History Main / MalevolentArchitecture

8th Sep '17 5:02:30 PM Gowan
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* In ''Literature/{{Hurog}}'', Hurog Keep, with the interesting twist that while Oreg, who literally [[PoweredByAForsakenChild is]] the place, is rather friendly and actively helps some of the people who live there, children raised in Hurog Keep have a tendency to not survive to adulthood.
* In the ''Literature/ImperialRadch'' trilogy, there are sentient spaceships and space stations. If you piss them off, and they have some help in overriding their programming, they can become this.



* In ''Literature/{{Hurog}}'', Hurog Keep, with the interesting twist that while Oreg, who literally [[PoweredByAForsakenChild is]] the place, is rather friendly and actively helps some of the people who live there, children raised in Hurog Keep have a tendency to not survive to adulthood.

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* In ''Literature/{{Hurog}}'', Hurog Keep, with the interesting twist that while Oreg, who literally [[PoweredByAForsakenChild is]] the place, is rather friendly and actively helps some of the people who live there, children raised in Hurog Keep have a tendency to not survive to adulthood.
8th Sep '17 4:46:36 PM Gowan
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In ''Literature/TheNewestPlutarch'', Benito Umberti's Gimnastyco style invokes it deliberately. The whole idea is building a house that makes you stronger by being an obstacle course.
* In ''Literature/{{Hurog}}'', Hurog Keep, with the interesting twist that while Oreg, who [[PoweredByAForsakenChild is]] the place, is rather neutral and actively helps some of the people who live there, children raised in Hurog Keep have a tendency to not survive to adulthood.

to:

* In ''Literature/TheNewestPlutarch'', Benito Umberti's Gimnastyco style invokes it deliberately. The whole idea is building a house that makes you stronger by being an obstacle course.
* In ''Literature/{{Hurog}}'', Hurog Keep, with the interesting twist that while Oreg, who literally [[PoweredByAForsakenChild is]] the place, is rather neutral friendly and actively helps some of the people who live there, children raised in Hurog Keep have a tendency to not survive to adulthood. adulthood.
8th Sep '17 4:35:00 PM Gowan
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* In ''Literature/{{Hurog}}'' fanfic ''[[http://archiveofourown.org/works/3648681?view_full_work=true The Haunted Castle]]'', Hurog is both an example of MalevolentArchitecture and BenevolentArchitecture, depending on who you ask. The place is PoweredByAForsakenChild, and while [[GeniusLoci Oreg]] likes some people, he very much dislikes others.


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* In ''Literature/{{Hurog}}'', Hurog Keep, with the interesting twist that while Oreg, who [[PoweredByAForsakenChild is]] the place, is rather neutral and actively helps some of the people who live there, children raised in Hurog Keep have a tendency to not survive to adulthood.
1st Sep '17 1:05:09 PM Omeganian
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In Literature/TheNewestPlutarch, Benito Umberti's Gimnastyco style invokes it deliberately. The whole idea is building a house that makes you stronger by being an obstacle course.

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In Literature/TheNewestPlutarch, ''Literature/TheNewestPlutarch'', Benito Umberti's Gimnastyco style invokes it deliberately. The whole idea is building a house that makes you stronger by being an obstacle course.
26th Aug '17 8:39:38 AM Omeganian
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In Literature/TheNewestPlutarch, Benito Umberti's Gimnastyco style invokes it deliberately. The whole idea is building a house that makes you stronger by being an obstacle course.
13th Aug '17 4:39:14 PM Luigifan
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See also AlienGeometries, for something that does something similar, except [[BrownNote to your brain]].

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See also AlienGeometries, for something that does something similar, except [[MindScrew except]] [[BrownNote to your brain]].brain]], and StageFatality, which is what happens when somebody weaponizes this during a fight.



* Any {{temple|OfDoom}} left by an ancient civilization in any {{RPG}}, ''ever''. In fact, any ancient ''[[RuinsForRuinsSake anything]]''. No wonder all these ancient civilizations died out -- they probably got killed by their own overly-complicated temples, outhouses and kitchens.

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* Any {{temple|OfDoom}} left by an ancient civilization in any {{RPG}}, ''ever''. In fact, any ancient ''[[RuinsForRuinsSake anything]]''. No wonder all these ancient civilizations died out -- they probably got killed by their own overly-complicated temples, outhouses outhouses, and kitchens.



** Jak 2 features such locales as the Fortress, the Palace (and it's support cables), the [[NoOSHACompliance Secret Weapons Laboratory]], and the Haven Forest Temple.
* In the [[FreewareGames freeware]] ''VideoGame/BinaryBoy'', you have a beautiful green field ... which has stumps with man-sized balls spinning around, and meter-tall red blades flipping up and down, both very much lethal to the protagonist.
* Mostly justified in ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands 2}}'': the majority of the buildings in the setting are either cobbled together by bandits of questionable sanity (and as a result wouldn't necessarily have a logical layout anyway), and most of the other constructions actually make some sense (although many of them have fallen into heavy disuse). The few exceptions (such as Opportunity, which has a rather unintuitive layout for a city) are also justified, as the guy who built them cares much more about stroking his ego than about [[FascistButInefficient any practical concerns]].
** Tiny Tina's Assault on Dragon Keep brings us the [[NamesToRunAwayFrom Lair of Infinite Agony]], the dungeon of the titular Dragon Keep. The place is filled with spiders and numerous traps, including a hallway with constantly-moving platforms that will crush you against the ceiling.
* Dracula's Castle in all its forms in the ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' games. Given who it belongs to, it is quite malevolent. It is, as his son puts it, "a creature of chaos". It isn't even Dracula's doing -- it's ever-shifting, creating new deathtraps without his lifting a finger, although he ''does'' stock it with monsters- but some of them just appear regardless. After his death, his reincarnation has to deal with it just as the Belmonts did -- and it's ''just as bad'' despite his metaphorical deed of ownership.

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** Jak 2 features such locales as the Fortress, the Palace (and it's its support cables), the [[NoOSHACompliance Secret Weapons Laboratory]], and the Haven Forest Temple.
* In the [[FreewareGames freeware]] ''VideoGame/BinaryBoy'', you have a beautiful green field ...field... which has stumps with man-sized balls spinning around, and meter-tall red blades flipping up and down, both very much lethal to the protagonist.
* Mostly justified in ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands 2}}'': the majority of the buildings in the setting are either cobbled together by bandits of questionable sanity (and as a result wouldn't necessarily have a logical layout anyway), and most of the other constructions actually make some sense (although many of them have fallen into heavy disuse). The few exceptions (such as Opportunity, which has a rather unintuitive layout for a city) are also justified, as the guy who built them [[FascistButInefficient cares much more about stroking his ego than about [[FascistButInefficient any practical concerns]].
** Tiny Tina's Assault on Dragon Keep brings us the [[NamesToRunAwayFrom [[IDontLikeTheSoundOfThatPlace Lair of Infinite Agony]], the dungeon of the titular Dragon Keep. The place is filled with spiders and numerous traps, including a hallway with constantly-moving platforms that will crush you against the ceiling.
* [[GeniusLoci Dracula's Castle Castle]] in all its forms in the ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' games. Given who it belongs to, it is quite malevolent. It is, as his son puts it, "a creature of chaos". It isn't even Dracula's doing -- [[ChaosArchitecture it's ever-shifting, ever-shifting]], creating new deathtraps without his lifting a finger, although he ''does'' stock it with monsters- monsters -- but some of them just appear regardless. After his death, his reincarnation has to deal with it just as the Belmonts did -- and it's ''just as bad'' despite his metaphorical deed of ownership.



* For whatever reason, ''Franchise/CrashBandicoot'' has to deal with tons of explosive crates left by whoever in all his adventures. Aside from that, the first game alone had trap-filled tribal fortresses, broken bridges in misty terrain, ruins with flaming platforms and power plants containing burning pipes and toxic waste pools.

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* For whatever reason, ''Franchise/CrashBandicoot'' has to deal with tons of explosive crates left by whoever in all his adventures. Aside from that, the first game alone had trap-filled tribal fortresses, broken bridges in misty terrain, ruins with flaming platforms platforms, and power plants containing burning pipes and toxic waste pools.



--> Brother Genitivi: It's much lyrical to write "Maker will smite the heathen", then "Billy toiled for years and years to make sure the spike goes right up some traveller's ass.".
** In ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'', this is somewhat justified as Kirkwall was originally built by Tevinter Magisters. To prevent slave uprisings in Lowtown, the streets were purposefully designed to be narrow and "fences" are knee-high, jagged iron spikes. "The Enigma of Kirkwall" codex entry speculates that many streets were intentionally designed to form sigils for BloodMagic rituals, making the entire city itself both Malevolent Architecture and an EldritchLocation.

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--> Brother Genitivi: '''Brother Genitivi:''' It's much more lyrical to write "Maker will smite the heathen", then "Billy toiled for years and years to make sure the spike goes right up some traveller's ass.".
** In ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'', this is somewhat justified justified, as Kirkwall was originally built by Tevinter Magisters. To prevent slave uprisings in Lowtown, the streets were purposefully designed to be narrow and "fences" are knee-high, jagged iron spikes. "The Enigma of Kirkwall" codex entry speculates that many streets were intentionally designed to form sigils for BloodMagic rituals, making the entire city itself both Malevolent Architecture and an EldritchLocation.



** Played oh-so-straight in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]''. Ayleid ruins are the most justified example, since they were xenophobic against all other species, and so nearly every ruin is filled with traps. However, not only do they fail to actually keep anyone besides the player out, but other ruins also include traps with much less justification. A goblin-infested cave featuring tripwires? Makes sense. An abandoned mine reclaimed by bandits can drop logs on your head? Plausible. An ''Imperial fort'' full of '''undead''' that has clearly inbuilt pressure plates and swinging axes? This trope to a hilt. One quest even had you walk through a grid of pressure plates which triggered darts if you didn't [[SolveTheSoupCans follow a pattern of symbols]] on the conveniently-given map. Of course, this quest took place [[YourMindMakesItReal in a crazed guy's head]], so it makes sense in the retrospect.

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** Played oh-so-straight in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]''. Ayleid ruins are the most justified example, since they were xenophobic against all other species, and so nearly every ruin is filled with traps. However, not only do they fail to actually keep anyone besides the player out, but other ruins also include traps with much less justification. A goblin-infested cave featuring tripwires? Makes sense. An abandoned mine reclaimed by bandits can drop logs on your head? Plausible. An ''Imperial fort'' full of '''undead''' that has clearly inbuilt pressure plates and swinging axes? This trope to a hilt. One quest even had you walk through a grid of pressure plates which triggered darts if you didn't [[SolveTheSoupCans follow a pattern of symbols]] on the conveniently-given map. Of course, this quest took place [[YourMindMakesItReal in a crazed guy's head]], so it makes sense in the retrospect.



* The ''FatalFrame''/''Project Zero'' franchise. It almost seems a common practise to create the building in ancient Japan as puzzle rooms requiring the inhabitant to find all the missing pieces or shuffle around blocks to get into the next room, and certain rooms in the third game can only be accessed by climbing around in the rafters...
** [[spoiler:Justified in a way that the architect really DID design them that way on purpose for some reason and were then killed and buried in the very walls of the building.]]

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* The ''FatalFrame''/''Project Zero'' franchise. It almost seems a common practise practice to create the building in ancient Japan as puzzle rooms requiring the inhabitant to find all the missing pieces or shuffle around blocks to get into the next room, and certain rooms in the third game can only be accessed by climbing around in the rafters...
** [[spoiler:Justified in a way that the architect really DID design them that way on purpose for some reason reason, [[ShootTheBuilder and were then killed and buried in the very walls of the building.building]].]]



** [[ZigzaggedTrope Zig-zagged]] in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX''. When Summoners go on their pilgrimage, they are required to pray at all of the temples across Spira, with the "Trial of the Fayth" being reportedly ''very dangerous''. The actual trials are all variations of block maze puzzles, but with lethal elemental magic. In Killika, there ''are'' flames that could kill you if you did the puzzle wrong. In Djose, there's lightning everywhere, in Macalania, if you can't solve the puzzle (and it's quite difficult), you stay there forever, and in Bevelle there are many platforms one could have fallen off from. Of course, [[GameplayAndStorySegregation the game doesn't actually let you die in any of those trials]], and the first temple in Besaid is not dangerous in any reasonable way.
* Severely downplayed in ''VideoGame/GobletGrotto''. Even though the game is full of Bizarrchitecture, the Egyptian Pyramid level is the only one that comes close to this trope - and all it has are a few shallow pits, that are easily seen and avoided in spite of the trapmasters attempting to persuade you [[BlatantLies they're full of jewels and perfectly safe.]] Of course, the game is a parody, so this was to be expected.
* ''VideoGame/GodOfWar'': Pandora's Temple. {{Justified|Trope}} in that it protects the only weapon powerful enough to let a mortal kill a god, and as such, it was specifically designed (by an architect, making it actual Malevolent '''Architecture''') for no other purpose than to [[EverythingTryingtoKillYou kill]] [[BoobyTrap every]] [[DeathCourse single]] [[TempleofDoom thing]] that crosses its threshold.

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** [[ZigzaggedTrope Zig-zagged]] in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX''. When Summoners go on their pilgrimage, they are required to pray at all of the temples across Spira, with the "Trial of the Fayth" being reportedly ''very dangerous''. The actual trials are all variations of block maze puzzles, but with lethal elemental magic. In Killika, there ''are'' flames that could kill you if you did the puzzle wrong. In Djose, there's lightning everywhere, in Macalania, if you can't solve the puzzle (and it's quite difficult), you stay there forever, and in Bevelle Bevelle, there are many platforms one could have fallen off from. Of course, [[GameplayAndStorySegregation the game doesn't actually let you die in any of those trials]], and the first temple in Besaid is not dangerous in any reasonable way.
* Severely downplayed in ''VideoGame/GobletGrotto''. Even though the game is full of Bizarrchitecture, {{Bizarrchitecture}}, the Egyptian Pyramid level is the only one that comes close to this trope - -- and all it has are a few shallow pits, that are easily seen and avoided in spite of the trapmasters attempting to persuade you [[BlatantLies they're full of jewels and perfectly safe.]] Of course, the game is a parody, so this was to be expected.
* ''VideoGame/GodOfWar'': Pandora's Temple. {{Justified|Trope}} in that it protects the only weapon powerful enough to let a mortal kill a god, and as such, it was specifically designed (by an architect, making it actual Malevolent '''Architecture''') for no other purpose than to [[EverythingTryingtoKillYou [[EverythingTryingToKillYou kill]] [[BoobyTrap every]] [[DeathCourse single]] [[TempleofDoom [[TempleOfDoom thing]] that crosses its threshold.



** And, surprisingly averted in 3, if an area isn't really fitting a death trap (like most of Olympus, which is only siege ready in the terms of their army), the most you'll find are a few foes. There is one exception though, the foyer where you fight [[spoiler: Hercules]] has thorns that can be either this or BenevolentArchitecture, since you and the boss can both be skewered by them.

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** And, surprisingly averted in 3, if an area isn't really fitting a death trap (like most of Olympus, which is only siege ready in the terms of their army), the most you'll find are a few foes. There is one exception though, the foyer where you fight [[spoiler: Hercules]] [[spoiler:Hercules]] has thorns that can be either this or BenevolentArchitecture, since you and the boss can both be skewered by them.



* The finale location in VideoGame/HeavyRain. Conveyor Belts which lead into meat grinders, a pit filled with water that can be used to drown kids, Pipes lying around for no reason...''Almost'' justified when you discover it's a scrap reprocessing plant. [[FridgeLogic But then it just raises more questions!]]

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* The finale location in VideoGame/HeavyRain.''VideoGame/HeavyRain''. Conveyor Belts which lead into meat grinders, a pit filled with water that can be used to drown kids, Pipes lying around for no reason...''Almost'' justified when you discover it's a scrap reprocessing plant. [[FridgeLogic But then it just raises more questions!]]



* VideoGame/IWannaBeTheGuy. The architecture in the game is ''loaded'' with this. The palace or castle of The Guy truly stands out.

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* VideoGame/IWannaBeTheGuy.''VideoGame/IWannaBeTheGuy''. The architecture in the game is ''loaded'' with this. The palace or castle of The Guy truly stands out.



** The Shadow Temple from ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime Ocarina of Time]]'' has to take the cake with invisible moving platforms, spikes, and illusionary floors. In certain rooms, [[EverythingTryingToKillYou clay jars will even hurl themselves at you!]]

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** The Shadow Temple from ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime Ocarina of Time]]'' has to take the cake with invisible moving platforms, spikes, and illusionary floors. In certain rooms, [[EverythingTryingToKillYou clay jars will even hurl themselves at you!]]you!]] Justified, as the place was implied to be [[TortureCellar a torture chamber]].



** ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess Twilight Princess]]'' has both the Lakebed Temple and The City in the Sky. Fans have debated which of them is more difficult: the former requires you to redirect the flow of water throughout the temple, by using the central chamber's rotating staircase to raise the temple's water level[[note]]which determines which rooms you can get to and in what order[[/note]]. While The City in the Sky is a non-linear 8-floor monstrosity where you'll have to use the Spinner to bridge bottomless chasms, or Clawshot your way across them, all while trying not to get lost, or fall to yor death.

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** ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess Twilight Princess]]'' has both the Lakebed Temple and The City in the Sky. Fans have debated which of them is more difficult: the former requires you to redirect the flow of water throughout the temple, by using the central chamber's rotating staircase to raise the temple's water level[[note]]which determines which rooms you can get to and in what order[[/note]]. While The City in the Sky is a non-linear 8-floor monstrosity where you'll have to use the Spinner to bridge bottomless chasms, or Clawshot your way across them, all while trying not to get lost, or fall to yor your death.



* ''Frachise/MortalKombat'' has Stage Fatalities, which are special Fatalities the winner of a match can use to kill his/her opponent using the rather hazardous nature of the specific arena. The first one was The Pit in the first game, which simply required the winner to uppercut the loser to drop him down into the spiked pit below. Several other games in the series had Stage Fatalities with spikes, but many were far more creative (some involved throwing your opponent into acid, crushing walls, lava, or even a laser grid that dices the victim. Some don't even use actual architecture; in the Living Forest, you throw your victim to carnivorous trees.) ''VideoGame/MortalKombatDeception'' also had a special version called Death Traps, which like Brutalities, could kill your opponent (or you, if you don't look where you're going) even if his Life Bar wasn't empty, sort of the Kombat version of a ring-out. There was even one arena, the Falling Cliffs, that with a Death Trap that could kill both Kombatant's at once. (If that happened, the player who had taken the least amount of damage won the match.)

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* ''Frachise/MortalKombat'' has [[StageFatality Stage Fatalities, Fatalities]], which are special Fatalities the winner of a match can use to kill his/her opponent using the rather hazardous nature of the specific arena. The first one was The Pit in the first game, which simply required the winner to uppercut the loser to drop him down into the spiked pit below. Several other games in the series had Stage Fatalities with spikes, but many were far more creative (some involved throwing your opponent into acid, crushing walls, lava, or even a laser grid that dices the victim. Some don't even use actual architecture; in the Living Forest, you throw your victim to carnivorous trees.) ''VideoGame/MortalKombatDeception'' also had a special version called Death Traps, which like Brutalities, could kill your opponent (or you, if you don't look where you're going) even if his Life Bar wasn't empty, sort of the Kombat version of a ring-out. There was even one arena, the Falling Cliffs, that with a Death Trap that could kill both Kombatant's at once. (If that happened, the player who had taken the least amount of damage won the match.)
4th Aug '17 7:36:20 PM WillBGood
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* Creator/SimonRGreen's ''Blood and Honour'' has a castle that is slowly turning into an EldritchAbomination, amongst the many joys contained therein is a suite that one day spontaneously turned into a stomach and digested the family (including small children) that was living in it. * The [[http://www.dionaea-house.com Dionaea House]].

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* Creator/SimonRGreen's ''Blood and Honour'' has a castle that is slowly turning into an EldritchAbomination, amongst the many joys contained therein is a suite that one day spontaneously turned into a stomach and digested the family (including small children) that was living in it. * The [[http://www.dionaea-house.com Dionaea House]].
4th Aug '17 7:36:02 PM WillBGood
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* Creator/SimonRGreen's ''Blood and Honour'' has a castle that is slowly turning into an EldritchAbomination, amongst the many joys contained therein is a suite that one day spontaneously turned into a stomach and digested the family (including small children) that was living in it. [[SarcasmMode It's such a happy book]].
* The [[http://www.dionaea-house.com Dionaea House]].

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* Creator/SimonRGreen's ''Blood and Honour'' has a castle that is slowly turning into an EldritchAbomination, amongst the many joys contained therein is a suite that one day spontaneously turned into a stomach and digested the family (including small children) that was living in it. [[SarcasmMode It's such a happy book]].
* The [[http://www.dionaea-house.com Dionaea House]].
8th Jul '17 10:21:53 AM bfunc
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* The ... structure ... being investigated in Creator/AlgysBudrys' novella ''Rogue Moon'' may be intended as an intelligence test. Or a test of determination. Or ... who knows. It kills people in bizarre ways for seemingly arbitrary things, such as kneeling while facing north. Or raising one hand above your head. Or for having visible oxygen hoses instead of having them integrated into your suit. Even more arbitrary is that some of these rules only apply past a certain point in the maze and before that you can freely do the proscribed actions.
8th Jul '17 10:10:48 AM bfunc
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-->" Why do we even ''have'' that lever?"

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-->" Why do we even ''have'' that lever?"lever?"[[note]]The fact that ''Kronk'' pulls it and ''Yzma'' (standing next to him) is the one dropped into the pit may hint at the original designer's intent.[[/note]]
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