History Main / MetaOrigin

6th May '17 8:02:21 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Franchise/TransformersFilmSeries established the [=AllSpark=] as a mystical artifact responsible for the creation of Cybertron and Cybertronians, including other artifacts like the Matrix of Leadership. The [=AllSpark=] itself is a composite of various items like the Matrix of Leadership and the supercomputer Vector Sigma, and helps explain multiple transforming robot species in the galaxy that were apparently unrelated to Cybertron, such as the Junkions and Unicron (whose original origin was rather bizarre, created by a monkey scientist). The films and later incarnations of the franchise, such as the Franchise/TransformersAlignedUniverse, have followed suit by establishing that everything is connected to the [=AllSpark=], or at the least the [=AllSpark=] itself is tied closely with the power of Primus, [[PhysicalGod a mechanical deity]].

to:

* The Franchise/TransformersFilmSeries Film/TransformersFilmSeries established the [=AllSpark=] as a mystical artifact responsible for the creation of Cybertron and Cybertronians, including other artifacts like the Matrix of Leadership. The [=AllSpark=] itself is a composite of various items like the Matrix of Leadership and the supercomputer Vector Sigma, and helps explain multiple transforming robot species in the galaxy that were apparently unrelated to Cybertron, such as the Junkions and Unicron (whose original origin was rather bizarre, created by a monkey scientist). The films and later incarnations of the franchise, such as the Franchise/TransformersAlignedUniverse, have followed suit by establishing that everything is connected to the [=AllSpark=], or at the least the [=AllSpark=] itself is tied closely with the power of Primus, [[PhysicalGod a mechanical deity]].
2nd May '17 1:29:29 PM maximsk
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** It's implied the the Arc Reactor created by Howard Stark was created by studying the Tesseract (an Asgardian artifact and Infinity Stone discovered by the Red Skull), and in turn was adapted and miniaturized by Tony Stark for his ComicBook/IronMan armor, linking Iron Man to Asgard and other supernatural elements by way of the SuperSoldier project.

to:

** It's *** In ''Film/IronMan2'' and ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger'', it's implied the the Arc Reactor created by Howard Stark was created by studying the Tesseract (an (a seemingly Asgardian artifact and Infinity Stone discovered by the Red Skull), and in turn was adapted and miniaturized by Tony Stark for his ComicBook/IronMan armor, linking Iron Man to Asgard and other supernatural elements by way of the SuperSoldier project.
2nd May '17 1:27:45 PM maximsk
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** It's implied the the Arc Reactor created by Howard Stark was created by studying the Tessaract (an Asgardian artifact discovered by the Red Skull) which in turn was adapted and miniaturized by Tony Stark for his ComicBook/IronMan armor, linking Iron Man to Asgard by way of the SuperSoldier project.
** Several characters are revealed to have gotten their powers from the [[ComicBook/TheInfinityGauntlet Infinity Stones]], and several powerful objects from the comics are revealed to ''be'' Infinity Stones.

to:

** It's implied the the Arc Reactor created by Howard Stark was created by studying the Tessaract (an Asgardian artifact discovered by the Red Skull) which in turn was adapted and miniaturized by Tony Stark for his ComicBook/IronMan armor, linking Iron Man to Asgard by way of the SuperSoldier project.
** Several characters are revealed to have gotten their powers from the [[ComicBook/TheInfinityGauntlet Infinity Stones]], and several powerful objects from the comics are revealed to ''be'' Infinity Stones. Stones.
** It's implied the the Arc Reactor created by Howard Stark was created by studying the Tesseract (an Asgardian artifact and Infinity Stone discovered by the Red Skull), and in turn was adapted and miniaturized by Tony Stark for his ComicBook/IronMan armor, linking Iron Man to Asgard and other supernatural elements by way of the SuperSoldier project.
3rd Apr '17 1:38:04 AM Heckfire
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** As well, there's the "Godwave" from the CrisisCrossover "War of the Gods", which was explained as creating both [[PhysicalGod Physical Gods]] and super-powered humans, but that seems to have been [[DorkAge quietly ignored]] since.

to:

** As well, there's the "Godwave" from the CrisisCrossover "War of the Gods", "Genesis", which was explained as creating both [[PhysicalGod Physical Gods]] and super-powered humans, but that seems to have been [[DorkAge quietly ignored]] since.
20th Mar '17 5:29:56 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The TransformersFilmSeries established the [=AllSpark=] as a mystical artifact responsible for the creation of Cybertron and Cybertronians, including other artifacts like the Matrix of Leadership. The [=AllSpark=] itself is a composite of various items like the Matrix of Leadership and the supercomputer Vector Sigma, and helps explain multiple transforming robot species in the galaxy that were apparently unrelated to Cybertron, such as the Junkions and Unicron (whose original origin was rather bizarre, created by a monkey scientist). The films and later incarnations of the franchise, such as the TransformersAlignedUniverse, have followed suit by establishing that everything is connected to the [=AllSpark=], or at the least the [=AllSpark=] itself is tied closely with the power of Primus, [[PhysicalGod a mechanical deity]].

to:

* The TransformersFilmSeries Franchise/TransformersFilmSeries established the [=AllSpark=] as a mystical artifact responsible for the creation of Cybertron and Cybertronians, including other artifacts like the Matrix of Leadership. The [=AllSpark=] itself is a composite of various items like the Matrix of Leadership and the supercomputer Vector Sigma, and helps explain multiple transforming robot species in the galaxy that were apparently unrelated to Cybertron, such as the Junkions and Unicron (whose original origin was rather bizarre, created by a monkey scientist). The films and later incarnations of the franchise, such as the TransformersAlignedUniverse, Franchise/TransformersAlignedUniverse, have followed suit by establishing that everything is connected to the [=AllSpark=], or at the least the [=AllSpark=] itself is tied closely with the power of Primus, [[PhysicalGod a mechanical deity]].
7th Mar '17 12:11:31 PM nighttrainfm
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'' explicitly ties the origins of ComicBook/WonderWoman and the ComicBook/MartianManhunter to the same alien invasion that leads to the formation of the Justice League, since both characters made their debut in that show without prior introduction. Diana chooses to leave Themyscira to aid the people of "Man's World" against the invaders, refusing to remain safe in the Amazons' island refuge while innocent people die; J'onn J'onzz is a veteran of the invaders' earlier war with the peaceful Martian race who escapes to Earth to warn humanity about their return, and he's TheLastOfHisKind because the invaders slaughtered his people. Note that ComicBook/GreenLantern and [[ComicBook/{{Hawkman}} Hawkgirl]] don't get this treatment, instead being examples of RememberTheNewGuy. [[note]] ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'' introduces Kyle Rayner and the Green Lantern Corps, but it's never explained how John Stewart became the Green Lantern, or how Superman and Batman met him before the invasion. No DCAU shows ever tell us how the other superheroes first met the Thanagarian warrior Hawkgirl, though the series finale of ''Justice League'' did finally explain that [[spoiler: she first came to Earth as an advance agent for a Thanagarian invasion]].[[/note]]

to:

** ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'' explicitly ties the origins of ComicBook/WonderWoman and the ComicBook/MartianManhunter to the same alien invasion that leads to the formation of the Justice League, since both characters made their debut in that show without prior introduction. Diana chooses to leave Themyscira to aid the people of "Man's World" against the invaders, refusing to remain safe in the Amazons' island refuge while innocent people die; J'onn J'onzz is a veteran of the invaders' earlier war with the peaceful Martian race race, who escapes to Earth to warn humanity about their return, and he's TheLastOfHisKind the LastOfHisKind because the invaders slaughtered his people. Note that ComicBook/GreenLantern and [[ComicBook/{{Hawkman}} Hawkgirl]] don't get this treatment, instead being examples of RememberTheNewGuy. [[note]] ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'' introduces Kyle Rayner and the Green Lantern Corps, but it's never explained how John Stewart became the Green Lantern, or how Superman and Batman met him before the invasion. No DCAU shows ever tell us how the other superheroes first met the Thanagarian warrior Hawkgirl, though the series finale of ''Justice League'' did finally explain that [[spoiler: she first came to Earth as an advance agent for a Thanagarian invasion]].[[/note]]invasion.]][[/note]]
2nd Feb '17 1:55:52 AM KeithM
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Some comics in both Marvel and DC (and possibly other publishers) have toyed with the idea that all superpowered characters really have the same power: [[RealityWarper reality warping]]. The apparent differences between them are the result of limits in how they can express that reality alteration, and why winners of the SuperpowerLottery can seem to have powers that would seem logically unrelated to each other.

to:

* Some comics in both Marvel and DC (and possibly other publishers) have toyed with the idea that all superpowered characters really have the same power: [[RealityWarper reality warping]]. The apparent differences between them are the result of limits in how they can express that reality alteration, and why winners of the SuperpowerLottery can seem to have different powers that would seem logically unrelated to each other.
2nd Feb '17 1:54:47 AM KeithM
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Some comics in both Marvel and DC (and possibly other publishers) have toyed with the idea that all superpowered characters really have the same power: [[RealityWarper reality warping]]. The apparent differences between them are the result of limits in how they can express that reality alteration, and why winners of the SuperpowerLottery can seem to have powers that would seem logically unrelated to each other.
8th Jan '17 3:01:46 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In UltimateMarvel, everyone who isn't a mutant, an alien or a god has their powers derived from the SuperSoldier project or one of its offshoots. The mini-series ''Ultimate Origins'' elaborates on the Meta Origin and how it connects everything else; [[spoiler: it seems that the {{mutants}}, too, owe their origin to the project]].

to:

** In UltimateMarvel, ComicBook/UltimateMarvel, everyone who isn't a mutant, an alien or a god has their powers derived from the SuperSoldier project or one of its offshoots. The mini-series ''Ultimate Origins'' elaborates on the Meta Origin and how it connects everything else; [[spoiler: it seems that the {{mutants}}, too, owe their origin to the project]].
28th Nov '16 6:27:52 PM N1KF
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In ''Marvel Knights Comicbook/{{Spider-Man}}'' #9, it was explained that, after World War II, big businessmen had feared superheroes would start interfering with politics and business, so they created most of the early supervillains, to keep them busy and make sure that ReedRichardsIsUseless. This hasn't been mentioned again since, and may have fallen into DorkAge status. Although it should be noted that the fourth issue of Daniel Way's Bullseye miniseries threw out the same concept at the same time (they were published the same month) [[StrangeMindsThinkAlike with no apparent contact between the two writers.]]

to:

** In ''Marvel Knights Comicbook/{{Spider-Man}}'' Comicbook/SpiderMan'' #9, it was explained that, after World War II, big businessmen had feared superheroes would start interfering with politics and business, so they created most of the early supervillains, to keep them busy and make sure that ReedRichardsIsUseless. This hasn't been mentioned again since, and may have fallen into DorkAge status. Although it should be noted that the fourth issue of Daniel Way's Bullseye miniseries threw out the same concept at the same time (they were published the same month) [[StrangeMindsThinkAlike with no apparent contact between the two writers.]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 169. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.MetaOrigin