History Main / MetaOrigin

2nd Feb '17 1:55:52 AM KeithM
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* Some comics in both Marvel and DC (and possibly other publishers) have toyed with the idea that all superpowered characters really have the same power: [[RealityWarper reality warping]]. The apparent differences between them are the result of limits in how they can express that reality alteration, and why winners of the SuperpowerLottery can seem to have powers that would seem logically unrelated to each other.

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* Some comics in both Marvel and DC (and possibly other publishers) have toyed with the idea that all superpowered characters really have the same power: [[RealityWarper reality warping]]. The apparent differences between them are the result of limits in how they can express that reality alteration, and why winners of the SuperpowerLottery can seem to have different powers that would seem logically unrelated to each other.
2nd Feb '17 1:54:47 AM KeithM
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* Some comics in both Marvel and DC (and possibly other publishers) have toyed with the idea that all superpowered characters really have the same power: [[RealityWarper reality warping]]. The apparent differences between them are the result of limits in how they can express that reality alteration, and why winners of the SuperpowerLottery can seem to have powers that would seem logically unrelated to each other.
8th Jan '17 3:01:46 PM nombretomado
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** In UltimateMarvel, everyone who isn't a mutant, an alien or a god has their powers derived from the SuperSoldier project or one of its offshoots. The mini-series ''Ultimate Origins'' elaborates on the Meta Origin and how it connects everything else; [[spoiler: it seems that the {{mutants}}, too, owe their origin to the project]].

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** In UltimateMarvel, ComicBook/UltimateMarvel, everyone who isn't a mutant, an alien or a god has their powers derived from the SuperSoldier project or one of its offshoots. The mini-series ''Ultimate Origins'' elaborates on the Meta Origin and how it connects everything else; [[spoiler: it seems that the {{mutants}}, too, owe their origin to the project]].
28th Nov '16 6:27:52 PM N1KF
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** In ''Marvel Knights Comicbook/{{Spider-Man}}'' #9, it was explained that, after World War II, big businessmen had feared superheroes would start interfering with politics and business, so they created most of the early supervillains, to keep them busy and make sure that ReedRichardsIsUseless. This hasn't been mentioned again since, and may have fallen into DorkAge status. Although it should be noted that the fourth issue of Daniel Way's Bullseye miniseries threw out the same concept at the same time (they were published the same month) [[StrangeMindsThinkAlike with no apparent contact between the two writers.]]

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** In ''Marvel Knights Comicbook/{{Spider-Man}}'' Comicbook/SpiderMan'' #9, it was explained that, after World War II, big businessmen had feared superheroes would start interfering with politics and business, so they created most of the early supervillains, to keep them busy and make sure that ReedRichardsIsUseless. This hasn't been mentioned again since, and may have fallen into DorkAge status. Although it should be noted that the fourth issue of Daniel Way's Bullseye miniseries threw out the same concept at the same time (they were published the same month) [[StrangeMindsThinkAlike with no apparent contact between the two writers.]]
8th Nov '16 7:14:02 PM jormis29
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** Several characters are revealed to have gotten their powers from the [[ComicBook/TheInfinityGauntlet Infinity Stones]], and several powerful objects from the comics are revealed to ''be'' Infinity Stones. ''Film/ThorTheDarkWorld'' reveals that the Tesseract ([[AdaptationNameChange the "Cosmic Cube" in the comics]]) and the Aether are the Space Stone and the Reality Stone, respectively, and it's heavily implied that the Asgardians can build space portals because they had the Space Stone in their possession for centuries. In ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'', Ronan the Accuser gets his enhanced strength from having the Power Stone embedded in his hammer. And in ''Film/AvengersAgeOfUltron'', ComicBook/ScarletWitch, ComicBook/{{Quicksilver}}, ComicBook/TheVision and ComicBook/{{Ultron}} himself are all created in some form or another by the Mind Stone; Ultron achieved sentience after being connected to it, the twins gained their powers from experimentation with it, and the Vision achieved both his sentience and his energy-blasts from the Stone being embedded in his forehead.

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** Several characters are revealed to have gotten their powers from the [[ComicBook/TheInfinityGauntlet Infinity Stones]], and several powerful objects from the comics are revealed to ''be'' Infinity Stones.
***
''Film/ThorTheDarkWorld'' reveals that the Tesseract ([[AdaptationNameChange the "Cosmic Cube" in the comics]]) and the Aether are the Space Stone and the Reality Stone, respectively, and it's heavily implied that the Asgardians can build space portals because they had the Space Stone in their possession for centuries. centuries.
***
In ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'', Ronan the Accuser gets his enhanced strength from having the Power Stone embedded in his hammer. And in hammer.
*** In
''Film/AvengersAgeOfUltron'', ComicBook/ScarletWitch, ComicBook/{{Quicksilver}}, ComicBook/TheVision and ComicBook/{{Ultron}} himself are all created in some form or another by the Mind Stone; Ultron achieved sentience after being connected to it, the twins gained their powers from experimentation with it, and the Vision achieved both his sentience and his energy-blasts from the Stone being embedded in his forehead.forehead.
*** The Eye of Agamotto from ''Film/{{Doctor Strange|2016}}'' contains the Time Stone which gives it its powers.
8th Nov '16 8:28:22 AM skadooshbag
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This, however, led to a few questions. While it might make sense that a FreakLabAccident could increase someone's natural strength and speed to superhuman levels, the fact that {{million to one chance}}s had independently gifted fifty or sixty different people with different powers started to stretch WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief. And as the comics started appealing to an older target demographic, they started noticing such things more and more.

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This, however, led to a few questions. While it might make sense that a FreakLabAccident could increase someone's natural strength and speed to superhuman levels, the fact that {{million to one chance}}s had independently gifted fifty or sixty different people (all on the same planet, no less) with different powers started to stretch WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief. And as the comics started appealing to an older target demographic, they started noticing such things more and more.
2nd Nov '16 10:18:30 PM DustSnitch
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** In fact, the final ''Alpha'' game reveals [[spoiler:the BiggerBad was TheManBehindTheMan of every original villain in the previous installments]]; additionally, all the {{Big Bad}}s from the licensed series that appeared were directed into the path that led them against the heroes of ''Alpha''.

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** In fact, the final ''Alpha'' game reveals [[spoiler:the BiggerBad Greater Scope Villain was TheManBehindTheMan of behind every original villain in the previous installments]]; additionally, all the {{Big Bad}}s from the licensed series that appeared were directed into the path that led them against the heroes of ''Alpha''.
30th Oct '16 10:16:10 AM nombretomado
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* ''International Super Teams'', the official super hero roleplaying setting for ''{{GURPS}}'', traces powers back to the Seeders, [[{{Precursors}} Precursor-like]] aliens who uplift dead-end species by adding the potential for sapience and a racial super power (to be determined by its evolution and environmental stresses) to the species' genetic code. In the case of Earth, humanity's engineered ancestors suffered a solar radiation event which ''suppressed'' most of the Seeder genes; only intelligence evolved until another radiation event in the late 1920s reactivated the "power genes", which then began to express themselves more or less randomly from individual to individual.

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* ''International Super Teams'', the official super hero roleplaying setting for ''{{GURPS}}'', ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'', traces powers back to the Seeders, [[{{Precursors}} Precursor-like]] aliens who uplift dead-end species by adding the potential for sapience and a racial super power (to be determined by its evolution and environmental stresses) to the species' genetic code. In the case of Earth, humanity's engineered ancestors suffered a solar radiation event which ''suppressed'' most of the Seeder genes; only intelligence evolved until another radiation event in the late 1920s reactivated the "power genes", which then began to express themselves more or less randomly from individual to individual.
18th Oct '16 4:11:30 PM nombretomado
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* Most of the characters in ''FreedomForce'' got their powers from a mysterious form of energy imaginatively called "Energy X". This energy is explained as the "secret weapon" of the multiverse-spanning empire known as the Domain. Their leader, Lord Dominion, thinking that Earth, the only place he hasn't conquered, won't prove to be a challenge, orders his underlings to give Energy X to the most evil people on Earth in the hopes that they will destroy Humanity and each other. However, a rebel named Mentor steals all the Energy X canisters and tries to bring them to Earth, so he can give them to the most ''heroic'' people on Earth... only to be shot down by the pursuing fleet, causing the canisters to rain down on Earth, and giving powers to those who happened to be in their vicinity.

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* Most of the characters in ''FreedomForce'' ''VideoGame/FreedomForce'' got their powers from a mysterious form of energy imaginatively called "Energy X". This energy is explained as the "secret weapon" of the multiverse-spanning empire known as the Domain. Their leader, Lord Dominion, thinking that Earth, the only place he hasn't conquered, won't prove to be a challenge, orders his underlings to give Energy X to the most evil people on Earth in the hopes that they will destroy Humanity and each other. However, a rebel named Mentor steals all the Energy X canisters and tries to bring them to Earth, so he can give them to the most ''heroic'' people on Earth... only to be shot down by the pursuing fleet, causing the canisters to rain down on Earth, and giving powers to those who happened to be in their vicinity.



** Amusingly enough, the company that created FreedomForce would later go on to create Bioshock...

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** Amusingly enough, the company that created FreedomForce ''Freedom Force'' would later go on to create Bioshock...
18th Sep '16 5:50:21 PM ChrysKelly
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* In ''Literature/{{Sanctioned}}'', there are genetic markers that indicate a person might develop super-powers. Not everyone who has those markers develops powers, but no one can develop powers without them. In Scotland, potential sixteen year olds are taken to a state run school for the government to try and unlock the powers and then teach the youths to control them. So far, there seems to be two theories about the origin of the powers, the Harrington theory (God did it) and the Benoit theory (we don't know the science, yet, but we know it wasn't God).
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