History Main / MoralDissonance

3rd Nov '16 2:32:54 PM NNinja
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* ''[[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/12074680/1/Tales-of-Attornia-A-Yanmegaman-and-thepudz-collab Tales of Attornia]]'', an ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' TransplantedCharacterFic: Maya is suspected of destroying a town and is hunted for it by Phoenix. When he finally finds her he initially wants to kill her, but changes his mind after learning she's his mentor's sister and takes her alive claiming it would be wrong to kill her without trial. In the same scene Morgan(one of three survivors from said town) demands her to be killed on spot, but Phoenix claims she used him to kill Maya and executes her on spot, even though Morgan was perfectly willing to stand trial for this.
31st Oct '16 8:44:30 AM NNinja
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* In ''Series/TheFlash2014'', what establishes Griffin Grey as a villain is him kindapping Dr. Wells, which he did because he was dying and desperately wanted to find a cure. When Barry kidnapped someone(not a villain) for less understandable reason few episodes earlier no one cared.
30th Oct '16 6:03:33 PM SaraJaye
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* One of the biggest criticisms of the [[PlayerCharacter Avatar]] for ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'' ties to this trope. When war escalates between the peaceful land of [[{{Arcadia}} Hoshido]] and the ambitious land of [[WretchedHive Nohr]], the Avatar - having blood ties to Hoshido, but raised in Nohr from a young age - must either choose a kingdom, or side with neither. While picking neither side keeps their personality consistent with their morals, picking one of the two kingdoms leads to two ''very'' different attitudes from the Avatar, some which directly go against their morals (including a desire peace, yet can get aggressive if need be):
** If they choose Nohr, the Avatar will borderline-{{Wangst}} over their choice, feeling guilty for killing a Hoshidan even in self-defense. They will feel extreme guilt over having to fight their Hoshidan siblings, despite the fact that they have not seen them since they were a child, and during the game before the split, has spent no more than ''several days'' with both them and their biological mother. The Avatar also stands up to [[TheCaligula King Garon]] before the split with no issue, but becomes too timid to speak up against him afterward.
** If they choose Hoshido, the Avatar becomes angry and vengeful toward Nohr, and other than their Nohrian siblings (and they don't beg for their forgiveness like they do for the Hoshidan siblings like in ''Conquest''), has no issue killing Nohrian soldiers who are otherwise just doing their job and hold no loyalty to Garon. It's a very sharp contrast to both their belief in negotiation, as well as the "Hoshidan way" of peace and diplomacy over brutality. To emphasize this, most of ''Birthright's'' Chapters are either routing the enemy or killing the boss, whereas ''Conquest's'' are more varied, including a map that involves ''defending'' a Nohrian port town from Hoshidan invaders. What's more, despite the aforementioned preference for diplomacy, none of the other Hoshidans attempt to be civil with whatever civil Nohrians they encounter.
30th Oct '16 4:38:53 PM nombretomado
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* In the ''Franchise/HeroFactory'' episode "Invasion from Below", Hero Natalie Breez discovers that the beasts are only attacking the city because a drilling operation has disturbet their nest, and that they are actually sentient, sapient beings. After Breez makes peace with them, a stray gunshot fired by an stepped-on weapon causes the beasts to attack again. This time, the Heroes don't bother with reasoning, instead they kill them all, unhatched eggs included. The end of the episode finds our Heroes celebrating and being celebrated, with Breez joining in on the party.

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* In the ''Franchise/HeroFactory'' ''Toys/HeroFactory'' episode "Invasion from Below", Hero Natalie Breez discovers that the beasts are only attacking the city because a drilling operation has disturbet their nest, and that they are actually sentient, sapient beings. After Breez makes peace with them, a stray gunshot fired by an stepped-on weapon causes the beasts to attack again. This time, the Heroes don't bother with reasoning, instead they kill them all, unhatched eggs included. The end of the episode finds our Heroes celebrating and being celebrated, with Breez joining in on the party.
30th Oct '16 8:12:33 AM Mhazard
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With an OmniscientMoralityLicense the old Mentor character, especially a TricksterMentor, can do ''anything'' because of their [[GambitRoulette absolute knowledge over what will occur]]. Anyone else even approaching that level of arrogance would be [[BreakTheHaughty smacked by the plot]] [[HumiliationConga and smacked hard]]. Obviously {{Sociopathic Hero}}es are exempt as they are expected to act this way.

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With an OmniscientMoralityLicense the old Mentor character, especially a TricksterMentor, or in some cases, {{God}} himself if having JerkassGod tendency, can do ''anything'' because of their [[GambitRoulette absolute knowledge over what will occur]]. Anyone else even approaching that level of arrogance would be [[BreakTheHaughty smacked by the plot]] [[HumiliationConga and smacked hard]]. Obviously {{Sociopathic Hero}}es are exempt as they are expected to act this way.
20th Sep '16 8:12:24 PM Sammettik
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* One of the biggest criticisms of the [[PlayerCharacter Avatar]] (whose default name is Kamui in the Japanese version, and Corrin everywhere else) for ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'' ties to this trope. When war escalates between the peaceful land of [[{{Arcadia}} Hoshido]] and the ambitious land of [[WretchedHive Nohr]], the Avatar - having blood ties to Hoshido, but raised in Nohr from a young age - must either choose a kingdom, or side with neither. While picking neither side keeps their personality consistent with their morals, picking one of the two kingdoms leads to two ''very'' different attitudes from the Avatar, some which directly go against their morals (including a desire peace, yet can get aggressive if need be):

to:

* One of the biggest criticisms of the [[PlayerCharacter Avatar]] (whose default name is Kamui in the Japanese version, and Corrin everywhere else) for ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'' ties to this trope. When war escalates between the peaceful land of [[{{Arcadia}} Hoshido]] and the ambitious land of [[WretchedHive Nohr]], the Avatar - having blood ties to Hoshido, but raised in Nohr from a young age - must either choose a kingdom, or side with neither. While picking neither side keeps their personality consistent with their morals, picking one of the two kingdoms leads to two ''very'' different attitudes from the Avatar, some which directly go against their morals (including a desire peace, yet can get aggressive if need be):
26th Aug '16 12:03:57 PM Sapphirea2
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** In deposing Harriet Jones, the Doctor is violating his own often stated moral standards of not interfering with major historical events or "fixed points in time" as they're called in this series. We had it on no less authority than the Doctor himself that Harriet Jones was supposed to have three successful terms as Prime Minister and lead Britain into a Golden Age. That sure as Hell sounded like a "fixed point in time" if there ever was one. Furthermore, everything that's happened since then in the Franchise/{{Whoniverse}} in regards to the British premiership-such as ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'''s Brian Green-that the Doctor didn't just change history, [[NiceJobBreakingItHero he also changed history for the worse.]]
*** Then again, years later the ''Twelfth'' Doctor decides '''not''' to interfere with a point in time that's in flux in "Kill the Moon", and let humanity decide its own fate -- leaving his companion Clara in charge, believing that she/humanity can and will make the best choice under the circumstances. She does, but then chews out and temporarily abandons him (leaving him ''friendless'') for not just taking care of things himself! So much for not sticking his nose in where it doesn't belong.
** The aliens have already shown that at least their leader was not above being forced to surrender but instead trying to stab his enemy in the back when they lower their guard, which greatly weakens the Doctor's argument about attacking a retreating species whom was already more than willing to hold a planet at ransom.
** Another example is when 10 gets furious at his clone for wiping out the Daleks in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E13JourneysEnd Journey's End]]". Despite the fact that earlier in that series he had wiped out the Pyroviles, a much less objectionable species, to save humanity and in the process killed 20,000 innocent people, though this was a fixed point in time. Even more ridiculous as the Daleks had come close to destroying entire Universe, had only temporarily been beaten, and were the only ones destroyed by the clone.

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** In deposing Harriet Jones, the Doctor is violating his own often stated often-stated moral standards of not interfering with major historical events or "fixed points in time" as they're called in this series. We had it on no less authority than the ''the Doctor himself himself'' that Harriet Jones was supposed to have three successful terms as Prime Minister and lead Britain into a Golden Age. Age. That sure as Hell sounded like a "fixed point in time" if there ever was one. But then she decided to have the retreating Sycorax killed in "The Christmas Invasion", and Ten got mad. Keep in mind that the aliens had already shown that at least their leader was not above being forced to surrender but instead trying to stab his enemy in the back when they lower their guard, which greatly weakens the Doctor's argument about attacking a retreating species whom was already more than willing to hold a planet at ransom. Furthermore, everything that's happened since then in the Franchise/{{Whoniverse}} in regards to the British premiership-such premiership -- such as ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'''s Brian Green-that Green -- that the Doctor didn't just change history, [[NiceJobBreakingItHero he also changed history for the worse.]]
***
worse!]]
** Another example is when Ten gets furious at his clone for wiping out the Daleks in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E13JourneysEnd Journey's End]]". Despite the fact that earlier in that series he had wiped out the Pyroviles, a much less objectionable species, to save humanity and in the process killed 20,000 innocent people, though this ''was'' a fixed point in time. Even more ridiculous as the Daleks had come close to destroying the entire universe, had only temporarily been beaten, and were the only ones destroyed by the clone!
**
Then again, years later the ''Twelfth'' Doctor decides '''not''' to interfere with a point in time that's in flux in "Kill the Moon", and let humanity decide its own fate -- leaving his companion Clara in charge, believing that she/humanity can and will make the best choice under the circumstances. She does, but then chews out and temporarily abandons him, leaving him (leaving him ''friendless'') ''friendless'', for not just taking care of things himself! So much for not sticking his nose in where it doesn't belong.
** The aliens have already shown that at least their leader was not above being forced to surrender but instead trying to stab his enemy in the back when they lower their guard, which greatly weakens the Doctor's argument about attacking
belong. (In general, Twelve [[WhatTheHellHero gets called out a retreating species whom was already lot more often for his more morally dubious actions and attitudes than willing to hold a planet at ransom.
** Another example is when 10 gets furious at
his clone for wiping out the Daleks in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E13JourneysEnd Journey's End]]". Despite the fact that earlier in that series he had wiped out the Pyroviles, a much less objectionable species, to save humanity and in the process killed 20,000 innocent people, though this was a fixed point in time. Even more ridiculous as the Daleks had come close to destroying entire Universe, had only temporarily been beaten, and were the only ones destroyed by the clone. predecessors]].)
19th Aug '16 10:24:24 PM EvilKid
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Compare ValuesDissonance, where the cause is cultural. Compare also FamilyUnfriendlyAesop, where the hero's actions line up with morals that the reader might not agree with. Also compare FelonyMisdemeanor. Contrast NotSoDifferent, where the double standard is noticed; WhatTheHellHero, where they are expressly called out ([[StrawmanHasAPoint though particularly infuriating if the person calling the hero out is treated as being wrong]]) and can even be a driving force of the plot; ItsAllAboutMe, where the villain actively holds this kind of double standard, and it's noticed; TautologicalTemplar, where another character also actively thinks he can do no wrong. For TheRival holding a grudge, it's DisproportionateRetribution. See also ProtagonistCenteredMorality.

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Compare ValuesDissonance, where the cause is cultural. Compare also FamilyUnfriendlyAesop, where the hero's actions line up with morals that the reader might not agree with. Also compare FelonyMisdemeanor. Contrast NotSoDifferent, where the double standard is noticed; WhatTheHellHero, where they are expressly called out ([[StrawmanHasAPoint though particularly infuriating if the person calling the hero out is treated as being wrong]]) and can even be a driving force of the plot; ItsAllAboutMe, where the villain actively holds this kind of double standard, and it's noticed; TautologicalTemplar, where another character also actively thinks he can do no wrong. Also compare with MoralMyopia if DoubleStandard is portrayed as wrong in-universe. For TheRival holding a grudge, it's DisproportionateRetribution. See also ProtagonistCenteredMorality.
17th Jul '16 7:32:54 AM Sapphirea2
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** In deposing Harriet Jones, the Doctor is violating his own often stated moral standards of not interfering with major historical events or "fixed points in time" as they're called in this series. We had it on no less authority than the Doctor himself that Harriet Jones was supposed to have three successful terms as Prime Minister and lead Britain into a Golden Age. That sure as Hell sounded like a "fixed point in time" if there ever was one. Furthermore, everything that's happened since then in the Franchise/{{Whoniverse}} in regards to the British premiership-such as Series/{{Torchwood}}'s Brian Green-that the Doctor didn't just change history, [[NiceJobBreakingItHero he also changed history for the worse.]]

to:

** In deposing Harriet Jones, the Doctor is violating his own often stated moral standards of not interfering with major historical events or "fixed points in time" as they're called in this series. We had it on no less authority than the Doctor himself that Harriet Jones was supposed to have three successful terms as Prime Minister and lead Britain into a Golden Age. That sure as Hell sounded like a "fixed point in time" if there ever was one. Furthermore, everything that's happened since then in the Franchise/{{Whoniverse}} in regards to the British premiership-such as Series/{{Torchwood}}'s ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'''s Brian Green-that the Doctor didn't just change history, [[NiceJobBreakingItHero he also changed history for the worse.]]]]
*** Then again, years later the ''Twelfth'' Doctor decides '''not''' to interfere with a point in time that's in flux in "Kill the Moon", and let humanity decide its own fate -- leaving his companion Clara in charge, believing that she/humanity can and will make the best choice under the circumstances. She does, but then chews out and temporarily abandons him (leaving him ''friendless'') for not just taking care of things himself! So much for not sticking his nose in where it doesn't belong.
1st Jul '16 12:34:06 AM PaulA
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* In Creator/DavidEddings' ''Literature/TheElenium'' and the sequel books ''The Tamuli'', we meet Kring, chief of the Peloi, a tribe of savage horsemen. In his first appearance, his troops have joined an allied army to fight a joint enemy. He asks about the army's policy on raping. He is told that it is not allowed and he sighs, saying it will be hard to explain to his men that they can't. Later, his fiancée talks about how she murdered men who attempted to rape her. He clearly shows how he thinks rape is wrong and he is glad they died. No one in the story seems to recall or mention that he was unhappy that his men weren't allowed to rape women earlier. Considering the time period ''The Elenium'' is set in, Kring might see a difference between taking a woman as a war trophy (as was commonly done long ago) and men simply setting upon a woman in the night, however. It could also be a case of MoralMyopia where he thinks it's wrong if a woman he cares about is involved, versus the anonymous strangers who he was asking about previously.

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* In Creator/DavidEddings' ''Literature/TheElenium'' and the sequel books ''The Tamuli'', ''Literature/TheTamuli'', we meet Kring, chief of the Peloi, a tribe of savage horsemen. In his first appearance, his troops have joined an allied army to fight a joint enemy. He asks about the army's policy on raping. He is told that it is not allowed and he sighs, saying it will be hard to explain to his men that they can't. Later, his fiancée talks about how she murdered men who attempted to rape her. He clearly shows how he thinks rape is wrong and he is glad they died. No one in the story seems to recall or mention that he was unhappy that his men weren't allowed to rape women earlier. Considering the time period ''The Elenium'' is set in, Kring might see a difference between taking a woman as a war trophy (as was commonly done long ago) and men simply setting upon a woman in the night, however. It could also be a case of MoralMyopia where he thinks it's wrong if a woman he cares about is involved, versus the anonymous strangers who he was asking about previously.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.MoralDissonance