History Main / MiscarriageofJustice

28th May '16 10:12:13 PM TSBasilisk
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[[folder:Web Original]]
* Canary's trial in ''Literature/{{Worm}}'' has shades of this. Despite being normal aside from her CompellingVoice, she's fitted with a restraint system used for superpowered Brutes which no doubt hurts her impression to the jury. Speaking of the voice she's literally gagged and denied the right to speak in her own defense. When convicted the judge uses her to set a precedent by immediately sentencing her to [[TheAlcatraz the Birdcage]] despite having no prior convictions.
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19th May '16 1:09:58 PM TheOneWhoTropes
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* In an episode of ''RockosModernLife'', Rocko is convicted (by a JokerJury of insects) for injuring a fly, and sentenced to 30 days [[BalefulPolymorph as a fly]]. Later, the fly that Rocko allegedly injured is seen perfectly fine, guzzling soup at a fancy restaurant. At the same restaurant is TheJudge, who then comes to Rocko's home to turn him back into a wallaby, apologizing profusely for the MiscarriageOfJustice.

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* In an episode of ''RockosModernLife'', ''WesternAnimation/RockosModernLife'', Rocko is convicted (by a JokerJury of insects) for injuring a fly, and sentenced to 30 days [[BalefulPolymorph as a fly]]. Later, the fly that Rocko allegedly injured is seen perfectly fine, guzzling soup at a fancy restaurant. At the same restaurant is TheJudge, who then comes to Rocko's home to turn him back into a wallaby, apologizing profusely for the MiscarriageOfJustice.
15th May '16 3:08:49 PM Fireblood
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** ''A Murder In the Park'' has a disturbing twist on this. Anthony Porter was released in 1999 after a team of university students claimed to have found exculpatory evidence, including the confession of the real murderer. However, the film says, not only was Porter almost certainly guilty but the man who confessed did so under coercion and manipulation from their private investigator. The man who confessed, Alstory Simon, was pressured to plead guilty by his lawyer to avoid a life sentence. His lawyer just so happened to be a ''friend'' of the same investigator who procured his confession. Simon got 37 years, though he was freed in 2014. So, if the film is correct, we have a killer wrongly set free and another man wrongly sent to prison later in his place then himself exonerated. What is most damning is that per its allegations, the investigators seeking to exonerate Porter used many of the same tactics found in miscarriages of justice by the government: getting witnesses to change their stories with bribery or threats, coercing a false confession, and ignoring evidence implicating him in a double murder. Not only that but since Porter has been pardoned and the statute of limitations has run out on the investigators' crimes, neither can be prosecuted. However, Simon is suing them and the university.

to:

** ''A Murder In the Park'' has a disturbing twist on this. Anthony Porter was released in 1999 after a team of university students claimed to have found exculpatory evidence, including the confession of the real murderer. However, the film says, not only was Porter almost certainly guilty but the man who confessed did so under coercion and manipulation from their private investigator. The man who confessed, Alstory Simon, was pressured to plead guilty by his lawyer to avoid a life sentence. His lawyer just so happened to be a ''friend'' friend of the same investigator who procured his confession. Simon got 37 years, though he was freed in 2014. So, if the film is correct, we have a killer wrongly set free and another man wrongly sent to prison later in his place place, then himself exonerated. What is most damning is that per its allegations, the investigators seeking to exonerate Porter used many of the same tactics found in miscarriages of justice by the government: getting witnesses to change their stories with bribery or threats, coercing a false confession, and ignoring evidence implicating him in a double murder. Not only that but since Porter has been pardoned and the statute of limitations has run out on the investigators' crimes, neither [[KarmaHoudini no one can be prosecuted.prosecuted]]. However, Simon is suing them and the university.
12th May '16 9:16:09 PM Fireblood
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** ''A Murder In the Park'' has a disturbing twist on this. Anthony Porter was released in 1999 after a team of university students claimed to have found exculpatory evidence, including the confession of the real murderer. However, the film says, not only was Porter almost certainly guilty but the man who confessed did so under coercion and manipulation from their private investigator. The man who confessed, Alstory Simon, was pressured to plead guilty by his lawyer to avoid a life sentence. His lawyer just so happened to be a ''friend'' of the same investigator who procured his confession. Simon got 37 years, though he was freed in 2014. So, if the film is correct, we have a killer wrongly set free and another man wrongly sent to prison later in his place then himself exonerated. What is most damning is that per its allegations, the investigators seeking to exonerate Porter used many of the same tactics found in miscarriages of justice by the government: getting witnesses to change their stories with bribery or threats, coercing a false confession, and ignoring evidence implicating him in a double murder. Not only that but since Porter has been pardoned and the statute of limitations has run out on the investigators' crimes, neither can be prosecuted. However, Simon is using them and the university.

to:

** ''A Murder In the Park'' has a disturbing twist on this. Anthony Porter was released in 1999 after a team of university students claimed to have found exculpatory evidence, including the confession of the real murderer. However, the film says, not only was Porter almost certainly guilty but the man who confessed did so under coercion and manipulation from their private investigator. The man who confessed, Alstory Simon, was pressured to plead guilty by his lawyer to avoid a life sentence. His lawyer just so happened to be a ''friend'' of the same investigator who procured his confession. Simon got 37 years, though he was freed in 2014. So, if the film is correct, we have a killer wrongly set free and another man wrongly sent to prison later in his place then himself exonerated. What is most damning is that per its allegations, the investigators seeking to exonerate Porter used many of the same tactics found in miscarriages of justice by the government: getting witnesses to change their stories with bribery or threats, coercing a false confession, and ignoring evidence implicating him in a double murder. Not only that but since Porter has been pardoned and the statute of limitations has run out on the investigators' crimes, neither can be prosecuted. However, Simon is using suing them and the university.
12th May '16 9:15:28 PM Fireblood
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** ''A Murder In the Park'' has a disturbing twist on this. Anthony Porter was released in 1999 after a team of university students claimed to have found exculpatory evidence, including the confession of the real murderer. However, the film says, not only was Porter almost certainly guilty but the man who confessed did so under coercion and manipulation from their private investigator. The man who confessed, Alstory Simon, was pressured to plead guilty by his lawyer to avoid a life sentence. His lawyer just so happened to be a ''friend'' of the same investigator who procured his confession. Simon got 37 years, though he was freed in 2014. So, if the film is correct, we have a killer wrongly set free and another man wrongly sent to prison later in his place then himself exonerated. What is most damning is that per its allegations, the investigators seeking to exonerate Porter used many of the same tactics found in miscarriages of justice by the government: getting witnesses to change their stories with bribery or threats, coercing a false confession, and ignoring evidence implicating him in the original crime.

to:

** ''A Murder In the Park'' has a disturbing twist on this. Anthony Porter was released in 1999 after a team of university students claimed to have found exculpatory evidence, including the confession of the real murderer. However, the film says, not only was Porter almost certainly guilty but the man who confessed did so under coercion and manipulation from their private investigator. The man who confessed, Alstory Simon, was pressured to plead guilty by his lawyer to avoid a life sentence. His lawyer just so happened to be a ''friend'' of the same investigator who procured his confession. Simon got 37 years, though he was freed in 2014. So, if the film is correct, we have a killer wrongly set free and another man wrongly sent to prison later in his place then himself exonerated. What is most damning is that per its allegations, the investigators seeking to exonerate Porter used many of the same tactics found in miscarriages of justice by the government: getting witnesses to change their stories with bribery or threats, coercing a false confession, and ignoring evidence implicating him in a double murder. Not only that but since Porter has been pardoned and the original crime. statute of limitations has run out on the investigators' crimes, neither can be prosecuted. However, Simon is using them and the university.



** A subversion took place on June 20, 2014. The Central Park 5 [[http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/06/20/323996355/central-park-5-win-40-million-from-nyc-for-false-convictions will receive $40 million dollars]] due to false conviction laws.
* In 1983, Henry McCollum and Leon Brown (two mentally handicapped half brothers) were accused of raping and murdering an 11 year old girl. There was no physical evidence, the confessions were inconsistent, and what little did match up was already known by the police. They were sentenced to death (though Leon later had his commuted to life in prison) in 1984. It wasn't until 2014, when DNA implicated a sex predator named Roscoe Artis (who lived 100 feet from where the little girl's body had been found, had been implicated in a similar murder a county over, and was convicted of murdering another young girl a month after the Brothers had been arrested in the same neighborhood) that the two were released. By this time their mother had died just a year before. Both were ultimately pardoned in June 2015.

to:

** A subversion took place on June 20, 2014. The Central Park 5 [[http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/06/20/323996355/central-park-5-win-40-million-from-nyc-for-false-convictions will receive $40 million dollars]] due to false wrongful conviction compensation laws.
* In 1983, Henry McCollum and Leon Brown (two mentally handicapped half brothers) were accused of raping and murdering an 11 year old girl. There was no physical evidence, the confessions were inconsistent, and what little did match up was already known by the police. They were sentenced to death (though Leon later had his sentence commuted to life in prison) in 1984. It wasn't until 2014, when DNA implicated a sex predator named Roscoe Artis (who lived 100 feet from where the little girl's body had been found, had been implicated in a similar murder a county over, and was convicted of murdering another young girl a month after the Brothers had been arrested in the same neighborhood) that the two were released. By this time their mother had died just a year before. Both were ultimately pardoned in June 2015.



* In one of the gravest public blunders of the Italian judiciary system, Enzo Tortora was wrongfully sentenced to ten years of prison after accusations of being a member of the Camorra involved in drug trafficking, based on paper-thin proofs and the claims of a mentally unstable [[UsefulNotes/TheMafia pentito]]. What's notable is the fact the the guy was a beloved ''TV Host''; when his ordeal ended and was allowed back to the scenes, now physically worn out and struggling with cancer, he famously started off the show by simply saying [[{{Badass}} "Well then, where did we leave off?"]].
* Perhaps the most infamous case in French history is Captain Alfred Dreyfus, in 1894, who was accused of spying under false charges. Being Jewish in a still anti-Semitic, fiercely conservative army, he was the scapegoat while the army protected the actual culprit, and was sent to the PenalColony of [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Devil's Island]] in French Guiana for five years of hell. His brother and his wife fought to obtain proof of the miscarriage. Eventually, some first-rate intellectuals (including Émile Zola and his Main/JAccuse) took up the defense of Dreyfus in the press and obtained a new trial. The affair was unusual in that it really divided France into two clear sides: the ''dreyfusards'' (Dreyfus' defenders, mostly left-wing republicans) and the ''anti-dreyfusards'' (right-wing, traditionally religious conservatives). Dreyfus was eventually found not guilty (in 1906) and went on to serve during Main/WorldWar1, rising to the rank of lieutenant-colonel, but the years his career had lost were never taken into account and he never could make it to general, as he could have before the affair.
* The first season of the podcast ''Serial'' takes an in-depth look at the case of Adnan Syed, a Muslim man convicted of murder at the age of 18 in the death of his friend Hae Min Lee. In the course of reporting, the evidence is examined, and the conclusion is eventually drawn by reporter Sarah Koenig that the case against Adnan was based on either fundamentally flawed evidence (timelines that didn't match, evidence that ultimately was demonstrably incorrect), or BlatantLies (witness testimony that changed with each telling, or that was left out entirely because it didn't fit the prosecution's case). She ultimately states that she doesn't know if Adnan is actually the killer, but there's no way he should be found guilty based on the evidence provided. The fact that Adnan has constantly pled his innocence, for ''15 years'' despite it hurting his case and his chances at parole, implies that this trope is in effect.

to:

* In one of the gravest public blunders of the Italian judiciary system, Enzo Tortora was wrongfully sentenced to ten years of prison after accusations of being a member of the Camorra involved in drug trafficking, based on paper-thin proofs evidence and the claims of a mentally unstable [[UsefulNotes/TheMafia pentito]]. What's notable is the fact the the guy was a beloved ''TV Host''; when his ordeal ended and was allowed back to the scenes, now physically worn out and struggling with cancer, he famously started off the show by simply saying [[{{Badass}} "Well then, where did we leave off?"]].
* Perhaps the most infamous case in French history is Captain Alfred Dreyfus, in 1894, who in 1894 was accused of spying under false charges. for Germany. Being Jewish in a still anti-Semitic, fiercely conservative army, he was the scapegoat while the army protected acquitted the actual culprit, and was sent to the PenalColony of [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Devil's Island]] in French Guiana for five years of hell. His brother and his wife fought to obtain proof of the miscarriage. Eventually, some first-rate intellectuals (including Émile Zola and his Main/JAccuse) took up the defense of Dreyfus in the press and obtained a new trial. The affair was unusual in that it really divided France into two clear sides: the ''dreyfusards'' (Dreyfus' defenders, mostly left-wing republicans) and the ''anti-dreyfusards'' (right-wing, traditionally religious conservatives). Dreyfus was eventually found not guilty (in 1906) and went on to serve during Main/WorldWar1, rising to the rank of lieutenant-colonel, but the years his career had lost were never taken into account and he never could make it to general, as he could have before the affair.
* The first season of the podcast ''Serial'' takes an in-depth look at the case of Adnan Syed, a Muslim man convicted of murder at the age of 18 in the death of his friend Hae Min Lee. In the course of reporting, the evidence is examined, and the conclusion is eventually drawn by reporter Sarah Koenig that the case against Adnan was based on either fundamentally flawed evidence (timelines that didn't match, evidence that ultimately was demonstrably incorrect), or BlatantLies (witness testimony that changed with each telling, or that was left out entirely because it didn't fit the prosecution's case). She ultimately states that she doesn't know if Adnan is actually the killer, but there's no way he should be found guilty based on the evidence provided. The fact that Adnan has constantly pled his innocence, innocence for ''15 years'' despite it hurting his case and his chances at parole, implies that this trope is in effect.
12th May '16 9:07:43 PM Fireblood
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** ''Paradise Lost: The Child Murders at Robin Hood Hills'', where three non-conformist boys, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Memphis_Three The West Memphis Three]] were indicted for a horrific triple murder and convicted even though it's obvious that at best, there is not enough evidence, or at worst, they are innocent boys screwed by community prejudice and hysteria. Here, activists worked on getting them exonerated with the help of the producers following up with ''Paradise Lost 2'' and soon, ''Paradise Lost 3'', which drop the ambiguity of the first film and firmly support the boys' innocence.
*** Recently the boys were released with the understanding that they plead guilty[[note]]Technically what's called an Alford plea, which basically amounts to "I didn't do it but I know I'll be convicted anyway"[[/note]] while still allowed to assert their innocence. Obviously, the fight for a real exoneration will continue.
*** A certain kind of real life {{Fridge Horror}} kicks in when you realize another miscarriage of justice. If we take for granted that the boys were innocent (general consensus is that the evidence shows this, and the state of Arkansas offering the Alford Plea deal to convicted first-degree murderers was taken as tacit acknowledgement that the prosecution messed up and convicted the wrong people) then . . . what happened to the real killer? Presumably he (or she) is still out there somewhere, if not dead.

to:

** ''Paradise Lost: The Child Murders at Robin Hood Hills'', where three non-conformist boys, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Memphis_Three The West Memphis Three]] Three]], were indicted for a horrific triple murder and convicted even though it's obvious that at best, best there is not enough evidence, or at worst, worst they are innocent boys screwed by community prejudice and hysteria. Here, activists worked on getting them exonerated with the help of the producers following up with ''Paradise Lost 2'' and soon, ''Paradise Lost 3'', which drop the ambiguity of the first film and firmly support the boys' three's innocence.
*** Recently the boys three were released with the understanding that they plead guilty[[note]]Technically what's called an Alford plea, which basically amounts to "I didn't do it but I know I'll be convicted anyway"[[/note]] while still allowed to assert their innocence. Obviously, the fight for a real exoneration will continue.
continue.
*** A certain kind of real life {{Fridge Horror}} kicks in when you realize another miscarriage of justice. If we take for granted that the boys were innocent (general consensus is that the evidence shows this, and the state of Arkansas offering the Alford Plea deal to convicted first-degree murderers was taken as tacit acknowledgement that the prosecution messed up and convicted the wrong people) then . . . what happened to the real killer? Presumably he (or she) is still out there somewhere, if not dead. One of the boys' fathers was implicated by the defense at trial, but there's no hard evidence against him.
** ''A Murder In the Park'' has a disturbing twist on this. Anthony Porter was released in 1999 after a team of university students claimed to have found exculpatory evidence, including the confession of the real murderer. However, the film says, not only was Porter almost certainly guilty but the man who confessed did so under coercion and manipulation from their private investigator. The man who confessed, Alstory Simon, was pressured to plead guilty by his lawyer to avoid a life sentence. His lawyer just so happened to be a ''friend'' of the same investigator who procured his confession. Simon got 37 years, though he was freed in 2014. So, if the film is correct, we have a killer wrongly set free and another man wrongly sent to prison later in his place then himself exonerated. What is most damning is that per its allegations, the investigators seeking to exonerate Porter used many of the same tactics found in miscarriages of justice by the government: getting witnesses to change their stories with bribery or threats, coercing a false confession, and ignoring evidence implicating him in the original crime.
12th May '16 8:15:29 PM Fireblood
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* ''Film/TheShawshankRedemption'': The driving force of the plot is that Andy Dufresne is wrongly convicted of the murder of his wife and her lover in the [[TheCorpseStopsHere misleading circumstantial evidence]] variant. It then becomes much worse when exculpatory evidence emerges, and is destroyed by corrupt officials, because Andy has been acting as the warden's accountant during his prison time and now [[HeKnowsTooMuch knows too much]] about his shady finances to be allowed to go free. [[spoiler: They ''murder'' a witness willing to testify that someone else committed the crime.]]

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* ''Film/TheShawshankRedemption'': The driving force of the plot is that Andy Dufresne is wrongly convicted of the murder of his wife and her lover in the [[TheCorpseStopsHere misleading circumstantial evidence]] variant. It then becomes much worse when exculpatory evidence emerges, and is destroyed by corrupt officials, because Andy has been acting as the warden's accountant during his prison time and now [[HeKnowsTooMuch knows too much]] about his shady finances to be allowed to go free. [[spoiler: They ''murder'' a witness willing to testify that someone else committed the crime. He eventually escapes to Mexico rather than be legally exonerated.]]



* In ''Film/AndJusticeForAll'' Jeff was arrested due to mistaken identity (he had the same name as a suspect) then framed by other inmates for a prison guard's stabbing. Kirkland can't get him out due to the evidence clearing him coming in too late, [[spoiler: leading Jeff to snap, taking hostages after being [[PrisonRape gang-raped by fellow prisoners]] and is then [[{{Tearjerker}} shot dead by a police sniper]].]]

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* In ''Film/AndJusticeForAll'' Jeff was arrested due to mistaken identity (he had the same name as a suspect) then framed by other inmates for a prison guard's stabbing. Kirkland can't get him out due to the evidence clearing him coming in too late, late. [[spoiler: leading This leads Jeff to snap, taking hostages after being [[PrisonRape gang-raped by fellow prisoners]] and is then [[{{Tearjerker}} shot dead by a police sniper]].]]sniper.]]]]
2nd May '16 6:50:55 PM LordYAM
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* In 1983, Henry McCollum and Leon Brown (two mentally handicapped half brothers) were accused of raping and murdering an 11 year old girl. There was no physical evidence, the confessions were inconsistent, and what little did match up was already known by the police. They were sentenced to death (though Leon later had his commuted to life in prison) in 1984. It wasn't until 2014, when DNA implicated a sex predator named Roscoe Artis (who lived 100 feet from where the little girl's body had been found, had been implicated in a similar murder a county over, and was convicted of murdering another young girl a month after the Brothers had been arrested in the same neighborhood) that the two were released. By this time their mother had died just a year before. Both were ultimately pardoned in June 2015.
7th Mar '16 5:27:39 PM Delphi
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* RebaMacintyre's ''The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia'' has the singer's brother arrested, tried, convicted and ''executed'' all in a single evening [[spoiler: for a murder the singer committed.]]
12th Feb '16 3:43:18 PM eroock
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* ''Film/TrueBeliever: Shu Kai Kim was convicted of a murder he didn't commit [[spoiler: due to false evidence presented by the police and prosecutor]].

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* ''Film/TrueBeliever: ''Film/TrueBeliever'': Shu Kai Kim was convicted of a murder he didn't commit [[spoiler: due to false evidence presented by the police and prosecutor]].
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