History Main / MoneyForNothing

16th Aug '17 8:42:22 AM Crino37
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*** One of the rewards for finishing the game with HundredPercentCompletion is $1,000,000. Although, was the player already completed all the required tasks, there's not much to do with all the money (even more considering it will acumulate over the cash CJ already has).

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*** One of the rewards for finishing the game with HundredPercentCompletion is $1,000,000. Although, was as the player already completed all the required tasks, tasks off the game, there's not much to do with all the money (even more considering it will acumulate over the cash CJ C.J. already has).
16th Aug '17 8:36:45 AM Crino37
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*** One of the rewards for finishing the game with HundredPercentCompletion is $1,000,000. Although, was the player already completed all the required tasks, there's not much to do with all the money (even more considering it will acumulate over the money CJ already has).

to:

*** One of the rewards for finishing the game with HundredPercentCompletion is $1,000,000. Although, was the player already completed all the required tasks, there's not much to do with all the money (even more considering it will acumulate over the money cash CJ already has).
16th Aug '17 8:35:44 AM Crino37
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*** One of the rewards for finishing the game with HundredPercentCompletion is $1,000,000. Although, was the player already completed all the required tasks, there's not much to do with all the money (even more considering it will acumulate over the money CJ already has).
14th Aug '17 8:30:50 PM thatother1dude
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** In ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 1}}'', even a character with middling Barter skill could sell items to shopkeepers at higher prices than the shopkeepers' prices. With repeated buying and selling attempts, you could take literally everything any shopkeeper owned peacefully. It was a real GameBreaker, and was {{nerf}}ed by the first patch -- traders no longer sell cheaper than they buy.
** Other ''Fallout'' games jacked up the prices of shopkeepers, but it's still very possible to steal items from their shop or kill them and take everything. The only things you can attain exclusively through spending caps are the room themes for your residence in ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}''.

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** In ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 1}}'', ''VideoGame/Fallout1'', even a character with middling Barter skill could sell items to shopkeepers at higher prices than the shopkeepers' prices. With repeated buying and selling attempts, you could take literally everything any shopkeeper owned peacefully. It was a real GameBreaker, and was {{nerf}}ed by the first patch -- traders no longer sell cheaper than they buy.
** Other ''Fallout'' games jacked up the prices of shopkeepers, but it's still very possible to steal items from their shop or kill them and take everything. The only things you can attain exclusively through spending caps are the room themes for your residence in ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}''.''VideoGame/Fallout3''.



** In ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'', at higher levels, if you limit yourself to a handful of weapons, you could theoretically make thousands of caps off of ammo you get from killing [[GoddamnBats raiders]], super mutants, and Enclave soldiers.
** ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' continues this tradition. Selling items that you don't need to traders (along with having a high Barter skill) is still a great way of earning caps. The Jury Rigging perk is also useful in this regard, as it allows you to repair weapons and armor that are in the same "class"; therefore, you could repair an expensive piece of equipment (a Super Sledge) with something cheap (a baseball bat), and sell it for a massive profit.
*** The ''Gun Runners Arsenal'' DLC subverts this trope by adding a large number of unique weapons that can only be bought from merchants (previously, unique weapons were found while exploring. The lone exception to this rule could be stolen by picking a locked door while the shopkeeper was away). Many of these weapons are truly unique, rather than boosted versions of normal weapons (for example, Sleepytime is the only 10mm submachine gun that will accept a silencer, Two-Step Goodbye is a Ballistic Fist with a rocket launcher instead of a shotgun on it, and the Bozar is the only Light Machine Gun with magnifying optics), and all of them are ''expensive,'' typically costing upwards of 20,000 caps (for comparison, that's five times what the implants that give you a permanent stat increase cost). Of course, if you managed to steal the entire supply of gold bricks from ''Dead Money'', you can more than pay for the entire set without spending a single actual cap.

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** In ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'', ''VideoGame/Fallout3'', at higher levels, if you limit yourself to a handful of weapons, you could theoretically make thousands of caps off of ammo you get from killing [[GoddamnBats raiders]], raiders, super mutants, and Enclave soldiers.
** ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' continues this tradition. Selling items that you don't need to traders (along with having a high Barter skill) is still a great way of earning caps. The Jury Rigging perk is also useful in this regard, as it allows you to repair weapons and armor that are in the same "class"; therefore, you could repair an expensive piece of equipment (a Super Sledge) with something cheap (a baseball bat), and sell it for a massive profit.
***
profit. The ''Gun Runners Arsenal'' DLC subverts this trope by adding a large number of unique weapons that can only be bought from merchants (previously, unique weapons were found while exploring. The lone exception to this rule could be stolen by picking a locked door while the shopkeeper was away). Many of these weapons are truly unique, rather than boosted versions of normal weapons (for example, Sleepytime is the only 10mm submachine gun that will accept a silencer, Two-Step Goodbye is a Ballistic Fist with a rocket launcher instead of a shotgun on it, and the Bozar is the only Light Machine Gun with magnifying optics), and all of them are ''expensive,'' typically costing upwards of 20,000 caps (for comparison, that's five times what the implants that give you a permanent stat increase cost). Of course, if you managed to steal the entire supply of gold bricks from ''Dead Money'', you can more than pay for the entire set without spending a single actual cap.cap.
** In ''VideoGame/Fallout4'', you'll typically ''get'' fewer caps than in previous games, but merchants are perpetually running out of useful things to buy with them. You'll end up getting most of your supplies from scavenging and settlements, continuously accumulating wealth faster than you can spend.
25th Jul '17 12:19:08 PM MyFinalEdits
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* ''Videogame/NeverwinterNights2'' gives you a stronghold to fix up midway through the game, which acts as an effective MoneySink. Once the stronghold is finished, however, it is still likely to fall victim to this trope.\\

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* ''Videogame/NeverwinterNights2'' ''Videogame/NeverwinterNights2'':
** The game
gives you a stronghold to fix up midway through the game, which acts as an effective MoneySink. Once the stronghold is finished, however, it is still likely to fall victim to this trope.\\



*** In ''VideoGame/UltimaIII: Exodus'' you could make quick starter cash by creating endless extra characters, selling their gear and then deleting them. This goes even further - you could ''give blood'' ingame, getting a set amount of gold for every 10hp, REALLY stretching those throw-away characters for all they're worth.

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*** ** In ''VideoGame/UltimaIII: Exodus'' you could make quick starter cash by creating endless extra characters, selling their gear and then deleting them. This goes even further - you could ''give blood'' ingame, getting a set amount of gold for every 10hp, REALLY stretching those throw-away characters for all they're worth.
25th Jul '17 12:12:35 PM MBG
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** More conventionally, you can buy magic items from shopkeepers. Unfortunately, bar a few items with unique abilities, none of them stack up to the items you can craft yourself.
13th Jul '17 8:03:06 PM rjd1922
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* In ''VideoGame/YumeNikki'', [=NPCs=] randomly drop money when killed with the knife, but it can only be used to buy health drinks at vending machines to increase your equally-pointless health. This is probably all just an artifact of the game being made in RPG Maker.

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* In ''VideoGame/YumeNikki'', [=NPCs=] randomly drop money yen when killed with the knife, but it can only be used to buy health drinks at vending machines to increase your equally-pointless health. This is probably all just an artifact of the game being made in RPG Maker.VideoGame/RPGMaker.
13th Jul '17 8:01:38 PM rjd1922
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* In ''VideoGame/YumeNikki'', enemies randomly drop money when killed, but it can only be used to buy health drinks at vending machines to increase your equally-pointless health. This is probably all just an artifact of the game being made in RPG Maker.

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* In ''VideoGame/YumeNikki'', enemies [=NPCs=] randomly drop money when killed, killed with the knife, but it can only be used to buy health drinks at vending machines to increase your equally-pointless health. This is probably all just an artifact of the game being made in RPG Maker.
22nd Jun '17 11:27:35 AM superkeijikun
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* ''VideoGame/FatalLabyrinth'' has gold, but no stores and no way to spend it. The only function gold has in the game is getting you a nicer grave and more people to attend your funeral in the event of your ([[NintendoHard all too likely]]) [[GameOver demise]].
8th Jun '17 9:18:17 PM ADrago
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* ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'' does avert this at the base level, since the vanilla game only allows the player to gather around 80 gold in Act 1 (50 of which has to go toward the CashGate to enter Act 2). But if all the expansion packs have been installed, there are a number of items which can be worn that increase the amount of money dropped by enemies. With the ''Black Emporium'' DLC, there's also a Rune of Fortune which can be added to any armor pieces to achieve the same effect. The Emporium sells only one such rune, but it also sells the schematic to craft more of it (which must be purchased in Act 1 or it's LostForever), so as long as the crafting resources needed are uncovered, you can make as many Runes of Fortune as you're willing to pay for. Since adding multiple Runes of Fortune to armor will cause the effect to ''stack'', it's very easy to acquire immense wealth.

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* ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'' does avert this at the base level, since the vanilla game only allows the player to gather around 80 gold in Act 1 (50 of which has to go toward the CashGate to enter Act 2). But if all the expansion packs have been installed, there are a number of items which can be worn that increase the amount of money dropped by enemies. With the ''Black Emporium'' DLC, there's also a Rune of Fortune which can be added to any armor pieces to achieve the same effect. The Emporium sells only one such rune, but it also sells the schematic to craft more of it (which must be purchased in Act 1 or it's LostForever), {{Permanently Miss|able Content}}ed), so as long as the crafting resources needed are uncovered, you can make as many Runes of Fortune as you're willing to pay for. Since adding multiple Runes of Fortune to armor will cause the effect to ''stack'', it's very easy to acquire immense wealth.



* Because your parents are constantly showering you with gifts, you should have enough money by the end of ''Videogame/EarthBound'' to retire. You even get to buy a useless, run-down old building for a fortune (which is easy enough to obtain) with nothing but a story cameo inside! Also, the last store in the game provides you with some things actually worth purchasing, including normally difficult to obtain MP-restoring items. The limitation is more how much you can fit in your storage area (because the store is LostForever) than whether or not you can afford it all.

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* Because your parents are constantly showering you with gifts, you should have enough money by the end of ''Videogame/EarthBound'' to retire. You even get to buy a useless, run-down old building for a fortune (which is easy enough to obtain) with nothing but a story cameo inside! Also, the last store in the game provides you with some things actually worth purchasing, including normally difficult to obtain MP-restoring items. The limitation is more how much you can fit in your storage area (because the store is LostForever) limited) than whether or not you can afford it all.
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