History Main / MotherNatureFatherScience

31st May '17 6:05:58 PM nombretomado
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* Diane Duane's YoungWizards series follows this. Nita's magic relates to nature and living things. Her male partner Kit tends to do better with technology and inanimate objects like rocks. However, later on Nita's sister subverts the whole thing by being a computer wiz with a magical affinity for technology and silicon-based lifeforms, and both Nita and Kit eventually grow out of their original specialties into others, which is apparently common for wizards. It's left open whether their initial foci came from awareness of the trope, but newcomers to magic in the books do tend to get it in a form which behaves as much the way they expect it to as is practical (without breaking MagicAIsMagicA).

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* Diane Duane's YoungWizards ''Literature/YoungWizards'' series follows this. Nita's magic relates to nature and living things. Her male partner Kit tends to do better with technology and inanimate objects like rocks. However, later on Nita's sister subverts the whole thing by being a computer wiz with a magical affinity for technology and silicon-based lifeforms, and both Nita and Kit eventually grow out of their original specialties into others, which is apparently common for wizards. It's left open whether their initial foci came from awareness of the trope, but newcomers to magic in the books do tend to get it in a form which behaves as much the way they expect it to as is practical (without breaking MagicAIsMagicA).
26th Mar '17 7:31:22 AM IdumeanPatriot
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Added DiffLines:

* Inverted in ''Literature/{{Victoria}}'', where the technocratic Amazons of [[LadyLand Azania]] eagerly embrace science and technology, whereas their enemies in the reactionary, borderline theocratic [[TheFundamentalist Northern Confederation]] gut their universities and actively ban modern electronics. By the time they go to war, Azania uses cloning and genetic engineering for mass-scale HomosexualReproduction and deploys a network-centric military based on air supremacy, smart artillery, drones and information advantage, whereas the Confederation employs World War II-era armor and large forces of [[HomeGuard rugged militiamen]] to counter their foe's superior firepower with audacity and [[WeHaveReserves numbers]].
21st Feb '17 8:14:52 PM TriumphantMagician
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Note that which approach is portrayed as better varies widely; see RomanticismVersusEnlightenment. In many works that come down on the side of Enlightenment, you'll see women portrayed as [[HystericalWoman hysterically]] [[StrawmanEmotional irrational]] and [[WeakWilled easily manipulated]], while their male counterparts' hard-nosed, [[StreetSmart pragmatic]] rationalism proves to be [[ScienceHero the key to saving the day]]. More Romanticist works, on the other hand, often portray men as [[TheStoic cold]], [[InsufferableGenius arrogant]], [[LackOfEmpathy heartless]], and [[MeasuringTheMarigolds unable to appreciate beauty or emotional realities]], while the women are [[CloserToEarth more balanced]], [[TheHeart compassionate]], and [[NatureHero in tune with nature]] (though is must be said that not all enlightenment or romanticist works conformed to these generalizations). In some works, it will be suggested that [[TheKirk both approaches are necessary]] and [[EmotionsVersusStoicism have to balance each other]]. (Note that this doesn't entirely get rid of the UnfortunateImplications if it's still implied that your gender determines which approach you have to take.) Nowadays, due to widespread awareness of this trope and its UnfortunateImplications, it's increasingly common to see [[InvertedTrope inversions]], with [[MasculineGirlFeminineBoy a sensitive, expressive man and a logical, stoic woman]]. Again, which one is portrayed as right will still vary, although works like this are perhaps slightly more likely to go with the "both sides are necessary for balance" approach.

to:

Note that which approach is portrayed as better varies widely; see RomanticismVersusEnlightenment. In many works that come down on the side of Enlightenment, you'll see women portrayed as [[HystericalWoman hysterically]] [[StrawmanEmotional irrational]] and [[WeakWilled easily manipulated]], while their male counterparts' hard-nosed, [[StreetSmart pragmatic]] rationalism proves to be [[ScienceHero the key to saving the day]]. More Romanticist works, on the other hand, often portray men as [[TheStoic cold]], [[InsufferableGenius arrogant]], [[LackOfEmpathy heartless]], and [[MeasuringTheMarigolds unable to appreciate beauty or emotional realities]], while the women are [[CloserToEarth more balanced]], [[TheHeart compassionate]], and [[NatureHero in tune with nature]] (though is it must be said that not all enlightenment or romanticist works conformed to these generalizations). In some works, it will be suggested that [[TheKirk both approaches are necessary]] and [[EmotionsVersusStoicism have to balance each other]]. (Note that this doesn't entirely get rid of the UnfortunateImplications if it's still implied that your gender determines which approach you have to take.) Nowadays, due to widespread awareness of this trope and its UnfortunateImplications, it's increasingly common to see [[InvertedTrope inversions]], with [[MasculineGirlFeminineBoy a sensitive, expressive man and a logical, stoic woman]]. Again, which one is portrayed as right will still vary, although works like this are perhaps slightly more likely to go with the "both sides are necessary for balance" approach.
21st Feb '17 8:13:59 PM TriumphantMagician
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Note that which approach is portrayed as better varies widely; see RomanticismVersusEnlightenment. In many works that come down on the side of Enlightenment, you'll see women portrayed as [[HystericalWoman hysterically]] [[StrawmanEmotional irrational]] and [[WeakWilled easily manipulated]], while their male counterparts' hard-nosed, [[StreetSmart pragmatic]] rationalism proves to be [[ScienceHero the key to saving the day]] (although many enlightenment thinkers were also feminists and would avert this trope). More Romanticist works, on the other hand, often portray men as [[TheStoic cold]], [[InsufferableGenius arrogant]], [[LackOfEmpathy heartless]], and [[MeasuringTheMarigolds unable to appreciate beauty or emotional realities]], while the women are [[CloserToEarth more balanced]], [[TheHeart compassionate]], and [[NatureHero in tune with nature]] (unless the romanticist work is of the more reactionary variety, and therefore skeptical of woman's capabilities). In some works, it will be suggested that [[TheKirk both approaches are necessary]] and [[EmotionsVersusStoicism have to balance each other]]. (Note that this doesn't entirely get rid of the UnfortunateImplications if it's still implied that your gender determines which approach you have to take.) Nowadays, due to widespread awareness of this trope and its UnfortunateImplications, it's increasingly common to see [[InvertedTrope inversions]], with [[MasculineGirlFeminineBoy a sensitive, expressive man and a logical, stoic woman]]. Again, which one is portrayed as right will still vary, although works like this are perhaps slightly more likely to go with the "both sides are necessary for balance" approach.

to:

Note that which approach is portrayed as better varies widely; see RomanticismVersusEnlightenment. In many works that come down on the side of Enlightenment, you'll see women portrayed as [[HystericalWoman hysterically]] [[StrawmanEmotional irrational]] and [[WeakWilled easily manipulated]], while their male counterparts' hard-nosed, [[StreetSmart pragmatic]] rationalism proves to be [[ScienceHero the key to saving the day]] (although many enlightenment thinkers were also feminists and would avert this trope). day]]. More Romanticist works, on the other hand, often portray men as [[TheStoic cold]], [[InsufferableGenius arrogant]], [[LackOfEmpathy heartless]], and [[MeasuringTheMarigolds unable to appreciate beauty or emotional realities]], while the women are [[CloserToEarth more balanced]], [[TheHeart compassionate]], and [[NatureHero in tune with nature]] (unless the (though is must be said that not all enlightenment or romanticist work is of the more reactionary variety, and therefore skeptical of woman's capabilities).works conformed to these generalizations). In some works, it will be suggested that [[TheKirk both approaches are necessary]] and [[EmotionsVersusStoicism have to balance each other]]. (Note that this doesn't entirely get rid of the UnfortunateImplications if it's still implied that your gender determines which approach you have to take.) Nowadays, due to widespread awareness of this trope and its UnfortunateImplications, it's increasingly common to see [[InvertedTrope inversions]], with [[MasculineGirlFeminineBoy a sensitive, expressive man and a logical, stoic woman]]. Again, which one is portrayed as right will still vary, although works like this are perhaps slightly more likely to go with the "both sides are necessary for balance" approach.
2nd Jan '17 4:17:49 PM nombretomado
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* Averted in ''VideoGame/{{Portal}}'', where the science-loving GLaDOS is clearly female.

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* Averted in ''VideoGame/{{Portal}}'', where the science-loving GLaDOS [=GLaDOS=] is clearly female.
4th Dec '16 1:24:31 PM Morgenthaler
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** GenderFlip: D'Argo, the ProudWarriorRaceGuy of deep feeling, and Aeryn, [[EmotionlessGirl stone-cold]] BadAss soldier. Over time, both become less and less like this, Aeryn's emotional growth (while not losing her self-control) a key part of the story, while D'Argo becomes more and more self-aware and almost meta in his thinking: "John, I'm going to tell you something I've never put into words. I ''really'' like shooting stuff. And I'm very good at it."

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** GenderFlip: D'Argo, the ProudWarriorRaceGuy of deep feeling, and Aeryn, [[EmotionlessGirl stone-cold]] BadAss badass soldier. Over time, both become less and less like this, Aeryn's emotional growth (while not losing her self-control) a key part of the story, while D'Argo becomes more and more self-aware and almost meta in his thinking: "John, I'm going to tell you something I've never put into words. I ''really'' like shooting stuff. And I'm very good at it."
31st Oct '16 4:54:35 PM CumbersomeTercel
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** Most of the Doctor's female companions, by necessity of CastSpeciation. The stereotype goes - the Doctor, male, old, science, good but a bit morally alien, TheFettered, brave in the face of danger; the Companion, female, young, less knowledgeable/humanities, good but not able to moralise as objectively as the Doctor, the Doctor's MoralityChain, scared of the spooky monsters. Sliced even more roughly - the Doctor, a male ScienceHero, and the Companion, a female TheHeart. It should of course be noted that these are enormous generalisations and definitely do not always apply. Romana is the most obvious inversion - she is better at physics than the Doctor, makes her own (superior) sonic screwdriver that the Doctor tries to steal, and got much better marks in her Time Lord exams than the Doctor did. The Doctor leans more heavily on the arty, philosophical end of his intelligence in the seasons he shares with her than on his harder subjects, screwing up his maths and blowing up his engineering projects but claiming to have helped written ''Hamlet'' and being able to identify genuine da Vinci paintings from the brushstrokes.
** In "The Daemons", the Doctor is contrasted to Miss Hawthorne, a witch. The text seems to suggest that they're NotSoDifferent, however.

to:

** Most of the Doctor's female companions, by necessity of CastSpeciation. The stereotype goes - the Doctor, male, old, science, good but a bit morally alien, TheFettered, brave in the face of danger; the Companion, female, young, less knowledgeable/humanities, good but not able to moralise as objectively as the Doctor, the Doctor's MoralityChain, scared of the spooky monsters. Sliced even more roughly - the Doctor, a male ScienceHero, and the Companion, a female TheHeart. It should of course be noted that these are enormous generalisations and definitely do not always apply. Romana is the most obvious inversion - she is better at physics than the Doctor, makes her own (superior) sonic screwdriver that the Doctor tries to steal, and got much better marks in her Time Lord exams than the Doctor did. The Doctor leans more heavily on the arty, philosophical end of his intelligence in the seasons he shares with her than on his harder subjects, screwing up his maths and blowing up his engineering projects but claiming to have helped written ''Hamlet'' ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' and being able to identify genuine da Vinci paintings from the brushstrokes.
** In "The Daemons", "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS8E5TheDaemons The Dæmons]]", the Doctor is contrasted to Miss Hawthorne, a witch. The text seems to suggest that they're NotSoDifferent, however.



** In "The Brain of Morbius", we have a MadScientist and TheIgor who are both male, and a fascistic Time Lord scientist who is also male. We also have an all-female 'sisterhood' cult who, despite possessing what is actually Time Lord technology, treat it as a force of nature and worship it.

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** In "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS13E5TheBrainOfMorbius The Brain of Morbius", Morbius]]", we have a MadScientist and TheIgor who are both male, and a fascistic Time Lord scientist who is also male. We also have an all-female 'sisterhood' cult who, despite possessing what is actually Time Lord technology, treat it as a force of nature and worship it.
7th Oct '16 2:03:22 PM Terran117
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* Ecofeminism and "difference feminism" generally play this trope straight, arguing that Western society has traditionally privileged "masculine" sources of knowledge and ways of approaching nature over "feminine" values like intuition, nurturing and respect for the natural world. Note that neither of these are really widely accepted by mainstream feminists these days, although they're still significant side factions.

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* Ecofeminism and "difference feminism" generally play this trope straight, arguing that Western society has traditionally privileged "masculine" sources of knowledge and ways of approaching nature over "feminine" values like intuition, nurturing and respect for the natural world. Note that neither of these are really widely accepted by mainstream feminists these days, days since this school of thought still upholds traditional gender roles, although they're still significant side factions.
7th Oct '16 1:59:42 PM Terran117
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Note that which approach is portrayed as better varies widely; see RomanticismVersusEnlightenment. In many works that come down on the side of Enlightenment, you'll see women portrayed as [[HystericalWoman hysterically]] [[StrawmanEmotional irrational]] and [[WeakWilled easily manipulated]], while their male counterparts' hard-nosed, [[StreetSmart pragmatic]] rationalism proves to be [[ScienceHero the key to saving the day]]. More Romanticist works, on the other hand, often portray men as [[TheStoic cold]], [[InsufferableGenius arrogant]], [[LackOfEmpathy heartless]], and [[MeasuringTheMarigolds unable to appreciate beauty or emotional realities]], while the women are [[CloserToEarth more balanced]], [[TheHeart compassionate]], and [[NatureHero in tune with nature]]. In some works, it will be suggested that [[TheKirk both approaches are necessary]] and [[EmotionsVersusStoicism have to balance each other]]. (Note that this doesn't entirely get rid of the UnfortunateImplications if it's still implied that your gender determines which approach you have to take.) Nowadays, due to widespread awareness of this trope and its UnfortunateImplications, it's increasingly common to see [[InvertedTrope inversions]], with [[MasculineGirlFeminineBoy a sensitive, expressive man and a logical, stoic woman]]. Again, which one is portrayed as right will still vary, although works like this are perhaps slightly more likely to go with the "both sides are necessary for balance" approach.

to:

Note that which approach is portrayed as better varies widely; see RomanticismVersusEnlightenment. In many works that come down on the side of Enlightenment, you'll see women portrayed as [[HystericalWoman hysterically]] [[StrawmanEmotional irrational]] and [[WeakWilled easily manipulated]], while their male counterparts' hard-nosed, [[StreetSmart pragmatic]] rationalism proves to be [[ScienceHero the key to saving the day]]. day]] (although many enlightenment thinkers were also feminists and would avert this trope). More Romanticist works, on the other hand, often portray men as [[TheStoic cold]], [[InsufferableGenius arrogant]], [[LackOfEmpathy heartless]], and [[MeasuringTheMarigolds unable to appreciate beauty or emotional realities]], while the women are [[CloserToEarth more balanced]], [[TheHeart compassionate]], and [[NatureHero in tune with nature]].nature]] (unless the romanticist work is of the more reactionary variety, and therefore skeptical of woman's capabilities). In some works, it will be suggested that [[TheKirk both approaches are necessary]] and [[EmotionsVersusStoicism have to balance each other]]. (Note that this doesn't entirely get rid of the UnfortunateImplications if it's still implied that your gender determines which approach you have to take.) Nowadays, due to widespread awareness of this trope and its UnfortunateImplications, it's increasingly common to see [[InvertedTrope inversions]], with [[MasculineGirlFeminineBoy a sensitive, expressive man and a logical, stoic woman]]. Again, which one is portrayed as right will still vary, although works like this are perhaps slightly more likely to go with the "both sides are necessary for balance" approach.
30th Jul '16 11:54:12 AM nombretomado
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* Jack and Annie from MagicTreeHouse, although given their ages, Jack simply has been in school longer than his sister.
* Everything DanBrown has ever written is a inversion of this trope. His hero is always an expert in some area of humanities, while his heroine is an expert in some mathematical field.

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* Jack and Annie from MagicTreeHouse, ''MagicTreeHouse'', although given their ages, Jack simply has been in school longer than his sister.
* Everything DanBrown Creator/DanBrown has ever written is a inversion of this trope. His hero is always an expert in some area of humanities, while his heroine is an expert in some mathematical field.
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