History Main / MindVirus

23rd Jul '17 10:07:08 PM SimYouLater
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* ''Literature/SnowCrash'' features a "biolinguistic virus" that renders its victims unable to communicate normally; anytime they try to talk, they just speak gibberish.

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* ''Literature/SnowCrash'' features a "biolinguistic virus" that renders its victims unable to communicate normally; anytime they try to talk, they just speak gibberish. [[spoiler:Actually, it's a "metavirus". It has ways of converting between any format... malware... biological... neurological... linguistic... it's a wonder it could be stopped at all.]]




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** [[According to one article, ''human sentience'' is a sentient and pandemic MindVirus, and as much as nobody wants to admit it in-universe, it's good that it is too or it would be wiped out by any number of things]].
20th Jul '17 8:41:27 PM racnor
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Added DiffLines:

*''Fanfic/LulusBizarreRebellion'': The stand Hey Jude acts as this, inflicting MentalTimeTravel on anyone effected. Give in to the temptation to change something you know will happen, and you become a new user/carrier of the stand.
25th Apr '17 4:34:21 PM NNinja
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* The Radical-6 from ''VisualNovel/ZeroEscape'' Trilogy slows down thought processes of brain making everything around look like it's going on fast-forward and after a while causes severe urge to commit suicide.
31st Mar '17 3:25:35 PM nombretomado
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* In ''OrionsArm'' [[http://www.orionsarm.com/eg-topic/45b41654cd0c4 memetics]] are a mature science.

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* In ''OrionsArm'' ''WebOriginal/OrionsArm'' [[http://www.orionsarm.com/eg-topic/45b41654cd0c4 memetics]] are a mature science.
4th Mar '17 8:31:11 PM KillerClowns
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Compare with EarWorm, where it's a song that can't get out of your head; InfectiousInsanity, a trope where mental illnesses are treated like a Mind Virus; and MemeticMutation. Compare & contrast TheVirus, where a contagion acts as an intelligent, self-directed entity (adding to "itself", having a HiveMind, etc). See ScienceRelatedMemeticDisorder, which is often--but not always--caused by one of these.

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Compare with EarWorm, where it's a song that can't get out of your head; InfectiousInsanity, a trope where mental illnesses are treated like a Mind Virus; MemeticMutation, and MemeticMutation.BrownNote. Compare & contrast TheVirus, where a contagion acts as an intelligent, self-directed entity (adding to "itself", having a HiveMind, etc). See ScienceRelatedMemeticDisorder, which is often--but not always--caused by one of these.
4th Mar '17 10:52:41 AM nombretomado
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* In one ''Homer Price'' story, the town gets infected with a song. A mysterious stranger comes to town and puts a record in the donut shop's jukebox, telling Homer and his friend [[SchmuckBait not to play it]]. Of course they do, and they [[EarWorm can't stop singing the song]]. They teach the song to others, who can't stop, and so on. Homer finally cures himself and the town by learning a different song (from a MarkTwain story), which makes them forget the first song, and once you pass that song on you forget it in turn. They send the one person infected with the new song out of town (she was going on vacation anyway) where they hope she'll teach it to someone else.

to:

* In one ''Homer Price'' story, the town gets infected with a song. A mysterious stranger comes to town and puts a record in the donut shop's jukebox, telling Homer and his friend [[SchmuckBait not to play it]]. Of course they do, and they [[EarWorm can't stop singing the song]]. They teach the song to others, who can't stop, and so on. Homer finally cures himself and the town by learning a different song (from a MarkTwain Creator/MarkTwain story), which makes them forget the first song, and once you pass that song on you forget it in turn. They send the one person infected with the new song out of town (she was going on vacation anyway) where they hope she'll teach it to someone else.
25th Feb '17 3:42:02 PM 1810072342
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* The entire premise of ''VisualNovel/LuxPain'' revolves around fighting the spread of Mind Viruses.

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* The entire premise of ''VisualNovel/LuxPain'' revolves around fighting the spread of Mind Viruses.
Viruses, which cause people to either become insanely violent of suicidally self-destructive.
23rd Feb '17 1:27:08 PM Amahn
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* ''The 6th Extinction'', the 10th title in James Rollin's ''Literature/SigmaForce'' series uses a Mind Virus as half of the villain's plot. [[spoiler:A scientist creates a virus which destroys human's higher brain functions, reverting them to primitive animalistic behavior. At the same time he genetically engineers newer more violent animals. When both are released into the world, the now weak defenseless primitive humans will be easily picked off - letting "nature" take the planet back. Why bother with the virus? He didn't want his hands to be personally bloody with humanity's extinction, instead just rendering them without tools or reasoning and letting the animals do the job.]]
19th Feb '17 5:14:54 PM AthenaBlue
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Compare with EarWorm, where it's a song that can't get out of your head; InfectiousInsanity, a trope where mental illnesses is treated like a Mind Virus; and MemeticMutation. Compare & contrast TheVirus, where a contagion acts as an intelligent, self-directed entity (adding to "itself", having a HiveMind, etc). See ScienceRelatedMemeticDisorder, which is often--but not always--caused by one of these.

to:

Compare with EarWorm, where it's a song that can't get out of your head; InfectiousInsanity, a trope where mental illnesses is are treated like a Mind Virus; and MemeticMutation. Compare & contrast TheVirus, where a contagion acts as an intelligent, self-directed entity (adding to "itself", having a HiveMind, etc). See ScienceRelatedMemeticDisorder, which is often--but not always--caused by one of these.



* In ''Anime/GhostInTheShellStandAloneComplex 2nd Gig'' the "Individual Eleven" virus infected people who read a certain essay, becoming terrorists and (aside from Kuze) eventually committed suicide.



* In ''Anime/GhostInTheShellStandAloneComplex 2nd Gig'' the "Individual Eleven" virus infected people who read a certain essay, becoming terrorists and (aside from Kuze) eventually committed suicide.



* ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'': The denizens of the evil dimension of Deadworld have once used Judge Anderson's mind to spread a psychic virus called Half-Life into Mega-City One, which caused widespread chaos as people spontaneously became either homicidal and suicidal (or both).
* Came up in a section of [[ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen the Black Dossier]], in which a descendant of Fu Manchu tried to release an (ancient Aztec) linguistic virus into a Massachusetts spaghetti restaurant to perpetuate a feud between his family and Professor Moriarty's. [[MakesJustAsMuchSenseInContext Makes far, far less sense in]] [[Creator/TheBeatGeneration context]].



* Came up in a section of [[ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen the Black Dossier]], in which a descendant of Fu Manchu tried to release an (ancient Aztec) linguistic virus into a Massachusetts spaghetti restaurant to perpetuate a feud between his family and Professor Moriarty's. [[MakesJustAsMuchSenseInContext Makes far, far less sense in]] [[Creator/TheBeatGeneration context]].



* ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'': The denizens of the evil dimension of Deadworld have once used Judge Anderson's mind to spread a psychic virus called Half-Life into Mega-City One, which caused widespread chaos as people spontaneously became either homicidal and suicidal (or both).

to:

* ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'': The denizens of the evil dimension of Deadworld have once used Judge Anderson's mind to spread a psychic virus called Half-Life into Mega-City One, which caused widespread chaos as people spontaneously became either homicidal and suicidal (or both).



* Creator/AlastairReynolds features these prominently in many of his novels. ''Century Rain'' has the "Amusica" virus that causes its victims to be unable to appreciate music (released as a demoralizing tool in a war). ''[[Literature/RevelationSpaceSeries Chasm City]]'' has a communicable virus that inflicts its victims with the memories of a religious cult leader, giving them dreams of his life and causing stigmata to appear on their body.
* Creator/CharlesStross has this in the novel ''[[Literature/{{Accelerando}} Glasshouse]]''. A virus called "Curious Yellow" has infected nearly all humans, via the ubiquitous and necessary [[PortalNetwork Warp Gates]] that everyone uses to get around. It deleted memories of a recent war, giving pretty much everyone amnesia of that specific time period. Furthermore, it also deleted the memories of ''who released it'' and its full extent, meaning that nobody knows what ''else'' it might've done (or still be doing).
* ''Master of Space and Time'' by Rudy Rucker has a section where the heroes visit an alternate dimension full of "meme viruses". One of the characters is bitten by a "Jesus Lizard" and subsequently starts gaining [[MessianicArchetype messiah-like characteristics]], along with [[HippieJesus growing out his hair and beard and wearing sandals all the time]].
* In Kathleen Ann Goonan's ''Queen City Jazz'', part of her "Nanotech Quartet" series, a nanotech apocalypse sweeps across the world. There are several nanotech mind viruses going around, such as a virus that compels its user to [[DisappearsIntoLight go to one of several glowing spheres]] that have cropped up around the country. Further, the main character in ''Mississipi Blues'' is infected with a virus that compels her to abandon her old life and go rafting down the Mississippi river ''a la'' ''Huckleberry Finn''.
* The third book in the ''Literature/PlagueYearSeries'' by Jeff Carlson, ''Plague Zone'', features a mind virus that turns its victims into mindless husks that wander around, attempting to spread the virus to others (through airborne contact). They're not ''violent'' or anything, but insistent, shambling about like living zombies that don't eat or attack.
* Creator/PeterWatts' ''Literature/RiftersTrilogy'' features several mind viruses, most notably "[=GuiltTrip=]", which forces its victims to always do "good" things (and severely punishes them, through pain or death, for failing to do so). A government agency purposefully infects its employess with [=GuiltTrip=], reasoning that by doing so they do not have to worry about security anymore, since nobody would dare attempt to subvert or steal anything.
* There is a short story by Creator/RobertSheckley where everyone on Earth learns to levitate. If, however, they ever doubt their ability to levitate, they lose it. Additionally, if one person sees another who is unable to levitate, it would automatically plant doubt into ''their'' minds as well, in effect becoming a fast-spreading virus.
* ''Literature/SnowCrash'' features a "biolinguistic virus" that renders its victims unable to communicate normally; anytime they try to talk, they just speak gibberish.

to:

* Creator/AlastairReynolds features these prominently in many of his novels. ''Century Rain'' has the "Amusica" virus that causes its victims to be unable to appreciate music (released as a demoralizing tool in a war). ''[[Literature/RevelationSpaceSeries Chasm City]]'' has a communicable virus that inflicts its victims with the memories of a religious cult leader, giving them dreams of his life and causing stigmata to appear on their body.
* Creator/CharlesStross has this in the novel ''[[Literature/{{Accelerando}} Glasshouse]]''. A virus called "Curious Yellow" has infected nearly all humans, via the ubiquitous and necessary [[PortalNetwork Warp Gates]] that everyone uses to get around. It deleted memories of a recent war, giving pretty much everyone amnesia of that specific time period. Furthermore, it also deleted the memories of ''who released it'' and its full extent, meaning that nobody knows what ''else'' it might've done (or still be doing).
* ''Master of Space and Time'' by Rudy Rucker has a section where the heroes visit an alternate dimension full of "meme viruses". One of the characters is bitten by a "Jesus Lizard" and subsequently starts gaining [[MessianicArchetype messiah-like characteristics]], along with [[HippieJesus growing out his hair and beard and wearing sandals all the time]].
* In Kathleen Ann Goonan's ''Queen City Jazz'', part of her "Nanotech Quartet" series, a nanotech apocalypse sweeps across the world. There are several nanotech mind viruses going around, such as a virus that compels its user to [[DisappearsIntoLight go to one of several glowing spheres]] that have cropped up around the country. Further, the main character in ''Mississipi Blues'' is infected with a virus that compels her to abandon her old life and go rafting down the Mississippi river ''a la'' ''Huckleberry Finn''.
* The third book in the ''Literature/PlagueYearSeries'' by Jeff Carlson, ''Plague Zone'', features a mind virus that turns its victims into mindless husks that wander around, attempting to spread the virus to others (through airborne contact). They're not ''violent'' or anything, but insistent, shambling about like living zombies that don't eat or attack.
* Creator/PeterWatts' ''Literature/RiftersTrilogy'' features several mind viruses, most notably "[=GuiltTrip=]", which forces its victims to always do "good" things (and severely punishes them, through pain or death, for failing to do so). A government agency purposefully infects its employess with [=GuiltTrip=], reasoning that by doing so they do not have to worry about security anymore, since nobody would dare attempt to subvert or steal anything.
* There is
"Hostess", a short story by Creator/RobertSheckley where everyone on Earth learns to levitate. If, however, they ever doubt Creator/IsaacAsimov, suggests that humans die of old age because they're infected by a parasite that exists in their ability mind (it having adapted to levitate, they lose it. Additionally, if one person sees another who is unable to levitate, it would automatically plant doubt into ''their'' minds as well, in effect becoming not even needing a fast-spreading virus.
* ''Literature/SnowCrash'' features a "biolinguistic virus"
body). By the end, it's indicated that renders its victims unable to communicate normally; anytime they try to talk, they just speak gibberish.many of humanity's [[HumansAreSpecial unusual traits]] are caused by the existence of the parasite.



* In one ''Homer Price'' story, the town gets infected with a song. A mysterious stranger comes to town and puts a record in the donut shop's jukebox, telling Homer and his friend [[SchmuckBait not to play it]]. Of course they do, and they [[EarWorm can't stop singing the song]]. They teach the song to others, who can't stop, and so on. Homer finally cures himself and the town by learning a different song (from a MarkTwain story), which makes them forget the first song, and once you pass that song on you forget it in turn. They send the one person infected with the new song out of town (she was going on vacation anyway) where they hope she'll teach it to someone else.
* "Hostess", a short story by Creator/IsaacAsimov, suggests that humans die of old age because they're infected by a parasite that exists in their mind (it having adapted to not even needing a body). By the end, it's indicated that many of humanity's [[HumansAreSpecial unusual traits]] are caused by the existence of the parasite.

to:

* In John Barnes's ''Candle'' portrays the near-total success of one ''Homer Price'' story, the town gets infected such virus, with a song. A mysterious stranger comes to town and puts a record only one remaining human being in the donut shop's jukebox, telling Homer and his friend [[SchmuckBait not to play it]]. Of course they do, and they [[EarWorm can't stop singing the song]]. They teach the song to others, world who can't stop, and so on. Homer finally cures himself and the town by learning isn't infected. [[spoiler:He has a different song (from a MarkTwain story), which makes them forget the first song, and once you pass that song on you forget it in turn. They send the one person infected with the new song out of town (she was going on vacation anyway) where they hope she'll teach it to someone else.
* "Hostess", a short story by Creator/IsaacAsimov, suggests that humans die of old age because they're infected by a parasite that exists in their mind (it having adapted to not even needing a body). By the end, it's indicated that many of humanity's [[HumansAreSpecial unusual traits]] are caused by the existence of the parasite.
virus instead.]]



* Though the "culling song" in Creator/ChuckPalahniuk's ''Literature/{{Lullaby}}'' starts out as a lethal BrownNote, it eventually turns out that merely thinking about it can telepathically transmit it to someone else, making it a lethal Mind Virus.
* John Barnes's ''Candle'' portrays the near-total success of one such virus, with only one remaining human being in the world who isn't infected. [[spoiler:He has a different virus instead.]]

to:

* Though the "culling song" in Creator/ChuckPalahniuk's ''Literature/{{Lullaby}}'' starts out as ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'' has [[spoiler: Nemesis, a lethal BrownNote, it eventually turns out mental plague that merely thinking about it can telepathically transmit it warps its victims to someone else, making it a lethal Mind Virus.
* John Barnes's ''Candle'' portrays
the near-total success service of one such virus, with only one remaining human being in the world who isn't infected. [[spoiler:He has a different virus instead.Outsiders. Dropped hints suggest that nearly every villain Dresden encounters may have been influenced by Nemesis.]]



* In Kathleen Ann Goonan's ''Queen City Jazz'', part of her ''Nanotech Quartet'' series, a nanotech apocalypse sweeps across the world. There are several nanotech mind viruses going around, such as a virus that compels its user to [[DisappearsIntoLight go to one of several glowing spheres]] that have cropped up around the country. Further, the main character in ''Mississipi Blues'' is infected with a virus that compels her to abandon her old life and go rafting down the Mississippi river ''a la'' ''Huckleberry Finn''.
* In one ''Homer Price'' story, the town gets infected with a song. A mysterious stranger comes to town and puts a record in the donut shop's jukebox, telling Homer and his friend [[SchmuckBait not to play it]]. Of course they do, and they [[EarWorm can't stop singing the song]]. They teach the song to others, who can't stop, and so on. Homer finally cures himself and the town by learning a different song (from a MarkTwain story), which makes them forget the first song, and once you pass that song on you forget it in turn. They send the one person infected with the new song out of town (she was going on vacation anyway) where they hope she'll teach it to someone else.
* Though the "culling song" in Creator/ChuckPalahniuk's ''Literature/{{Lullaby}}'' starts out as a lethal BrownNote, it eventually turns out that merely thinking about it can telepathically transmit it to someone else, making it a lethal Mind Virus.
* The third book in the ''Literature/PlagueYearSeries'' by Jeff Carlson, ''Plague Zone'', features a mind virus that turns its victims into mindless husks that wander around, attempting to spread the virus to others (through airborne contact). They're not ''violent'' or anything, but insistent, shambling about like living zombies that don't eat or attack.



* Creator/AlastairReynolds features these prominently in many of his novels. ''Century Rain'' has the "Amusica" virus that causes its victims to be unable to appreciate music (released as a demoralizing tool in a war). ''[[Literature/RevelationSpaceSeries Chasm City]]'' has a communicable virus that inflicts its victims with the memories of a religious cult leader, giving them dreams of his life and causing stigmata to appear on their body.
* Creator/PeterWatts' ''Literature/RiftersTrilogy'' features several mind viruses, most notably "[=GuiltTrip=]", which forces its victims to always do "good" things (and severely punishes them, through pain or death, for failing to do so). A government agency purposefully infects its employess with [=GuiltTrip=], reasoning that by doing so they do not have to worry about security anymore, since nobody would dare attempt to subvert or steal anything.
* ''Master of Space and Time'' by Rudy Rucker has a section where the heroes visit an alternate dimension full of "meme viruses". One of the characters is bitten by a "Jesus Lizard" and subsequently starts gaining [[MessianicArchetype messiah-like characteristics]], along with [[HippieJesus growing out his hair and beard and wearing sandals all the time]].
* There is a short story by Creator/RobertSheckley where everyone on Earth learns to levitate. If, however, they ever doubt their ability to levitate, they lose it. Additionally, if one person sees another who is unable to levitate, it would automatically plant doubt into ''their'' minds as well, in effect becoming a fast-spreading virus.
* ''Literature/SnowCrash'' features a "biolinguistic virus" that renders its victims unable to communicate normally; anytime they try to talk, they just speak gibberish.
* Creator/CharlesStross has this in the novel ''[[Literature/{{Accelerando}} Glasshouse]]''. A virus called "Curious Yellow" has infected nearly all humans, via the ubiquitous and necessary [[PortalNetwork Warp Gates]] that everyone uses to get around. It deleted memories of a recent war, giving pretty much everyone amnesia of that specific time period. Furthermore, it also deleted the memories of ''who released it'' and its full extent, meaning that nobody knows what ''else'' it might've done (or still be doing).



* ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'' has [[spoiler: Nemesis, a mental plague that warps its victims to the service of the Outsiders. Dropped hints suggest that nearly every villain Dresden encounters may have been influenced by Nemesis.]]

to:

* ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'' has [[spoiler: Nemesis, a mental plague that warps its victims to the service of the Outsiders. Dropped hints suggest that nearly every villain Dresden encounters may have been influenced by Nemesis.]]



* The Sickness in ''Series/{{Lost}}'', which is how The Man in Black recruits people to his side.



* The Sickness in ''Series/{{Lost}}'', which is how The Man in Black recruits people to his side.

to:

* The Sickness in ''Series/{{Lost}}'', which is how The Man in Black recruits people to his side.



* ''Webcomic/AMiracleOfScience'' never goes into the exact details of how one normally contracts ScienceRelatedMemeticDisorder in-universe (it's implied to be more of a "GoMadFromTheRevelation" scenario, but never really discussed in-depth), but the [[HiveMind Martians]] express concern that if one of their citizens contracts it, it might become one of these to them. It's only a theoretical possibility, but one they're understandably unwilling to test.



* ''Webcomic/AMiracleOfScience'' never goes into the exact details of how one normally contracts ScienceRelatedMemeticDisorder in-universe (it's implied to be more of a "GoMadFromTheRevelation" scenario, but never really discussed in-depth), but the [[HiveMind Martians]] express concern that if one of their citizens contracts it, it might become one of these to them. It's only a theoretical possibility, but one they're understandably unwilling to test.

to:

* ''Webcomic/AMiracleOfScience'' never goes into the exact details of how one normally contracts ScienceRelatedMemeticDisorder in-universe (it's implied to be more of a "GoMadFromTheRevelation" scenario, but never really discussed in-depth), but the [[HiveMind Martians]] express concern that if one of their citizens contracts it, it might become one of these to them. It's only a theoretical possibility, but one they're understandably unwilling to test.



* In ''OrionsArm'' [[http://www.orionsarm.com/eg-topic/45b41654cd0c4 memetics]] are a mature science.



* In ''OrionsArm'' [[http://www.orionsarm.com/eg-topic/45b41654cd0c4 memetics]] are a mature science.

to:

* In ''OrionsArm'' [[http://www.orionsarm.com/eg-topic/45b41654cd0c4 memetics]] are a mature science.



* Mentioned in WesternAnimation/YoungJustice. When Artemis drugs (and is subsequently attacked by) an evil telepath when on deep-cover, she uses this as an explanation for his odd behaviour.

to:

* Mentioned in WesternAnimation/YoungJustice.''WesternAnimation/YoungJustice''. When Artemis drugs (and is subsequently attacked by) an evil telepath when on deep-cover, she uses this as an explanation for his odd behaviour.






8th Feb '17 1:22:57 PM DastardlyDemolition
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* The [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green-banded_broodsac Green-banded Broodsac]] is a parasitic flatworm that uses lain snails as a intermediate host to get to their real host of birds. The broodsac accomplishes this by forming large broodsacs in the snail's tentacles (preferably the left one) filled to the brim with cercariae (free swimming larvae) to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aggressive_mimicry look like a fat, juicy caterpillar]] and reduces the snail's ability to sense the change in lighting so that it will mistakenly crawl up into a high place, thinking it's night time, and let a bird rip off the tentacle to allow the broodsacs to develop to adulthood in the bird's insides to start the cycle again.

to:

* The [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green-banded_broodsac Green-banded Broodsac]] is a parasitic flatworm that uses lain land snails as a intermediate host to get to their real host of birds. The broodsac accomplishes this by forming large broodsacs in the snail's tentacles (preferably the left one) filled to the brim with cercariae (free swimming larvae) to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aggressive_mimicry look like a fat, juicy caterpillar]] and reduces the snail's ability to sense the change in lighting so that it will mistakenly crawl up into a high place, thinking it's night time, and let a bird rip off the tentacle to allow the broodsacs to develop to adulthood in the bird's insides to start the cycle again.
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