History Main / MeaninglessLives

5th Jan '16 6:01:21 PM LucaEarlgrey
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* ''RayCrisis'''s Special Mode drops so many extra life pickups, you practically have unlimited lives.
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* ''RayCrisis'''s ''VideoGame/{{Ray|Series}}Crisis'''s Special Mode drops so many extra life pickups, you practically have unlimited lives.lives. However, picking up an extra life resets the point values of point pickups, so you actually want to ''avoid'' them if you're playing for score. In other words, coast through the game with a poor measure of play performance, or risk a GameOver trying to get a high score.
5th Dec '15 11:35:51 AM nombretomado
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* ''[[SeriousSam Serious Sam 2]]'', a FirstPersonShooter, released in 2005, that you can have as many saves at any moment as you want in, has lives. Possibly as part of its DenserAndWackier theme that also harkens back to the old console games of yore. Still a rather pointless feature.
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* ''[[SeriousSam ''[[VideoGame/SeriousSam Serious Sam 2]]'', a FirstPersonShooter, released in 2005, that you can have as many saves at any moment as you want in, has lives. Possibly as part of its DenserAndWackier theme that also harkens back to the old console games of yore. Still a rather pointless feature.
24th Nov '15 12:41:18 PM MyFinalEdits
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* The first ''VideoGame/RogueSquadron'' game had a variation on this trope, in which the player has three lives which are shared between missions, and could lose one if they failed a mission (in addition to dying, which is the usual way to lose one). However, failing a mission is pretty much the same as a Game Over (since you have to start from the beginning either way), and even if you ''did'' get a game over, your overall mission progress is still saved, so there's nothing stopping you from picking up where you left off with three fresh lives. Later games in the series [[AvertedTrope did away with this system]] and gave you three lives which refreshed after each mission, as well as an instant game over for mission failure.
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* The first ''VideoGame/RogueSquadron'' game had has a variation on this trope, in which the player has three lives which are shared between missions, and could can lose one if they failed fail a mission (in addition to dying, which is the usual way to lose one). However, But failing a mission is pretty much the same as a Game Over (since you have to start from the beginning either way), and even if you ''did'' ''do'' get a game over, your overall mission progress is still saved, so there's nothing stopping you from picking up where you left off with three fresh lives. Later games in the series [[AvertedTrope did do away with this system]] and gave give you three lives which refreshed refresh after each mission, as well as an instant game over for mission failure.
14th Nov '15 3:15:38 PM MrUnderhill
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* The first ''VideoGame/RogueSquadron'' game had a variation on this trope, in which the player has three lives and could lose one if they failed a mission (in addition to dying, which is the usual way to lose one). However, failing a mission is pretty much the same as a Game Over (since you have to start from the beginning either way), and even if you ''did'' get a game over, your overall mission progress is still saved, so there's nothing stopping you from picking up where you left off with three fresh lives. Later games in the series [[AvertedTrope did away with this system]] and gave you three lives which refreshed after each mission, as well as an instant game over for mission failure.
to:
* The first ''VideoGame/RogueSquadron'' game had a variation on this trope, in which the player has three lives which are shared between missions, and could lose one if they failed a mission (in addition to dying, which is the usual way to lose one). However, failing a mission is pretty much the same as a Game Over (since you have to start from the beginning either way), and even if you ''did'' get a game over, your overall mission progress is still saved, so there's nothing stopping you from picking up where you left off with three fresh lives. Later games in the series [[AvertedTrope did away with this system]] and gave you three lives which refreshed after each mission, as well as an instant game over for mission failure.
14th Nov '15 3:15:08 PM MrUnderhill
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Added DiffLines:
* The first ''VideoGame/RogueSquadron'' game had a variation on this trope, in which the player has three lives and could lose one if they failed a mission (in addition to dying, which is the usual way to lose one). However, failing a mission is pretty much the same as a Game Over (since you have to start from the beginning either way), and even if you ''did'' get a game over, your overall mission progress is still saved, so there's nothing stopping you from picking up where you left off with three fresh lives. Later games in the series [[AvertedTrope did away with this system]] and gave you three lives which refreshed after each mission, as well as an instant game over for mission failure.
6th Sep '15 1:57:23 PM gophergiggles
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** ''VideoGame/MegaManX5''/''VideoGame/MegaManX6'' were especially ridiculous, as getting a Game Over did not even make you lose your level checkpoint. Also, the littering of hostages in many stages, ''each'' of whom granted an extra life, meant maxing out at 9 lives was too easy.
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** ''VideoGame/MegaManX5''/''VideoGame/MegaManX6'' were especially ridiculous, as getting a Game Over did not even make you lose your level checkpoint. Also, the littering of hostages in many stages, ''each'' of whom granted an extra life, meant maxing out at 9 lives was too easy.easy, and since your ''only'' means of exiting an unbeaten level was a GameOver, they leaned toward PowerUpLetdown.
18th Jul '15 4:49:54 PM VictorDamazio
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** ''VideoGame/EryisAction'' does the same, being a PlatformHell game that draws heavy inspiration from ''Syobon Action''.
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** ''VideoGame/EryisAction'' does the same, being a PlatformHell game that draws heavy inspiration from ''Syobon Action''.Action'', however, after beating the game once, you unlock a mode with limited lives and losing all puts you back at the beggining.
24th Jun '15 8:11:54 PM nombretomado
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* There's no punishment at all for running out of Lives in KirbySuperStar. The score isn't even reset.
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* There's no punishment at all for running out of Lives in KirbySuperStar.''VideoGame/KirbySuperStar''. The score isn't even reset.
16th Jun '15 6:24:51 PM Morgenthaler
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* The GBC version of ''DonaldDuckGoinQuackers'' rewards you with one life per 20 blue pegs collected as well as one per... well... "[[OneUp Donald]]". By the end of the game, you're likely to have stocked up on roughly 90-99 lives, making a desperate chase for more quite redundant.
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* The GBC version of ''DonaldDuckGoinQuackers'' ''VideoGame/DonaldDuckGoinQuackers'' rewards you with one life per 20 blue pegs collected as well as one per... well... "[[OneUp Donald]]". By the end of the game, you're likely to have stocked up on roughly 90-99 lives, making a desperate chase for more quite redundant.
15th Jun '15 7:16:46 AM rjd1922
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* Having a "game over" serve no purpose besides making you lose your level checkpoint and returning you to the title screen, where you can simply re-load your game and pick up where you left off. (Basically any time [[Main/{{DeathIsASlapOnTheWrist}} Death Is A Slap On The Wrist]].)
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* Having a "game over" serve no purpose besides making you lose your level checkpoint and returning you to the title screen, where you can simply re-load your game and pick up where you left off. (Basically any time [[Main/{{DeathIsASlapOnTheWrist}} Death Is A Slap On The Wrist]].DeathIsASlapOnTheWrist.)

Somebody who [[IThoughtItMeant takes the trope name too literally]] is a StrawNihilist.
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Somebody who [[IThoughtItMeant [[JustForFun/IThoughtItMeant takes the trope name too literally]] is a StrawNihilist.

** Downplayed in the Lost Levels, as even though you can max out your life counter at 127-8 (depending on the version) in the first level, you can still easily lose them all before beating the game. Played straight in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioAllStars'', in which ''Lost Levels'' is the only game in the compilation where the player can save his progress at the last stage he played, a benefit not featured in the other games in the compilation.
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** Downplayed in the Lost Levels, ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBrosTheLostLevels'', as even though you can max out your life counter at 127-8 (depending on the version) in the first level, you can still easily lose them all before beating the game. Played straight in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioAllStars'', in which ''Lost ''The Lost Levels'' is the only game in the compilation where the player can save his progress at the last stage he played, a benefit not featured in the other games in the compilation.

** The SNES version of Super Mario World allowed you to quickly rack up lives by replaying certain levels, but the life counter was not saved. The GBA remake saved it and also extended the life counter to three digits. It was not uncommon to accumulate hundreds of lives without even trying by the end of the game.
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** The SNES version of Super Mario World ''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld'' allowed you to quickly rack up lives by replaying certain levels, but the life counter was not saved. The GBA remake saved it and also extended the life counter to three digits. It was not uncommon to accumulate hundreds of lives without even trying by the end of the game.

** ''VideoGame/SuperMario64'': Getting a game over was only marginally more time consuming than losing a life (dying drops you at the level entrance, game overs kick you to the front of the castle). There was the occasional checkpoint now and then, but again, it didn't take long to reach them. It's not hard to get upwards of twenty lives in one sitting anyway, and 100% completion was [[AWinnerIsYou 99 of the bloody things]].
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** ''VideoGame/SuperMario64'': Getting a game over was only marginally more time consuming than losing a life (dying drops you at the level entrance, game overs kick you to the front of the castle). There was the occasional checkpoint now and then, but again, it didn't take long to reach them. It's not hard to get upwards of twenty lives in one sitting anyway, and the reward for getting 100% completion was [[AWinnerIsYou 99 of the bloody things]].

** VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy2 is this to about as much degree at the first game. The hub has the usual five odd lives, as well as an infinite supply in the basement via the Chance Cube in the casino (aka, about 20 possible lives to get for about a 100 coins apiece). And the standard five from Princess Peach's letters to Mario. And the Chance Cubes in most levels. And the fact unlike most 3D Mario games, you keep any lives you gain in a level if you exit without beating it, meaning easy 1-Up farming. ** ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosWii'' and ''U'' have over a dozen intentional ways to get infinite (or high numbers of) 1-ups, and in ''Wii'' they're all documented in videos in the game. In other words, the game tells you how to get them. Although getting lives is trivial, losing them holds a little more weight as 7 deaths in one level (except on hard levels) makes the Super Guide block pop up which means your file can [[LostForever never]] have shiny stars. Also, in multiplayer there isn't time to collect as many 1ups unless everyone cooperates, and running out means you need to sit out the level until it's completed or everyone dies.
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** VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy2 ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy2'' is this to about as much degree at the first game. The hub has the usual five odd lives, as well as an infinite supply in the basement via the Chance Cube in the casino (aka, about 20 possible lives to get for about a 100 coins apiece). And the standard five from Princess Peach's letters to Mario. And the Chance Cubes in most levels. And the fact unlike most 3D Mario games, you keep any lives you gain in a level if you exit without beating it, meaning easy 1-Up farming. ** ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosWii'' and ''U'' have over a dozen intentional ways to get infinite (or high numbers of) 1-ups, and in ''Wii'' they're all documented in videos in the game. In other words, the game tells you how to get them. Although getting lives is trivial, losing them holds a little more weight as 7 deaths in one level (except on hard levels) makes the Super Guide block pop up which means your file can [[LostForever never]] have shiny stars. Also, in multiplayer there isn't time to collect as many 1ups 1-Ups unless everyone cooperates, and running out means you need to sit out the level until it's completed or everyone dies.

** In ''VideoGame/MarioVsDonkeyKong'': Minis March Again, which was the first game in the series to even HAVE lives (aside from the [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness completely different original]]), losing all of them causes you to... gain five more. Yeah...
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** In ''VideoGame/MarioVsDonkeyKong'': ''VideoGame/MarioVsDonkeyKong: Minis March Again, Again!'', which was the first game in the series to even HAVE lives (aside from the [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness completely different original]]), losing all of them causes you to... gain five more. Yeah...
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