History Main / MookHorrorShow

24th May '17 6:56:22 PM BattleMaster
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* The assassination attempt on Moses in ''Film/{{Red}}''.

to:

* The assassination attempt on Moses in ''Film/{{Red}}''.the beginning of ''Film/{{Red}}''. A CIA hit squad goes to eliminate a single retiree. They don't catch on to just how dangerous their target actually is until he's killed two of them and they haven't even ''seen'' him yet.



* Franchise/{{Robocop}} has shades of this. He is effectively bulletproof, slow but nigh-unstoppable, more machine than man, and has perfect aim. Most bad guys try to run while Robocop walks after them like a typical horror movie villain. His early arrests of Emil and Clarence in ''Film/RoboCop1987'' both emphasize their utter helplessness when face-to-face with him.

to:

* Franchise/{{Robocop}} has shades of this. He is effectively bulletproof, [[ImplacableMan slow but nigh-unstoppable, nigh-unstoppable]], more machine than man, and has perfect aim. Most bad guys try to run while Robocop walks after them like a typical horror movie villain. His early arrests of Emil and Clarence in ''Film/RoboCop1987'' both emphasize their utter helplessness when face-to-face with him.
18th May '17 12:55:15 AM Medinoc
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** The greatest example of this is probably in book five, ''Operation Shield''. Cassandra had befriended a trio of war orphans in the previous novel, and the League government decided that kidnapping the two oldest ones would be a great way to blackmail her. She had a reputation as a cool thinker, so they expected that she'd easily cave to their demands to keep the kids safe. They weren't expecting her to discover her [[MamaBear maternal instincts]]. And go into a RoaringRampageOfRescue with a mission plan consisting of "everything between me and the kids dies." By the time they realized just what they'd unleashed, it was far too late. To really drive it home, the scene is done from the perspective of the League commander as she shouts orders over her radio to her squads, only to have them killed off one by one. And Cassandra deliberately leaves a single witness alive, to make sure that everyone gets the message: don't ''ever'' threaten her kids.

to:

** The greatest example of this is probably in book five, ''Operation Shield''. Cassandra had befriended a trio of war orphans in the previous novel, and the League government decided that kidnapping the two oldest ones would be a great way to blackmail her. She had a reputation as a cool thinker, so they expected that she'd easily cave to their demands to keep the kids safe. They weren't expecting her to discover her [[MamaBear maternal instincts]]. And go into a RoaringRampageOfRescue with a mission plan consisting of "everything between me and the kids dies." By the time they realized just what they'd unleashed, it was far too late. To really drive it home, the scene is done from the perspective of the League commander as she shouts orders over her radio to her squads, only to have them killed off one by one. And Cassandra [[SpareAMessenger deliberately leaves a single witness alive, alive]], to make sure that everyone gets the message: don't ''ever'' threaten her kids.
17th May '17 8:03:04 PM AthenaBlue
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[[folder:Film -- Animated]]
* In ''Disney/LiloAndStitch'', Stitch's escape scene in the first part plays out this way apart from the fact that protagonist IS a criminal and his hunters are the cops who attempt to arrest him.
[[/folder]]



* ''Literature/AnitaBlake'' is this to vampires as told by Jean-Claude, who is the Master Vampire of St. Louis. "To us, you are the boogeyman who snatches young foolish vampires." Or something like that. And when she executed a were serial killer in the middle of a mall in front of small children who looked horrified that she was going to kill him after she strolled up to him in the food court. Then she snaps at a werewolf who annoyed her on the phone, who breaks down in tears and blubbers for her not to kill her. It helps she's a licensed Executioner who can kill vampires and weres legally. Oh, and one of the most powerful necromancers in the United States.
** It's even worse with Edward, the BadassNormal vampire hunter that Anita occasionally works with. Vampires call her The Executioner since she's killed so many of their kind, but they just call him [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Death]].
* In the Creator/DaleBrown novels, this generally occurs when [[PoweredArmor Tin]] [[ImplacableMan Men]] or [[MotionCaptureMecha CIDs]] are around and there're no anti-tank weapons in the enemy's reach.



** The greatest example of this is probably in book five, Operation Shield. Cassandra had befriended a trio of war orphans in the previous novel, and the League government decided that kidnapping the two oldest ones would be a great way to blackmail her. She had a reputation as a cool thinker, so they expected that she'd easily cave to their demands to keep the kids safe. They weren't expecting her to discover her [[MamaBear maternal instincts]]. And go into a RoaringRampageOfRescue with a mission plan consisting of "everything between me and the kids dies." By the time they realized just what they'd unleashed, it was far too late. To really drive it home, the scene is done from the perspective of the League commander as she shouts orders over her radio to her squads, only to have them killed off one by one. And Cassandra deliberately leaves a single witness alive, to make sure that everyone gets the message: don't ''ever'' threaten her kids.

to:

** The greatest example of this is probably in book five, Operation Shield.''Operation Shield''. Cassandra had befriended a trio of war orphans in the previous novel, and the League government decided that kidnapping the two oldest ones would be a great way to blackmail her. She had a reputation as a cool thinker, so they expected that she'd easily cave to their demands to keep the kids safe. They weren't expecting her to discover her [[MamaBear maternal instincts]]. And go into a RoaringRampageOfRescue with a mission plan consisting of "everything between me and the kids dies." By the time they realized just what they'd unleashed, it was far too late. To really drive it home, the scene is done from the perspective of the League commander as she shouts orders over her radio to her squads, only to have them killed off one by one. And Cassandra deliberately leaves a single witness alive, to make sure that everyone gets the message: don't ''ever'' threaten her kids.kids.
* At the end of ''Literature/TheDemonBreed'' by Creator/JamesHSchmitz, the story is retold from the aliens' point of view, and we see just how badly the ActionGirl protagonist ended up scaring them.
-->There seemed to be nothing they could do to check her. She came and went as she chose, whether in the sea or in the dense floating forests, and was traceless as a ghost. Moreover, those who had the misfortune of encountering her did not report the fact. They simply disappeared.



** In ''Discworld/{{NightWatch}}!'' you see Reg's transformation into a zombie... he refuses to die after being shot (with arrows) seven or eight times in the chest at point blank range. The archers don't take it well.

to:

** In ''Discworld/{{NightWatch}}!'' ''Discworld/NightWatch'', you see Reg's transformation into a zombie... he refuses to die after being shot (with arrows) seven or eight times in the chest at point blank range. The archers don't take it well.



* There's one scene that plays like this in book seven of ''Literature/{{Safehold}}'' series when [[ImplacableMan Merlin]]/[[SuperpoweredEvilSide Dialydd]] attacks barge full of [[CorruptChurch Inquisitors]] who killed his friend. The entire scene is narrated from perspective of one of the Inquisitors and it shows the reader just how ''scary'' Merlin can be if he turns off his internal limits.
* ''Literature/AnitaBlake'' is this to vampires as told by Jean-Claude, who is the Master Vampire of St.Louis. "To us, you are the boogeyman who snatches young foolish vampires." Or something like that. And when she executed a were serial killer in the middle of a mall in front of small children who looked horrified that she was going to kill him after she strolled up to him in the food court. Then she snaps at a werewolf who annoyed her on the phone, who breaks down in tears and blubbers for her not to kill her. It helps she's a licensed Executioner who can kill vampires and weres legally. Oh, and one of the most powerful necromancers in the United States.
** It's even worse with Edward, the BadassNormal vampire hunter that Anita occasionally works with. Vampires call her The Executioner since she's killed so many of their kind, but they just call him [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Death]].
* In the Creator/DaleBrown novels, this generally occurs when [[PoweredArmor Tin]] [[ImplacableMan Men]] or [[MotionCaptureMecha CIDs]] are around and there're no anti-tank weapons in the enemy's reach.
* Several ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' books have the thoughts of various Peep or Solarian officers about to be on the receiving end of a [[MacrossMissileMassacre Manticore Missile Massacre]], usually because their CO is too [[TooDumbToLive dumb]], [[{{Pride}} arrogant]], or [[CassandraTruth incredulous]] to realize that they're about to be ripped apart by said Massacre. And, of course, [[RedShirt vice versa]].
* PulpMagazine heroes Radio/TheShadow and Literature/TheSpider lived for this. It's not surprising that these two were the primary inspiration for the Batman.
* At the end of ''Literature/TheDemonBreed'' by Creator/JamesHSchmitz, the story is retold from the aliens' point of view, and we see just how badly the ActionGirl protagonist ended up scaring them.
-->There seemed to be nothing they could do to check her. She came and went as she chose, whether in the sea or in the dense floating forests, and was traceless as a ghost. Moreover, those who had the misfortune of encountering her did not report the fact. They simply disappeared.
* The final chapter of John Gardner's novel ''Literature/{{Grendel}}'' is more of a ''Boss'' Horror Show, with Literature/{{Beowulf}} coming off as cruel and sadistic as he [[ForegoneConclusion mortally wounds the main character by ripping off his arm]].
* ''Literature/TheReynardCycle'': In ''The Baron of Maleperduys'', a particularly likable Calvarian foot soldier wakes up after a battle, only to discover that he and many of his fellow mooks have been taken prisoner by Reynard, who is going to hang the majority of them, and then ''feed their corpses to Tiecelin's Shrikes''.
* Jack Fleming from ''Literature/TheVampireFiles'' has employed this trope occasionally, using his vampiric powers to feign a haunting in an early novel and to completely scare the crap out of gangsters in his later, grimmer adventures.

to:

* There's one scene that plays like this in book seven of ''Literature/{{Safehold}}'' series when [[ImplacableMan Merlin]]/[[SuperpoweredEvilSide Dialydd]] attacks barge full of [[CorruptChurch Inquisitors]] who killed his friend. The entire scene is narrated from perspective of one of the Inquisitors and it shows the reader just how ''scary'' Merlin can be if he turns off his internal limits.
* ''Literature/AnitaBlake'' is this to vampires as told by Jean-Claude, who is the Master Vampire of St.Louis. "To us, you are the boogeyman who snatches young foolish vampires." Or something like that. And when she executed a were serial killer in the middle of a mall in front of small children who looked horrified that she was going to kill him after she strolled up to him in the food court. Then she snaps at a werewolf who annoyed her on the phone, who breaks down in tears and blubbers for her not to kill her. It helps she's a licensed Executioner who can kill vampires and weres legally. Oh, and one of the most powerful necromancers in the United States.
** It's even worse with Edward, the BadassNormal vampire hunter that Anita occasionally works with. Vampires call her The Executioner since she's killed so many of their kind, but they just call him [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Death]].
* In the Creator/DaleBrown novels, this generally occurs when [[PoweredArmor Tin]] [[ImplacableMan Men]] or [[MotionCaptureMecha CIDs]] are around and there're no anti-tank weapons in the enemy's reach.
* Several ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' books have the thoughts of various Peep or Solarian officers about to be on the receiving end of a [[MacrossMissileMassacre Manticore Missile Massacre]], usually because their CO is too [[TooDumbToLive dumb]], [[{{Pride}} arrogant]], or [[CassandraTruth incredulous]] to realize that they're about to be ripped apart by said Massacre. And, of course, [[RedShirt vice versa]].
* PulpMagazine heroes Radio/TheShadow and Literature/TheSpider lived for this. It's not surprising that these two were the primary inspiration for the Batman.
* At the end of ''Literature/TheDemonBreed'' by Creator/JamesHSchmitz, the story is retold from the aliens' point of view, and we see just how badly the ActionGirl protagonist ended up scaring them.
-->There seemed to be nothing they could do to check her. She came and went as she chose, whether in the sea or in the dense floating forests, and was traceless as a ghost. Moreover, those who had the misfortune of encountering her did not report the fact. They simply disappeared.
* The final chapter of John Gardner's novel ''Literature/{{Grendel}}'' is more of a ''Boss'' Horror Show, with Literature/{{Beowulf}} coming off as cruel and sadistic as he [[ForegoneConclusion mortally wounds the main title character by ripping off his arm]].
* ''Literature/TheReynardCycle'': In ''The Baron
of Maleperduys'', a particularly likable Calvarian foot soldier wakes up after a battle, only to discover that he and many of his fellow mooks have been taken prisoner by Reynard, who is going to hang the majority of them, and then ''feed their corpses to Tiecelin's Shrikes''.
* Jack Fleming from ''Literature/TheVampireFiles'' has employed this trope occasionally, using his vampiric powers to feign a haunting in an early
Creator/StephenKing novel ''[[Literature/NightmaresAndDreamscapes Dolan's Cadillac]]'' seeks revenge against the title character, who ordered a hit on his wife. To this end he quits his job as a teacher and becomes a road worker in order to completely scare the crap out of gangsters set a trap for Dolan when he passes by in his later, grimmer adventures.you know what. [[spoiler:He digs a large hole and covers it with a weak stretch of road so that the Cadillac plunges into it. He then taunts Dolan for a while before filling up the hole.]]



** He lampshades this himself in ''Literature/TurnCoat''. He is facing [[spoiler: no less than five Wardens and three members of the [[AuthorityEqualsAsskicking Senior Council]]]] and ''they'' are afraid to fight ''him''. Then he remembers something... "They were dealing with something far more dangerous than me, Harry Dresden, whose battered old Volkswagen was currently in the city impound. They were dealing with the potential demonic dark lord nightmare warlock they'd been busy fearing since I turned sixteen. They were dealing with the wizard who had faced the Heirs of Kemmler [[spoiler:riding a zombie dinosaur]], and emerged victorious from a fight that had flattened Morgan and Captain Luccio before they had even reached it. They were dealing with the man who had dropped a challenge to the entire Senior Council, and who had then actually ''showed'', apparently willing to fight-on the shores of an entirely too creepy island in the middle of a freshwater sea."
** This trope is at its most direct in ''Changes'', where a red court vampire assassin, upon seeing Harry, screams and runs away.
** In the novella "Aftermath", which takes place hours after the events of "Changes", Karrin Murphy thinks a bit about Harry and how he's a nice guy, weird and goofy and eccentric, but his magical knowledge can sometimes seem like {{Sherlock Scan}}s, and when he needs to deal with something that can survive being thrown through a city block, he can do the throwing.
---> '''Murphy''': Watching Dresden operate was usually one of two things: mildly amusing or positively terrifying. On a scene, his whole personal manner always made me think of autistic kids. He never met anyone's eyes for more than a flickering second. He moved with the sort of exaggerated caution of someone who was several sizes larger than normal, keeping his hands and arms in close to his body. He spoke a little bit softly, as if apologizing for the resonant baritone of his voice.
--->But when something caught his attention, he changed. His dark, intelligent eyes would glitter, and his gaze became something so intense it could start a fire. During the situations that changed from investigation to desperate struggle, his whole being shifted in the same way. His stance widened, becoming more aggressive and confident, and his voice rose up to become a ringing trumpet that could have been clearly heard from opposite ends of a football stadium.
--->Quirky nerd, gone. Terrifying icon, present.
--->Not many “vanillas,” as he called nominally normal humans, had seen Dresden standing his ground in the fullness of his power. If we had, more of us would have taken him seriously—but I had decided that for his sake, if nothing else, it was a good thing that his full capabilities went unrecognized. Dresden’s power would have scared the hell out of most people, just like it had scared me.
--->It wasn’t the kind of fear that makes you scream and run. That’s fairly mild, as fear goes. That’s Franchise/ScoobyDoo fear. No. Seeing Dresden in action filled you with the fear that you had just become a casualty of evolution—that you were watching something far larger and infinitely more dangerous than yourself, and that your only chance of survival was to kill it, immediately, before you were crushed beneath a power greater than you would ever know.
** In ''Ghost Story'' we get this from Molly's perspective:

to:

** He lampshades this himself in ''Literature/TurnCoat''. He is facing [[spoiler: no [[spoiler:no less than five Wardens and three members of the [[AuthorityEqualsAsskicking Senior Council]]]] Council]]]], and ''they'' are afraid to fight ''him''. Then he remembers something... "They were dealing with something far more dangerous than me, Harry Dresden, whose battered old Volkswagen was currently in the city impound. They were dealing with the potential demonic dark lord nightmare warlock they'd been busy fearing since I turned sixteen. They were dealing with the wizard who had faced the Heirs of Kemmler [[spoiler:riding a zombie dinosaur]], and emerged victorious from a fight that had flattened Morgan and Captain Luccio before they had even reached it. They were dealing with the man who had dropped a challenge to the entire Senior Council, and who had then actually ''showed'', apparently willing to fight-on the shores of an entirely too creepy island in the middle of a freshwater sea."
** This trope is at its most direct in ''Changes'', ''Literature/{{Changes}}'', where a red court Red Court vampire assassin, upon seeing Harry, screams and runs away.
** In the novella "Aftermath", which takes place hours after the events of "Changes", ''Changes'', Karrin Murphy thinks a bit about Harry and how he's a nice guy, weird and goofy and eccentric, but his magical knowledge can sometimes seem like {{Sherlock Scan}}s, and when he needs to deal with something that can survive being thrown through a city block, he can do the throwing.
---> '''Murphy''': --->'''Murphy:''' Watching Dresden operate was usually one of two things: mildly amusing or positively terrifying. On a scene, his whole personal manner always made me think of autistic kids. He never met anyone's eyes for more than a flickering second. He moved with the sort of exaggerated caution of someone who was several sizes larger than normal, keeping his hands and arms in close to his body. He spoke a little bit softly, as if apologizing for the resonant baritone of his voice.
--->But
voice.\\
But
when something caught his attention, he changed. His dark, intelligent eyes would glitter, and his gaze became something so intense it could start a fire. During the situations that changed from investigation to desperate struggle, his whole being shifted in the same way. His stance widened, becoming more aggressive and confident, and his voice rose up to become a ringing trumpet that could have been clearly heard from opposite ends of a football stadium.
--->Quirky
stadium.\\
Quirky
nerd, gone. Terrifying icon, present.
--->Not
present.\\
Not
many “vanillas,” “vanillas”, as he called nominally normal humans, had seen Dresden standing his ground in the fullness of his power. If we had, more of us would have taken him seriously—but I had decided that for his sake, if nothing else, it was a good thing that his full capabilities went unrecognized. Dresden’s power would have scared the hell out of most people, just like it had scared me.
--->It
me.\\
It
wasn’t the kind of fear that makes you scream and run. That’s fairly mild, as fear goes. That’s Franchise/ScoobyDoo fear. No. Seeing Dresden in action filled you with the fear that you had just become a casualty of evolution—that evolution -— that you were watching something far larger and infinitely more dangerous than yourself, and that your only chance of survival was to kill it, immediately, before you were crushed beneath a power greater than you would ever know.
** In ''Ghost Story'' ''Literature/GhostStory'' we get this from Molly's perspective:



'''Molly:''' ''Of you'', Harry. You could find anything in this town, but you never even noticed the shadow you cast. [...] Every time you defied someone, every time you came out on top against things you couldn’t possibly have beaten, your name grew. And they feared that name. There were other cities to prey on -— cities that didn’t have the mad wizard Dresden defending them. They ''feared'' you.
** {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in ''Skin Games'': Michael points out that the last time someone threatened Harry[[spoiler:'s daughter, Harry killed the entirety of the Red Court, one of the three major powers in the world, akin to killing everyone in the Soviet Union during the Cold War]]. Even monsters would have to think twice about making that threat again.
* The title character of the Creator/StephenKing novel ''[[Literature/NightmaresAndDreamscapes Dolan's Cadillac]]'' seeks revenge against the title character, who ordered a hit on his wife. To this end he quits his job as a teacher and becomes a road worker in order to set a trap for Dolan when he passes by in his you know what. [[spoiler:He digs a large hole and covers it with a weak stretch of road so that the Cadillac plunges into it. He then taunts Dolan for a while before filling up the hole.]]

to:

'''Molly:''' ''Of you'', Harry. You could find anything in this town, but you never even noticed the shadow you cast. [...] ''[...]'' Every time you defied someone, every time you came out on top against things you couldn’t possibly have beaten, your name grew. And they feared that name. There were other cities to prey on -— cities that didn’t have the mad wizard Dresden defending them. They ''feared'' you.
** {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in ''Skin Games'': ''Literature/SkinGame'': Michael points out that the last time someone threatened Harry[[spoiler:'s daughter, Harry killed the entirety of the Red Court, one of the three major powers in the world, akin to killing everyone in the Soviet Union during the Cold War]]. Even monsters would have to think twice about making that threat again.
* The title character Happens quite often in ''Literature/TheExecutioner'' series with villains invoking the terror of the Creator/StephenKing novel ''[[Literature/NightmaresAndDreamscapes Dolan's Cadillac]]'' seeks revenge against the title character, who ordered a hit on his wife. To this end he quits his job as a teacher and becomes a road worker in order to set a trap for Dolan when he passes by in his you know what. [[spoiler:He digs a large hole and covers it black-clad OneManArmy with a weak stretch of road so that the Cadillac plunges into it. He then taunts Dolan for a while before filling up the hole.]]icy blue eyes, striding untouched through their ranks, dealing death.



* The final chapter of John Gardner's novel ''Literature/{{Grendel}}'' is more of a ''Boss'' Horror Show, with Literature/{{Beowulf}} coming off as cruel and sadistic as he [[ForegoneConclusion mortally wounds the main character by ripping off his arm]].
* Several ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' books have the thoughts of various Peep or Solarian officers about to be on the receiving end of a [[MacrossMissileMassacre Manticore Missile Massacre]], usually because their CO is too [[TooDumbToLive dumb]], [[{{Pride}} arrogant]], or [[CassandraTruth incredulous]] to realize that they're about to be ripped apart by said Massacre. And, of course, [[RedShirt vice versa]].
* The short story ''[[http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/gregory_07_13_reprint/ The Illustrated Biography of Lord Grimm]]'' by Daryl Gregory, showing the POV of those who happen to be living in a country ruled by a supervillain when it's 'invaded' for the umpteenth time by American superheroes... WhatDoYouMeanItsNotPolitical
* ''Literature/TheJungleBook'': When Baloo and Bagheera want to save Mowgli from the sinister Bandar Log monkeys they enlist the help of one of the most feared predators in the jungle, Kaa the python. He is still terrifying from the perspective of his enemies, especially the Bandar Log who panick and become his prey in no time.
* In ''Literature/TheHuntersBladesTrilogy'', which is part of ''Literature/TheLegendOfDrizzt'', the titular hero uses his skills as a ranger as well as his MasterSwordsman status to inflict devastating losses on the orcs coming to join a local warlord. It's his hope he can ebb the recruitment of King Obould's army through ''sheer terror.'' It works.
* Nadreck of Palain VII from the ''Literature/{{Lensman}}'' series. Made possibly even worse because the mooks never even realize he's at work until they all suddenly go mad and kill each other... and depopulate their entire planet except for 3 leaders.
* This happens at least [[OncePerEpisode once a book]] in ''Literature/TheOregonFiles'', whenever the bad guys [[OhCrap realize]] that the titular ship isn't a dilapidated tramp steamer full of grungy sailors, [[WhatAPieceOfJunk but a highly advanced, heavily armed warship crewed by special forces-trained mercenaries.]]
* The scene that brings Tobimar and Poplock together in ''Literature/PhoenixRising'', as Tobimar is rescued from attacking ''mazakh'' by a mysterious force that seems to attack out of nowhere and then disappear. The ''mazakh'' who aren't killed outright flee in terror, and even Tobimar is distinctly unsettled.
* ''Literature/TheReynardCycle'': In ''The Baron of Maleperduys'', a particularly likable Calvarian foot soldier wakes up after a battle, only to discover that he and many of his fellow mooks have been taken prisoner by Reynard, who is going to hang the majority of them, and then ''feed their corpses to Tiecelin's Shrikes''.



* ''Literature/TheWardstoneChronicles'': In Book 6, the protagonists are forced into an EnemyMine situation with the Witches. As they are travelling to Greece, their ship is attacked by pirates. The heroes react by unleashing the army of AxCrazy, blood-thirsty witches on them, and [[CurbStompBattle a hilariously one-sided fight ensues]].
* In the Witcher Saga, Ciri mows down a squad of bad guys after luring them onto a frozen lake. In thick fog. She has skates.
* The short story ''[[http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/gregory_07_13_reprint/ The Illustrated Biography of Lord Grimm]]'' by Daryl Gregory, showing the POV of those who happen to be living in a country ruled by a supervillain when it's 'invaded' for the umpteenth time by American superheroes...WhatDoYouMeanItsNotPolitical

to:

* ''Literature/TheWardstoneChronicles'': In Book 6, There's one scene that plays like this in book seven of ''Literature/{{Safehold}}'' series when [[ImplacableMan Merlin]]/[[SuperpoweredEvilSide Dialydd]] attacks barge full of [[CorruptChurch Inquisitors]] who killed his friend. The entire scene is narrated from perspective of one of the protagonists are forced into an EnemyMine situation with Inquisitors and it shows the Witches. As they are travelling to Greece, their ship is attacked by pirates. The reader just how ''scary'' Merlin can be if he turns off his internal limits.
* PulpMagazine
heroes react by unleashing Radio/TheShadow and Literature/TheSpider lived for this. It's not surprising that these two were the army of AxCrazy, blood-thirsty witches on them, and [[CurbStompBattle a hilariously one-sided fight ensues]].
* In the Witcher Saga, Ciri mows down a squad of bad guys after luring them onto a frozen lake. In thick fog. She has skates.
* The short story ''[[http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/gregory_07_13_reprint/ The Illustrated Biography of Lord Grimm]]'' by Daryl Gregory, showing the POV of those who happen to be living in a country ruled by a supervillain when it's 'invaded'
primary inspiration for the umpteenth time by American superheroes...WhatDoYouMeanItsNotPoliticalBatman.



* In ''Literature/TheHuntersBladesTrilogy'', which is part of ''Literature/TheLegendOfDrizzt'', the titular hero uses his skills as a ranger as well as his MasterSwordsman status to inflict devastating losses on the orcs coming to join a local warlord. It's his hope he can ebb the recruitment of King Obould's army through ''sheer terror.'' It works.



* Happens quite often in ''Literature/TheExecutioner'' series with villains invoking the terror of the black-clad OneManArmy with icy blue eyes, striding untouched through their ranks, dealing death.
* Nadreck of Palain VII from the Lensman series. Made possibly even worse because the mooks never even realise he's at work until they all suddenly go mad and kill each other... and depopulate their entire planet except for 3 leaders.
* This happens at least [[OncePerEpisode once a book]] in ''Literature/TheOregonFiles'', whenever the bad guys [[OhCrap realize]] that the titular ship isn't a dilapidated tramp steamer full of grungy sailors, [[WhatAPieceOfJunk but a highly advanced, heavily armed warship crewed by special forces-trained mercenaries.]]
* The scene that brings Tobimar and Poplock together in ''Literature/PhoenixRising'', as Tobimar is rescued from attacking ''mazakh'' by a mysterious force that seems to attack out of nowhere and then disappear. The ''mazakh'' who aren't killed outright flee in terror, and even Tobimar is distinctly unsettled.
* ''Literature/TheJungleBook'': When Baloo and Bagheera want to save Mowgli from the sinister Bandar Log monkeys they enlist the help of one of the most feared predators in the jungle, Kaa the python. He is still terrifying from the perspective of his enemies, especially the Bandar Log who panick and become his prey in no time.

to:

* Happens quite often Jack Fleming from ''Literature/TheVampireFiles'' has employed this trope occasionally, using his vampiric powers to feign a haunting in ''Literature/TheExecutioner'' series an early novel and to completely scare the crap out of gangsters in his later, grimmer adventures.
* ''Literature/TheWardstoneChronicles'': In Book 6, the protagonists are forced into an EnemyMine situation
with villains invoking the terror of the black-clad OneManArmy with icy blue eyes, striding untouched through Witches. As they are travelling to Greece, their ranks, dealing death.
* Nadreck of Palain VII from
ship is attacked by pirates. The heroes react by unleashing the Lensman series. Made possibly even worse because army of AxCrazy, blood-thirsty witches on them, and [[CurbStompBattle a hilariously one-sided fight ensues]].
* In
the mooks never even realise he's at work until they all suddenly go mad and kill each other... and depopulate their entire planet except for 3 leaders.
* This happens at least [[OncePerEpisode once
''[[Literature/TheWitcher Witcher]] Saga'', Ciri mows down a book]] in ''Literature/TheOregonFiles'', whenever the squad of bad guys [[OhCrap realize]] that the titular ship isn't after luring them onto a dilapidated tramp steamer full of grungy sailors, [[WhatAPieceOfJunk but a highly advanced, heavily armed warship crewed by special forces-trained mercenaries.]]
* The scene that brings Tobimar and Poplock together in ''Literature/PhoenixRising'', as Tobimar is rescued from attacking ''mazakh'' by a mysterious force that seems to attack out of nowhere and then disappear. The ''mazakh'' who aren't killed outright flee in terror, and even Tobimar is distinctly unsettled.
* ''Literature/TheJungleBook'': When Baloo and Bagheera want to save Mowgli from the sinister Bandar Log monkeys they enlist the help of one of the most feared predators in the jungle, Kaa the python. He is still terrifying from the perspective of his enemies, especially the Bandar Log who panick and become his prey in no time.
frozen lake. In thick fog. She has skates.



* In the final season of ''Series/TwentyFour 24'', possibly the crowning moment of Jack Bauer's RoaringRampageOfRevenge was the scene where he stops traffic in an underground carpark and proceeds to tear his way through a small army of mooks while wearing head-to-toe body armour and a big black goalie mask. Another moment comes from the end of the same episode which shows the aftermath of a roomful of mooks (and TheDragon) that Jack has massacred in horrific ways, with only one survivor left.

to:

* In the final season of ''Series/TwentyFour 24'', ''Series/TwentyFour'', possibly the crowning moment of Jack Bauer's RoaringRampageOfRevenge was the scene where he stops traffic in an underground carpark and proceeds to tear his way through a small army of mooks while wearing head-to-toe body armour and a big black goalie mask. Another moment comes from the end of the same episode which shows the aftermath of a roomful of mooks (and TheDragon) that Jack has massacred in horrific ways, with only one survivor left.



* If you [[TooDumbToLive make]] Franchise/{{Superman}} in Franchise/{{DCAU}} angry enough, he may do this. [[BoisterousBruiser Hawkgirl]] and [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy Aquaman]], on the other hand, skip ''directly'' to this.
* Shades of this in the portrayal of "The Night Watcher," Raphael's vigilante persona in ''WesternAnimation/{{TMNT}}''.
* One episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' started out this way by showing what Brock Sampson in action looks like through the eyes of a rookie henchman. After the rookie's corpse is used as a test subject in Dr. Venture's reanimation experiments, [[WhatMeasureIsAMook Brock must deal with the guilt of accepting that the disposable mooks he's been killing are generally decent people]].
* In an episode of ''WesternAnimation/MegasXLR'', "Coop D'Etat," an army of giant robots follow Megas into a large cloud and are picked off one by one. One of the robots even trembles in fear.
* Several ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'' episodes were told through the eyes of sympathetic characters attempting to kill Jack. Jack is just as unstoppable in those episodes as any others.
** At the end of the [[FiveEpisodePilot Three Episode Pilot]], Jack has single-handedly decimated a horde of insectoid MechaMooks, ending with one of the robots surrounding him taking a single step ''away'' from the samurai covered in the SymbolicBlood of his enemies. "No. There ''is'' no escape." Violent action ensues.
** Gets played for laughs in Season Five. Aku has spent the past ''fifty years'' throwing ''everything he has'' at Jack and watching everything he has ''fail miserably'', and plus Jack has ''stopped aging'' so he can't even just hide and wait for Jack to naturally die. The possibility of Jack eventually finding and killing him has been hanging over his head all this time, and it's driven him to become a NervousWreck. [[spoiler:Little does he know, Jack has lost his sword and so can't kill him.]]

to:

* If you [[TooDumbToLive make]] Franchise/{{Superman}} in Franchise/{{DCAU}} angry enough, he may do this. [[BoisterousBruiser Hawkgirl]] and [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy Aquaman]], on the other hand, skip ''directly'' to this.
* Shades of this in the portrayal of "The Night Watcher," Raphael's vigilante persona in ''WesternAnimation/{{TMNT}}''.
* One
The very first episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' started out ''WesternAnimation/AeonFlux'' casts the title character in this way by showing what Brock Sampson in action looks like through light, slaughtering [[FacelessGoons masked mooks]] left and right to [[CrossesTheLineTwice levels reaching almost parody]]. And then the eyes of a rookie henchman. After masks come off, the rookie's corpse is used as a test subject in Dr. Venture's reanimation experiments, [[WhatMeasureIsAMook Brock must deal with families come to collect the guilt of accepting that the disposable mooks he's been killing are generally decent people]].
* In an episode of ''WesternAnimation/MegasXLR'', "Coop D'Etat," an army of giant robots follow Megas into a large cloud and are picked off one by one.
bodies… One of the robots even trembles in fear.
* Several ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'' episodes were told through
early shorts (before the eyes series was made) begins with Aeon moving down dozens of sympathetic characters attempting enemy, and then the narrative abandons her to kill Jack. Jack is focus on one soldier's painful dying moments after being shot down.
* In the ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' episode "The Avatar State", Aang has a nightmare where he sees himself in the Avatar state, and realizes
just as unstoppable in those episodes as any others.
** At
how terrifying an opponent he is to his enemies when he unloads the end of the [[FiveEpisodePilot Three Episode Pilot]], Jack has single-handedly decimated whup-ass.
* In ''WesternAnimation/TheAvengersEarthsMightiestHeroes'', Hank Pym's introductory scene and EstablishingCharacterMoment [[BewareTheNiceOnes as
a horde of insectoid MechaMooks, ending with one of the robots surrounding nice guy unless you push him too far]] shows him conducting an experiment which is interrupted by a team of badass mercenaries. He shrinks himself [[HeartIsAnAwesomePower and shows how dangerous that power can be]] by taking a single step ''away'' from out the samurai covered group one by one, essentially invisible, causing all of them to totally lose their composure and freak out. The whole thing is inspired by a scene in ''Film/{{Predator}}'' (with Hank standing in for the SymbolicBlood of his enemies. "No. There ''is'' no escape." Violent action ensues.
** Gets played for laughs in Season Five. Aku has spent the past ''fifty years'' throwing ''everything he has'' at Jack and watching everything he has ''fail miserably'', and plus Jack has ''stopped aging'' so he can't even just hide and wait for Jack to naturally die. The possibility of Jack eventually finding and killing him has been hanging over his head all this time, and it's driven him to become a NervousWreck. [[spoiler:Little does he know, Jack has lost his sword and so can't kill him.]]
Predator).



* In the ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' episode "The Avatar State," Aang has a nightmare where he sees himself in the Avatar state, and realizes just how terrifying an opponent he is to his enemies when he unloads the whup-ass.
* In ''WesternAnimation/BeastWars'' Optimus Primal, of all bots, pulls this in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vEwoJpHYMa8&feature=related "Gorilla Warfare"]], when he's hit by a virus that was ''supposed'' to turn him into a coward. Instead, it made him [[GoneHorriblyWrong a devoid-of-fear berserker]] who rampaged through the Predacon base, subjecting [[MadScientist Taratulas]] and [[ButtMonkey Waspinator]] to this trope.
* On ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'':
** Raven once invoked this trope on Dr. Light ''by accident'', because her self-control was slipping and [[spoiler: her dark/angry half-demon side]] got out of control. Given a funny ContinuityNod later in the series, when a gleefully-gloating Dr. Light suddenly found himself facing Raven again, and ''immediately'' surrendered and asked to be taken to jail.
** In the two-parter ''Aftershock'', the Titans as a whole, having to deal with their SixthRangerTraitor Terra, first approach by going easy on her, giving her chances to come back to her senses and return to them. [[RedemptionRejection She brutally rejects every single time, viciously taking them down one by one]] all while [[KickTheDog mocking some of them]]. Comes the second part, the Titans stop holding their punches against her... and proceed to tear through her as she runs in terror.

to:

* In the ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' episode "The Avatar State," Aang has Being a nightmare where he sees himself in the Avatar state, pastiche of Franchise/{{Batman}} and realizes just how terrifying an opponent he is Radio/TheShadow, ''WesternAnimation/DarkwingDuck'' tries very hard to his enemies when he unloads the whup-ass.
* In ''WesternAnimation/BeastWars'' Optimus Primal, of all bots, pulls this in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vEwoJpHYMa8&feature=related "Gorilla Warfare"]], when he's hit by a virus that was ''supposed'' to turn him into a coward. Instead, it made him [[GoneHorriblyWrong a devoid-of-fear berserker]] who rampaged through the Predacon base, subjecting [[MadScientist Taratulas]] and [[ButtMonkey Waspinator]] to this trope.
* On ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'':
** Raven once invoked
pull this trope off. He usually fails, but on Dr. Light ''by accident'', because her self-control was slipping and [[spoiler: her dark/angry half-demon side]] got out occasions, he does succeed quite well.
* Franchise/{{DCAU}}:
** The opening sequence
of control. Given a funny ContinuityNod later ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' follows in the series, same vein as other ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' media.
*** The best in-episode example is in "The Trial". Batman is loose and the villains are in a dark room lit only by Two-Face's lighter. Batman, in the exact environment where he is next to invincible, circles around the edges of the room, outside the lighter's glow, and grabs the villains one by one. The Joker finally says it's time to panic
when a gleefully-gloating Dr. Light suddenly found himself facing Raven again, he sees Harley suspended from the ceiling and ''immediately'' surrendered bound with the straitjacket Batman had just escaped from. To make things worse, Harley ''had'' been holding onto Batman's utility belt...
*** Another good example is at the climax of "The Forgotten", which has Batman taking down some evil gold miners who have been enslaving homeless people. In a startling aversion of HollywoodDarkness, the BigBad has the miners switch off ''all'' the lights in the mine
and asked turn on their head-lamps as the only source of illumination, [[WrongGenreSavvy not realizing that Batman]] ''[[WrongGenreSavvy loves]]'' [[WrongGenreSavvy the dark]]. The miners are like fish in a barrel as Batman incapacitates them - [[NothingIsScarier and all of this offscreen, as all we get are screams, sounds of struggle and the remaining miners slowly coming unglued]], until their leader actually tries to be flee from Batman rather than attempting to kill him.
*** "The Man Who Killed Batman" [[PlayingWithATrope plays some variants]] when [[{{Mooks}} humble mook]] Sid the Squid gains the RedBaron title [[TheMagnificent ''The Man Who Killed Batman'']] more or less by accident. First, FalseFriend {{mook|s}} Eddie G. arranges for Sid to play the bait while Eddie gets away, so Sid is chased by a TerrorHero. Sid is saved by his own luck and stupidity, apparently killing Batman in the process. He's
taken to jail.
** In
a BadGuyBar to celebrate, only to have some BitPartBadGuys GangBangers challenge him for the two-parter ''Aftershock'', title of "the toughest guy in Gotham." Cue a BarBrawl. In quick succession, Sid is "saved" by the Titans as a whole, having arrival of the police, only to deal be menaced by Harvey Bullock with their SixthRangerTraitor Terra, first approach a little JackBauerInterrogationTechnique; "saved" by going easy a lawyer, who turns out to be Harley Quinn and leads Sid to the Joker, who puts Sid in a DeathTrap; escapes by a DeusExMachina and seeks protection from TheDon Rupert Thorne, who suspects Sid is trying to pull a ScheherezadeGambit and decides [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness Sid has outlived his usefulness]]; and finally truly saved by Batman, who plays this trope straight on her, giving her chances Thorne's gang, and sends Sid to come jail... where he is held in high regard for ''almost'' killing Batman.
** If you [[TooDumbToLive make]] Franchise/{{Superman}} angry enough, he may do this. [[BoisterousBruiser Hawkgirl]] and [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy Aquaman]], on the other hand, skip ''directly'' to this.
* Given the Urpneys' immense SympatheticPOV (and how cowardly they were on top of it), slapstick variations were fairly common in ''WesternAnimation/TheDreamstone''. They even tried to make the cutesy heroes look as menacing as possible in many cases. "The Dream Beam Invasion" is a rare case of using the trope and then [[ATasteOfTheirOwnMedicine reversing it
back to her senses and return to them. [[RedemptionRejection She brutally rejects every single time, viciously taking onto the heroes]] straight afterwards. Apparently when the Urpneys stopped being afraid of them down one by one]] all while [[KickTheDog mocking some of them]]. Comes and actually threatened to fight back, [[PaperTiger the second part, the Titans stop holding their punches against her... and proceed to tear through her as she runs in terror. heroes were kind of out of strategies.]]



* The very first episode of ''WesternAnimation/AeonFlux'' casts the title character in this light, slaughtering [[FacelessGoons masked mooks]] left and right to [[CrossesTheLineTwice levels reaching almost parody]]. And then the masks come off, the families come to collect the bodies… One of the early shorts (before the series was made) begins with Aeon moving down dozens of enemy, and then the narrative abandons her to focus on one soldier's painful dying moments after being shot down.
* The opening sequence of ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' follows in the same vein as other ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' media.
** The best in-episode example is in "The Trial". Batman is loose and the villains are in a dark room lit only by Two-Face's lighter. Batman, in the exact environment where he is next to invincible, circles around the edges of the room, outside the lighter's glow, and grabs the villains one by one. The Joker finally says it's time to panic when he sees Harley suspended from the ceiling and bound with the straitjacket Batman had just escaped from. To make things worse, Harley ''had'' been holding onto Batman's utility belt...
** Another good example is at the climax of "The Forgotten", which has Batman taking down some evil gold miners who have been enslaving homeless people. In a startling aversion of HollywoodDarkness, the BigBad has the miners switch off ''all'' the lights in the mine and turn on their head-lamps as the only source of illumination, [[WrongGenreSavvy not realizing that Batman]] ''[[WrongGenreSavvy loves]]'' [[WrongGenreSavvy the dark]]. The miners are like fish in a barrel as Batman incapacitates them - [[NothingIsScarier and all of this offscreen, as all we get are screams, sounds of struggle and the remaining miners slowly coming unglued]], until their leader actually tries to flee from Batman rather than attempting to kill him.
** "The Man Who Killed Batman" [[PlayingWithATrope plays some variants]] when [[{{Mooks}} humble mook]] Sid the Squid gains the RedBaron title [[TheMagnificent ''The Man Who Killed Batman'']] more or less by accident. First, FalseFriend {{mook|s}} Eddie G. arranges for Sid to play the bait while Eddie gets away, so Sid is chased by a TerrorHero. Sid is saved by his own luck and stupidity, apparently killing Batman in the process. He's taken to a BadGuyBar to celebrate, only to have some BitPartBadGuys GangBangers challenge him for the title of "the toughest guy in Gotham." Cue a BarBrawl. In quick succession, Sid is "saved" by the arrival of the police, only to be menaced by Harvey Bullock with a little JackBauerInterrogationTechnique; "saved" by a lawyer, who turns out to be Harley Quinn and leads Sid to the Joker, who puts Sid in a DeathTrap; escapes by a DeusExMachina and seeks protection from TheDon Rupert Thorne, who suspects Sid is trying to pull a ScheherezadeGambit and decides [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness Sid has outlived his usefulness]]; and finally truly saved by Batman, who plays this trope straight on Thorne's gang, and sends Sid to jail... where he is held in high regard for ''almost'' killing Batman.
* [[GentleGiant Bulkhead]] pulls this in ''WesternAnimation/TransformersPrime'' with MECH Mooks.
** [[spoiler: Predaking, having learned that the 'Cons engineered the destruction of his brethren, goes on a rampage inside the warship. The Vehicons try their best, but they're little more than an annoyance.]]
* In ''WesternAnimation/TheAvengersEarthsMightiestHeroes'', Hank Pym's introductory scene and EstablishingCharacterMoment [[BewareTheNiceOnes as a nice guy unless you push him too far]] shows him conducting an experiment which is interrupted by a team of badass mercenaries. He shrinks himself [[HeartIsAnAwesomePower and shows how dangerous that power can be]] by taking out the group one by one, essentially invisible, causing all of them to totally lose their composure and freak out. The whole thing is inspired by a scene in ''Film/{{Predator}}'' (with Hank standing in for the Predator).
* In ''Disney/LiloAndStitch'', Stitch's escape scene in the first part plays out this way apart from the fact that protagonist IS a criminal and his hunters are the cops who attempt to arrest him.
* Being a pastiche of Franchise/{{Batman}} and Radio/TheShadow, ''WesternAnimation/DarkwingDuck'' tries very hard to pull this trope off. He usually fails, but on occasions, he does succeed quite well.

to:

* The very first In an episode of ''WesternAnimation/AeonFlux'' casts the title character in this light, slaughtering [[FacelessGoons masked mooks]] left ''WesternAnimation/MegasXLR'', "Coop D'Etat", an army of giant robots follow Megas into a large cloud and right to [[CrossesTheLineTwice levels reaching almost parody]]. And then the masks come off, the families come to collect the bodies… One of the early shorts (before the series was made) begins with Aeon moving down dozens of enemy, and then the narrative abandons her to focus on one soldier's painful dying moments after being shot down.
* The opening sequence of ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' follows in the same vein as other ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' media.
** The best in-episode example is in "The Trial". Batman is loose and the villains
are in a dark room lit only by Two-Face's lighter. Batman, in the exact environment where he is next to invincible, circles around the edges of the room, outside the lighter's glow, and grabs the villains picked off one by one. The Joker finally says it's time to panic when he sees Harley suspended from One of the ceiling and bound with robots even trembles in fear.
* Several ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'' episodes were told through
the straitjacket Batman had just escaped from. To make things worse, Harley ''had'' been holding onto Batman's utility belt...
** Another good example is at the climax
eyes of "The Forgotten", which has Batman taking down some evil gold miners who have been enslaving homeless people. In a startling aversion of HollywoodDarkness, the BigBad has the miners switch off ''all'' the lights in the mine and turn on their head-lamps as the only source of illumination, [[WrongGenreSavvy not realizing that Batman]] ''[[WrongGenreSavvy loves]]'' [[WrongGenreSavvy the dark]]. The miners are like fish in a barrel as Batman incapacitates them - [[NothingIsScarier and all of this offscreen, as all we get are screams, sounds of struggle and the remaining miners slowly coming unglued]], until their leader actually tries to flee from Batman rather than sympathetic characters attempting to kill him.
Jack. Jack is just as unstoppable in those episodes as any others.
** "The Man Who Killed Batman" [[PlayingWithATrope plays some variants]] when [[{{Mooks}} humble mook]] Sid At the Squid gains the RedBaron title [[TheMagnificent ''The Man Who Killed Batman'']] more or less by accident. First, FalseFriend {{mook|s}} Eddie G. arranges for Sid to play the bait while Eddie gets away, so Sid is chased by a TerrorHero. Sid is saved by his own luck and stupidity, apparently killing Batman in the process. He's taken to a BadGuyBar to celebrate, only to have some BitPartBadGuys GangBangers challenge him for the title of "the toughest guy in Gotham." Cue a BarBrawl. In quick succession, Sid is "saved" by the arrival end of the police, only to be menaced by Harvey Bullock [[FiveEpisodePilot Three Episode Pilot]], Jack has single-handedly decimated a horde of insectoid MechaMooks, ending with a little JackBauerInterrogationTechnique; "saved" by a lawyer, who turns out to be Harley Quinn and leads Sid to one of the Joker, who puts Sid in a DeathTrap; escapes by a DeusExMachina and seeks protection from TheDon Rupert Thorne, who suspects Sid is trying to pull a ScheherezadeGambit and decides [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness Sid has outlived his usefulness]]; and finally truly saved by Batman, who plays this trope straight on Thorne's gang, and sends Sid to jail... where he is held in high regard for ''almost'' killing Batman.
* [[GentleGiant Bulkhead]] pulls this in ''WesternAnimation/TransformersPrime'' with MECH Mooks.
** [[spoiler: Predaking, having learned that the 'Cons engineered the destruction of his brethren, goes on a rampage inside the warship. The Vehicons try their best, but they're little more than an annoyance.]]
* In ''WesternAnimation/TheAvengersEarthsMightiestHeroes'', Hank Pym's introductory scene and EstablishingCharacterMoment [[BewareTheNiceOnes as a nice guy unless you push
robots surrounding him too far]] shows him conducting an experiment which is interrupted by a team of badass mercenaries. He shrinks himself [[HeartIsAnAwesomePower and shows how dangerous that power can be]] by taking out the group one by one, essentially invisible, causing all of them to totally lose their composure and freak out. The whole thing is inspired by a scene in ''Film/{{Predator}}'' (with Hank standing in for the Predator).
* In ''Disney/LiloAndStitch'', Stitch's escape scene in the first part plays out this way apart
single step ''away'' from the fact that protagonist IS a criminal samurai covered in the SymbolicBlood of his enemies. "No. There ''is'' no escape." Violent action ensues.
** Gets played for laughs in Season Five. Aku has spent the past ''fifty years'' throwing ''everything he has'' at Jack
and watching everything he has ''fail miserably'', and plus Jack has ''stopped aging'' so he can't even just hide and wait for Jack to naturally die. The possibility of Jack eventually finding and killing him has been hanging over his hunters are the cops who attempt to arrest him.
* Being a pastiche of Franchise/{{Batman}} and Radio/TheShadow, ''WesternAnimation/DarkwingDuck'' tries very hard to pull
head all this trope off. He usually fails, but on occasions, he time, and it's driven him to become a NervousWreck. [[spoiler:Little does succeed quite well.he know, Jack has lost his sword and so can't kill him.]]



* Used in ''WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles2012'' with Splinter. His appearance in Shredder's chamber is heralded by a panicked-looking Foot {{Mook|s}} falling into the room and being dragged back into darkness and a pair of GlowingEyesOfDoom.
* Given the Urpneys immense SympatheticPOV (and how cowardly they were on top of it), slapstick variations were fairly common in ''WesternAnimation/TheDreamstone''. They even tried to make the cutesy heroes look as menacing as possible in many cases. "The Dream Beam Invasion" is a rare case of using the trope and then [[ATasteOfTheirOwnMedicine reversing it back onto the heroes]] straight afterwards. Apparently when the Urpneys stopped being afraid of them and actually threatened to fight back, [[PaperTiger the heroes were kind of out of strategies.]]


Added DiffLines:

* ''Franchise/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles'':
** Used in ''WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles2012'' with Splinter. His appearance in Shredder's chamber is heralded by a panicked-looking Foot {{Mook|s}} falling into the room and being dragged back into darkness and a pair of GlowingEyesOfDoom.
** Shades of this in the portrayal of "The Night Watcher", Raphael's vigilante persona in ''WesternAnimation/{{TMNT}}''.
* On ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'':
** Raven once invoked this trope on Dr. Light ''by accident'', because her self-control was slipping and [[spoiler: her dark/angry half-demon side]] got out of control. Given a funny ContinuityNod later in the series, when a gleefully-gloating Dr. Light suddenly found himself facing Raven again, and ''immediately'' surrendered and asked to be taken to jail.
** In the two-parter ''Aftershock'', the Titans as a whole, having to deal with their SixthRangerTraitor Terra, first approach by going easy on her, giving her chances to come back to her senses and return to them. [[RedemptionRejection She brutally rejects every single time, viciously taking them down one by one]] all while [[KickTheDog mocking some of them]]. Comes the second part, the Titans stop holding their punches against her... and proceed to tear through her as she runs in terror.
* ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'':
** [[GentleGiant Bulkhead]] pulls this in ''WesternAnimation/TransformersPrime'' with MECH Mooks.
*** [[spoiler: Predaking, having learned that the 'Cons engineered the destruction of his brethren, goes on a rampage inside the warship. The Vehicons try their best, but they're little more than an annoyance.]]
** In ''WesternAnimation/BeastWars'' Optimus Primal, of all bots, pulls this in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vEwoJpHYMa8&feature=related "Gorilla Warfare"]], when he's hit by a virus that was ''supposed'' to turn him into a coward. Instead, it made him [[GoneHorriblyWrong a devoid-of-fear berserker]] who rampaged through the Predacon base, subjecting [[MadScientist Taratulas]] and [[ButtMonkey Waspinator]] to this trope.
* One episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' started out this way by showing what Brock Sampson in action looks like through the eyes of a rookie henchman. After the rookie's corpse is used as a test subject in Dr. Venture's reanimation experiments, [[WhatMeasureIsAMook Brock must deal with the guilt of accepting that the disposable mooks he's been killing are generally decent people]].
17th May '17 7:49:15 PM AthenaBlue
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** Lan Fan has a HesBack moment in which she shows that she's recovered from the loss of her arm by rescuing Ed and his group from Gluttony by cutting Gluttony to ribbons with the blade attached to her automail. It's an awesome scene, but it's initially shown from the perspective of Gluttony, an ObliviouslyEvil PsychopathicManchild who is overwhelmed with pain and fear.

to:

** Lan Fan has a HesBack [[HesBack She's Back]] moment in which she shows that she's recovered from the loss of her arm by rescuing Ed and his group from Gluttony by cutting Gluttony to ribbons with the blade attached to her automail. It's an awesome scene, but it's initially shown from the perspective of Gluttony, an ObliviouslyEvil PsychopathicManchild who is overwhelmed with pain and fear.



[[folder:Film]]

to:

[[folder:Film]][[folder:Film -- Live-Action]]



* ''Film/TheCrow'' had a much more elaborate re-creation of the shootout on the street from the comic, set this time up in Top Dollar's penthouse suite above the nightclub he owns. Unlike in the comic, here Eric doesn't actually want to kill anyone except for Skank, one of his fiancée's rapists (all of whom were acting on Top Dollar's orders, but Eric doesn't know this yet) - and was willing to let everyone else live, including Top Dollar and his half-sister, if they would just hand Skank over to him. But Top Dollar's extreme arrogance drives him to immediately order Eric's execution - and the inevitable result is what looks like two dozen henchmen being slaughtered either by gunfire, [[BreakOutTheMuseumPiece Top Dollar's stash of antique weapons]], or simply being thrown out the window. Ridiculously, they all keep coming at Eric even when it should be clear that they are [[CurbStompBattle absolutely no match for him]] ''even when all together'', yet alone as one or two stubbornly persistent men.
* Pops up near the end of ''Film/{{Waterworld}}'', when the Mariner boards the Smoker vessel. After murdering one of them, a group of Smokers start hunting him throughout the ship. He slowly picks them off in a segment interspersed with scenes of the MoralityPet bragging about how the Mariner will kill them all.
* ''Film/KillBill'': The Bride's battle against the Crazy 88, in which she utterly spanks them. (literally, in one case) It's nearly 20 minutes long!
* ''Film/{{Commando}},'' especially the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0B5xEBASwgE toolshed scene]].



* In ''Film/IronMan1'', Tony's escape from the cave in a huge, unstoppable suit of powered armor is played out a bit like a monster movie. He does it again when he goes back to Afghanistan and kills all the terrorists with his new upgraded armor.
* The first appearance of the Hulk in ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'' is deliberately done in this way.
* In ''Film/TheScorpionKing'', the hero uses a sandstorm to force a bunch of Mooks into a cave, where he kills them one by one.
* The opening hit scene of ''Leon, Film/TheProfessional''. Leon knocks off the drug henchmen one by one - pointblank headshot, garrotte from the ceiling panel, pulled over the stairwell by a necktie, numerous unseen shootings - without anyone (mooks or viewer) ever laying eyes on him. "Those bastards blocked both the exits," mutters the kingpin, when seeing one of his mooks hanging by the neck on CCTV. (He ends up with a knife to his throat, produced by a disembodied arm out of shadow.)

to:

* In ''Film/IronMan1'', Tony's escape from the cave in a huge, unstoppable suit of powered armor is played out a bit like a monster movie. He does it again when he goes back to Afghanistan and kills all the terrorists with his new upgraded armor.
* The first appearance of the Hulk in ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'' is deliberately done in this way.
* In ''Film/TheScorpionKing'', the hero uses a sandstorm to force a bunch of Mooks into a cave, where he kills them one by one.
* The opening hit scene of ''Leon, Film/TheProfessional''. Leon knocks off the drug henchmen one by one - pointblank headshot, garrotte from the ceiling panel, pulled over the stairwell by a necktie, numerous unseen shootings - without anyone (mooks or viewer) ever laying eyes on him. "Those bastards blocked both the exits," mutters the kingpin, when seeing one of his mooks hanging by the neck on CCTV. (He ends up with a knife to his throat, produced by a disembodied arm out of shadow.)



* In ''Film/ActOfValor'', all of the major gunfights the [=SEALs=] get in invoke this on the part of the terrorists/cartel soldiers. The parts shown from their perspective as they ([[CurbstompBattle try to]]) fight the [=SEALs=] shows them facing deadly squads of elite soldiers who are slipping among their positions in total silence, snipers picking off their men as they try to flee, and deadly-coordinated [=SEALs=] cutting down their troops with precise shots.
* A scene in ''Film/AirForceOne'' stages a shootout in the baggage hold of the eponymous plane; it's entirely from the perspective of the Russian baddies, while the hero, the President, is seen only as a vague silhouette delivering death to the terrified mooks.
* At the end of the remake of ''Bangkok Dangerous'' Joo stalks and efficiently kills many gangsters as they grow increasingly jumpy and frantic.
* The opening scene of Tim Burton's ''Film/{{Batman}}'' qualifies - but then the trope is inverted in the movie's cathedral climax, with ComicBook/TheJoker ''inviting'' Batman ("Shall we dance?") to tangle with his stealthy, ''gongfu''-trained assassins. What makes the scenario especially ironic is that Batman has just survived being ''blown up'' and is already bleeding and at least partially physically weakened; he does manage to dispatch all three of the mooks - indeed, killing all but one of them! - but it isn't easy.



* The opening scene of Tim Burton's ''Film/{{Batman}}'' qualifies - but then the trope is inverted in the movie's cathedral climax, with ComicBook/TheJoker ''inviting'' Batman ("Shall we dance?") to tangle with his stealthy, ''gongfu''-trained assassins. What makes the scenario especially ironic is that Batman has just survived being ''blown up'' and is already bleeding and at least partially physically weakened; he does manage to dispatch all three of the mooks - indeed, killing all but one of them! - but it isn't easy.
* The intro of ''Film/NinjaAssassin'' is a textbook example. [[spoiler:Except it's not the ''hero'' who's acting the part of the monster.]]
* ''Film/{{Serenity}}'': River's rampage in the Maidenhead bar is definitely one of these.
* The assassination attempt on Moses in ''Film/{{Red}}''.

to:

* The opening scene of Tim Burton's ''Film/{{Batman}}'' qualifies - but then In ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'', [[Comicbook/{{Batman}} Batman's]] first appearance plays out like this, except the trope POV characters are two Gotham cops rather than {{Mooks}}. First, they find the slaves who Batman saved from a human trafficker, refusing to leave their cell because the [[HorrifyingHero thing]] that saved them is inverted still in the movie's cathedral climax, building. Then the cops hear the sounds of a fight and the human trafficker's terrified scream. The [[NewMeat rookie cop]], Officer Rucka, finds the human trafficker handcuffed to a radiator, badly beaten and branded with ComicBook/TheJoker ''inviting'' Batman ("Shall we dance?") to tangle with his stealthy, ''gongfu''-trained assassins. What makes the scenario especially ironic is a Bat symbol. Rucka, already freaking out, suddenly realises that Batman has just survived being ''blown up'' is right behind him, causing him to panic and is already bleeding fire wildly at the Bat while Batman [[WallCrawl quickly crawls across the ceiling]] in a ''very'' creepy way and at least partially physically weakened; he does manage to dispatch all three of the mooks - indeed, killing all but one of them! - but it isn't easy.disappears.
* The intro of ''Film/NinjaAssassin'' is a textbook example. [[spoiler:Except it's not ''Film/{{Commando}}'', especially the ''hero'' who's [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0B5xEBASwgE toolshed scene]].
* ''Film/TheCrow'' had a much more elaborate re-creation of the shootout on the street from the comic, set this time up in Top Dollar's penthouse suite above the nightclub he owns. Unlike in the comic, here Eric doesn't actually want to kill anyone except for Skank, one of his fiancée's rapists (all of whom were
acting on Top Dollar's orders, but Eric doesn't know this yet) - and was willing to let everyone else live, including Top Dollar and his half-sister, if they would just hand Skank over to him. But Top Dollar's extreme arrogance drives him to immediately order Eric's execution - and the part inevitable result is what looks like two dozen henchmen being slaughtered either by gunfire, [[BreakOutTheMuseumPiece Top Dollar's stash of antique weapons]], or simply being thrown out the monster.]]
window. Ridiculously, they all keep coming at Eric even when it should be clear that they are [[CurbStompBattle absolutely no match for him]] ''even when all together'', yet alone as one or two stubbornly persistent men.
* ''Film/{{Serenity}}'': River's rampage in ''Film/DeadMansShoes'' follows the Maidenhead bar is definitely victims whenever the main character confronts them.
* In ''Film/{{Desperado}}'', the opening scene has El Mariachi's character reintroduced this way as Buscemi narrates over
one of these.
* The assassination attempt ''Film/JamesBond'' films rarely go here due to the necessity of keeping Bond a positive character. There have been exceptions:
** Prof. Dent's execution in ''Film/DrNo''.
** After Bond sends a mook
on Moses skis careening over a cliff in ''Film/{{Red}}''.''Film/OnHerMajestysSecretService'', the camera stays on the mook as he takes his long, final, fall to his death.
** The death scream uttered by the unnamed villain whose parachute Bond steals at the start of ''Film/{{Moonraker}}'' is one of the most disturbing sounds ever heard in cinema.
** The way Bond kills the bald man (i.e. the expy Blofeld) at the start of ''Film/ForYourEyesOnly'' could trigger this trope in anyone with claustrophobia.
** Dr. Kaufman, in ''Film/TomorrowNeverDies'', is one of the only characters in the Bond film canon to be heard begging for his life before 007 kills him anyway.
** A very subtle one occurs in ''Film/CasinoRoyale2006''. When Bond shoots the corrupt section chief in his office, for a split second a close-up of a photograph on the man's desk is shown - an image showing him with his family.



* ''Franchise/StarWars''

to:

* ''Franchise/StarWars''''Film/KillBill'': The Bride's battle against the Crazy 88, in which she utterly spanks them (literally, in one case). It's nearly 20 minutes long!
* In ''Film/TheLongKissGoodnight'', Charlie's rampage through the farmhouse is not seen, only heard, from Mitch's perspective as he's locked in the basement.
* Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse:
** In ''Film/IronMan1'', Tony's escape from the cave in a huge, unstoppable suit of powered armor is played out a bit like a monster movie. He does it again when he goes back to Afghanistan and kills all the terrorists with his new upgraded armor.
** The first appearance of the Hulk in ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'' is deliberately done in this way.
** ''Film/AvengersAgeOfUltron'' opens with soldiers rushing about because they're under attack... by the Avengers.
--->'''Henchman:''' Herr Strucker, it's the Avengers!\\
'''Strucker:''' Can we hold them?!\\
'''Henchman:''' They're [[CurbstompBattle the]] [[BadassCrew Avengers...]]
* The intro of ''Film/NinjaAssassin'' is a textbook example. [[spoiler:Except it's not the ''hero'' who's acting the part of the monster.]]
* The opening hit scene of ''Leon, Film/TheProfessional''. Leon knocks off the drug henchmen one by one - pointblank headshot, garrote from the ceiling panel, pulled over the stairwell by a necktie, numerous unseen shootings - without anyone (mooks or viewer) ever laying eyes on him. "Those bastards blocked both the exits," mutters the kingpin, when seeing one of his mooks hanging by the neck on CCTV. (He ends up with a knife to his throat, produced by a disembodied arm out of shadow.)
* The assassination attempt on Moses in ''Film/{{Red}}''.
* In ''Film/ResidentEvilApocalypse'' the S.T.A.R.S. squad who are targeted by Nemesis who massacres all of them, except for the taxi driver who is spared.
* Franchise/{{Robocop}} has shades of this. He is effectively bulletproof, slow but nigh-unstoppable, more machine than man, and has perfect aim. Most bad guys try to run while Robocop walks after them like a typical horror movie villain. His early arrests of Emil and Clarence in ''Film/RoboCop1987'' both emphasize their utter helplessness when face-to-face with him.
* Joey's [[RoaringRampageOfRevenge actions]] in ''Film/RollingVengeance'' tends to play out this way. We hardly get any shots of him inside the truck, while his victims flee desperately in terror from him. The truck itself is demonic-looking, completely with flames spewing out its exhaust pipes and a giant drill on the front. This could just have easily been a horror movie if the monster truck was driven by a villain instead.
* In ''Film/TheRookie'', Charlie Sheen's character instantly switches from coward to badass when his partner (Clint Eastwood) is kidnapped. The trope kicks in when he enters a bar in which he previously had the shit beaten out of him. First he [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome breathes fire on the bartender]], beats up half the patrons and fires off several rounds from his gun - at this point, the patrons are standing in stunned silence. Then he trashes the place and sets fire to it, at which point they all flee in terror.
* In ''Film/TheScorpionKing'', the hero uses a sandstorm to force a bunch of Mooks into a cave, where he kills them one by one.
* ''Film/{{Serenity}}'': River's rampage in the Maidenhead bar is definitely one of these.
* Early in ''Film/TheShadow'', some mooks have fitted an old man with cement shoes and are about to drop him into a river when the title character shows up and picks them off unseen, taunting them with wisecracks and his signature laugh as he goes.
* ''Franchise/StarWars'':



** ''Episode III - Film/RevengeOfTheSith'' shows dozens of clone troopers experience this when Yoda and Obi Wan re-enter the Jedi Temple. The Jedi hardly break stride as they slaughter them all without a scratch.
** ''Film/RogueOne'' gives us a villainous example in [[spoiler:what happens when a squad of Rebel troopers meets Darth Vader in the prime of his Sith powers. The only thing that even slows Vader down is the time it takes him to kill each man before him, and the only thing the Rebels succeed in is getting the Death Star plans away from him by the skin of their teeth]].
* Franchise/{{Robocop}} has shades of this. He is effectively bullet-proof, slow but nigh-unstoppable, more machine than man, and has perfect aim. Most bad guys try to run while Robocop walks after them like a typical horror movie villain. His early arrests of Emil and Clarence in ''Film/RoboCop1987'' both emphasise their utter helplessness when face-to-face with him.
* At the end of the remake of ''Bangkok Dangerous'' Joo stalks and efficiently kills many gangsters as they grow increasingly jumpy and frantic.
* In ''Film/{{Desperado}}'', the opening scene has El Mariachi's character reintroduced this way as Buscemi narrates over one of these.
* ''Film/DeadMansShoes'' follows the victims whenever the main character confronts them.

to:

** ''Episode III - Film/RevengeOfTheSith'' shows dozens of clone troopers experience experiencing this when Yoda and Obi Wan re-enter the Jedi Temple. The Jedi hardly break stride as they slaughter them all without a scratch.
** ''Film/RogueOne'' gives us a villainous example in [[spoiler:what happens when a squad of Rebel troopers meets Darth Vader in the prime of his Sith powers. The only thing that even slows Vader down is the time it takes him to kill each man before him, and the only thing the Rebels succeed in is getting the Death Star plans away from him by the skin of their teeth]].
* Franchise/{{Robocop}} has shades of this. He is effectively bullet-proof, slow but nigh-unstoppable, more machine than man, and has perfect aim. Most bad guys try to run while Robocop walks after them like a typical horror movie villain. His early arrests of Emil and Clarence in ''Film/RoboCop1987'' both emphasise their utter helplessness when face-to-face with him.
* At the end of the remake of ''Bangkok Dangerous'' Joo stalks and efficiently kills many gangsters as they grow increasingly jumpy and frantic.
* In ''Film/{{Desperado}}'', the opening scene has El Mariachi's character reintroduced this way as Buscemi narrates over one of these.
* ''Film/DeadMansShoes'' follows the victims whenever the main character confronts them.
teeth.]]



* A scene in ''Film/AirForceOne'' stages a shootout in the baggage hold of the eponymous plane; it's entirely from the perspective of the Russian baddies, while the hero, the President, is seen only as a vague silhouette delivering death to the terrified mooks.
* The ''Film/JamesBond'' films rarely go here due to the necessity of keeping Bond a positive character. There have been exceptions:
** Prof. Dent's execution in ''Film/DrNo''.
** After Bond sends a mook on skis careening over a cliff in ''Film/OnHerMajestysSecretService'', the camera stays on the mook as he takes his long, final, fall to his death.
** The death scream uttered by the unnamed villain whose parachute Bond steals at the start of ''Film/{{Moonraker}}'' is one of the most disturbing sounds ever heard in cinema.
** The way Bond kills the bald man (i.e. the expy Blofeld) at the start of ''Film/ForYourEyesOnly'' could trigger this trope in anyone with claustrophobia.
** Dr. Kaufman, in ''Film/TomorrowNeverDies'', is one of the only characters in the Bond film canon to be heard begging for his life before 007 kills him anyway.
** A very subtle one occurs in ''Film/CasinoRoyale2006''. When Bond shoots the corrupt section chief in his office, for a split second a close-up of a photograph on the man's desk is shown - an image showing him with his family.
* In ''Film/ResidentEvilApocalypse'' the S.T.A.R.S. squad who are targeted by Nemesis who massacres all of them, except for the taxi driver who is spared.
* Early in ''Film/TheShadow'', some mooks have fitted an old man with cement shoes and are about to drop him into a river when the title character shows up and picks them off unseen, taunting them with wisecracks and his signature laugh as he goes.
* In ''Film/TheRookie'', Charlie Sheen's character instantly switches from coward to badass when his partner (Clint Eastwood) is kidnapped. The trope kicks in when he enters a bar in which he previously had the shit beaten out of him. First he [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome breathes fire on the bartender]], beats up half the patrons and fires off several rounds from his gun - at this point, the patrons are standing in stunned silence. Then he trashes the place and sets fire to it, at which point they all flee in terror.
* In ''Film/TheLongKissGoodnight'', Charlie's rampage through the farmhouse is not seen, only heard, from Mitch's perspective as he's locked in the basement.
* In ''Film/ActOfValor'', all of the major gunfights the [=SEALs=] get in invoke this on the part of the terrorists/cartel soldiers. The parts shown from their perspective as they ([[CurbstompBattle try to]]) fight the [=SEALs=] shows them facing deadly squads of elite soldiers who are slipping among their positions in total silence, snipers picking off their men as they try to flee, and deadly-coordinated [=SEALs=] cutting down their troops with precise shots.
* Joey's [[RoaringRampageOfRevenge actions]] in ''Film/RollingVengeance'' tends to play out this way. We hardly get any shots of him inside the truck, while his victims flee desperately in terror from him. The truck itself is demonic-looking, completely with flames spewing out its exhaust pipes and a giant drill on the front. This could just have easily been a horror movie if the monster truck was driven by a villain instead.

to:

* A scene in ''Film/AirForceOne'' stages a shootout in Pops up near the baggage hold end of ''Film/{{Waterworld}}'', when the eponymous plane; it's entirely from Mariner boards the perspective of the Russian baddies, while the hero, the President, is seen only as a vague silhouette delivering death to the terrified mooks.
* The ''Film/JamesBond'' films rarely go here due to the necessity of keeping Bond a positive character. There have been exceptions:
** Prof. Dent's execution in ''Film/DrNo''.
**
Smoker vessel. After Bond sends a mook on skis careening over a cliff in ''Film/OnHerMajestysSecretService'', the camera stays on the mook as he takes his long, final, fall to his death.
** The death scream uttered by the unnamed villain whose parachute Bond steals at the start of ''Film/{{Moonraker}}'' is
murdering one of the most disturbing sounds ever heard in cinema.
** The way Bond kills the bald man (i.e. the expy Blofeld) at the start of ''Film/ForYourEyesOnly'' could trigger this trope in anyone with claustrophobia.
** Dr. Kaufman, in ''Film/TomorrowNeverDies'', is one of the only characters in the Bond film canon to be heard begging for his life before 007 kills him anyway.
** A very subtle one occurs in ''Film/CasinoRoyale2006''. When Bond shoots the corrupt section chief in his office, for a split second a close-up of a photograph on the man's desk is shown - an image showing him with his family.
* In ''Film/ResidentEvilApocalypse'' the S.T.A.R.S. squad who are targeted by Nemesis who massacres all
of them, except for a group of Smokers start hunting him throughout the taxi driver who is spared.
* Early in ''Film/TheShadow'', some mooks have fitted an old man with cement shoes and are about to drop him into a river when the title character shows up and
ship. He slowly picks them off unseen, taunting them in a segment interspersed with wisecracks and his signature laugh as he goes.
* In ''Film/TheRookie'', Charlie Sheen's character instantly switches from coward to badass when his partner (Clint Eastwood) is kidnapped. The trope kicks in when he enters a bar in which he previously had the shit beaten out of him. First he [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome breathes fire on the bartender]], beats up half the patrons and fires off several rounds from his gun - at this point, the patrons are standing in stunned silence. Then he trashes the place and sets fire to it, at which point they all flee in terror.
* In ''Film/TheLongKissGoodnight'', Charlie's rampage through the farmhouse is not seen, only heard, from Mitch's perspective as he's locked in the basement.
* In ''Film/ActOfValor'', all
scenes of the major gunfights MoralityPet bragging about how the [=SEALs=] get in invoke this on the part of the terrorists/cartel soldiers. The parts shown from their perspective as they ([[CurbstompBattle try to]]) fight the [=SEALs=] shows Mariner will kill them facing deadly squads of elite soldiers who are slipping among their positions in total silence, snipers picking off their men as they try to flee, and deadly-coordinated [=SEALs=] cutting down their troops with precise shots.
* Joey's [[RoaringRampageOfRevenge actions]] in ''Film/RollingVengeance'' tends to play out this way. We hardly get any shots of him inside the truck, while his victims flee desperately in terror from him. The truck itself is demonic-looking, completely with flames spewing out its exhaust pipes and a giant drill on the front. This could just have easily been a horror movie if the monster truck was driven by a villain instead.
all.



* ''Film/AvengersAgeOfUltron'' opens with soldiers rushing about because they're under attack... by the Avengers.
-->'''Henchman:''' Herr Strucker, it's the Avengers!\\
'''Strucker:''' Can we hold them?!\\
'''Henchman:''' They're [[CurbstompBattle the]] [[BadassCrew Avengers...]]
* In ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'', [[Comicbook/{{Batman}} Batman's]] first appearance plays out like this, except the POV characters are two Gotham cops rather than {{Mooks}}. First, they find the slaves who Batman saved from a human trafficker, refusing to leave their cell because the [[HorrifyingHero thing]] that saved them is still in the building. Then the cops hear the sounds of a fight and the human trafficker's terrified scream. The [[NewMeat rookie cop]], Officer Rucka, finds the human trafficker handcuffed to a radiator, badly beaten and branded with a Bat symbol. Rucka, already freaking out, suddenly realises that Batman is right behind him, causing him to panic and fire wildly at the Bat while Batman [[WallCrawl quickly crawls across the ceiling]] in a ''very'' creepy way and disappears.



* In the final season of ''Series/TwentyFour 24'', possibly the crowning moment of Jack Bauer's RoaringRampageOfRevenge was the scene where he stops traffic in an underground carpark and proceeds to tear his way through a small army of mooks while wearing head-to-toe body armour and a big black goalie mask. Another moment comes from the end of the same episode which shows the aftermath of a roomful of mooks (and TheDragon) that Jack has massacred in horrific ways, with only one survivor left.
* The fourth episode of ''Series/AgentCarter'' starts off in the POV of the {{Mooks}} who have [[spoiler:Howard Stark]] held captive. One of their fellow {{Mooks}} is knocked out by some killer in the shadows, and when they try and find out who did this to him, they only end up being knocked out by the same killer, who, of course, is none other than Peggy. The scene is complete with spooky background music, too!
* An early episode of ''Series/{{Angel}}'' opens with a demon fleeing from a "rogue demon hunter" on a motorcycle. In a comedic twist, [[spoiler:it turns out it's Wesley]].
** Angel fights a blind but extremely skilled and deadly assassin. Since Angel is a vampire who lacks a pulse, breath, or body heat, she can't sense him unless he's moving. He takes advantage of this fact to defeat her. She is shown terrified out of her wits before Angel kills her.



* In ''Series/TheXFiles'', one episode opens with a teenage boy fleeing some off-camera pursuer, frantically yelling for help. It's to no avail, as his pursuer catches up and kills him... with a stake to the chest. It's Mulder, and he was vampire hunting.
* In an episode of the 2010 series ''Series/HumanTarget'', a plan to infiltrate the well-guarded mansion of a tycoon with Ilsa's help goes awry, and Ilsa is captured. Chance, thanks to his UnresolvedSexualTension with her, single-handedly goes to rescue her, mowing down the tycoon's [[PrivateMilitaryContractors mercenary]] army. All this is shown from the viewpoint of the tycoon and his [[TheDragon Dragon]], whose faces get more horrified at the closing sounds of gunshots, screams, and shouts of "he's unstoppable". Chance then bursts into the room and guns down the rest of the {{Mooks}}. All with a pistol.
** Chance is not unique in this regard, although he is the best. Guerrero's name is enough to scare the wits out of any criminal or even a mob boss, and the guy himself looks like a HollywoodNerd. Baptiste is also just as badass, which makes sense, since all of them went through the same school.

to:

* In ''Series/TheXFiles'', one episode opens with a teenage boy fleeing some off-camera pursuer, frantically yelling for help. It's to no avail, as his pursuer catches up and kills him... with a stake to the chest. It's Mulder, and he was vampire hunting.
* In an episode
''Series/BurnNotice'': He's Michael Westen! There are only four of the 2010 series ''Series/HumanTarget'', a plan to infiltrate the well-guarded mansion of a tycoon with Ilsa's help goes awry, and Ilsa is captured. Chance, thanks to his UnresolvedSexualTension with her, single-handedly goes to rescue her, mowing down the tycoon's [[PrivateMilitaryContractors mercenary]] army. All this is shown from the viewpoint of the tycoon and his [[TheDragon Dragon]], whose faces get more horrified at the closing sounds of gunshots, screams, and shouts of "he's unstoppable". Chance then bursts into the room and guns down the rest of the {{Mooks}}. All with a pistol.
** Chance is not unique in this regard, although he is the best. Guerrero's name is enough to scare the wits out of any criminal or even a mob boss, and the guy himself looks like a HollywoodNerd. Baptiste is also just as badass, which makes sense, since all of them went through the same school.
us!



'''Young boy:''' *screams before opening credits*
** Later, we learn that the ice cream van is [[spoiler: a trap set against prepubescent demons]].
* The opening of ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E7AGoodManGoesToWar A Good Man Goes To War]]" invokes this on behalf of the villains, as they prepare for an imminent attack by The Doctor. One scene has the Cybermen deal with an off-screen attack destroying parts of their base. "Intruder level 11! Seal off levels 12, 13, and 14! ''Intruder level 15!''" [[spoiler: Although it turns out the attacker is not The Doctor, but, in fact, "The Last Centurion" Rory Williams.]]
--> [[spoiler: "[[PunctuatedForEmphasis Where. Is. My. Wife?]]"]]
** Lampshaded later when River Song calls out the Doctor on this ("You make them so afraid.") as a violation of the ideals he set out with.
** A more subtle version is invoked by the Eleventh Doctor in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E13TheWeddingOfRiverSong The Wedding of River Song]]".
--> ''"Imagine you were dying. Imagine you were afraid and a long way from home and in terrible pain. And just when you thought it couldn't get worse, you looked up and saw the face of the devil himself."''

to:

'''Young boy:''' *screams ''*screams before opening credits*
credits*''
** Later, we learn that the ice cream van is [[spoiler: a [[spoiler:a trap set against prepubescent demons]].
* In one episode of ''Series/{{Daredevil 2015}}'', Russian mobsters kidnap Clair Temple and start beating her to get information on the "Masked Man" who's been troubling their business interests. Suddenly the lights all go out, and then, one by one, the Russians get the shit beaten out of them.
* ''Series/DoctorWho'':
** The Dalek POV shots in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E2TheDalekInvasionOfEarth "The Dalek Invasion of Earth"]] -- when the Doctor is just about to get the upper hand over the Daleks, we're suddenly in a Dalek's head for the scene as the First Doctor stares it with a PsychoticSmirk and we know he's done something very clever.
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E12ThePandoricaOpens "The Pandorica Opens"]], the Doctor recounts a fairy tale:
--->'''The Doctor:''' There was a goblin, or a... trickster. Or a warrior. A nameless, terrible thing, soaked in the blood of a billion galaxies. The most feared being in all the cosmos. And nothing could stop it, or hold it, or... reason with it. One day it would just [[OutsideContextProblem drop out of the sky and tear down your world]]. ([[spoiler:It's him.]])
**
The opening of ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E7AGoodManGoesToWar A [[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E7AGoodManGoesToWar "A Good Man Goes To War]]" to War"]] invokes this on behalf of the villains, as they prepare for an imminent attack by The the Doctor. One scene has the Cybermen deal with an off-screen attack destroying parts of their base. "Intruder level 11! Seal off levels 12, 13, and 14! ''Intruder level 15!''" [[spoiler: Although it turns out the attacker is not The Doctor, but, in fact, "The Last Centurion" Rory Williams.]]
--> [[spoiler: "[[PunctuatedForEmphasis --->[[spoiler:"[[PunctuatedForEmphasis Where. Is. My. Wife?]]"]]
** *** Lampshaded later when River Song calls out the Doctor on this ("You make them so afraid.") as a violation of the ideals he set out with.
** A more subtle version is invoked by the Eleventh Doctor in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E13TheWeddingOfRiverSong The [[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E13TheWeddingOfRiverSong "The Wedding of River Song]]".
--> ''"Imagine
Song"]].
--->''"Imagine
you were dying. Imagine you were afraid and a long way from home and in terrible pain. And just when you thought it couldn't get worse, you looked up and saw the face of the devil himself."''



** The Dalek POV shots in "The Dalek Invasion of Earth" - when the Doctor is just about to get the upper hand over the Daleks, we're suddenly in a Dalek's head for the scene as the First Doctor stares it with a PsychoticSmirk and we know he's done something very clever.
** In "The Pandorica Opens", the Doctor recounts a fairy-tale:
-->'''The Doctor''': There was a goblin, or a... trickster. Or a warrior. A nameless, terrible thing, soaked in the blood of a billion galaxies. The most feared being in all the cosmos. And nothing could stop it, or hold it, or... reason with it. One day it would just [[OutsideContextProblem drop out of the sky and tear down your world]]. ([[spoiler:It's him.]])
* In the season six episode of ''Series/StargateSG1'' "The Other Guys," when SG-1 is attacking the Jaffa guarding the stargate, O'Neill, Carter and Jonas use the standard "shoot them with zats" approach, but Teal'c instead waits for a Jaffa to run past him and ''erupts out of a lake and drags the Jaffa down into the water.''
* In the final season of ''[[Series/TwentyFour 24]]'', possibly the crowning moment of Jack Bauer's RoaringRampageOfRevenge was the scene where he stops traffic in an underground carpark and proceeds to tear his way through a small army of mooks while wearing head-to-toe body armour and a big black goalie mask. Another moment comes from the end of the same episode which shows the aftermath of a roomful of mooks (and TheDragon) that Jack has massacred in horrific ways, with only one survivor left.
* An early episode of ''Series/{{Angel}}'' opens with a demon fleeing from a "rogue demon hunter" on a motorcycle. In a comedic twist, [[spoiler:it turns out it's Wesley]].
** Angel fights a blind but extremely skilled and deadly assassin. Since Angel is a vampire who lacks a pulse, breath, or body heat, she can't sense him unless he's moving. He takes advantage of this fact to defeat her. She is shown terrified out of her wits before Angel kills her.

to:

** The Dalek POV shots in "The Dalek Invasion of Earth" - when the Doctor is just about to get the upper hand over the Daleks, we're suddenly in a Dalek's head for the scene as the First Doctor stares it with a PsychoticSmirk and we know he's done something very clever.
** In "The Pandorica Opens", the Doctor recounts a fairy-tale:
-->'''The Doctor''': There was a goblin, or a... trickster. Or a warrior. A nameless, terrible thing, soaked in the blood of a billion galaxies. The most feared being in all the cosmos. And nothing could stop it, or hold it, or... reason with it. One day it would just [[OutsideContextProblem drop out of the sky and tear down your world]]. ([[spoiler:It's him.]])
* In the season six an episode of ''Series/StargateSG1'' "The Other Guys," when SG-1 is attacking the Jaffa guarding 2010 series ''Series/HumanTarget'', a plan to infiltrate the stargate, O'Neill, Carter and Jonas use the standard "shoot them well-guarded mansion of a tycoon with zats" approach, but Teal'c instead waits for a Jaffa to run past him Ilsa's help goes awry, and ''erupts out of a lake and drags the Jaffa Ilsa is captured. Chance, thanks to his UnresolvedSexualTension with her, single-handedly goes to rescue her, mowing down the tycoon's [[PrivateMilitaryContractors mercenary]] army. All this is shown from the viewpoint of the tycoon and his [[TheDragon Dragon]], whose faces get more horrified at the closing sounds of gunshots, screams, and shouts of "he's unstoppable". Chance then bursts into the water.''
* In
room and guns down the final season rest of ''[[Series/TwentyFour 24]]'', possibly the crowning moment of Jack Bauer's RoaringRampageOfRevenge was {{Mooks}}. All with a pistol.
** Chance is not unique in this regard, although he is
the scene where he stops traffic in an underground carpark best. Guerrero's name is enough to scare the wits out of any criminal or even a mob boss, and proceeds to tear his way the guy himself looks like a HollywoodNerd. Baptiste is also just as badass, which makes sense, since all of them went through a small army of mooks while wearing head-to-toe body armour and a big black goalie mask. Another moment comes from the end of the same episode which shows the aftermath of a roomful of mooks (and TheDragon) that Jack has massacred in horrific ways, with only one survivor left.
* An early episode of ''Series/{{Angel}}'' opens with a demon fleeing from a "rogue demon hunter" on a motorcycle. In a comedic twist, [[spoiler:it turns out it's Wesley]].
** Angel fights a blind but extremely skilled and deadly assassin. Since Angel is a vampire who lacks a pulse, breath, or body heat, she can't sense him unless he's moving. He takes advantage of this fact to defeat her. She is shown terrified out of her wits before Angel kills her.
school.



* ''Series/BurnNotice'': He's Michael Westen! There are only four of us!
* The fourth episode of ''Series/AgentCarter'' starts off in the POV of the {{Mooks}} who have [[spoiler:Howard Stark]] held captive. One of their fellow {{Mooks}} is knocked out by some killer in the shadows, and when they try and find out who did this to him, they only end up being knocked out by the same killer, who, of course, is none other than Peggy. The scene is complete with spooky background music, too!
* In one episode of ''Series/{{Daredevil 2015}}'', Russian mobsters kidnap Clair Temple and start beating her to get information on the "Masked Man" who's been troubling their business interests. Suddenly the lights all go out, and then, one by one, the Russians get the shit beaten out of them.
* A second season episode of ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' opens with a terrified woman being stalked by a dark presence in a forest. She hides desperately behind a tree, relaxing in relief when her pursuer goes past, [[HopeSpot apparently not noticing her]]. Moments later, her head is chopped off. Sometime later, we find out [[spoiler:she was a vampire]]. However, in a twist, [[spoiler:she belonged to a coven that was feeding off of cattle to avoid killing humans, and the hunter who killed her turns out to be AxCrazy.]]

to:

* ''Series/BurnNotice'': He's Michael Westen! There are only four of us!
* The fourth
In the season six episode of ''Series/AgentCarter'' starts off in the POV of the {{Mooks}} who have [[spoiler:Howard Stark]] held captive. One of their fellow {{Mooks}} is knocked out by some killer in the shadows, and ''Series/StargateSG1'' "The Other Guys", when they try SG-1 is attacking the Jaffa guarding the Stargate, O'Neill, Carter and find out who did this to him, they only end up being knocked out by Jonas use the same killer, who, of course, is none other than Peggy. The scene is complete standard "shoot them with spooky background music, too!
* In one episode of ''Series/{{Daredevil 2015}}'', Russian mobsters kidnap Clair Temple
zats" approach, but Teal'c instead waits for a Jaffa to run past him and start beating her to get information on the "Masked Man" who's been troubling their business interests. Suddenly the lights all go out, and then, one by one, the Russians get the shit beaten ''erupts out of them.
a lake and drags the Jaffa down into the water.''
* A second season episode of ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' opens with a terrified woman being stalked by a dark presence in a forest. She hides desperately behind a tree, relaxing in relief when her pursuer goes past, [[HopeSpot apparently not noticing her]]. Moments later, her head is chopped off. Sometime later, we find out [[spoiler:she was a vampire]]. However, in a twist, [[spoiler:she belonged to a coven that was feeding off of cattle to avoid killing humans, and the hunter who killed her turns out to be AxCrazy.]]AxeCrazy.]]
* In ''Series/TheXFiles'', one episode opens with a teenage boy fleeing some off-camera pursuer, frantically yelling for help. It's to no avail, as his pursuer catches up and kills him... with a stake to the chest. It's Mulder, and he was vampire hunting.
8th May '17 1:19:29 PM Theokal3
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* On ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'', Raven once invoked this trope on Dr. Light ''by accident'', because her self-control was slipping and [[spoiler: her dark/angry half-demon side]] got out of control. Given a funny ContinuityNod later in the series, when a gleefully-gloating Dr. Light suddenly found himself facing Raven again, and ''immediately'' surrendered and asked to be taken to jail.

to:

* On ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'', ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'':
**
Raven once invoked this trope on Dr. Light ''by accident'', because her self-control was slipping and [[spoiler: her dark/angry half-demon side]] got out of control. Given a funny ContinuityNod later in the series, when a gleefully-gloating Dr. Light suddenly found himself facing Raven again, and ''immediately'' surrendered and asked to be taken to jail.jail.
** In the two-parter ''Aftershock'', the Titans as a whole, having to deal with their SixthRangerTraitor Terra, first approach by going easy on her, giving her chances to come back to her senses and return to them. [[RedemptionRejection She brutally rejects every single time, viciously taking them down one by one]] all while [[KickTheDog mocking some of them]]. Comes the second part, the Titans stop holding their punches against her... and proceed to tear through her as she runs in terror.
3rd May '17 7:49:04 PM Pilomotor
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** Case in point: Walking ''very'' slowly down a corridor towards an elevator full of mooks despite having SuperSpeed, or allowing enemies to shoot him up a bit, just to make them think they had a chance.

to:

** Case in point: Walking ''very'' slowly down a corridor towards an elevator full of mooks despite having SuperSpeed, or allowing enemies to shoot him up a bit, just to make them think sure they had a chance.know they have ''zero'' chance of survival when they realize their weapons barely inconvenience him.



* In ''LightNovel/LogHorizon'' Shiroe realizes that to [[spoiler:Kinjo and the reset of the Kunie clan]] the raid on their base of operations must have been horrifying: Two dozen warriors with inhuman abilities appear and start wiping out their defenses, and even if they die they'll get back up and keep fighting like zombies.

to:

* In ''LightNovel/LogHorizon'' Shiroe realizes that to [[spoiler:Kinjo and the reset rest of the Kunie clan]] the raid on their base of operations must have been horrifying: Two dozen warriors with inhuman abilities appear and start wiping out their defenses, and even if they die they'll get back up and keep fighting like zombies.
17th Apr '17 9:17:21 AM Yukianesa
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** Gets played for laughs in Season Five. Aku has spent the past ''fifty years'' throwing ''everything he has'' at Jack and watching everything he has ''fail miserably'', and plus Jack has ''stopped aging'' so he can't even just hide and wait for Jack to naturally die. The possibility of Jack eventually finding and killing him has been hanging over his head all this time, and it's driven him to become a NervousWreck.

to:

** Gets played for laughs in Season Five. Aku has spent the past ''fifty years'' throwing ''everything he has'' at Jack and watching everything he has ''fail miserably'', and plus Jack has ''stopped aging'' so he can't even just hide and wait for Jack to naturally die. The possibility of Jack eventually finding and killing him has been hanging over his head all this time, and it's driven him to become a NervousWreck. [[spoiler:Little does he know, Jack has lost his sword and so can't kill him.]]
17th Apr '17 9:16:56 AM Yukianesa
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Added DiffLines:

** Gets played for laughs in Season Five. Aku has spent the past ''fifty years'' throwing ''everything he has'' at Jack and watching everything he has ''fail miserably'', and plus Jack has ''stopped aging'' so he can't even just hide and wait for Jack to naturally die. The possibility of Jack eventually finding and killing him has been hanging over his head all this time, and it's driven him to become a NervousWreck.
8th Apr '17 12:44:17 AM Mavado
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* ''Manga/ElfenLied'' starts out with half an episode of this trope courtesy of [[TragicVillain Lucy]], who escapes from her cell, [[FullFrontalAssault strips naked]] (except for her creepy helmet), and cuts a bloody swath of destruction through the facility. She encounters dozens of heavily-armed guards and [[PersonOfMassDestruction kills them messily with what seems like very little effort]]. She also decapitates an innocent bystander who had no idea what was going on and wouldn't have been an obstacle, just to make sure the audience finds it impossible to sympathize with Lucy... until her [[MonsterSobStory character development]].

to:

* ''Manga/ElfenLied'' starts out with half an episode of this trope courtesy of [[TragicVillain Lucy]], who escapes from her cell, [[FullFrontalAssault strips naked]] (except for her creepy helmet), and cuts a bloody swath of destruction through the facility. She encounters dozens of heavily-armed guards and [[PersonOfMassDestruction kills them messily with what seems like very little effort]]. She also decapitates an innocent a bystander who had no idea what was going on and wouldn't have been an obstacle, just to make sure the audience finds it impossible to sympathize with Lucy... until her [[MonsterSobStory character development]].
5th Apr '17 4:22:20 PM Frankencastle
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Added DiffLines:

*** Earlier than that the CIA was treated to a very literal horror show when they witnessed Frank massacre dozens of mobsters via satellite. Even Frank's old buddy Microchip is shaken up by what he's seen.
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