History Main / Mithril

17th Aug '16 2:07:19 PM margdean56
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Mithril is a fictional metal from Creator/JRRTolkien's Middle-earth fantasy writings. It is silvery and stronger than steel but much lighter in weight. The author first wrote of it in ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'', and it was {{Retcon}}ned in the second, revised edition of ''Literature/TheHobbit'' in 1966. In the first 1937 edition, the mail shirt given to Bilbo was described as being made of "silvered steel". This metal was the reason for the Dwarves of Khazad-dûm's wealth and power. Greed for this metal eventually led to the downfall of the dwarves when they [[DugTooDeep found a vein of mithril that led to]] a [[SealedEvilInACan sleeping Balrog.]]

to:

Mithril is a fictional metal from Creator/JRRTolkien's Middle-earth fantasy writings. It is silvery and stronger than steel but much lighter in weight. The author first wrote of it in ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'', and it was {{Retcon}}ned in into the second, revised edition of ''Literature/TheHobbit'' in 1966. In the first 1937 edition, the mail shirt given to Bilbo was described as being made of "silvered steel". This metal was the reason for the Dwarves of Khazad-dûm's wealth and power. Greed for this metal eventually led to the downfall of the dwarves when they [[DugTooDeep found a vein of mithril that led to]] a [[SealedEvilInACan sleeping Balrog.]]
1st Mar '15 3:38:38 AM SeptimusHeap
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The name "mithril"[[note]]For the curious, ''mithril'' in Sindarin (Elvish) means "grey glitter", the ''-ril'' part being the same as in ''Silmaril''.[[/note]] or similarly spelled variations (mithral, mythril, and others) is present in other fictional contexts like role-playing games, since the Tolkien Estate did not trademark the term, unlike "[[Literature/TheHobbit Hobbit]]" or "Balrog". One early example is DungeonsAndDragons and its derivatives (e.g. ForgottenRealms). It appears in many computer and video games such as ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'' (it also appeared in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall'', although there it was a ''mid-weight'' material), ''VideoGame/EverQuest'', ''VideoGame/RuneScape'', ''Franchise/{{Tales|Series}}'' series, ''VideoGame/DarkAgeOfCamelot'', ''VideoGame/DungeonsAndDragonsOnline'', ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Terraria}}'', ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'', ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' and ''VideoGame/NetHack''. The name is usually used for a special type of metal (often used as armor), or as a denomination of currency, or as a name for a project or device. It's very useful to have an exotic trope metal that is more rare and valuable than mundane metals like steel or gold. Citadel Miniatures even produced a color of (metallic) paint named Mithril Silver.

to:

The name "mithril"[[note]]For the curious, ''mithril'' in Sindarin (Elvish) means "grey glitter", the ''-ril'' part being the same as in ''Silmaril''.[[/note]] or similarly spelled variations (mithral, mythril, and others) is present in other fictional contexts like role-playing games, since the Tolkien Estate did not trademark the term, unlike "[[Literature/TheHobbit Hobbit]]" or "Balrog". One early example is DungeonsAndDragons ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' and its derivatives (e.g. ForgottenRealms). It appears in many computer and video games such as ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'' (it also appeared in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall'', although there it was a ''mid-weight'' material), ''VideoGame/EverQuest'', ''VideoGame/RuneScape'', ''Franchise/{{Tales|Series}}'' series, ''VideoGame/DarkAgeOfCamelot'', ''VideoGame/DungeonsAndDragonsOnline'', ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Terraria}}'', ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'', ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' and ''VideoGame/NetHack''. The name is usually used for a special type of metal (often used as armor), or as a denomination of currency, or as a name for a project or device. It's very useful to have an exotic trope metal that is more rare and valuable than mundane metals like steel or gold. Citadel Miniatures even produced a color of (metallic) paint named Mithril Silver.
3rd Nov '13 4:48:15 PM Vilui
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As to if Mithril was ever based on a real metal, Tolkien never said. Guesses for this metal have been aluminum, titanium, naturally occuring titanium-molybdenum alloy and platinum (and yttrium silver [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intermetallics if you want to get technical]]). Titanium comes closest in lightness, hardness, toughness and resistance to tarnishing, yet it is not found whole in nature, it has to be extracted from minerals via a complex process which could not be discovered and put in practice by a non-industrial civilization. Unless they had magic....

to:

As to if whether Mithril was ever based on a real metal, Tolkien never said. Guesses for this metal have been aluminum, titanium, naturally occuring titanium-molybdenum alloy and platinum (and yttrium silver [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intermetallics if you want to get technical]]). Titanium comes closest in lightness, hardness, toughness and resistance to tarnishing, yet it is not found whole in nature, it has to be extracted from minerals via a complex process which could not be discovered and put in practice by a non-industrial civilization. Unless they had magic....
3rd Nov '13 4:19:31 PM Zenoseiya
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Compare with ThunderboltIron, {{Orichalcum}}, {{Unobtainium}}, SilverHasMysticPowers. Contrast with ColdIron

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Subtrope of FantasyMetals. Compare with ThunderboltIron, {{Orichalcum}}, {{Unobtainium}}, SilverHasMysticPowers. Contrast with ColdIron
ColdIron.
27th Oct '13 12:31:13 PM ShorinBJ
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As to if Mithril was ever based on a real metal, Tolkien never said. Guesses for this metal have been aluminum, titanium, naturally occuring titanium-molybdenum alloy and platinum (and yttrium silver [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intermetallics if you want to get technical]]). Titanium comes closest in lightness, hardness, toughness and resistance to tarnishing, yet it is not found whole in nature, it has to be extracted from minerals via a complex process which could not be discovered and put in practice by a non-industrial civilization.

to:

As to if Mithril was ever based on a real metal, Tolkien never said. Guesses for this metal have been aluminum, titanium, naturally occuring titanium-molybdenum alloy and platinum (and yttrium silver [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intermetallics if you want to get technical]]). Titanium comes closest in lightness, hardness, toughness and resistance to tarnishing, yet it is not found whole in nature, it has to be extracted from minerals via a complex process which could not be discovered and put in practice by a non-industrial civilization.
civilization. Unless they had magic....
29th Sep '13 6:34:48 AM Viira
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The name "mithril"[[hottip:*:For the curious, ''mithril'' in Sindarin (Elvish) means "grey glitter", the ''-ril'' part being the same as in ''Silmaril''.]] or similarly spelled variations (mithral, mythril, and others) is present in other fictional contexts like role-playing games, since the Tolkien Estate did not trademark the term, unlike "[[Literature/TheHobbit Hobbit]]" or "Balrog". One early example is DungeonsAndDragons and its derivatives (e.g. ForgottenRealms). It appears in many computer and video games such as ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'' (it also appeared in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall'', although there it was a ''mid-weight'' material), ''VideoGame/EverQuest'', ''VideoGame/RuneScape'', ''Franchise/{{Tales|Series}}'' series, ''VideoGame/DarkAgeOfCamelot'', ''VideoGame/DungeonsAndDragonsOnline'', ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Terraria}}'', ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'', ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' and ''VideoGame/NetHack''. The name is usually used for a special type of metal (often used as armor), or as a denomination of currency, or as a name for a project or device. It's very useful to have an exotic trope metal that is more rare and valuable than mundane metals like steel or gold. Citadel Miniatures even produced a color of (metallic) paint named Mithril Silver.

to:

The name "mithril"[[hottip:*:For "mithril"[[note]]For the curious, ''mithril'' in Sindarin (Elvish) means "grey glitter", the ''-ril'' part being the same as in ''Silmaril''.]] [[/note]] or similarly spelled variations (mithral, mythril, and others) is present in other fictional contexts like role-playing games, since the Tolkien Estate did not trademark the term, unlike "[[Literature/TheHobbit Hobbit]]" or "Balrog". One early example is DungeonsAndDragons and its derivatives (e.g. ForgottenRealms). It appears in many computer and video games such as ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'' (it also appeared in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall'', although there it was a ''mid-weight'' material), ''VideoGame/EverQuest'', ''VideoGame/RuneScape'', ''Franchise/{{Tales|Series}}'' series, ''VideoGame/DarkAgeOfCamelot'', ''VideoGame/DungeonsAndDragonsOnline'', ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Terraria}}'', ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'', ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' and ''VideoGame/NetHack''. The name is usually used for a special type of metal (often used as armor), or as a denomination of currency, or as a name for a project or device. It's very useful to have an exotic trope metal that is more rare and valuable than mundane metals like steel or gold. Citadel Miniatures even produced a color of (metallic) paint named Mithril Silver.
18th May '13 3:12:25 PM Nautilus1
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As to if Mithril was ever based on a real metal, Tolkien never said. Guesses for this metal have been aluminum, titanium, naturally occuring titanium-molybdenum alloy and platinum (and yttrium silver [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intermetallics if you want to get technical]]).

to:

As to if Mithril was ever based on a real metal, Tolkien never said. Guesses for this metal have been aluminum, titanium, naturally occuring titanium-molybdenum alloy and platinum (and yttrium silver [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intermetallics if you want to get technical]]).
technical]]). Titanium comes closest in lightness, hardness, toughness and resistance to tarnishing, yet it is not found whole in nature, it has to be extracted from minerals via a complex process which could not be discovered and put in practice by a non-industrial civilization.
31st Mar '13 1:09:01 PM MacronNotes
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Not to be confused with HeavyMithril, or the [[FullMetalPanic fictional mercenary organization of the same name]].

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Not to be confused with HeavyMithril, or the [[FullMetalPanic [[Lightnovel/FullMetalPanic fictional mercenary organization of the same name]].
9th Mar '13 11:24:47 AM DantLorel
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The name "mithril"[[hottip:*:For the curious, ''mithril'' in Sindarin (Elvish) means "grey glitter", the ''-ril'' part being the same as in ''Silmaril''.]] or similarly spelled variations (mithral, mythril, and others) is present in other fictional contexts like role-playing games, since the Tolkien Estate did not trademark the term, unlike "[[Literature/TheHobbit Hobbit]]" or "Balrog". One early example is DungeonsAndDragons and its derivatives (e.g. ForgottenRealms). It appears in many computer and video games such as ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'' (it also appeared in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall'', although there it was a ''mid-weight'' material), ''VideoGame/EverQuest'', ''VideoGame/RuneScape'', ''Franchise/{{Tales|Series}}'' series, ''VideoGame/DarkAgeOfCamelot'', ''VideoGame/DungeonsAndDragonsOnline'', ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Terraria}}'', ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'', ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' and ''VideoGame/NetHack''. The name is usually used for a special type of metal (often used as armor), or as a denomination of currency, or as a name for a project or device. It's very useful to have an exotic trope metal that is more rare and valuable than mundane metals like steel or gold. Citadel Miniatures even produce a color of (metallic) paint named Mithril Silver.

to:

The name "mithril"[[hottip:*:For the curious, ''mithril'' in Sindarin (Elvish) means "grey glitter", the ''-ril'' part being the same as in ''Silmaril''.]] or similarly spelled variations (mithral, mythril, and others) is present in other fictional contexts like role-playing games, since the Tolkien Estate did not trademark the term, unlike "[[Literature/TheHobbit Hobbit]]" or "Balrog". One early example is DungeonsAndDragons and its derivatives (e.g. ForgottenRealms). It appears in many computer and video games such as ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'' (it also appeared in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall'', although there it was a ''mid-weight'' material), ''VideoGame/EverQuest'', ''VideoGame/RuneScape'', ''Franchise/{{Tales|Series}}'' series, ''VideoGame/DarkAgeOfCamelot'', ''VideoGame/DungeonsAndDragonsOnline'', ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Terraria}}'', ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'', ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' and ''VideoGame/NetHack''. The name is usually used for a special type of metal (often used as armor), or as a denomination of currency, or as a name for a project or device. It's very useful to have an exotic trope metal that is more rare and valuable than mundane metals like steel or gold. Citadel Miniatures even produce produced a color of (metallic) paint named Mithril Silver.
13th Jan '13 12:34:54 PM nombretomado
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Mithril is a fictional metal from Creator/JRRTolkien's Middle-earth fantasy writings. It is silvery and stronger than steel but much lighter in weight. The author first wrote of it in ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'', and it was {{Retcon}}ned in the second, revised edition of ''TheHobbit'' in 1966. In the first 1937 edition, the mail shirt given to Bilbo was described as being made of "silvered steel". This metal was the reason for the Dwarves of Khazad-dûm's wealth and power. Greed for this metal eventually led to the downfall of the dwarves when they [[DugTooDeep found a vein of mithril that led to]] a [[SealedEvilInACan sleeping Balrog.]]

to:

Mithril is a fictional metal from Creator/JRRTolkien's Middle-earth fantasy writings. It is silvery and stronger than steel but much lighter in weight. The author first wrote of it in ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'', and it was {{Retcon}}ned in the second, revised edition of ''TheHobbit'' ''Literature/TheHobbit'' in 1966. In the first 1937 edition, the mail shirt given to Bilbo was described as being made of "silvered steel". This metal was the reason for the Dwarves of Khazad-dûm's wealth and power. Greed for this metal eventually led to the downfall of the dwarves when they [[DugTooDeep found a vein of mithril that led to]] a [[SealedEvilInACan sleeping Balrog.]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.Mithril