases of DidntThinkThisThrough.

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This is CripplingOverspecialization applied to architecture. A designer puts immense effort and resources into a structure, most often a defensive point such as a wall, door, or window, but fails to notice a large weakness in the design that makes all of this easy to circumvent. The most common flaw being that for all that the door itself is indestructible, the wall around it is less so. This is especially so in Chinese and Japanese media where many walls are made out of paper. Often, the floor will also be vulnerable to burrowing. The door itself may not be that hard to open, especially if WeHaveTheKeys. Often played for laughs if the way through the apparently impenetrable defense is particularly obvious or easy. Sometimes serves as a RealityEnsues moment.

moment for whoever thought that they or their stuff would be safe in such a place.

A common justification in-universe, and which is also the reason for most RealLife examples as well, examples, is that the designer DidntThinkThisThrough. However, the reason is sometimes that the ''writer'' is unfamiliar with secure design, in which case characters who should have known better are cases of DidntThinkThisThrough.
not called out in-universe for making an amateur mistake.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.MyopicArchitecture