History Main / MarriedToTheJob

25th May '16 7:33:57 PM sayaleviathan
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* Tony Stark and Pepper Potts became the OfficialCouple in ''Film/IronMan2'' and Tony promised to her that he would retired from his job as Iron Man and destroyed all his suits at the end of [[Film/IronMan3 the third movie]]. The events of ''Film/AvengersAgeOfUltron'' says otherwise and as expected, [[spoiler:''Film/CaptainAmericaCivilWar'' confirmed that Pepper left him]].


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*In ''Series/WithoutATrace'', this is one of the two reasons why Jack Malone ended up divorced in Season 3 (the other is sleeping with his co-worker Samantha) and lost custody of his two daughters.
*In ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'', Robin is a career-focused, workaholic reporter and had no intention of settling down. This explains why she doesnít want to be in a committed relationship. However, her meeting with Ted changed it and she started dating him except they broke up due to wanting different things and for Robin, itís her career. HistoryRepeats when she dated and married [[spoiler:Barney]] and in the series finale, they got divorced due to her work. It also prevented her from seeing her friends.
19th May '16 3:07:44 PM LongTallShorty64
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* In the film ''Film/TheMarryingKind'', Chet works the night shift a lot and Florence complains about this, but he explains that he worked for the benefit of her and the kids.
16th May '16 3:01:25 AM Tron80
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* ''Fanfic/NeonGenesisEvangelionGenocide'':
** Ritsuko was devoted to her job. According Misato, that was all what mattered to her friend, and it drove a wedge between them.
--->Her work was all that mattered to her.
** Misato was so engrossed with her job in NERV for a while that she neglected her wards Shinji and Asuka right when they were breaking down.
7th May '16 5:19:07 PM nombretomado
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* On ''GreysAnatomy'' Bailey's husband Tucker divorced her because she's spending too much time at the hospital, you know, saving lives. {{Jerkass}}. Technically, though, ''she'' divorced him, after he gave her an ultimatum: him or the job. In her mind, once a marriage has reached a point of ultimatums, it's time to end it.

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* On ''GreysAnatomy'' ''Series/GreysAnatomy'' Bailey's husband Tucker divorced her because she's spending too much time at the hospital, you know, saving lives. {{Jerkass}}. Technically, though, ''she'' divorced him, after he gave her an ultimatum: him or the job. In her mind, once a marriage has reached a point of ultimatums, it's time to end it.
22nd Apr '16 6:34:45 PM Nakayama90
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** Soichiro in [[Series/DeathNote the TV drama]] is frequently away from home to his job. This puts a strain on his relationship with his son Light, who must act as a parental figure to Sayu, which is amplified by Soichiro's absence during [[spoiler: Sachiko's death ten years prior.]]
12th Apr '16 10:40:27 AM dmcreif
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* Walter White in ''Series/BreakingBad'' is married to his crystal meth empire, which gradually drives his family apart as Skyler is drawn into it, and moreso when Hank, Marie, and eventually Walt Jr. find out.
**Notable example: Walt ends up missing the birth of his daughter Holly because he has to honor a timed delivery of 38 pounds of meth to Gus Fring.
9th Apr '16 4:49:54 PM dmcreif
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'''The Character is a Workaholic''': In some cases, this concern is justified -- the character genuinely is spending too much time at work and is neglecting their other relationships and commitments, and the complaining spouse is genuinely in the right to call them out on it. This is particularly the case if the character has a career that, whilst it may be important, is not going to result in any fatalities or the Collapse of Western Civilization if they take a break now and then. In these cases, the character might be neglecting their significant others and relationships out of a genuine desire to provide the best for their families, having completely missed the point that it'd probably be better for their families in the long run if they actually spend some time with them now and again. On the other hand, they might just be too obsessed with their career and the perks, privileges and powers they have, and have Forgotten What's Important. Or because they're simply a {{workaholic}}. If it's a happy story, then the character will gradually realize that they're focusing on the wrong things and resolve to make amends and spend more time with their loved ones; in a DownerEnding, the character will lose everyone who is important to her / him and quickly discover that it's LonelyAtTheTop.

'''The Job They Perform is Just That Important''': More often than not, the complaining spouse's position is a little less clear-cut and righteous. While they might have a good point about their loved one's spending too much time at work having a negative impact on their marriage / relationship, the fact is that their loved one does a job that ''is'' demanding and their partner really does need to put in all that time at work in order to effectively do their job. This is TruthInTelevision especially if the job is a profession that involves saving human lives, like emergency services personnel (police officer, firefighter, paramedic) or doctors, in which case people really ''do'' need to work long hours, be on call 24-7, and / or expose themselves to dangerous situations, and lives genuinely ''can'' be lost if they aren't attentive to their work to a high degree, even if this means neglecting their relationships or families. In these situations (whether the writer intended it or not), the complaining spouse may come across as selfish, whiny and unfairly demanding, especially if it should have been obvious from the outset of the relationship that their loved one's job was going to demand a large portion of their time.

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'''The Character is a Workaholic''': Workaholic'''. In some cases, this concern is justified -- the character genuinely is spending too much time at work and is neglecting their other relationships and commitments, and the complaining spouse is genuinely in the right to call them out on it. This is particularly the case if the character has a career that, whilst it may be important, is not going to result in any fatalities or the Collapse of Western Civilization if they take a break now and then. In these cases, the character might be neglecting their significant others and relationships out of a genuine desire to provide the best for their families, having completely missed the point that it'd probably be better for their families in the long run if they actually spend some time with them now and again. On the other hand, they might just be too obsessed with their career and the perks, privileges and powers they have, and have Forgotten What's Important.forgotten what's important in life. Or because they're simply a {{workaholic}}. If it's a happy story, then the character will gradually realize that they're focusing on the wrong things and resolve to make amends and spend more time with their loved ones; in a DownerEnding, the character will lose everyone who is important to her / him and quickly discover that it's LonelyAtTheTop.

'''The Character Performs a Job They Perform That is Just That Important''': Important'''. More often than not, the complaining spouse's position is a little less clear-cut and righteous. While they might have a good point about their loved one's spending too much time at work having a negative impact on their marriage / relationship, the fact is that their loved one does a job that ''is'' '''is''' demanding and their partner really does need to put in all that time at work in order to effectively do their job. This is TruthInTelevision TruthInTelevision, especially if the job is a profession that involves saving human lives, like emergency services personnel (police a police officer, firefighter, paramedic) or doctors, paramedic, doctor, heart surgeon, and more, in which case people really ''do'' need to work long hours, be on call 24-7, and / or expose themselves to dangerous situations, and lives genuinely ''can'' be lost if they aren't attentive to their work to a high degree, even if this means neglecting they have to neglect their relationships or families. In these situations (whether the writer intended it or not), the complaining spouse may come across as selfish, whiny and unfairly demanding, especially if it should have been obvious from the outset start of the relationship that their loved one's job was going to demand a large portion of their time.



This is particularly common among military personnel, detectives, secret agents and doctors. Architects also seem prone to this trope (and usually fall into the first category) for some reason.

An interesting aspect whenever this is bought up in fiction is that nobody ever seems to direct the blame to the one thing largely responsible for this plight: mismanagement. If a character is spending too much time at their job, it usually means a mis-allocation of resources or manpower on a managerial level. Yet nobody ever approach the managers, even though they are the ones who might actually be able do something for the character suffering from this.

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This is particularly common among military personnel, police detectives, secret agents and doctors. Architects also seem prone to this trope (and usually fall into the first category) for some reason.

An interesting aspect whenever this is bought up in fiction is that nobody ever seems to direct the blame to the one thing largely responsible for this plight: mismanagement. If a character is spending too much time at their job, it usually means a mis-allocation of resources or manpower on a managerial level. Yet nobody ever approach the supervisors and managers, even though they are the ones who might actually be able do something for the character suffering from this.
6th Apr '16 5:51:33 PM dmcreif
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** In the start of season five, he does pick up a girlfriend in the form of suave realtor Linda Fusco, but it doesn't last. The first reason is that Stottlemeyer's police duties means that their dates are frequently interrupted, postponed, or cancelled completely (to the point in "Mr. Monk and His Biggest Fan," Linda has to "buy" Stottlemeyer at a BachelorAuction to secure a date with him, but even then that gets interrupted when Stottlemeyer has to leave to save Monk and Marci Maven from a deranged killer). The second reason is that Monk and Natalie discover that she murdered her ex-business partner when he decided to break off and start his own agency.

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** In the start of season five, he does pick up a girlfriend in the form of suave realtor Linda Fusco, but it doesn't last. The first reason is that Stottlemeyer's police duties means that their dates are frequently interrupted, postponed, or cancelled completely (to completely, to the point in "Mr. Monk and His Biggest Fan," Linda has to "buy" Stottlemeyer at a BachelorAuction to secure a date with him, but even then that him (which of course gets interrupted when Stottlemeyer has by him making a EurekaMoment in a murder case, forcing him to leave ditch her to save Monk and Marci Maven from a deranged killer). The second reason is that Her being exposed by Monk and Natalie discover that she murdered for murdering her ex-business business partner when he decided to break off and start his own agency.doesn't help.



** Natalie also observes this about Stottlemeyer in ''Mr. Monk and the Blue Flu''. When she and Monk happen to notice Stottlemeyer sitting in his car outside Monk's apartment, Natalie notes that he's in the unmarked Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptor that the SFPD has assigned him to use:
--->''Here's something odd I've noticed about cops: They drive around all day in black-and-white and unmarked Crown Victorias, the standard vehicle used by law enforcement agencies nationwide[[note]]Well, it was when the book was published in 2007. The Ford Crown Victoria was ditched with the Ford Taurus becoming the new 'standard' Ford police car model in 2011[[/note]]. So you'd think that when they bought their own cars, they'd want something entirely different, something less big, boxy, and official. But no. They don't feel comfortable in "civilian" cars. They want to be cops at home, too. Which may be why divorce rates among cops are so high. Perhaps if they ditched their Crown Vics, they would less likely be ditched themselves.''
*** Of course, it is probably truth in television that any modern police force will have a lot of single and divorced cops in their ranks, but most of the strain in their relationships is because most police officers, especially someone in a higher rank of authority like Stottlemeyer, has to be on call at all hours of the day and again, risk their life every day when they are on duty. And this happens to be a job where you have to have an A+ grade thinking efficiency.

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** Natalie also observes this about Stottlemeyer in ''Mr. Monk and the Blue Flu''. When she and Monk happen to notice Stottlemeyer sitting in his car outside Monk's apartment, Natalie notes that he's in the unmarked Ford his SFPD issue-Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptor that the SFPD has assigned him to use:
Interceptor:
--->''Here's something odd I've noticed about cops: They drive around all day in black-and-white and unmarked Crown Victorias, the standard vehicle used by law enforcement agencies nationwide[[note]]Well, it was when the book was published in 2007. The Ford Crown Victoria was ditched with the Ford Taurus becoming the new 'standard' Ford police car model in 2011[[/note]].2011. Police departments also use a lot of [=SUV=]s.[[/note]]. So you'd think that when they bought their own cars, they'd want something entirely different, something less big, boxy, and official. But no. They don't feel comfortable in "civilian" cars. They want to be cops at home, too. Which may be why divorce rates among cops are so high. Perhaps if they ditched their Crown Vics, they would less likely be ditched themselves.''
*** Of course, it is probably truth in television that any modern police force will have a lot of single and divorced cops in their ranks, but most of the strain in their relationships is because most police officers, especially someone in a higher rank of authority like Stottlemeyer, has to be on call at all hours of the day and again, risk their life every day when they are on duty. And this happens to be a job where you have to have an A+ grade thinking efficiency.
''
25th Feb '16 10:09:06 PM Eagal
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* Franchise/{{Batman}} uses this as an excuse at times. His other excuses are ItsNotYouItsMyEnemies and [[HoYay Robin looks really good in tights]].

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* Franchise/{{Batman}} uses this as an excuse at times. His other excuses are ItsNotYouItsMyEnemies and [[HoYay Robin looks really good in tights]].excuse go to excuse is ItsNotYouItsMyEnemies
18th Feb '16 7:22:16 PM kazokuhouou
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* In ''Webcomic/KevinAndKell'', a feline friend of Kell's, Aby, is [[LiteralMetaphor literally married to her job]]. They had a wedding and everything. The 'marriage' is complete with an anniversary gift (a new sign for her shop) and concern that she might be cheating on it (by making supplemental income on [[SecondLife Ninth Life]]). (And apparently franchises are their equivalent of children).

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* In ''Webcomic/KevinAndKell'', a feline friend of Kell's, Aby, is [[LiteralMetaphor literally married to her job]]. They had a wedding and everything. The 'marriage' is complete with an anniversary gift (a new sign for her shop) and concern that she might be cheating on it (by making supplemental income on [[SecondLife Ninth Life]]). (And apparently franchises are their equivalent of children). This has become downplayed in recent years, since she became romantically linked with a MOUSCAR driver.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.MarriedToTheJob