History Main / MirandaRights

15th Apr '16 1:17:36 AM Kirayoshi
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* In one episode of ''Series/AlienNation'', Officer Francisco had to arrest an elderly dying Newcomer who had murdered other Newcomers, who had been revealed to be Overseers who were hiding from their fellows to avoid punishment for their crimes. When Francisco starts reading his rights, he gets as far as "You have the right to remain silent," before the Newcomer shouts, "No one has the right to remain silent!"
22nd Mar '16 3:28:35 PM SSJMagus
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In fiction, the Miranda Rights[[note]]The rights themselves exist independent of the court's decision on Miranda - they are in the constitution - and the Warning is only meant to remind you that they exist, although any legal scholar will recognise that, say, the Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination falls under the umbrella heading of "Miranda Rights" while the Third Amendment right to not have to quarter troops in your home does not.[[/note]] are frequent victims of HollywoodLaw. In some movies or series, the rights are an inevitable part of every climax. In others, perps ''never'' seem to get their ''Miranda'' rights read to them when they are arrested. The latter case is actually [[RealityIsUnrealistic more realistic]], since the police only read a ''Miranda'' warning to detainees they want to interrogate. When we ''do'' see the perps Mirandized, however, the officer almost invariably recites the text from memory. In reality, officers are required to read the rights from a card, to avoid mistakes that could get the case thrown out (''any'' deviation from the actual rights as printed mean the perp was not properly read their rights), and will get the perps to sign the card, in case he later denies having been read his rights. Also, they will not stop when a jaded criminal mastermind mutters, "Yeah yeah, I know my rights..." (They ''can't'', because the law requires that an officer inform a suspect of their rights, whether they claim to know them or not). Likewise, the officer is not allowed to interrupt the reading of rights to suggest an obnoxious suspect ''really should'' take advantage of his right to remain silent.

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In fiction, the Miranda Rights[[note]]The rights themselves exist independent of the court's decision on Miranda - they are in the constitution - and the Warning is only meant to remind you that they exist, although any legal scholar will recognise that, say, the Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination falls under the umbrella heading of "Miranda Rights" while the Third Amendment right to not have to quarter troops in your home does not.[[/note]] are frequent victims of HollywoodLaw. In some movies or series, the rights are an inevitable part of every climax. In others, perps ''never'' seem to get their ''Miranda'' rights read to them when they are arrested. The latter case is actually [[RealityIsUnrealistic more realistic]], since the police only read a ''Miranda'' warning to detainees they want to interrogate. When we ''do'' see the perps Mirandized, however, the officer almost invariably recites the text from memory. In reality, officers are required to read the rights from a card, to avoid mistakes that could get the case thrown out (''any'' deviation from the actual rights as printed mean the perp was not properly read their rights), and will get the perps to sign the card, in case he later denies having been read his rights. Also, they will not stop when a jaded criminal mastermind mutters, "Yeah yeah, I know my rights..." (They ''can't'', because the law requires that an officer inform a suspect of their rights, whether they claim to know them or not). Likewise, the officer is not allowed to interrupt the reading of rights to suggest an obnoxious suspect ''really should'' take advantage of his right to remain silent.
silent. Or to modify the "if you cannot afford an attorney" with sarcastic references to a wealthy suspect's obvious ability to afford one.
16th Mar '16 5:20:14 PM JediGoalie30
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* Miranda rights are often read by [[Creator/MichaelConnelly Harry Bosch and other detectives in the Connelly universe]]. On several occasions, the detectives [[DiscussedTrope talk about]] when it will be required to Mirandize someone during a voluntary interview. One incident that is discussed in ''A Darkness More Than Night'' happened prior to the events of ''The Last Coyote'', when Harry had convinced a suspect in a murder case to come to the police station for a voluntary interview [[note]]the suspect at that point had claimed self-defense and thought he was being interviewed as a victim and witness[[/note]]. Before Harry could begin the interview, however, his [[ObstructiveBureaucrat lieutenant]] went and read the suspect his Miranda rights, tipping him off that they were investigating the incident as a murder rather than self-defense. When Harry started the interview and the suspect asked for a lawyer (essentially ending the interview before it could begin), Harry confronted the lieutenant and [[DisproportionateRetribution shoved him through his office window]].
9th Mar '16 10:13:35 AM Hossmeister
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* In ''BeavisAndButthead [[TheMovie Do America]]'', Mr. Van Dreissen is arrested by the ATF. When he asks about his Miranda Rights, one of the agents wordlessly knocks him down with the butt of his rifle.

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* In ''BeavisAndButthead ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButthead [[TheMovie Do America]]'', Mr. Van Dreissen is arrested by the ATF. When he asks about his Miranda Rights, one of the agents wordlessly knocks him down with the butt of his rifle.
7th Mar '16 8:39:08 AM Morgenthaler
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* Unfortunately, despite the original intent of the ''Miranda'' decision (to eliminate shady-but-technically-legal police practices ''circa'' 1966), the result of the decision has been the standardization of the ''Miranda'' warning as part of official police procedure, followed by the adoption of many techniques that don't actually violate the ''letter'' of the law, but do undermine its ''spirit''. The "photocopier lie detector" trick, for example, in both ''TheWire'' and ''HomicideLifeOnTheStreet'', doesn't run afoul of the doctrine of ''Miranda'', but is a good example of what the decision was intended to stop. (There's debate about whether that one occurred, but similar methods have developed in police stations across the country.) Additionally, people who are arrested rarely ''bother'' to remain silent, and besides, the Supreme Court has scaled back the boundaries of what ''Miranda'' means in the forty years since handing down the decision. In the end, ''Miranda'' doesn't really interfere with police investigations as much as you might think.

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* Unfortunately, despite the original intent of the ''Miranda'' decision (to eliminate shady-but-technically-legal police practices ''circa'' 1966), the result of the decision has been the standardization of the ''Miranda'' warning as part of official police procedure, followed by the adoption of many techniques that don't actually violate the ''letter'' of the law, but do undermine its ''spirit''. The "photocopier lie detector" trick, for example, in both ''TheWire'' ''Series/TheWire'' and ''HomicideLifeOnTheStreet'', ''Series/HomicideLifeOnTheStreet'', doesn't run afoul of the doctrine of ''Miranda'', but is a good example of what the decision was intended to stop. (There's debate about whether that one occurred, but similar methods have developed in police stations across the country.) Additionally, people who are arrested rarely ''bother'' to remain silent, and besides, the Supreme Court has scaled back the boundaries of what ''Miranda'' means in the forty years since handing down the decision. In the end, ''Miranda'' doesn't really interfere with police investigations as much as you might think.
6th Feb '16 11:09:20 PM nombretomado
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* Discussed in an episode of ''{{Frasier}}''. Frasier believes that he cannot commit perjury for Niles's sake, and has a discussion with Martin about it. Martin brings up an example where he did not read a criminal's rights. Said criminal had been arrested multiple times, and knew his rights as well as Martin did. This was an example of HollywoodLaw, though, as Martin said he ''saw'' the suspect shoot someone, and thus wasn't going to interrogate him-it was unnecessary. Plus, the only reason he didn't read them anyway is because the suspect got loose and he had to go catch him.

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* Discussed in an episode of ''{{Frasier}}''.''Series/{{Frasier}}''. Frasier believes that he cannot commit perjury for Niles's sake, and has a discussion with Martin about it. Martin brings up an example where he did not read a criminal's rights. Said criminal had been arrested multiple times, and knew his rights as well as Martin did. This was an example of HollywoodLaw, though, as Martin said he ''saw'' the suspect shoot someone, and thus wasn't going to interrogate him-it was unnecessary. Plus, the only reason he didn't read them anyway is because the suspect got loose and he had to go catch him.
23rd Jan '16 9:41:12 AM nombretomado
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* Used by the [[spoiler: crazy EldritchAbomination-possessed]] cop in the StephenKing novel ''Literature/{{Desperation}}''. One of the first signs that something is very, very wrong is when he mixes "I am going to kill you" into the Miranda rights.

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* Used by the [[spoiler: crazy EldritchAbomination-possessed]] cop in the StephenKing Creator/StephenKing novel ''Literature/{{Desperation}}''. One of the first signs that something is very, very wrong is when he mixes "I am going to kill you" into the Miranda rights.
20th Jan '16 3:49:48 AM Adept
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* Used in ''HyperPolice'' (word for word, insofar as translations go), where Natsuki reads a giant tick his rights (it's that kind of a series). PlayedForLaughs when she [[RealityIsUnrealistic has to read from a card to finish]].

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* Used in ''HyperPolice'' ''Manga/HyperPolice'' (word for word, insofar as translations go), where Natsuki reads a giant tick his rights (it's that kind of a series). PlayedForLaughs when she [[RealityIsUnrealistic has to read from a card to finish]].



* Apparently, {{Superman}} is expected to read rights to captured villains: failure to do so lets one crook off the hook in ''Series/LoisAndClark''; and in ''Film/SupermanReturns'', Lex Luthor implies Superman's failure to read him his ''Miranda'' rights (and testify in court) helped him weasel out of two life sentences. So, wait, Superman is a cop?

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* Apparently, {{Superman}} Franchise/{{Superman}} is expected to read rights to captured villains: failure to do so lets one crook off the hook in ''Series/LoisAndClark''; and in ''Film/SupermanReturns'', Lex Luthor implies Superman's failure to read him his ''Miranda'' rights (and testify in court) helped him weasel out of two life sentences. So, wait, Superman is a cop?
17th Jan '16 8:04:46 AM LadyJaneGrey
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* Parodies at the end of ''Fanfic/ShadowchasersTorment'' when the surviving villains are hauled away:
-->'''[=PaniK=]:''' This isnít over! The Order of the Dark God will rise again! [[LargeHam Soon, youíll all know the meaning of true fear!]]
-->'''Roxy:''' Oh, [=PaniK=], [[ShutUpHannibal shut up!]] Do us all a favor and start taking advantage of your right to remain silent! [[note]]What makes this hilarious is that Roxy is ''another'' villain being arrested; the other bad guys are as sick of [=PaniK=] as the good guys are.[[/note]]
4th Jan '16 6:25:59 PM bt8257
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* In France, it is mandatory to read their rights to arrested suspects. This is never done. PopculturalOsmosis often causes French suspects to insist on rights they don't actually have, however.

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* In France, it is mandatory to read their rights to arrested suspects. This is never done. PopculturalOsmosis PopCulturalOsmosis often causes French suspects to insist on rights they don't actually have, however.



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