History Main / MenAreTheExpendableGender

5th Feb '16 3:27:35 AM Laevatein
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* ''Franchise/SailorMoon'' averts this. Men and women die over the course of the story and whether or not their deaths are noteworthy depends heavily on their role in the narrative.
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* ''Franchise/SailorMoon'' averts this. Men and women die over the course of the story and whether or not their deaths are noteworthy depends heavily on their role in the narrative. However, Naoko Takeuchi has said in interviews that she feels she kills her male characters off too easily. In particular, she regretted killing Jadeite off so early once she heard his voice for the anime.
4th Feb '16 5:03:06 PM Mhazard
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Bloodborne}}'', of all the characters you can rescue in Yharnam, if you have progressed all of their quest lines, the SoleSurvivor would be [[OnlySaneMan Narrowed Minded Man]]. [[spoiler: And the rest of the women? Given the situation of MarsNeedsWomen brought by [[EldritchAbomination Oedon]], how desperate you need the Unbilical Cord pillaged from the pregnants [[note]]Arianna, Iosefka and Adella. Although Adella wasn't involved, killing her is mandatory to keep Arianna alive until she gave birth since she would murder Arianna[[/note]], as well as killing the others for Caryll Rune [[note]]Young Yharnam Girl if sent to clinic, if sent to Oedon Chapel she would instead be eaten by the Maneater Boar. And again, Iosefka pre-bloodmoon if you want a powerful rune[[/note]], and some dies on their own [[notes]] Sedative Woman and [[CoolOldLady Eileen The Crow]] [[/note]],they are all dead.]]
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Bloodborne}}'', of all the characters you can rescue in Yharnam, if you have progressed all of their quest lines, the SoleSurvivor would be [[OnlySaneMan Narrowed Minded Man]]. [[spoiler: And the rest of the women? Given the situation of MarsNeedsWomen brought by [[EldritchAbomination Oedon]], how desperate you need the Unbilical Cord pillaged from the pregnants [[note]]Arianna, Iosefka and Adella. Although Adella wasn't involved, killing her is mandatory to keep Arianna alive until she gave birth since she would murder Arianna[[/note]], as well as killing the others for Caryll Rune [[note]]Young Yharnam Girl if sent to clinic, if sent to Oedon Chapel she would instead be eaten by the Maneater Boar. And again, Iosefka pre-bloodmoon if you want a powerful rune[[/note]], and some dies on their own [[notes]] Sedative [[note]]Sedative Woman and [[CoolOldLady Eileen The Crow]] [[/note]],they [[/note]], they are all dead.]]
4th Feb '16 5:01:21 PM Mhazard
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Bloodborne}}'', of all the characters you can rescue in Yharnam, if you have progressed all of their quest lines, the SoulSurvivor would be [[OnlySaneMan Narrowed Minded Man]]. [[spoiler: And the rest of the women? Given the situation of MarsNeedsWomen brought by [[EldritchAbomination Oedon]], how desperate you need the Unbilical Cord pillaged from the pregnants [[note]]Arianna, Iosefka and Adella. Although Adella wasn't involved, killing her is mandatory to keep Arianna alive until she gave birth since she would murder Arianna[[/note]], as well as killing the others for Caryll Rune [[note]]Young Yharnam Girl if sent to clinic, if sent to Oedon Chapel she would instead be eaten by the Maneater Boar. And again, Iosefka if you want a powerful rune[[/note]], they are all dead.]]
to:
* In ''VideoGame/{{Bloodborne}}'', of all the characters you can rescue in Yharnam, if you have progressed all of their quest lines, the SoulSurvivor SoleSurvivor would be [[OnlySaneMan Narrowed Minded Man]]. [[spoiler: And the rest of the women? Given the situation of MarsNeedsWomen brought by [[EldritchAbomination Oedon]], how desperate you need the Unbilical Cord pillaged from the pregnants [[note]]Arianna, Iosefka and Adella. Although Adella wasn't involved, killing her is mandatory to keep Arianna alive until she gave birth since she would murder Arianna[[/note]], as well as killing the others for Caryll Rune [[note]]Young Yharnam Girl if sent to clinic, if sent to Oedon Chapel she would instead be eaten by the Maneater Boar. And again, Iosefka pre-bloodmoon if you want a powerful rune[[/note]], they and some dies on their own [[notes]] Sedative Woman and [[CoolOldLady Eileen The Crow]] [[/note]],they are all dead.]]
1st Feb '16 1:50:24 PM Menshevik
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* One may wonder how much of the importance attached to the "Website/WomenInRefrigerators" phenomenon is a matter of perception, since for the most part the victims in question happen to be [[MissingWhiteWomanSyndrome attractive young women]]. For instance, the death of Franchise/SpiderMan's [[ILetGwenStacyDie girlfriend Gwen Stacy]] in ''Amazing Spider-Man'' #121 caused a huge outcry among fans (so big in fact, that Marvel brought Gwen back as a clone less than two years later to assuage them), her death is still seen as a deep injustice by a number of diehard fans, and many people want to portray it as the UrExample of StuffedIntoTheFridge. Before her death, four supporting characters had been killed off in-story really without causing a ripple among readers, all men of various ages: [[DeathByOriginStory Uncle Ben]], Bennett Brant (Betty's brother, caught in the crossfire to provide a reason for her to hate Spider-Man), Frederick Foswell (''Daily Bugle'' reporter) and George Stacy (Gwen's father, died trying to save people's lives to provide an obstacle to her romance with Peter Parker). In later years ''The Death of Jean [=DeWolff=]'', the second female supporting character to be killed off, caused another major stir. The deaths of various male supporting characters -- Professor Miles Warren, Nathan Lubensky (Aunt May's fiancÚ), Ned Leeds (one of Peter's oldest ''Bugle'' colleagues), and even Harry Osborn (Peter Parker's oldest and ''best friend'' of the male persuasion) -- not so much. Harry Osborn who, as it turned out, could not well be replaced in his role in the cast, but that was fourteen years after his death. Even Aunt May (whose apparent death in ''Amazing Spider-Man'' #400 was widely seen as a satisfying ending to a fulfilled life) was brought back to the living more quickly. And while only Uncle Ben's death is referenced nearly as often as Gwen Stacy's, quite a few of the dead male characters are all but forgotten.
to:
* One may wonder how much of the importance attached to the "Website/WomenInRefrigerators" phenomenon is a matter of perception, since for the most part the victims in question happen to be [[MissingWhiteWomanSyndrome attractive young women]]. For instance, the death of Franchise/SpiderMan's [[ILetGwenStacyDie girlfriend Gwen Stacy]] in ''Amazing Spider-Man'' #121 caused a huge outcry among fans (so big in fact, that Marvel brought Gwen back as a clone less than two years later to assuage them), her death is still seen as a deep injustice by a number of diehard fans, and many people want to portray it as the UrExample of StuffedIntoTheFridge. Before her death, four supporting characters had been killed off in-story really without causing a ripple among readers, all men of various ages: [[DeathByOriginStory Uncle Ben]], Bennett Brant (Betty's brother, caught in the crossfire to provide a reason for her to hate Spider-Man), Frederick Foswell (''Daily Bugle'' reporter) and George Stacy (Gwen's father, died trying to save people's lives to provide an obstacle to her romance with Peter Parker). In later years ''The Death of Jean [=DeWolff=]'', the second female supporting character to be killed off, caused another major stir. The deaths of various male supporting characters -- Professor Miles Warren, Nathan Lubensky (Aunt May's fiancÚ), Ned Leeds (one of Peter's oldest ''Bugle'' colleagues), and even Harry Osborn (Peter Parker's oldest and ''best friend'' of the male persuasion) -- not so much. Harry Osborn who, as it turned out, could not well be replaced in his role in the cast, but that was fourteen years after his death. Even Aunt May (whose apparent death in ''Amazing Spider-Man'' #400 was widely seen as a satisfying ending to a fulfilled life) was brought back to the living more quickly. And while only Uncle Ben's death Ben is referenced in-story nearly as often as Gwen Stacy's, Stacy, quite a few of the dead male characters are all but forgotten.forgotten both by the writers and the fans.
1st Feb '16 1:48:51 PM Menshevik
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* One may wonder how much of the importance attached to the "Website/WomenInRefrigerators" phenomenon is a matter of perception, since for the most part the victims in question happen to be [[MissingWhiteWomanSyndrome attractive young women]]. For instance, the death of Franchise/SpiderMan's [[ILetGwenStacyDie girlfriend Gwen Stacy]] in ''Amazing Spider-Man'' #121 caused a huge outcry among fans (so big in fact, that Marvel brought Gwen back as a clone less than two years later to assuage them), her death is still seen as a deep injustice by a number of diehard fans, and many people want to portray it as the UrExample of StuffedIntoTheFridge. Before her death, four supporting characters had been killed off in-story really without causing a ripple among readers, all men of various ages: [[DeathByOriginStory Uncle Ben]] (murdered in Spider-Man's origin story), Bennett Brant (Betty's brother, caught in the crossfire to provide a reason for her to hate Spider-Man), Frederick Foswell (''Daily Bugle'' reporter) and George Stacy (Gwen's father, died trying to save people's lives). In later years ''The Death of Jean [=DeWolff=]'', the second female supporting character to be killed off, caused another major stir. The deaths of various male supporting characters -- Professor Miles Warren, Nathan Lubensky (Aunt May's fiancÚ), Ned Leeds (one of Peter's oldest ''Bugle'' colleagues), and even Harry Osborn (Peter Parker's oldest and ''best friend'' of the male persuasion) -- not so much. Harry Osborn who, as it turned out, could not well be replaced in his role in the cast, but that was fourteen years after his death. Even Aunt May (whose apparent death in ''Amazing Spider-Man'' #400 was widely seen as a satisfying ending to a fulfilled life) was brought back to the living more quickly. And while only Uncle Ben's death is referenced nearly as often as Gwen Stacy's, quite a few of the dead male characters are all but forgotten.
to:
* One may wonder how much of the importance attached to the "Website/WomenInRefrigerators" phenomenon is a matter of perception, since for the most part the victims in question happen to be [[MissingWhiteWomanSyndrome attractive young women]]. For instance, the death of Franchise/SpiderMan's [[ILetGwenStacyDie girlfriend Gwen Stacy]] in ''Amazing Spider-Man'' #121 caused a huge outcry among fans (so big in fact, that Marvel brought Gwen back as a clone less than two years later to assuage them), her death is still seen as a deep injustice by a number of diehard fans, and many people want to portray it as the UrExample of StuffedIntoTheFridge. Before her death, four supporting characters had been killed off in-story really without causing a ripple among readers, all men of various ages: [[DeathByOriginStory Uncle Ben]] (murdered in Spider-Man's origin story), Ben]], Bennett Brant (Betty's brother, caught in the crossfire to provide a reason for her to hate Spider-Man), Frederick Foswell (''Daily Bugle'' reporter) and George Stacy (Gwen's father, died trying to save people's lives).lives to provide an obstacle to her romance with Peter Parker). In later years ''The Death of Jean [=DeWolff=]'', the second female supporting character to be killed off, caused another major stir. The deaths of various male supporting characters -- Professor Miles Warren, Nathan Lubensky (Aunt May's fiancÚ), Ned Leeds (one of Peter's oldest ''Bugle'' colleagues), and even Harry Osborn (Peter Parker's oldest and ''best friend'' of the male persuasion) -- not so much. Harry Osborn who, as it turned out, could not well be replaced in his role in the cast, but that was fourteen years after his death. Even Aunt May (whose apparent death in ''Amazing Spider-Man'' #400 was widely seen as a satisfying ending to a fulfilled life) was brought back to the living more quickly. And while only Uncle Ben's death is referenced nearly as often as Gwen Stacy's, quite a few of the dead male characters are all but forgotten.
1st Feb '16 1:46:26 PM Menshevik
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* One may wonder how much of the importance attached to the "Website/WomenInRefrigerators" phenomenon is a matter of perception, since for the most part the victims in question happen to be [[MissingWhiteWomanSyndrome attractive young women]]. For instance, the death of Franchise/SpiderMan's [[ILetGwenStacyDie girlfriend Gwen Stacy]] in ''Amazing Spider-Man'' #121 caused a huge outcry among fans (so big in fact, that Marvel brought Gwen back as a clone less than two years later to assuage them), her death is still seen as a deep injustice by a number of diehard fans, and many people want to portray it as the UrExample of StuffedIntoTheFridge. Before her death, four supporting characters had been killed off in-story really without causing a ripple among readers, all men of various ages: [[DeathByOrigin Uncle Ben]] (murdered in Spider-Man's origin story), Bennett Brant (Betty's brother, caught in the crossfire to provide a reason for her to hate Spider-Man), Frederick Foswell (''Daily Bugle'' reporter) and George Stacy (Gwen's father, died trying to save people's lives). In later years ''The Death of Jean [=DeWolff=], the second female supporting character to be killed off, caused another major stir. The deaths of various male supporting characters -- Professor Miles Warren, Nathan Lubensky (Aunt May's fiancÚ), Ned Leeds (one of Peter's oldest ''Bugle'' colleagues), and even Harry Osborn (Peter Parker's oldest and ''best friend'' of the male persuasion) -- not so much. Harry Osborn who, as it turned out, could not well be replaced in his role in the cast, but that was fourteen years after his death. Even Aunt May (whose apparent death in ''Amazing Spider-Man'' #400 was widely seen as a satisfying ending to a fulfilled life) was brought back to the living more quickly.
to:
* One may wonder how much of the importance attached to the "Website/WomenInRefrigerators" phenomenon is a matter of perception, since for the most part the victims in question happen to be [[MissingWhiteWomanSyndrome attractive young women]]. For instance, the death of Franchise/SpiderMan's [[ILetGwenStacyDie girlfriend Gwen Stacy]] in ''Amazing Spider-Man'' #121 caused a huge outcry among fans (so big in fact, that Marvel brought Gwen back as a clone less than two years later to assuage them), her death is still seen as a deep injustice by a number of diehard fans, and many people want to portray it as the UrExample of StuffedIntoTheFridge. Before her death, four supporting characters had been killed off in-story really without causing a ripple among readers, all men of various ages: [[DeathByOrigin [[DeathByOriginStory Uncle Ben]] (murdered in Spider-Man's origin story), Bennett Brant (Betty's brother, caught in the crossfire to provide a reason for her to hate Spider-Man), Frederick Foswell (''Daily Bugle'' reporter) and George Stacy (Gwen's father, died trying to save people's lives). In later years ''The Death of Jean [=DeWolff=], [=DeWolff=]'', the second female supporting character to be killed off, caused another major stir. The deaths of various male supporting characters -- Professor Miles Warren, Nathan Lubensky (Aunt May's fiancÚ), Ned Leeds (one of Peter's oldest ''Bugle'' colleagues), and even Harry Osborn (Peter Parker's oldest and ''best friend'' of the male persuasion) -- not so much. Harry Osborn who, as it turned out, could not well be replaced in his role in the cast, but that was fourteen years after his death. Even Aunt May (whose apparent death in ''Amazing Spider-Man'' #400 was widely seen as a satisfying ending to a fulfilled life) was brought back to the living more quickly. And while only Uncle Ben's death is referenced nearly as often as Gwen Stacy's, quite a few of the dead male characters are all but forgotten.
1st Feb '16 1:41:52 PM Menshevik
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* One may wonder how much of the importance attached to the "Website/WomenInRefrigerators" phenomenon is a matter of perception, since for the most part the victims in question happen to be [[MissingWhiteWomanSyndrome attractive young women]]. For instance, the death of Franchise/SpiderMan's [[ILetGwenStacyDie girlfriend Gwen Stacy]] in ''Amazing Spider-Man'' #121 caused a huge outcry among fans (so big in fact, that Marvel brought Gwen back as a clone less than two years later to assuage them), her death is still seen as a deep injustice by a number of diehard fans, and many people want to portray it as the UrExample of StuffedIntoTheFridge. Before her death, four supporting characters had been killed off in-story really without causing a ripple among readers, all men of various ages: [[DeathByOrigin Uncle Ben]] (murdered in Spider-Man's origin story), Bennett Brant (Betty's brother, caught in the crossfire to provide a reason for her to hate Spider-Man), Frederick Foswell (''Daily Bugle'' reporter) and George Stacy (Gwen's father, died trying to save people's lives). In later years ''The Death of Jean [=DeWolff=], the second female supporting character to be killed off, caused another major stir. The deaths of various male supporting characters -- Professor Miles Warren, Nathan Lubensky (Aunt May's fiancÚ) not so much.
to:
* One may wonder how much of the importance attached to the "Website/WomenInRefrigerators" phenomenon is a matter of perception, since for the most part the victims in question happen to be [[MissingWhiteWomanSyndrome attractive young women]]. For instance, the death of Franchise/SpiderMan's [[ILetGwenStacyDie girlfriend Gwen Stacy]] in ''Amazing Spider-Man'' #121 caused a huge outcry among fans (so big in fact, that Marvel brought Gwen back as a clone less than two years later to assuage them), her death is still seen as a deep injustice by a number of diehard fans, and many people want to portray it as the UrExample of StuffedIntoTheFridge. Before her death, four supporting characters had been killed off in-story really without causing a ripple among readers, all men of various ages: [[DeathByOrigin Uncle Ben]] (murdered in Spider-Man's origin story), Bennett Brant (Betty's brother, caught in the crossfire to provide a reason for her to hate Spider-Man), Frederick Foswell (''Daily Bugle'' reporter) and George Stacy (Gwen's father, died trying to save people's lives). In later years ''The Death of Jean [=DeWolff=], the second female supporting character to be killed off, caused another major stir. The deaths of various male supporting characters -- Professor Miles Warren, Nathan Lubensky (Aunt May's fiancÚ) fiancÚ), Ned Leeds (one of Peter's oldest ''Bugle'' colleagues), and even Harry Osborn (Peter Parker's oldest and ''best friend'' of the male persuasion) -- not so much.much. Harry Osborn who, as it turned out, could not well be replaced in his role in the cast, but that was fourteen years after his death. Even Aunt May (whose apparent death in ''Amazing Spider-Man'' #400 was widely seen as a satisfying ending to a fulfilled life) was brought back to the living more quickly.
1st Feb '16 1:28:04 PM Menshevik
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* One may wonder how much of the importance attached to the "Website/WomenInRefrigerators" phenomenon is a matter of perception, since for the most part the victims in question happen to be [[MissingWhiteWomanSyndrome attractive young women]]. For instance, the death of Franchise/SpiderMan's [[ILetGwenStacyDie girlfriend Gwen Stacy]] in ''Amazing Spider-Man'' #121 caused a huge outcry among fans (so big in fact, that Marvel brought Gwen back as a clone less than two years later to assuage them), her death is still seen as a deep injustice by a number of diehard fans, and many people want to portray it as the UrExample of StuffedIntoTheFridge. Before her death, four supporting characters had been killed off in-story really without causing a ripple among readers, all men of various ages: [[DeathByOrigin Uncle Ben]] (murdered in Spider-Man's origin story), Bennett Brant (Betty's brother, caught in the crossfire to provide a reason for her to hate Spider-Man), Frederick Foswell (''Daily Bugle'' reporter) and George Stacy (Gwen's father, died trying to save people's lives). In later years ''The Death of Jean [=DeWolff=], the second female supporting character to be killed off, caused another major stir. The deaths of various male supporting characters -- Professor Miles Warren, Nathan Lubensky (Aunt May's fiancÚ) not so much.
22nd Jan '16 3:03:21 AM search
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* In both "No More Heroes" games, the women are killed off every bit as brutally as the men, but they are still portrayed much more sympathetically than them. He's still reluctant to kill women, but a female assassin tells him that it must be done. In the second game, Travis jumps from 50th place to 25th place on the assassin rankings when he defeats the high school football star's giant fighting robot and it explodes with the athlete and his cheerleaders still inside of it.
21st Jan '16 9:49:04 PM SunriseWarrior
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* The death of [[spoiler: Charity Burbage]] in the VillainOpeningScene of ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows''. The previous three books [[TonightSomeoneDies each featured]] the death of a sympathetic male character and all these deaths were treated with great weight. In contrast, Charity Burbage's death was essentially just a plot device to explain why the Muggle Studies position is open this year and she's barely mentioned for the rest of the book (and in [[Film/HarryPotter the film]], she's not mentioned again at all). Of course, she had never previously appeared in the series, although she was quickly established as a sympathetic character. [[spoiler:It's also notable that Snape managed to not lose any sympathy points for allowing her to die as part of maintaining his cover.]]
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* The death of [[spoiler: Charity Burbage]] in the VillainOpeningScene of ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows''. The previous three books [[TonightSomeoneDies each featured]] the death of a sympathetic male character and all these deaths were treated with great weight. In contrast, [[spoiler: Charity Burbage's Burbage']]s death was essentially just a plot device to explain why the Muggle Studies position is open this year and she's barely mentioned for the rest of the book (and in [[Film/HarryPotter the film]], she's not mentioned again at all). Of course, she had never previously appeared in the series, although she was quickly established as a sympathetic character. [[spoiler:It's also notable that Snape managed to not lose any sympathy points for allowing her to die as part of maintaining his cover.]]
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