History Main / MillenniumBug

17th Aug '16 9:07:31 PM Superjustinbros
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* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' has the Griffin family getting ready to celebrate New Year's Eve, but Peter groups them all into a shelter he built, believing the [=Y2K=] stories. It turns out to be true.

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* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', "Da Boom", has the Griffin family getting ready to celebrate New Year's Eve, but Peter groups them all into a shelter he built, believing the [=Y2K=] stories. It turns out to be true.
14th Aug '16 10:22:11 AM TheGrandestDad
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* ''WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill'' dealt with this as well when usually-sensible Hank catches Dale's paranoia and begins working with Dale and a hardcore survivalist to prepare for the event, including buying a Grandfather Clock for Peggy for Christmas instead of an iMac, because the Grandfather Clock would still be able to tell time afterwards. The {{Aesop}} of the episode is Hank learning not to fear the future.

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* ''WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill'' dealt with this as well when in the episode "Hillennium", in which usually-sensible Hank catches Dale's paranoia and begins working with Dale and a hardcore survivalist to prepare for the event, including buying a Grandfather Clock for Peggy for Christmas instead of an iMac, because the Grandfather Clock would still be able to tell time afterwards. The {{Aesop}} of the episode is Hank learning not to fear the future.
8th Aug '16 2:11:11 PM Willbyr
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* ''SteinsGate'' has this happen in some of the timelines Okabe sees.

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* ''SteinsGate'' ''VisualNovel/SteinsGate'' has this happen in some of the timelines Okabe sees.
28th Jul '16 3:35:45 PM margdean56
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* The children's comic ''ComicBook/TheDandy'' took the concept of the 'Millennium Bug' and anthropomorphised it as a strange insect. The comic had numerous characters interact with it - one story involved a robotic teacher being destroyed by a student handing in a photocopy of the bug as homework.

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* The children's comic ''ComicBook/TheDandy'' took the concept of the 'Millennium Bug' and anthropomorphised it as a strange insect. The comic had numerous characters interact with it - -- one story involved a robotic teacher being destroyed by a student handing in a photocopy of the bug as homework.



* God calls Bill Gates, Boris Yeltsin and Bill Clinton for an urgent message. He informs them the world will end next week and they are to relay a message to their people. Yeltsin goes back to Russia and says there is [[GoodNewsBadNews bad news and terrible news]] - the bad news is there really is a God, and the terrible news is the world will end next week. Clinton holds a press conference in Washington and says there is good news and bad news - the good news is there really is a God, and the bad news is the world will end next week. Bill Gates returns to Microsoft and holds an full employee conference, saying he has good news and great news. The good news is God knows what a wonderful, important person he is, and the great news is they don't have to worry about fixing the millennium bug!

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* God calls Bill Gates, Boris Yeltsin and Bill Clinton for an urgent message. He informs them the world will end next week and they are to relay a message to their people. Yeltsin goes back to Russia and says there is [[GoodNewsBadNews bad news and terrible news]] - -- the bad news is there really is a God, and the terrible news is the world will end next week. Clinton holds a press conference in Washington and says there is good news and bad news - -- the good news is there really is a God, and the bad news is the world will end next week. Bill Gates returns to Microsoft and holds an full employee conference, saying he has good news and great news. The good news is God knows what a wonderful, important person he is, and the great news is they don't have to worry about fixing the millennium bug!



* Despite the rampant fears, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Year_2000_problem#Documented_errors there were very few incidents of computer failure]], most of which were found in library and movie rental databases, humorously leaving a few people with overdue fines in the tens of thousands of dollars. Not for lack of much blood, sweat and tears on the part of coders and sysadmins the world over as software patches were rolled out throughout the final quarter of 1999. At least the overtime must have come in handy for the Christmas shopping- [[FridgeLogic Hey, wait a minute...]] [[ConspiracyTheory Son of a bitch!]]

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* Despite the rampant fears, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Year_2000_problem#Documented_errors there were very few incidents of computer failure]], most of which were found in library and movie rental databases, humorously leaving a few people with overdue fines in the tens of thousands of dollars. Not for lack of much blood, sweat and tears on the part of coders and sysadmins the world over as software patches were rolled out throughout the final quarter of 1999. At least the overtime must have come in handy for the Christmas shopping- shopping-- [[FridgeLogic Hey, wait a minute...]] [[ConspiracyTheory Son of a bitch!]]



* While there were no problems, many systems that listed a date but didn't actually do any ''calculations'' with it just kept right on chugging. For instance some building emergency fire systems kept on going with "1900, 1901, 1902" and so on for years after 2000, because what ''year'' it is doesn't really figure into setting off the fire alarm when there is smoke or fire, or an alarm pull being detected - it did cause a few jokes of make the fire department would send a period-specific fire vehicle, like a horse-drawn pumper with a dalmatian.

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* While there were no problems, many systems that listed a date but didn't actually do any ''calculations'' with it just kept right on chugging. For instance some building emergency fire systems kept on going with "1900, 1901, 1902" and so on for years after 2000, because what ''year'' it is doesn't really figure into setting off the fire alarm when there is smoke or fire, or an alarm pull being detected - -- it did cause a few jokes of make about how the fire department would might send a period-specific fire vehicle, like a horse-drawn pumper with a dalmatian.



* When midnight rolled around on December 31, 1999, the first technologically advanced nation it would hit (thanks to the location of the International Date Line) was [[UsefulNotes/NewZealand New Zealand]]. There was a brief panic starting shortly after midnight, New Zealand time, as people all over the world tried to ping New Zealand to make sure it was still online - [[SelfFulfillingProphecy causing an overload that brought down New Zealand's internet briefly]]. It was back up by about ten past midnight, much to everyone's relief.
* The first generation Zune, Microsoft's competitor to the [=iPod=], was hit by a Y2K-esque bug when the date rolled over to December 31, 2008[[note]]the 366th day of a leap year[[/note]], causing the music player to instantly lock up and crash, and would remain unusable til the device was hard restarted, the batteries drained, or the date rolled over again.

to:

* When midnight rolled around on December 31, 1999, the first technologically advanced nation it would hit (thanks to the location of the International Date Line) was [[UsefulNotes/NewZealand New Zealand]]. There was a brief panic starting shortly after midnight, New Zealand time, as people all over the world tried to ping New Zealand to make sure it was still online - -- [[SelfFulfillingProphecy causing an overload that brought down New Zealand's internet briefly]]. It was back up by about ten past midnight, much to everyone's relief.
* The first generation Zune, Microsoft's competitor to the [=iPod=], was hit by a Y2K-esque bug when the date rolled over to December 31, 2008[[note]]the 366th day of a leap year[[/note]], causing the music player to instantly lock up and crash, and would remain unusable til till the device was hard restarted, the batteries drained, or the date rolled over again.



* For those tempted to think the whole thing was a panic over nothing, there were a few notable glitches while various agencies worked to fix the problem that hint at what could have gone wrong had the problem been ignored. One community in Texas, for instance, had a surprise when the utilites department set its clocks ahead for a test run in 1999: somewhere along the line a timer controlling the sewer system's automated flow controls hadn't yet gotten the memo about the new date format, and thus sat patiently counting down the 1999 years until it next needed to open the release valves while a public park experienced a minor flood of raw sewage.

to:

* For those tempted to think the whole thing was a panic over nothing, there were a few notable glitches while various agencies worked to fix the problem that hint at what could have gone wrong had the problem been ignored. One community in Texas, for instance, had a surprise when the utilites utilities department set its clocks ahead for a test run in 1999: somewhere along the line a timer controlling the sewer system's automated flow controls hadn't yet gotten the memo about the new date format, and thus sat patiently counting down the 1999 years until it next needed to open the release valves while a public park experienced a minor flood of raw sewage.
20th Jun '16 9:07:45 PM bwburke94
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Supposedly, on the first of January, 2000, the world was going to be destroyed by a computer glitch named the 'Millennium Bug' ([[IHaveManyNames also referred to as '[=Y2K=]' or the 'Year 2000 problem']]) whereby numerous computer systems would think the year was 1900 instead of 2000, resulting in planes falling out of the sky, satellites going wrong and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking all the]] [[Series/RedDwarf calculators going to silicon heaven]]. (Most of the actual problems were just cosmetic, such as programs displaying the year after "1999" as [[http://catless.ncl.ac.uk/Risks/20.72.html "19100"]], or desktop internal clocks resetting to 1st January 1981 as a crash-preventing exception).

What had happened was, computer memory and disk space was extremely expensive. By comparison, today, a gigabyte of RAM (roughly 1.4 million kilobytes) for your computer is maybe 15 bucks and a two terabyte (about 20,000 times 100 megabytes) hard drive (about the size of two packs of playing cards) might be $100 or less. But go back to 1970 and one kilobyte of RAM is about a thousand dollars, a 100 megabyte hard drive (about the size of a dishwasher) might cost $12,000 and replacement disk packs (a foot high and the circumference of a dinner plate) are around $800 (For comparison, a brand-new VW Beetle was just under $2000). So they needed to find ways to use less internal RAM and less disk space in storing information on a computer. One way to save money was to store dates in a short form. So, typically all dates were stored internally as 6 digits (and punctuation was added at display time), so November 27, 1960 was coded as 112760. Now, a month later you can get by adding 1 to the first two digits. The new date is later than the original one. Now, however, say you have a date of November 15, 1992 (111592) and you add eight years to it, you get 111500, which, if the program wasn't prepared for it, would consider it not 11/15/2000, but ''11/15/1900''. Either the difference between the two is a negative amount, or instead of eight years difference being computed, 92 years are computed. The issue here might have been, if you bought something and charged it to your credit card on the last week of 1999, and your bill came in a month later, you get billed for 99 years of compound interest at 21%!

to:

Supposedly, on the first of January, 2000, the world was going to be destroyed by a computer glitch named the 'Millennium Bug' ([[IHaveManyNames also referred to as '[=Y2K=]' or the 'Year 2000 problem']]) whereby numerous computer systems would think the year was 1900 instead of 2000, resulting in planes falling out of the sky, satellites going wrong and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking all the]] [[Series/RedDwarf calculators going to silicon heaven]]. (Most of the actual problems were just cosmetic, such as programs displaying the year after "1999" as [[http://catless.ncl.ac.uk/Risks/20.72.html "19100"]], or desktop internal clocks resetting to 1st January 1981 as a crash-preventing exception).

What had happened was, computer memory and disk space was extremely expensive. By comparison, today, a gigabyte of RAM (roughly 1.4 million kilobytes) for your computer is maybe 15 bucks and a two terabyte (about 20,000 times 100 megabytes) hard drive (about the size of two packs of playing cards) might be $100 or less. But go back to 1970 and one kilobyte of RAM is about a thousand dollars, a 100 megabyte hard drive (about the size of a dishwasher) might cost $12,000 and replacement disk packs (a foot high and the circumference of a dinner plate) are around $800 (For comparison, a brand-new VW Beetle was just under $2000). So they needed to find ways to use less internal RAM and less disk space in storing information on a computer. One way to save money was to store dates in a short form. So, typically all dates were stored internally as 6 digits (and punctuation was added at display time), so November 27, 1960 was coded as 112760. Now, a month later you can get by adding 1 to the first two digits.second digit. The new date is later than the original one. Now, however, say you have a date of November 15, 1992 (111592) and you add eight years to it, you get 111500, 111500 or 111600 depending on how it's stored, which, if the program wasn't prepared for it, would consider it not 11/15/2000, 2000, but ''11/15/1900''.''1900''. Either the difference between the two is a negative amount, or instead of eight years difference being computed, 92 years are computed. The issue here might have been, is, if you bought something and charged it to your credit card on the last week of 1999, and your bill came in a month later, you might get billed for 99 years of compound interest at 21%!



* Raid, marketed itself as "the offical killer of the Millennium Bug"

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* Raid, marketed itself as "the offical official killer of the Millennium Bug"
30th Apr '16 1:38:37 PM Scorpion451
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Added DiffLines:

* For those tempted to think the whole thing was a panic over nothing, there were a few notable glitches while various agencies worked to fix the problem that hint at what could have gone wrong had the problem been ignored. One community in Texas, for instance, had a surprise when the utilites department set its clocks ahead for a test run in 1999: somewhere along the line a timer controlling the sewer system's automated flow controls hadn't yet gotten the memo about the new date format, and thus sat patiently counting down the 1999 years until it next needed to open the release valves while a public park experienced a minor flood of raw sewage.
4th Feb '16 1:43:06 PM notahandle
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* "Idioteque" by [[http://goo.gl/j2gDOQ Radiohead]].

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* "Idioteque" ''[[Music/KidA Idioteque]]'' by [[http://goo.gl/j2gDOQ Radiohead]].Music/{{Radiohead}}.
11th Dec '15 1:31:30 PM eroock
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-> ''They say two thousand zero zero, party over, oops, out of time\\
So tonight we're gonna party like it's nineteen ninety-nine.''

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-> ''They ''"They say two thousand zero zero, party over, oops, out of time\\
So tonight we're gonna party like it's nineteen ninety-nine.''"''
27th Nov '15 8:51:53 AM KingLyger
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* When midnight rolled around on December 31, 1999, the first technologically advanced nation it would hit (thanks to the location of the International Date Line) was [[UsefulNotes/NewZealand New Zealand]]. There was a brief panic starting shortly after midnight, New Zealand time, as people all over the world tried to ping New Zealand to make sure it was still online - causing an overload that brought down New Zealand's internet briefly. It was back up by about ten past midnight, much to everyone's relief.

to:

* When midnight rolled around on December 31, 1999, the first technologically advanced nation it would hit (thanks to the location of the International Date Line) was [[UsefulNotes/NewZealand New Zealand]]. There was a brief panic starting shortly after midnight, New Zealand time, as people all over the world tried to ping New Zealand to make sure it was still online - [[SelfFulfillingProphecy causing an overload that brought down New Zealand's internet briefly.briefly]]. It was back up by about ten past midnight, much to everyone's relief.
27th Nov '15 8:48:23 AM KingLyger
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Of course, planes, satellites and calculators didn't do that, much to the joy of aviators, astronomers and calculus students. But the bug was an opportunity for writers to come up with doomsday stories and a few of them even wrote of actual insects ([[LamePunReaction groan-worthy though that may sound]]).

Some newspapers even had a weekly column in their tech section throughout 1999, detailing how things were going in the battle against the bug.

There is now a retrospective [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement debate]] as to whether [=Y2K=] was blown out of proportion by [[WindmillCrusader people looking for an excuse to panic]] (or an excuse to [[LuddWasRight damn the demon computer]]), or whether disaster was averted by thousands of man-hours of programmers (mostly COBOL, which isn't really used for ''safety-critical'' software) working tirelessly to avoid a technological apocalypse. Although some dangers such as "planes falling out of the sky" were pretty much fabricated, the effects on the economy of a plausible worst-case scenario would still have been immeasurable. In addition, the [=Y2K=] preparations also had the effect of causing a lot of companies to rethink their emergency plans, helping them get back on their feet faster after events like 9/11 and the 2003 Northeast US blackout. The fears over the bug did lead to many companies purchasing new hardware before they otherwise would have leading to a tech boom followed by a bursting tech bubble in the early 2000's.

to:

Of course, planes, satellites and calculators didn't do that, much to the joy of aviators, astronomers and calculus students. But the bug was an opportunity for writers to come up with doomsday stories and a few of them even wrote of actual insects ([[LamePunReaction groan-worthy though that may sound]]).

sound]]). Some newspapers even had a weekly column in their tech section throughout 1999, detailing how things were going in the battle against the bug.

There Finally, January 1, 2000 arrived, and aside from a few glitches here and there, not much happened. Certainly nothing than can be called "apocalyptic." Thus, there is now a retrospective [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement debate]] as to whether [=Y2K=] was blown out of proportion by [[WindmillCrusader people looking for an excuse to panic]] (or an excuse to [[LuddWasRight damn the demon computer]]), or whether disaster was averted by thousands of man-hours of programmers (mostly COBOL, which isn't really used for ''safety-critical'' software) working tirelessly to avoid a technological apocalypse. Although some dangers such as "planes falling out of the sky" were pretty much fabricated, the effects on the economy of a plausible worst-case scenario would still have been immeasurable. In addition, the [=Y2K=] preparations also had the effect of causing a lot of companies to rethink their emergency plans, helping them get back on their feet faster after events like 9/11 and the 2003 Northeast US blackout. The fears over the bug did lead to many companies purchasing new hardware before they otherwise would have leading to a tech boom followed by a bursting tech bubble in the early 2000's.
2000's. Regardless of the aftermath, [=Y2K=] nonetheless provides an interesting look into the mindset of people who are faced with an oncoming problem of global proportions.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.MillenniumBug