History Main / MoneyForNothing

22nd Jun '17 11:27:35 AM superkeijikun
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* ''VideoGame/FatalLabyrinth'' has gold, but no stores and no way to spend it. The only function gold has in the game is getting you a nicer grave and more people to attend your funeral in the event of your ([[NintendoHard all too likely]]) [[GameOver demise]].
8th Jun '17 9:18:17 PM ADrago
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* ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'' does avert this at the base level, since the vanilla game only allows the player to gather around 80 gold in Act 1 (50 of which has to go toward the CashGate to enter Act 2). But if all the expansion packs have been installed, there are a number of items which can be worn that increase the amount of money dropped by enemies. With the ''Black Emporium'' DLC, there's also a Rune of Fortune which can be added to any armor pieces to achieve the same effect. The Emporium sells only one such rune, but it also sells the schematic to craft more of it (which must be purchased in Act 1 or it's LostForever), so as long as the crafting resources needed are uncovered, you can make as many Runes of Fortune as you're willing to pay for. Since adding multiple Runes of Fortune to armor will cause the effect to ''stack'', it's very easy to acquire immense wealth.

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* ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'' does avert this at the base level, since the vanilla game only allows the player to gather around 80 gold in Act 1 (50 of which has to go toward the CashGate to enter Act 2). But if all the expansion packs have been installed, there are a number of items which can be worn that increase the amount of money dropped by enemies. With the ''Black Emporium'' DLC, there's also a Rune of Fortune which can be added to any armor pieces to achieve the same effect. The Emporium sells only one such rune, but it also sells the schematic to craft more of it (which must be purchased in Act 1 or it's LostForever), {{Permanently Miss|able Content}}ed), so as long as the crafting resources needed are uncovered, you can make as many Runes of Fortune as you're willing to pay for. Since adding multiple Runes of Fortune to armor will cause the effect to ''stack'', it's very easy to acquire immense wealth.



* Because your parents are constantly showering you with gifts, you should have enough money by the end of ''Videogame/EarthBound'' to retire. You even get to buy a useless, run-down old building for a fortune (which is easy enough to obtain) with nothing but a story cameo inside! Also, the last store in the game provides you with some things actually worth purchasing, including normally difficult to obtain MP-restoring items. The limitation is more how much you can fit in your storage area (because the store is LostForever) than whether or not you can afford it all.

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* Because your parents are constantly showering you with gifts, you should have enough money by the end of ''Videogame/EarthBound'' to retire. You even get to buy a useless, run-down old building for a fortune (which is easy enough to obtain) with nothing but a story cameo inside! Also, the last store in the game provides you with some things actually worth purchasing, including normally difficult to obtain MP-restoring items. The limitation is more how much you can fit in your storage area (because the store is LostForever) limited) than whether or not you can afford it all.
20th May '17 3:05:26 PM nombretomado
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* In ''VampireTheMasqueradeBloodlines'', if your character does not rely heavily on firearms, you will almost certainly end up with much more money than you can reasonably hope to spend. If your character does rely heavily on firearms, then you will constantly be spending money on ammunition, and this will act as a huge MoneySink.

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* In ''VampireTheMasqueradeBloodlines'', ''VideoGame/VampireTheMasqueradeBloodlines'', if your character does not rely heavily on firearms, you will almost certainly end up with much more money than you can reasonably hope to spend. If your character does rely heavily on firearms, then you will constantly be spending money on ammunition, and this will act as a huge MoneySink.
20th May '17 11:29:11 AM nombretomado
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* All of the ''Franchise/{{Ultima}}'' games have this to varying degrees.

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* All of the ''Franchise/{{Ultima}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Ultima}}'' games have this to varying degrees.
5th Apr '17 11:46:05 AM Theriocephalus
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* In the ''{{Pokemon}}'' games, your money won't become useless (since the most useful items in the game are either only found in limited numbers during gameplay or are bought in shops for a nice sum of money or in casino for coins you can get with money), but since you earn money every time you defeat a trainer, and you defeat a ''lot'' of trainers during the course of the game, you'll end up hitting the maximum of 999,999P after you've been training your Pokémon for a while and are unlikely to ever buy enough items to run out of money. In Pokémon Platinum, you are given a villa once you reach a certain location whose only purpose is letting you waste money buying crazily expensive furniture for it (which does not do anything useful) and once you earn entrance to the Ribbon Society you can buy some extremely expensive ribbons (one of which cost ''as much money as you can possibly have'') for the BraggingRightsReward.

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* In the ''{{Pokemon}}'' ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' games, your money won't become useless (since the most useful items in the game are either only found in limited numbers during gameplay or are bought in shops for a nice sum of money or in casino for coins you can get with money), but since you earn money every time you defeat a trainer, and you defeat a ''lot'' of trainers during the course of the game, you'll end up hitting the maximum of 999,999P after you've been training your Pokémon for a while and are unlikely to ever buy enough items to run out of money. In Pokémon Platinum, ''Pokémon Platinum'', you are given a villa once you reach a certain location whose only purpose is letting you waste money buying crazily expensive furniture for it (which does not do anything useful) and once you earn entrance to the Ribbon Society you can buy some extremely expensive ribbons (one of which cost ''as much money as you can possibly have'') for the BraggingRightsReward.



** X and Y give you clothes shops so you can spend money by the thousands, and offers you to burn money by the hundreds of thousands in exchange for battles in the Battle Maison and the Lumiose restaurants. Of course, you can make up all the money you spent and then a few thousands more by winning all the battles in those areas, so...

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** X ''X and Y Y'' give you clothes shops so you can spend money by the thousands, and offers you to burn money by the hundreds of thousands in exchange for battles in the Battle Maison and the Lumiose restaurants. Of course, you can make up all the money you spent and then a few thousands more by winning all the battles in those areas, so...
3rd Apr '17 6:38:24 PM nombretomado
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* ''ProfessorLayton's London Life'', the sprite-inhabited RPG packaged with some versions of ''ProfessorLaytonAndTheLastSpecter'', falls into this trope after a while. Early in the game, you need to earn money, both because holding a job is a necessary step in the plot and because some of the objects required by {{fetch quest}}s have to be purchased from merchants. Eventually, though, you'll pile up the cash by the thousands, and unless you feel like saving up for the Golden Gloves (which cost just shy of a million gold coins), you'll run out of things to buy with it.

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* ''ProfessorLayton's London Life'', the sprite-inhabited RPG packaged with some versions of ''ProfessorLaytonAndTheLastSpecter'', ''VideoGame/ProfessorLaytonAndTheLastSpecter'', falls into this trope after a while. Early in the game, you need to earn money, both because holding a job is a necessary step in the plot and because some of the objects required by {{fetch quest}}s have to be purchased from merchants. Eventually, though, you'll pile up the cash by the thousands, and unless you feel like saving up for the Golden Gloves (which cost just shy of a million gold coins), you'll run out of things to buy with it.
29th Mar '17 11:11:15 AM NoxSky12599
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** In ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker The Wind Waker]]'', a late-game quest requires you use special maps to hunt down eight Triforce fragments. The catch is that each map has to be "deciphered" by Tingle before they can be used, and he charges you 398 rupees per map to do so. In the original Game Cube version, this required getting a wallet upgrade before you could even carry enough money to pay him. In the HD re-release, the default wallet size was increased to 500 rupees, and all but three of the charts were removed entirely.
** Averted (mostly) in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTriForceHeroes Tri Force Heroes]]'', where you're unlikely to get more than 300 to 500 rupees per level, whereas ItemCrafting materials in the shop range from 250 to 3,000 rupees per item, and the actual crafting costs an additional 100 to 3,000 rupees depending on the outfit. PlayedStraight once you've finally managed to make all the outfits, as there's literally nothing to spend money on besides more materials.
29th Mar '17 9:23:01 AM crazysamaritan
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* The currency in ''VideoGame/{{Scribblenauts}}'' is "Ollars". You get Ollars for completing any level (be they Action or Puzzle). You get more Ollars for using certain items (tools, animals, weapons, etc) or completing a level in a particularly clever or awesome way. The thing is...the only thing to spend these Ollars on are extra characters to replace Maxwell. They cost an average of 2000-3000 Ollars each. By the end of the game, you'll have well over 300,000 Ollars. [[note]]And don't bother writing "Ollar" in the magic book. [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything You'll get a stack of Ollars, sure, but it won't be added to your account]].[[/note]]

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* The currency in ''VideoGame/{{Scribblenauts}}'' is "Ollars". You get Ollars for completing any level (be they Action or Puzzle). You get more Ollars for using certain items (tools, animals, weapons, etc) or completing a level in a particularly clever or awesome way. The thing is...the only thing to spend these Ollars on are extra characters to replace Maxwell. They cost an average of 2000-3000 Ollars each. By the end of the game, you'll have well over 300,000 Ollars. [[note]]And don't bother writing "Ollar" in the magic book. [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything You'll get a stack of Ollars, sure, but it won't be added to your account]].account.[[/note]]



* Money in ''VideoGame/NetHack'' is a strange case; having some money around can help you bribe your way past a couple of (not hard) bosses, and buying protection from priests is often beneficial; but beyond that everything in shops can simply be stolen by a well-trained pet and it's dirt cheap to buy anyway (unless you stumble across [[InfinityPlusOneSword Grayswandir]] in a shop, you lucky sod), which means money is just there for extra points if you beat the game, and taking up space in your backpack (TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything in action - one hundred and thirty seven thousand gold pieces actually have ''weight'' in this game...).

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* Money in ''VideoGame/NetHack'' is a strange case; having some money around can help you bribe your way past a couple of (not hard) bosses, and buying protection from priests is often beneficial; but beyond that everything in shops can simply be stolen by a well-trained pet and it's dirt cheap to buy anyway (unless you stumble across [[InfinityPlusOneSword Grayswandir]] in a shop, you lucky sod), which means money is just there for extra points if you beat the game, and taking up space in your backpack (TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything in action - ([[DevelopersForesight one hundred and thirty seven thousand gold pieces actually have ''weight'' weight in this game...).]]).
18th Mar '17 5:58:49 PM nombretomado
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* ''NeoPets'' has an on-site browser RPG called Neo Quest II. In the first two or three levels, the player will likely be always short of money for healing potions and inn rests -- but after the healer joins the party, the money flowing in really has not many place to go -- healing potions are only relevant in boss battles now, and buyable equipment is inferior to droppables. During the last two chapters the player typically would only buy max stacks of speed, slowing, and healing potions in preparation fo the final boss battle, and face the final boss filthy rich.

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* ''NeoPets'' ''{{Website/Neopets}}'' has an on-site browser RPG called Neo Quest II. In the first two or three levels, the player will likely be always short of money for healing potions and inn rests -- but after the healer joins the party, the money flowing in really has not many place to go -- healing potions are only relevant in boss battles now, and buyable equipment is inferior to droppables. During the last two chapters the player typically would only buy max stacks of speed, slowing, and healing potions in preparation fo the final boss battle, and face the final boss filthy rich.
7th Mar '17 12:40:08 PM BeerBaron
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*** The flat-out easiest way to get money for nothing in ''Morrowind'' takes advantage of a rounding error, and doesn't even require decent stats: the game works out the total price of goods differently depending on whether you click on a whole stack of items at once or add them individually. At the start of a game, simply pick up a large stack of cheap items. Go to a merchant and add them to your "sell" stack one by one and the game will raise the price by the minimum value rounded up to a whole coin on each click. Sell for four hundred arrows, then buy the whole stack back for just ''one''

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*** The flat-out One of the easiest way to get money for nothing in ''Morrowind'' earning methods takes advantage of a rounding error, and doesn't even require decent stats: the game works out the total price of goods differently depending on whether you click on a whole stack of items at once or add them individually. At the start of a game, simply Simply pick up a large stack of cheap items. Go to a merchant and add them to your "sell" stack one by one and the game will raise the price by the minimum value rounded up to a whole coin on each click. Sell for four hundred arrows, then buy the whole stack back for just ''one''''one''...
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