History Main / MoneyForNothing

18th Mar '17 5:58:49 PM nombretomado
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* ''NeoPets'' has an on-site browser RPG called Neo Quest II. In the first two or three levels, the player will likely be always short of money for healing potions and inn rests -- but after the healer joins the party, the money flowing in really has not many place to go -- healing potions are only relevant in boss battles now, and buyable equipment is inferior to droppables. During the last two chapters the player typically would only buy max stacks of speed, slowing, and healing potions in preparation fo the final boss battle, and face the final boss filthy rich.

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* ''NeoPets'' ''{{Website/Neopets}}'' has an on-site browser RPG called Neo Quest II. In the first two or three levels, the player will likely be always short of money for healing potions and inn rests -- but after the healer joins the party, the money flowing in really has not many place to go -- healing potions are only relevant in boss battles now, and buyable equipment is inferior to droppables. During the last two chapters the player typically would only buy max stacks of speed, slowing, and healing potions in preparation fo the final boss battle, and face the final boss filthy rich.
7th Mar '17 12:40:08 PM BeerBaron
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*** The flat-out easiest way to get money for nothing in ''Morrowind'' takes advantage of a rounding error, and doesn't even require decent stats: the game works out the total price of goods differently depending on whether you click on a whole stack of items at once or add them individually. At the start of a game, simply pick up a large stack of cheap items. Go to a merchant and add them to your "sell" stack one by one and the game will raise the price by the minimum value rounded up to a whole coin on each click. Sell for four hundred arrows, then buy the whole stack back for just ''one''

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*** The flat-out One of the easiest way to get money for nothing in ''Morrowind'' earning methods takes advantage of a rounding error, and doesn't even require decent stats: the game works out the total price of goods differently depending on whether you click on a whole stack of items at once or add them individually. At the start of a game, simply Simply pick up a large stack of cheap items. Go to a merchant and add them to your "sell" stack one by one and the game will raise the price by the minimum value rounded up to a whole coin on each click. Sell for four hundred arrows, then buy the whole stack back for just ''one''''one''...
7th Mar '17 12:36:53 PM BeerBaron
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* Considering the vast amounts of expensive stuff the player gathers but can never sell in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'', the PC's net-worth can be estimated at well over a million. Good thing the coins were weightless.
** Try filling Grand Soul Gems with big monster souls and selling them to Creeper (mentioned below). Try pocketing ''5 million drakes in a single week of gameplay!''
** Using the enchanting services provided by certain {{NPC}}s added the gold spent to their inventory, allowing players to sell even the most expensive of goods at reasonable profit.
** The flat-out easiest way to get money for nothing in Morrowind takes advantage of a rounding error, and doesn't even require decent stats: the game works out the total price of goods differently depending on whether you click on a whole stack of items at once or add them individually. At the start of a game you can pick up a stack of four hundred minimum-value tax forms. Simply add them to your "sell" stack one by one and the game will raise the price by the minimum value rounded up to a whole coin on each click. Sell for four hundred Septims, then buy the whole stack back for one.

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* Considering ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'':
** In general in
the vast series, it is usually quite easy to acquire far more money than you'd realistically be able to spend, even if you're not being a KleptomaniacHero. Most of the best items and equipment are found or given as rewards rather than purchased. High level enchantments, custom magic spells, and high level training for skills can be quite costly, but the price is still easily covered by doing a dungeon dive or two. Expect to see many players running around with hundreds of thousands or even millions of gold yet nothing to spend it on.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'':
*** Even before leaving the ''character generation area'', it is possible to steal several valuable items with no repercussions. You can also acquire a key to another area with stuff to steal with this method. It's entirely possible that the only merchant in the FirstTown won't have enough gold to buy it all from you. (Especially if you return Fargoth's ring in order to get a disposition boost before selling.)
*** If you report to Caius Cosades, the initial main quest quest giver, before you reach level 4, he will give 200 free gold.
*** Most outdoor crates and urns in cities can be looted without issue. Most contain low end vendor trash, but considering many towns have dozens of these containers (including the 2nd town you are likely to visit, Balmora) and even the lowest value items are still worth at least one gold, it can really add up for a new player.
*** Even with no practice at it at all, you can easily brew potions from the cheaper unlimited-supply ingredients purchased from alchemist vendors, and sell them for more than the ingredients are worth, repeatedly, making arbitrary high
amounts of expensive stuff money bounded only by having to occasionally wait for their gold on hand to reset.
*** The game has two non-NPC merchants: Creeper
the player gathers but can never Scamp (with 5000 gold) and the Mudcrab Merchant (with 10000 gold). As they are classed as creatures instead of [=NPCs=], they have no Disposition or Mercantile skill to affect your selling prices. Therefore, you get full value for anything you sell in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'', the PC's net-worth can be estimated at well over a million. them. Good thing the coins were weightless.
** Try filling Grand Soul Gems with big monster souls and selling them to Creeper (mentioned below). Try pocketing ''5 million drakes in a single week of gameplay!''
** Using the enchanting services provided by certain {{NPC}}s added the gold spent to their inventory, allowing players to sell even the most expensive of goods at reasonable profit.
**
weightless...
***
The flat-out easiest way to get money for nothing in Morrowind ''Morrowind'' takes advantage of a rounding error, and doesn't even require decent stats: the game works out the total price of goods differently depending on whether you click on a whole stack of items at once or add them individually. At the start of a game you can game, simply pick up a large stack of four hundred minimum-value tax forms. Simply cheap items. Go to a merchant and add them to your "sell" stack one by one and the game will raise the price by the minimum value rounded up to a whole coin on each click. Sell for four hundred Septims, arrows, then buy the whole stack back for one.just ''one''



*** Also, with decent skills it was possible in Morrowind to buy items for less than you sold them for at normal merchants, so it really was money for nothing.
** A quick summary: most of the game's more expensive VendorTrash is worth anywhere between 10,000 and 500,000 gold. The most that any vendor actually has to pay you for it is 10,000.
** It's actually possible to create your own money sink through a glitch that can net you infinite levels. If you have an enchantment that boosts one of your stats past 100, say Endurance, and you have one of its governed skills at 100, like Heavy Armor, you can pay the master trainer of that skill to train that skill infinitely. It won't rise above 100, but after 10 training sessions, you will be able to level up. This can potentially cost very large amount of gold.
** Additionally, this can also be rather easy to do in later stages of ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' as well, especially if one completes the [[GottaCatchEmAll Stones of Barenziah quest]], which gives an added perk in the form of finding at least two precious gems in every chest or urn checked. In one dungeon crawl, the player can stack 10,000 gold in gems. A common challenge for players is to play through the entire game without ever buying or selling anything from a merchant, and it's not terribly difficult for even casual players.
** At least in these games player housing becomes an option for adventurers wanting to spend their vast amounts of money acquired in game.

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*** Also, with decent skills it was possible in Morrowind to buy items for less than you sold them for at normal merchants, so it really was money for nothing.
** A quick summary: most of the game's more expensive VendorTrash is worth anywhere between 10,000 and 500,000 gold. The most that any vendor actually has to pay you for it is 10,000.
** It's actually possible to create your own money sink through a glitch that can net you infinite levels. If you have an enchantment that boosts one of your stats past 100, say Endurance, and you have one of its governed skills at 100, like Heavy Armor, you can pay the master trainer of that skill to train that skill infinitely. It won't rise above 100, but after 10 training sessions, you will be able to level up. This can potentially cost very large amount of gold.
** Additionally, this can also be rather easy to do in later stages of ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' as well, especially if one completes the [[GottaCatchEmAll Stones of Barenziah quest]], which gives an added perk in the form of finding at least two precious gems in every chest or urn checked. In one dungeon crawl, the player can stack 10,000 gold in gems. A common challenge for players is to play through the entire game without ever buying or selling anything from a merchant, and it's not terribly difficult for even casual players.
**
players. At least in these games here, player housing becomes an option for adventurers wanting to spend their vast amounts of money acquired in game.game. (Particularly with ''Hearthfire'' installed.)
1st Mar '17 2:24:12 PM MisterVercetti
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*** Until you realize (or [[GuideDangIt look up on the internet]], more likely) that the stock-market altering assassination missions that become available sometime in the middle of the game can be saved up until the end when you have 20-40 million of starting capital. Then you can hit the 2 billion money cap on all characters simply by investing in the right companies while doing the missions.

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*** Until you realize (or [[GuideDangIt look up on the internet]], more likely) that the stock-market altering assassination missions that become available sometime in the middle of the game can be saved up until the end when you have 20-40 million of starting capital. Then you can hit the 2 billion money cap on all characters simply by investing in the right companies while doing the missions.missions, at which point you can buy everything the game has to offer and still have billions left over.
17th Feb '17 2:12:14 PM Kalaong
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*** When the game begins, Ezio is RichInDollarsPoorInSense, regularly emptying his wallet on booze and whores. ([[InsistentTerminology He'd never call that a waste!]]) Of course, you jumped into his life less than a day before it went to hell; the local magistrate frames and executes his family, for which he ends up as Ezio's first assassination. After that, [[YouCantGoHomeAgain he can't go home again]], eventually settling in a broken-down slum. Here's the weird part; keep up that behavior and you'll spend the rest of the game -- and the next two ''decades'' of his life -- in PerpetualPoverty. Invest in turning that slum into something respectable, and you'll soon have cash coming out of your ears. Even worse is that if you spend all of your villa income on upgrading the villa (and there aren't that many upgrades) you'll just earn money at an almost exponential rate. Compared to the pitiful loot you get off of treasure chests (which do add up over time) and pickpocketing, proper villa management can make any player stinking rich before even the halfway point of the game, without even bothering with the many side missions.

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*** When the game begins, Ezio is RichInDollarsPoorInSense, regularly emptying his wallet on booze and whores. ([[InsistentTerminology He'd never call that a waste!]]) Of course, you jumped into his life less than a day before it went to hell; the local magistrate frames and executes his family, for which he ends up as Ezio's first assassination. After that, [[YouCantGoHomeAgain he can't go home again]], eventually settling in a broken-down slum. Here's the weird part; keep up that behavior and you'll spend the rest of the game -- and the next two ''decades'' of his life -- in PerpetualPoverty. PerpetualPoverty, without enough cash to keep up his stocks of ammo and medicine, let alone the increasingly expensive weapon upgrades. Invest in turning that slum into something respectable, and you'll soon have cash coming out of your ears.ears, enabling him to keep all his stocks at max and purchase new weapons the instant they become available. Even worse is that if you spend all of your villa income on upgrading the villa (and there aren't that many upgrades) you'll just earn money at an almost exponential rate. Compared to the pitiful loot you get off of treasure chests (which do add up over time) and pickpocketing, proper villa management can make any player stinking rich before even the halfway point of the game, without even bothering with the many side missions.
11th Feb '17 9:10:11 AM MyFinalEdits
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* In many games of the ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series, shops sell items at ridiculous prices; that is, the same items you can obtain for free simply by going outside and cutting down grass. Money is seldom required in the main game.
** ''Zelda'' games play it as close as possible without falling into parody domain: plain glass bottles and bomb bags will be given out apologetically to reward you for an errand, but you can never just go to the store and buy four bottles.

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* In many games of the ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series, shops sell items at ridiculous prices; zig-zags this from game to game. In some cases it's played straight as there is little to buy, and/or because the money you would need is acquired so late that is, it won't be of much use by the same items you can obtain for free simply by going outside and cutting down grass. Money time you're rewarded with it. In other games, however, there are different factors or mechanics that implement major {{Money Sink}}s, thus making money an important necessity. The listed aversions pertain to cases when MoneySink is seldom required in the main game.
** ''Zelda'' games play it as close as possible without falling into parody domain: plain glass bottles and bomb bags will be given out apologetically to reward you for an errand, but you can never just go to the store and buy four bottles.
not strictly enforced:



** Averted in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker'' mostly thanks to Tingle, who requires you to [[CashGate spend 398 rupees]] ''eight times'' in order to complete the Triforce quest. Getting the Island Merchants' items (Which also gives you the magic armor and a piece of heart) also mean using lots of rupees if you're aiming for 100% Completition. The HD remake does away with most of the charts, but rupees remain useful nonetheless:the Magic Armor doesn't drain magic anymore, but takes away rupees every time you get hit, which means the more rupees you have, the longer you'll stay protected.
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'' zig-zags this. Collecting all the Golden Bugs and giving them to Agatha will give you a steady stream of money and there are many sidequests that require you to use your cash. One Piece of Heart requires giving a man in Castle Town 1000 rupees while helping to complete the bridge and opening the Castle Town Malo Mart requires 1200 rupees. Malo Mart, in turn, also sells many items that while usually optional are ''very'' useful. One of them, costing most of your wallet capacity to buy, is the Magic Armor. It causes damage to be taken from your rupee count instead of your health (as well as slowly draining 'em while you're wearing it). This means you'll be ''[[LevelGrinding grinding]]'' for rupees the first time you try to tackle the [[BonusDungeon Cave of Ordeals]]. And bombs must almost always be bought (there are a few in chests, but they're never dropped by enemies or found when [[RewardingVandalism breaking pots or cutting grass]]). However, this game's version of the 100 Skultulas quest (finding Poes) also gives you an unlimited supply of 200 rupees; some Poes can not be found until late game and three are found in the Cave of Ordeals.

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** Averted in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker'' mostly thanks to Tingle, who requires you to [[CashGate spend 398 rupees]] ''eight times'' in order to complete the Triforce quest. Getting the Island Merchants' items (Which also gives you the magic armor and a piece of heart) also mean using lots of rupees if you're aiming for 100% Completition. The HD remake does away with most of the charts, but rupees remain useful nonetheless:the Magic Armor doesn't drain magic anymore, but takes away rupees every time you get hit, which means the more rupees you have, the longer you'll stay protected.
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'' zig-zags this. Collecting all the Golden Bugs and giving them to Agatha will give you a steady stream of money and there are many some sidequests that require you to use your cash. cash: One Piece of Heart requires giving a man in Castle Town 1000 rupees while helping to complete the bridge and opening the Castle Town Malo Mart requires 2200 rupees (it can be reduced to 1200 rupees.rupees by helping a fatigued Goron who repairs the Western bridge in Hyrule Field). Malo Mart, in turn, also sells many items that while usually optional are ''very'' useful. One of them, costing most of your wallet capacity to buy, is the Magic Armor. It causes damage to be taken from your rupee count instead of your health (as well as slowly draining 'em while you're wearing it). This means you'll be ''[[LevelGrinding grinding]]'' for rupees the first time you try to tackle the [[BonusDungeon Cave of Ordeals]]. And bombs must almost always be bought (there are a few in chests, but they're never dropped by enemies or found when [[RewardingVandalism breaking pots or cutting grass]]). However, this game's version of the 100 Skultulas quest (finding Poes) also gives you an unlimited supply of 200 rupees; some Poes can not be found until late game and three are found in the Cave of Ordeals.



** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword'' also manages to avert it by making many useful items cost rupees. Additional pouches, medallions, a piece of heart, shields, shield repairs, etc. all have a cost and, until the very end, you're almost always in need of ''something'' -- which is also why your wallet is able to get so much bigger. Unlike any of the other console titles, it's actually possible to go through an entire [[HundredPercentCompletion 100% Completion]] campaign and never once have your wallet filled to capacity.
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkBetweenWorlds'' averts this by means of Ravio's item rental shop. You have to pay about 20 or so rupees to rent every item, and if you die, you have to re-rent them. Alternatively, you can spend several hundred rupees to have the item permanently, which also lets you upgrade them. There's also a fairy fountain where you can toss in a total of 3000 rupees. Your reward? Yet another plain glass bottle.
11th Feb '17 8:53:09 AM MyFinalEdits
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* In ''VideoGame/TheBindingOfIsaac'', this tends to happen beyond the sixth floor since shops stop appearing after you defeat Mom. After that, your only use of money is going to be on the occasional beggar, arcade, or slot machine. And while there are items you can acquire that use money in some fashion, in a game with over 300, you'll likely hit the cap before that.
** One of the trinkets introduced in the Afterbirth+ DLC for Rebirth is the Silver Dollar, which lets shops appear in The Womb. However, the trope is back in full swing afterwards as the trinket's effect doesn't apply to further areas. ''(Of course, this is assuming you even get to have the trinket in the first place, at that stage in the game, given the size of the trinket pool as of Aftebirth+.)''

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* In ''VideoGame/TheBindingOfIsaac'', this ''VideoGame/TheBindingOfIsaac'':
** This
tends to happen beyond the sixth floor since shops stop appearing after you defeat Mom. After that, your only use of money is going to be on the occasional beggar, arcade, or slot machine. And while there are items you can acquire that use money in some fashion, in a game with over 300, you'll likely hit the cap before that.
** One of the trinkets introduced in the Afterbirth+ DLC for Rebirth is the Silver Dollar, which lets shops appear in The Womb. However, the trope is back in full swing afterwards as the trinket's effect doesn't apply to further areas. ''(Of Of course, this is assuming you even get to have the trinket in the first place, at that stage in the game, given the size of the trinket pool as of Aftebirth+.)''
10th Feb '17 10:41:04 PM DarkDXZ
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Added DiffLines:

** One of the trinkets introduced in the Afterbirth+ DLC for Rebirth is the Silver Dollar, which lets shops appear in The Womb. However, the trope is back in full swing afterwards as the trinket's effect doesn't apply to further areas. ''(Of course, this is assuming you even get to have the trinket in the first place, at that stage in the game, given the size of the trinket pool as of Aftebirth+.)''
9th Feb '17 4:48:46 PM HeroicJay
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Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyRecordKeeper'' has Gil, but it's essentially just artifact of the main series: every single thing that you can spend Gil on requires another, rarer, consumable. Orbfests in particular give out oodles of Gil, far more than most players will even be ''able'' to spend.
31st Jan '17 1:51:17 PM mario0987
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** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'' is an aversion. You'll spend a decent amount of time with your wallet full, but there are many sidequests that require you to use your cash, such as helping to complete the bridge, and opening the Castle Town Malo Mart. Malo Mart, in turn, also sells many items that while usually optional are ''very'' useful. One of them, costing most of your wallet capacity to buy, is the Magic Armor. It causes damage to be taken from your rupee count instead of your health (as well as slowly draining 'em while you're wearing it). This means you'll be ''[[LevelGrinding grinding]]'' for rupees the first time you try to tackle the [[BonusDungeon Cave of Ordeals]]. And bombs must almost always be bought (there are a few in chests, but they're never dropped by enemies or found when [[RewardingVandalism breaking pots or cutting grass]]).

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** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'' is an aversion. You'll spend zig-zags this. Collecting all the Golden Bugs and giving them to Agatha will give you a decent amount steady stream of time with your wallet full, but money and there are many sidequests that require you to use your cash, such as cash. One Piece of Heart requires giving a man in Castle Town 1000 rupees while helping to complete the bridge, bridge and opening the Castle Town Malo Mart.Mart requires 1200 rupees. Malo Mart, in turn, also sells many items that while usually optional are ''very'' useful. One of them, costing most of your wallet capacity to buy, is the Magic Armor. It causes damage to be taken from your rupee count instead of your health (as well as slowly draining 'em while you're wearing it). This means you'll be ''[[LevelGrinding grinding]]'' for rupees the first time you try to tackle the [[BonusDungeon Cave of Ordeals]]. And bombs must almost always be bought (there are a few in chests, but they're never dropped by enemies or found when [[RewardingVandalism breaking pots or cutting grass]]). However, this game's version of the 100 Skultulas quest (finding Poes) also gives you an unlimited supply of 200 rupees; some Poes can not be found until late game and three are found in the Cave of Ordeals.
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