History Main / MortonsFork

18th Feb '18 6:09:10 PM KingLyger
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* [[http://notalwaysright.com/i-cry-you-cry-we-all-cry-for-ice-cream/2042 It either isnít crunched up enough or you won't see it]]. Who said a Morton's Fork cannot be hilarious? From [[Website/NotAlwaysRight the same site]] is [[http://notalwaysright.com/a-picture-is-worth-a-thousand-woes/21598 a more traditional version]], when someone tries to steal a girl's camera, which happens to contain some provocative selfies, and is found out via YouJustToldMe. As the security guard puts it:
--> "Sir, I can either charge you with stealing, or I can charge you with stalking and pedophilia, since this lady is obviously a minor. Which one is it going to be?"

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* Website/NotAlwaysRight
**
[[http://notalwaysright.com/i-cry-you-cry-we-all-cry-for-ice-cream/2042 It either isnít This story]] is where a customer at first complains that their Heath bar topping isn't crunched up enough or you won't enough. When the ice cream is remade with the bars crunched smaller, the customer then complains that they can no longer see it]]. Who said a Morton's Fork cannot be hilarious? From [[Website/NotAlwaysRight the same site]] is Heath bars.
**
[[http://notalwaysright.com/a-picture-is-worth-a-thousand-woes/21598 a more traditional version]], when someone Some jerk]] tries to steal a teenage girl's camera, which happens to contain some provocative selfies, and is found out via YouJustToldMe. YouJustToldMe that it's her camera. The would-be thief then tries to insist it's still his camera. As the security guard puts it:
--> "Sir, I can
it, either charge you with stealing, or I can charge you with the thief continues to say it's his own camera, in which case he goes to jail for stalking and pedophilia, since this lady is obviously a minor. Which one is it going child pornography, or the thief admits he's lying, in which case he goes to be?"jail for theft.
18th Feb '18 5:50:44 PM KingLyger
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* The second ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorney'' game (Justice for All), features a version of this that takes up the entire plot of the last case. Phoenix's friend and legal assistant Maya Fey is kidnapped by an assassin and is told she will be killed unless he gets Matt Engarde, a suspect in a murder, found innocent. [[spoiler:Over time Phoenix finds out that his client, Engarde, is truly guilty (he hired the assassin holding Maya hostage to kill the victim) and that if his client gets off the hook, another suspect, a truly innocent young woman, will be charged and possibly executed for the murder. Therefore, Phoenix must choose between defending a killer to save a friend while an innocent person is killed as a murderer, or letting said friend die to see justice done as well as saving a innocent woman's life. With Phoenix being a morally upstanding attorney who fights for justice, this choice is not so simple for him. Phoenix manages to TakeAThirdOption and shows the assassin holding Maya hostage how much of a monster Engarde is, along with proof that Engarde was planning on selling out the assassin anyway. Since this assassin believes that EvenEvilHasStandards, he drops his agreement with Engarde and lets Maya go, giving Engarde no leg to stand on. This twists the situation around so that Engarde is now the one facing a Morton's Fork: either he gets off as "not guilty" of the crime but the assassin will kill him for his act of betrayal, or he goes to jail to face the death penalty. [[ButThouMust No matter what Phoenix does at that point]], Engarde snaps and screams in court that he's guilty.]]
17th Feb '18 1:40:56 AM Kadorhal
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** This is basically the essence of being a l'Cie in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII''. Fail your [[MissionFromGod Focus]] or give up on it? You get turned into a nightmarish shambling monster called a Cie'th, that eventually degrades into a LivingStatue, and [[AndIMustScream suffers forever]]. Succeed in your Focus? You get [[TakenForGranite turned into a crystal statue]] forever, or until the fal'Cie decide to give you another Focus. Admittedly in the sequel a character that was decrystalized at the end of the first game notes having had pleasant dreams while in that state so it's not quite as bad as being a Cie'th, but it's still means you are pretty much going to lose everything and have no life other than being a slave for the fal'Cie, so you are still pretty much screwed whatever happens.
** A much harsher example in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII2'', [[spoiler: regardless of whether Caius succeeds in killing the goddess or dies trying, time/the world is still ultimately screwed, making all of your efforts pointless. In specific, after the final battle, much is made of a "choice" one has (whether to kill Caius or spare him), and the revelation that being killed was actually his goal all along. But whether you choose to kill or spare him, he dies anyway: choose mercy, and he grabs Noel's sword and impales himself on it, with the exact same results. Which raises the question, "in what sense was it accurate to say 'only Noel could kill him', if we aren't talking about Noel's volition but rather Noel's sword?" Note that throughout the plot no mention is ever made of Noel's sword having any special property vis-a-vis killing Caius; the reference is always to Noel himself, as if there is some mystical quality to him as a person that allows him to kill Caius. And yet, if the player chooses mercy, Caius is able to kill himself with Noel's sword]].



** The [[TheFundamentalist Ishgardians]] in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' deal with suspected heretics in a manner reminiscent of historical [[BurnTheWitch witch trials]] from RealLife. The accused heretic is flung into a ravine at [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Witchdrop]]. If they're innocent, they'll die, and be considered to have died with honor. Those who actually consort with dragons, it is believed, will sprout wings or call upon their draconic allies to save them, and will then be killed by the Inquisitors. This of course gets even worse when [[spoiler:one of those same Inquisitors is revealed to be a dragon in disguise, murdering innocent Ishgardians by planting false evidence of heresy, and anyone who points out this fact is of course accused of heresy]].

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** If you try to skip Cosmo Canyon for the first time in ''Videogame/FinalFantasyVII'', you can either try to proceed on foot and discover that you need the buggy to cross the river, or try to proceed in the buggy and have it break down before you get to the river. Either way, you cannot progress past the river until you visit Cosmo Canyon.
** In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsAdvance'', Mewt suffers one relating to bullying, [[TruthInTelevision similar to what's described in the Real Life section]]. During the snowball fight, the three bullies almost exclusively target him, relentlessly pelting him with snowballs. When Marche and Ritz protest, [[BlatantLies Mewt says he's fine]]. The bullies claim that Mewt saying this proof that there's nothing wrong with what they're doing, but Ritz points out that Mewt knows that they'd only make it worse if he complained.
** This is basically the essence of being a l'Cie in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII''. Fail your [[MissionFromGod Focus]] or give up on it? You get turned into a nightmarish shambling monster called a Cie'th, that eventually degrades into a LivingStatue, and [[AndIMustScream suffers forever]]. Succeed in your Focus? You get [[TakenForGranite turned into a crystal statue]] forever, or until the fal'Cie decide to give you another Focus. Admittedly in the sequel a character that was decrystalized at the end of the first game notes having had pleasant dreams while in that state so it's not quite as bad as being a Cie'th, but it's still means you are pretty much going to lose everything and have no life other than being a slave for the fal'Cie, so you are still pretty much screwed whatever happens.
** A much harsher example in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII2'', [[spoiler: regardless of whether Caius succeeds in killing the goddess or dies trying, time/the world is still ultimately screwed, making all of your efforts pointless. In specific, after the final battle, much is made of a "choice" one has (whether to kill Caius or spare him), and the revelation that being killed was actually his goal all along. But whether you choose to kill or spare him, he dies anyway: choose mercy, and he grabs Noel's sword and impales himself on it, with the exact same results. Which raises the question, "in what sense was it accurate to say 'only Noel could kill him', if we aren't talking about Noel's volition but rather Noel's sword?" Note that throughout the plot no mention is ever made of Noel's sword having any special property vis-a-vis killing Caius; the reference is always to Noel himself, as if there is some mystical quality to him as a person that allows him to kill Caius. And yet, if the player chooses mercy, Caius is able to kill himself with Noel's sword]].
** The [[TheFundamentalist Ishgardians]] in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' deal with suspected heretics in a manner reminiscent of historical [[BurnTheWitch witch trials]] from RealLife. The accused heretic is flung into a ravine at [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Witchdrop]]. If they're innocent, they'll die, and be considered to have died with honor. Those who actually consort with dragons, it is believed, will sprout wings or call upon their draconic allies to save them, and will then be killed by the Inquisitors. This of course gets even worse when [[spoiler:one of those same Inquisitors is revealed to be a dragon in disguise, murdering innocent Ishgardians by planting false evidence of heresy, and anyone who points out this fact is of course accused of heresy]].



* If you try to skip Cosmo Canyon for the first time in ''Videogame/FinalFantasyVII'', you can either try to proceed on foot and discover that you need the buggy to cross the river, or try to proceed in the buggy and have it break down before you get to the river. Either way, you cannot progress past the river until you visit Cosmo Canyon.



* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsAdvance'', Mewt suffers one relating to bullying, [[TruthInTelevision similar to what's described in the Real Life section]]. During the snowball fight, the three bullies almost exclusively target him, relentlessly pelting him with snowballs. When Marche and Ritz protest, [[BlatantLies Mewt says he's fine]]. The bullies claim that Mewt saying this proof that there's nothing wrong with what they're doing, but Ritz points out that Mewt knows that they'd only make it worse if he complained.



-->'''Take the elevator:''' The place is exploding, rocks are falling everywhere, and you're taking the elevator?! What if the power went out?! You'd be trapped!
-->'''Take the stairs:''' Your life is at stake, and you're going to walk up the stairs?! With falling rocks everywhere?! I get that you're an Olympian track runner and all, but ''what's wrong with you?!''

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-->'''Take the elevator:''' The place is exploding, rocks are falling everywhere, and you're taking the elevator?! What if the power went out?! You'd be trapped!
-->'''Take
trapped!\\
'''Take
the stairs:''' Your life is at stake, and you're going to walk up the stairs?! With falling rocks everywhere?! I get that you're an Olympian track runner and all, but ''what's wrong with you?!''
15th Feb '18 6:36:06 PM TitaniumDragon
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* In PrincessTutu, Princess Crow holds the fragment of heart containing the prince's love captive, but suggests that it can pick between herself and Duck. Duck is faced with the choice between confessing her love to the prince (which would cause her to dissolve into a mote of light, making it impossible for her to return the fragment of the prince's heart to the prince, as she's the only one who can) or allowing Princess Crow to win. [[spoiler: She [[TakeAThirdOption takes a third option]] and shows her love for him by dancing.]]
11th Feb '18 5:44:16 AM Vir
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** "The Crystal Empire" gives us several, courtesy of [[SorcerousOverlord King]] [[MagnificentBastard Sombra]]. Celestia and Luna were forced to seal him away in order to prevent him from using the Empire's special powers to become an uber-FisherKing over all of Equestria, but the sealing inadvertently triggered his backup curse to make the Empire vanish until his return. Shining Armor must hold him off long enough for Twilight's group to make it to safety, but Shining Armor's efforts only earn him a PowerNullifier curse and uselessness for nearly the rest of the episodes. Cadance is absolutely exhausting herself in trying to maintain her DeflectorShields to keep Sombra at bay, but her taking a breather will only allow him to return to the Empire that much sooner. Twilight and Spike must find the Crystal Heart -- the only surefire way to stop Sombra -- before Cadance's time runs out, but the Heart is guarded by several {{Booby Trap}}s that only a rare few can pass... and even when Twilight and Spike find it anyway, they trigger a backup curse that not only imprisons her but prevents her from using her magic to escape as well (effectively putting her in Shining Armor's predicament). Either way, Sombra ultimately returns to the Empire, and the only ones capable of stopping him are now incapacitated while he remains fresh due to all of his waiting. Only some '''''very''''' desperate last-second actions by Spike, Shining Armor, and Cadance manage to avert a DownerEnding.

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** "The Crystal Empire" gives us several, courtesy of [[SorcerousOverlord King]] [[MagnificentBastard Sombra]]. Celestia and Luna were forced to seal him away in order to prevent him from using the Empire's special powers to become an uber-FisherKing over all of Equestria, but the sealing inadvertently triggered his backup curse to make the Empire vanish until his return. Shining Armor must hold him off long enough for Twilight's group to make it to safety, but Shining Armor's efforts only earn him a PowerNullifier curse and uselessness for nearly the rest of the episodes. Cadance Cadence is absolutely exhausting herself in trying to maintain her DeflectorShields to keep Sombra at bay, but her taking a breather will only allow him to return to the Empire that much sooner. Twilight and Spike must find the Crystal Heart -- the only surefire way to stop Sombra -- before Cadance's Cadence's time runs out, but the Heart is guarded by several {{Booby Trap}}s that only a rare few can pass... and even when Twilight and Spike find it anyway, they trigger a backup curse that not only imprisons her but prevents her from using her magic to escape as well (effectively putting her in Shining Armor's predicament). Either way, Sombra ultimately returns to the Empire, and the only ones capable of stopping him are now incapacitated while he remains fresh due to all of his waiting. Only some '''''very''''' desperate last-second actions by Spike, Shining Armor, and Cadance Cadence manage to avert a DownerEnding.
11th Feb '18 5:38:32 AM Vir
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-->'''Option A:''' Yes! Sign me up for your fabulous and intrusive service, including the Home Invasion Cam!\\
'''Option B:''' No, I need another 90 days to decide, but I'm pretty sure I want this.
8th Feb '18 5:06:47 AM GoblinCipher
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** A popular question is [[ManyQuestionsFallacy "Are you a happy Communist? Yes/No"]]. As long as the player isn't allowed to elaborate, you either say you're a Communist (treason) or you're not happy (also treason). An even more insidious one, which will likely get you even if you elaborate, is "Are Communists happy? Explain why/why not". If you think Communists are happy, you imply Communism is a good way to live (Communist sympathiser!) If not, the Computer will ask why anyone would want to be a commie if it makes them unhappy (it doesn't make sense, and implies you're lying or hiding something).

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** A popular question is [[ManyQuestionsFallacy "Are you a happy Communist? Yes/No"]]. As long as the player isn't allowed to elaborate, you either say you're a Communist (treason) or you're not happy (also treason). Heavily downplayed in most editions, as being a Communist is punishable by death while not being happy "merely" means drug therapy and re-education, so the character does have an actual choice.
**
An even more insidious one, which will likely get you even if you elaborate, is "Are Communists happy? Explain why/why not". If you think Communists are happy, you imply Communism is a good way to live (Communist sympathiser!) If not, the Computer will ask why anyone would want to be a commie if it makes them unhappy (it doesn't make sense, and implies you're lying or hiding something).
6th Feb '18 1:36:25 PM margdean56
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* The Calvinist concept of [[YouCantFightFate predestination]] leads into both Hobson's Choice and Morton's Fork. The predestination doctrine (God decrees every human being to either Heaven or Hell before he or she has been born and there is absolutely nothing he/she can do on behalf of his/her fate). A sinner therefore is not doomed to Hell because of his sins, but he commits sins because he has already been doomed to Hell. While this doctrine is Biblical, it also makes [[GodIsEvil God the source of all sin and evil]] in the world. The Calvinists avert this dilemma by the total depravity doctrine: as the human nature is totally depraved, they choose by their own free will any of the sins available, but they cannot choose from ''not'' sinning. Likewise, the total depravity of human nature enables humans to refuse God's call (by their own free will), but not answering it.

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* The Calvinist concept of [[YouCantFightFate predestination]] leads into to both Hobson's Choice and Morton's Fork. The predestination doctrine (God decrees every human being to either Heaven or Hell before he or she has been born and there is absolutely nothing he/she can do on behalf of to alter his/her fate). A sinner therefore is not doomed to Hell because of his sins, but he commits sins because he has already been doomed to Hell. While this doctrine is Biblical, it also makes [[GodIsEvil God the source of all sin and evil]] in the world. The Calvinists avert this dilemma by the total depravity doctrine: as the since human nature is totally depraved, they choose by their own free will any of the sins available, but they cannot choose from ''not'' sinning. to sin. Likewise, the total depravity of human nature enables humans to refuse God's call (by their own free will), but not answering to answer it.



** Taxes are rendered unto Caesar since it is Caesars government which mints the money, insures its value, and provides the means of earning it, (maintaining markets, building and guarding roads, police protection etc.) symbolized by the image of Caesar.
** The Pharisees attempted to do this a second time in [[http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=John+8 John 8:1-11]], where they asked Him to judge a woman who was caught in adultery. If Jesus chose to let the woman free (instead of stoning her, as the Jewish law required), He'd be acting against the law of Moses; while if He did condemn her, He would be contradicting His own stated purpose to save sinners. The Pharisees were themselves violating the Law of Moses by bringing only the guilty woman, not the guilty man as well, despite them both being caught "in the act." If Jesus condemned her, he'd have shared in the Pharisees' sin. So he replied, ďLet any one of you who is without sin be the first to throw a stone at her.” Realizing they have failed, they all leave. Jesus asks the woman if anyone is condemning her, and she answers no, since all her accusers had left. He says "neither do I condemn you," which was also according to the Law, as at least two witnesses were required for a capital crime. But he never denied her guilt, for he says "[[GoAndSinNoMore Go, and sin no more]]."
** In the page quote Jesus attempts one himself against the Pharisees. John was too a popular figure just like Jesus and he was executed prior this event so he tries to discredit them asking if they thought John's baptism was of heavenly or mundane origin. If they answered "from heaven" they would get discredited by not becoming their followers. If they answered "of human origin" they would get discredited because the people believed that John was legit AND risked being stoned to death by them.
* [[http://www.nasruddin.org/ Nasruddin Hodja]], the [[UsefulNotes/{{Islam}} Sufi Muslim]] [[TheTrickster Trickster]] (known as Juha or Goha in the Arab World), especially when people pestered him for a piece of wisdom. Once when he had to preach but wasn't in a mood for this, he talked his way out of it... three Fridays in a row:

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** Taxes are rendered unto Caesar since it is Caesars Caesar's government which mints the money, insures its value, and provides the means of earning it, it (maintaining markets, building and guarding roads, police protection etc.) ), symbolized by the image of Caesar.
** The Pharisees attempted to do this a second time in [[http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=John+8 John 8:1-11]], where they asked Him to judge a woman who was caught in adultery. If Jesus chose to let the woman free (instead of stoning her, as the Jewish law required), He'd be acting against the law of Moses; while if He did condemn her, He would be contradicting His own stated purpose to save sinners. The Pharisees were themselves violating the Law of Moses by bringing only the guilty woman, not the guilty man as well, despite them both being caught "in the act." If Jesus condemned her, he'd have shared in the Pharisees' sin. So he replied, ďLet any one of you who is without sin be the first to throw a stone at her." Realizing they have failed, they all leave. Jesus asks the woman if anyone is condemning her, and she answers no, since all her accusers had left. He says "neither do I condemn you," which was also according to the Law, as at least two witnesses were required for a capital crime. But he never denied her guilt, for he says "[[GoAndSinNoMore Go, and sin no more]]."
** In the page quote Jesus attempts one himself against the Pharisees. John was too a popular figure just like Jesus and he was executed prior to this event event, so he tries to discredit them by asking if they thought John's baptism was of heavenly or mundane origin. If they answered "from heaven" they would get discredited by for not becoming their his followers. If they answered "of human origin" they would get discredited because the people believed that John was legit AND risked being stoned to death by them.
* [[http://www.nasruddin.org/ Nasruddin Hodja]], the [[UsefulNotes/{{Islam}} Sufi Muslim]] [[TheTrickster Trickster]] (known as Juha or Goha in the Arab World), especially when people pestered him for a piece of wisdom. Once when he had to preach but wasn't in a the mood for this, it, he talked his way out of it... three Fridays in a row:



* As Paris' choice kicks off the Trojan War, poor Orestes is forced to bear with its final aftermath. Orestes' father, Agamemnon, returns home successful from the siege of Troy - only to be murdered by his wife, Clytemnestra (who was herself avenging their daughter, Iphigenia, whom Agamemnon slew in sacrifice). Orestes, as his father's heir, had to avenge his murder, or else the Furies would pursue him to the ends of the earth. However, because matricide is a sin, the Furies were bound to torment Orestes even if he ''did'' kill Clytemnestra. In the end, Orestes chose to kill his mother.

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* As Paris' choice kicks off the Trojan War, poor Orestes is forced to bear with its final aftermath. Orestes' father, Agamemnon, returns home successful from the siege of Troy - only Troy--only to be murdered by his wife, Clytemnestra (who was herself avenging their daughter, Iphigenia, whom Agamemnon slew in sacrifice). Orestes, as his father's heir, had to avenge his murder, or else the Furies would pursue him to the ends of the earth. However, because matricide is a sin, the Furies were bound to torment Orestes even if he ''did'' kill Clytemnestra. In the end, Orestes chose to kill his mother.
6th Feb '18 1:26:55 PM margdean56
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* In ''[[Literature/{{Gor}} Players of Gor]]'' Tarl Cabot is given one of these: he is about to have a hunting sleen (think man-eating tiger, only Gorean and therefore worse) set upon him from a hundred yards away, and he can either stand his ground and be killed by it quickly, or panic and run into a pack of urts (think giant rats, only... etc) where he will die from being eaten alive in hundreds of much smaller bites. His gleeful enemy informs him that many men think they will wait for the sleen, only for their nerve to fail them at the last moment and die of urt bites instead.

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* In ''[[Literature/{{Gor}} Players of Gor]]'' Tarl Cabot is given one of these: he is about to have a hunting sleen (think man-eating tiger, only Gorean and therefore worse) set upon him from a hundred yards away, and he can either stand his ground and be killed by it quickly, or panic and run into a pack of urts (think giant rats, only... etc) etc.) where he will die from being eaten alive in hundreds of much smaller bites. His gleeful enemy informs him that many men think they will wait for the sleen, only for their nerve to fail them at the last moment and die of urt bites instead.



** In the novel ''Dragons of Autumn Twilight'', Raistlin refers to this as "the Ogre's Choice - 'die fast or die slow.'" The choice at this point being either entering a forest no one has ever come out of alive, or turning back into the pack of draconians hunting them.

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** In the novel ''Dragons of Autumn Twilight'', Raistlin refers to this as "the Ogre's Choice - 'die Choice--'die fast or die slow.'" The choice at this point being either entering a forest no one has ever come out of alive, or turning back into the pack of draconians hunting them.



* Soviet-era Lithuanian literature was quite fond of this. E.g., one well-known short story is about an old man who is brutally beaten and dragged away (possibly to be murdered) by the Nazis for speaking Lithuanian, which was prohibited during their occupation. Consequently, his daughter stops speaking Lithuanian and does whatever she can to please the occupiers-[[InsaneTrollLogic so they brutally rape her]]. In other words, whether or not you collaborate with the enemy, you're in for mind-shatteringly terrible physical violence!

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* Soviet-era Lithuanian literature was quite fond of this. E.g., one well-known short story is about an old man who is brutally beaten and dragged away (possibly to be murdered) by the Nazis for speaking Lithuanian, which was prohibited during their occupation. Consequently, his daughter stops speaking Lithuanian and does whatever she can to please the occupiers-[[InsaneTrollLogic occupiers--[[InsaneTrollLogic so they brutally rape her]]. In other words, whether or not you collaborate with the enemy, you're in for mind-shatteringly terrible physical violence!



* Although the actual fork doesn't appear, the original scenario crops up in ''Literature/TheRedemptionOfAlthalus'' by ''Creator/DavidEddings''. In his early days as a thief, Althalus visits an unfamiliar city, but is disappointed when his chosen target, thought to be very rich, turns out to have nothing but bare walls and run down furniture in his house. He only finds out later than all the rich people pretend to have nothing in order to avoid taxes, and there was actually a large pile of money hidden under the floor. It's mentioned that there's a sort of escalating game where the people get better at hiding their money and the collectors get better at finding it (the target actually made his fortune as a carpenter building secret compartments for other people), but it seems this world hasn't had it's equivalent of Morton show up yet.
* A case that only becomes clear later in ''Literature/LineOfDelirium''. While on the run from [[StateSec Imperial Security]], Kay and Arthur board a cruise liner that is supposed to take them to Epsilon Volantis. However, they know that, in all likelihood, there will be ISS ships waiting for them, when the ship exits hyperspace. Arthur finds out that some of the passengers are getting off the ship early via a shuttle, as the ship is passing by the Dogar System. Kay manager to convince a woman to give up her seat on the shuttle to him by painting a pretty picture of Volantis and paying her a small fortune. As it turns out, the shuttle is captured by Darlock spies, who plan to turn all passengers into sleeper agents (effectively destroying the original personalities). It seems that the woman lucked out, right? Wrong. What Kay doesn't know is that a cult has become very popular on Volantis, and the woman ends up being sacrificed to the sun on her second day there.

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* Although the actual fork doesn't appear, the original scenario crops up in ''Literature/TheRedemptionOfAlthalus'' by ''Creator/DavidEddings''. Creator/DavidEddings. In his early days as a thief, Althalus visits an unfamiliar city, but is disappointed when his chosen target, thought to be very rich, turns out to have nothing but bare walls and run down run-down furniture in his house. He only finds out later than that all the rich people pretend to have nothing in order to avoid taxes, and there was actually a large pile of money hidden under the floor. It's mentioned that there's a sort of escalating game where the people get better at hiding their money and the collectors get better at finding it (the target actually made his fortune as a carpenter building secret compartments for other people), but it seems this world hasn't had it's its equivalent of Morton show up yet.
* A case that only becomes clear later in ''Literature/LineOfDelirium''. While on the run from [[StateSec Imperial Security]], Kay and Arthur board a cruise liner that is supposed to take them to Epsilon Volantis. However, they know that, in all likelihood, there will be ISS ships waiting for them, when the ship exits hyperspace. Arthur finds out that some of the passengers are getting off the ship early via a shuttle, as the ship is passing by the Dogar System. Kay manager manages to convince a woman to give up her seat on the shuttle to him by painting a pretty picture of Volantis and paying her a small fortune. As it turns out, the shuttle is captured by Darlock spies, who plan to turn all passengers into sleeper agents (effectively destroying the original personalities). It seems that the woman lucked out, right? Wrong. What Kay doesn't know is that a cult has become very popular on Volantis, and the woman ends up being sacrificed to the sun on her second day there.
6th Feb '18 1:12:00 PM margdean56
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The name comes from the tax-collecting practices of John Morton, Archbishop of Canterbury and Lord Chancellor under [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfTudor Henry VII]]. He reasoned that anyone who was living extravagantly was rich, and so could afford high taxes, whereas anyone who was living frugally had saved a lot, and so could afford high taxes. Bear in mind before you get ''too'' crazy that this was typically used to keep people well-known to be well-off anyways from trying to weasel their way into not paying; he wasn't exactly trying to collect from peasants in hovels. Instead, he was trying to get around a then-common excuse for not paying taxes (that is, not having any money to do so) by discounting the proofs used to support the excuse (actual profligacy and feigned poverty).[[note]]The basic rule lives on: if you're going to say that you don't have the money to pay your taxes, you'll have to open your books to the government--saying "I spent it all on junk" and "Look, I'm living on the cheap, clearly I'm poor" won't cut it. Sometimes the [[IntimidatingRevenueService tax authorities]] will settle, but more often they'll just put a lien on what you do have so that if you sell anything, they can collect the proceeds. This is a lot easier today what with electronic payment systems; obviously it was much harder in Morton's day.[[/note]]

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The name comes from the tax-collecting practices of John Morton, Archbishop of Canterbury and Lord Chancellor under [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfTudor Henry VII]]. He reasoned that anyone who was living extravagantly was rich, and so could afford high taxes, whereas anyone who was living frugally had saved a lot, and so could afford high taxes. Bear in mind before you get ''too'' crazy that this was typically used to keep people well-known to be well-off anyways from trying to weasel their way into not out of paying; he wasn't exactly trying to collect from peasants in hovels. Instead, he was trying to get around a then-common excuse for not paying taxes (that is, not having any money to do so) by discounting the proofs used to support the excuse (actual profligacy and feigned poverty).[[note]]The basic rule lives on: if you're going to say that you don't have the money to pay your taxes, you'll have to open your books to the government--saying "I spent it all on junk" and "Look, I'm living on the cheap, clearly I'm poor" won't cut it. Sometimes the [[IntimidatingRevenueService tax authorities]] will settle, but more often they'll just put a lien on what you do have so that if you sell anything, they can collect the proceeds. This is a lot easier today what with electronic payment systems; obviously it was much harder in Morton's day.[[/note]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.MortonsFork