History Main / MalevolentArchitecture

27th Mar '17 12:34:12 PM GoblinCipher
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* Alpha Complex, the dilapidated underground city in ''TabletopGame/{{Paranoia}}'', thanks to the benevolent rule of your friend, The Computer (an insane and [[Literature/NineteenEightyFour Orwellian Big Brother type]] A.I. that rules over all of Alpha Complex). Danger lurks around every corner and in every hallway, ranging from nuclear leaks, crazed robots, medical experiments and exploding prototype equipment to your fellow clone citizens out for a quick promotion. The bureaucracy is a maze that strangles you in red tape. And let's not even talk about the food vats. The slightest mistake (such as failing to display the mandatory, required level of happiness, or failing to duck in time) can be instantly fatal, or at least invite summary execution.
** Which is generally fatal too.
** A ''malfunctioning maintenance unit'' can do this simply by using the wrong color of ''paint''. The hall leading to the briefing room? Now it's orange-colored, which means that your Red-level security clearance is woefully insufficient to ''walk'' through there - you will be executed if you do. Failure to reach the briefing room ''[[MortonsFork also]]'' results in execution. Have fun!

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* Alpha Complex, the dilapidated underground city in ''TabletopGame/{{Paranoia}}'', thanks to the benevolent rule of your friend, The Computer (an insane and [[Literature/NineteenEightyFour Orwellian Big Brother type]] A.I. that rules over all of Alpha Complex).Complex. Danger lurks around every corner and in every hallway, ranging from nuclear leaks, crazed robots, medical experiments and exploding prototype equipment to your fellow clone citizens out for a quick promotion. The bureaucracy is a maze that strangles you in red tape. And let's not even talk about the food vats. The slightest mistake (such as failing to display the mandatory, required level of happiness, or failing to duck in time) can be instantly fatal, or at least invite summary execution.
** Which is generally fatal too.
** A ''malfunctioning maintenance unit'' can do this simply by using the wrong color of ''paint''. The hall leading to the briefing room? Now it's orange-colored, which means that your Red-level security clearance is woefully insufficient to ''walk'' through there - you will be executed if you do. Failure to reach the briefing room ''[[MortonsFork also]]'' results in execution. Have fun!
execution.
26th Mar '17 4:28:30 PM Amahn
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* The Star Trek EU novel ''[[Literature/StarTrekTheNextGenerationRelaunch Before Dishonor]]'' turns Borg Cubes into Malevolent Spacecraft. It makes the claim that all Borg ships are sentient, but only exorcise said sentience if left crewless for a prolonged period. The Cube in question develops the ability to willfully reshape its interior spaces - moving and creating new walls, even engulfing hapless humans in conduits and other hazards (to be assimilated).
21st Mar '17 2:54:40 PM Vir
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* For whatever reason, ''VideoGame/CrashBandicoot'' has to deal with tons of explosive crates left by whoever in all his adventures. Aside from that, the first game alone had trap-filled tribal fortresses, broken bridges in misty terrain, ruins with flaming platforms and power plants containing burning pipes and toxic waste pools.

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* For whatever reason, ''VideoGame/CrashBandicoot'' ''Franchise/CrashBandicoot'' has to deal with tons of explosive crates left by whoever in all his adventures. Aside from that, the first game alone had trap-filled tribal fortresses, broken bridges in misty terrain, ruins with flaming platforms and power plants containing burning pipes and toxic waste pools.



* Subverted in ''{{ICO}}'', where the deathtrap of a castle you're trying to escape was clearly a perfectly inhabitable building before the ravages of time knocked out most of the access ladders, walkways, ropes, bridges, and anything else that falls to pieces easily with time. (A few puzzles even involve accelerating this process with acts of creative vandalism to create new paths.)

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* Subverted in ''{{ICO}}'', ''VideoGame/{{ICO}}'', where the deathtrap of a castle you're trying to escape was clearly a perfectly inhabitable building before the ravages of time knocked out most of the access ladders, walkways, ropes, bridges, and anything else that falls to pieces easily with time. (A few puzzles even involve accelerating this process with acts of creative vandalism to create new paths.)



** Every Eggman's base seems to consist of nothing more than endless rooms filled with deathtraps, bottomless pits, robots, and SpikesOfDoom, along with a few things that vary depending on the game. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] in those cases, as Eggman can fly around in his Egg Mobile and he wants to give Sonic a hard time upon entering them.

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** Every Eggman's base seems to consist of nothing more than endless rooms filled with deathtraps, bottomless pits, robots, and SpikesOfDoom, along with a few things that vary depending on the game. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] {{Justified|Trope}} in those cases, as Eggman can fly around in his Egg Mobile and he wants to give Sonic a hard time upon entering them.



* In ''[[StarWars Jedi Academy]]'', in the second level on Vjun, about two-thirds of the way through the game, you start in a hanger with the series's star Kyle Katarn, who immediately runs to the locked elevator, then starts talking about how the switch to summon it is hidden in a control panel fourteen floors up, and generally [[LampshadeHanging mocks]] the trope he has lived in for about five games so far. This sequence is easy to miss as the real exit is blatantly obvious and closer than the elevator; approaching it starts a new {{cutscene}} where Kyle makes more comments about your next stop being a garbage compactor.

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* In ''[[StarWars ''[[Franchise/StarWars Jedi Academy]]'', in the second level on Vjun, about two-thirds of the way through the game, you start in a hanger with the series's star Kyle Katarn, who immediately runs to the locked elevator, then starts talking about how the switch to summon it is hidden in a control panel fourteen floors up, and generally [[LampshadeHanging mocks]] the trope he has lived in for about five games so far. This sequence is easy to miss as the real exit is blatantly obvious and closer than the elevator; approaching it starts a new {{cutscene}} where Kyle makes more comments about your next stop being a garbage compactor.



* [[NamcoBandai Namco's]] Famicom version of StarWars is rich in levels that require precise jumping or else you'll end up falling to your death, whether it be a bed of spikes, water, quicksand, or a bottomless pit.

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* [[NamcoBandai [[Creator/NamcoBandai Namco's]] Famicom version of StarWars is rich in levels that require precise jumping or else you'll end up falling to your death, whether it be a bed of spikes, water, quicksand, or a bottomless pit.
21st Mar '17 10:52:04 AM Drope
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* For whatever reason, ''VideoGame/CrashBandicoot'' has to deal with tons of explosive crates left by whoever in all his adventures. Aside from that, the first game alone had trap-filled tribal fortresses, broken bridges in misty terrain, ruins with flaming platforms and power plants with burning pipes and toxic waste pools.

to:

* For whatever reason, ''VideoGame/CrashBandicoot'' has to deal with tons of explosive crates left by whoever in all his adventures. Aside from that, the first game alone had trap-filled tribal fortresses, broken bridges in misty terrain, ruins with flaming platforms and power plants with containing burning pipes and toxic waste pools.
21st Mar '17 10:50:13 AM Drope
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Added DiffLines:

* For whatever reason, ''VideoGame/CrashBandicoot'' has to deal with tons of explosive crates left by whoever in all his adventures. Aside from that, the first game alone had trap-filled tribal fortresses, broken bridges in misty terrain, ruins with flaming platforms and power plants with burning pipes and toxic waste pools.
7th Mar '17 6:38:44 AM BeerBaron
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* Largely averted in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind''. The player can explore tons of ancient ruins, especially those of the technocentric (and extinct) Dwemer, but the only things trying to kill you are the mechanical defenders. However, in the Tribunal expansion, the player can visit Sotha Sil's Clockwork City, where there ARE deathtraps which WILL kill you and anything else that they get a hold of. Partly explained by the Clockwork City only having one real inhabitant, who is both a recluse and (being both a [[PhysicalGod god]] and the creator of the City) in control of its functions, including the traps.
** Played oh-so-straight in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]''. Ayleid ruins are the most justified example, since they were xenophobic against all other species, and so nearly every ruin is filled with traps. However, not only do they fail to actually keep anyone besides the player out, but other ruins also include traps with much less justification. A goblin-infested cave featuring tripwires? Makes sense. An abandoned mine reclaimed by bandits can drop logs on your head? Plausible. An ''Imperial fort'' full of '''undead''' that has clearly inbuilt pressure plates and swinging axes? This trope to a hilt.
** One quest even had you walk through a grid of pressure plates which triggered darts if you didn't [[SolveTheSoupCans follow a pattern of symbols]] on the conveniently-given map. Of course, this quest took place [[YourMindMakesItReal in a crazed guy's head]], so it makes sense in the retrospect.

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* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls''
**
Largely averted in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind''. The player can explore tons of ancient ruins, especially those of the technocentric (and extinct) Dwemer, but the only things trying to kill you are the mechanical defenders. However, in the Tribunal expansion, the player can visit Sotha Sil's Clockwork City, where there ARE deathtraps which WILL kill you and anything else that they get a hold of. Partly explained by the Clockwork City only having one real inhabitant, who is both a recluse and (being both a [[PhysicalGod god]] and the creator of the City) in control of its functions, including the traps.
** Played oh-so-straight in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]''. Ayleid ruins are the most justified example, since they were xenophobic against all other species, and so nearly every ruin is filled with traps. However, not only do they fail to actually keep anyone besides the player out, but other ruins also include traps with much less justification. A goblin-infested cave featuring tripwires? Makes sense. An abandoned mine reclaimed by bandits can drop logs on your head? Plausible. An ''Imperial fort'' full of '''undead''' that has clearly inbuilt pressure plates and swinging axes? This trope to a hilt.
**
hilt. One quest even had you walk through a grid of pressure plates which triggered darts if you didn't [[SolveTheSoupCans follow a pattern of symbols]] on the conveniently-given map. Of course, this quest took place [[YourMindMakesItReal in a crazed guy's head]], so it makes sense in the retrospect.
25th Feb '17 3:45:53 PM nombretomado
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* Creator/TerryPratchett's ''Discworld/ReaperMan'' features the Lost Jewelled TempleOfDoom of Offler the Crocodile God. The priests have a very easy time of it as, of the very few people who ever find the place, none gets past the DeathCourse, even as far as the jolly drawing of a thermometer for the Roof Repair Fund (a joke about the maintenance problems of old English churches, by the way). The priests barely look up from their game of cards to comment, "Heyup, another one for the big rolling ball, then." To date, two people have gotten through: one is Mrs. Cake, feared by all churches as a stubborn busybody, and the other is Death. When the latter showed up, the priests ran screaming, thinking it was the former. Essentially, their choices boiled down to [[EddieIzzard Cake or Death.]]

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* Creator/TerryPratchett's ''Discworld/ReaperMan'' features the Lost Jewelled TempleOfDoom of Offler the Crocodile God. The priests have a very easy time of it as, of the very few people who ever find the place, none gets past the DeathCourse, even as far as the jolly drawing of a thermometer for the Roof Repair Fund (a joke about the maintenance problems of old English churches, by the way). The priests barely look up from their game of cards to comment, "Heyup, another one for the big rolling ball, then." To date, two people have gotten through: one is Mrs. Cake, feared by all churches as a stubborn busybody, and the other is Death. When the latter showed up, the priests ran screaming, thinking it was the former. Essentially, their choices boiled down to [[EddieIzzard [[Creator/EddieIzzard Cake or Death.]]
7th Jan '17 9:51:08 AM nombretomado
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** Naturally, ''TheLastDaysOfFOXHOUND'' mocks this as with everything else with the series. First with the trap doors by that it had already killed several {{Mooks}} and nearly claimed Sniper Wolf, and later on, upon examining the Furnace Room/Freezing Warehouse (directly adjacent), Ocelot remarks that "whoever designed this place can go straight to Hell." Liquid had earlier criticized the trapdoors by asking if Dr. Doom was the architectural consultant?

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** Naturally, ''TheLastDaysOfFOXHOUND'' ''Webcomic/TheLastDaysOfFOXHOUND'' mocks this as with everything else with the series. First with the trap doors by that it had already killed several {{Mooks}} and nearly claimed Sniper Wolf, and later on, upon examining the Furnace Room/Freezing Warehouse (directly adjacent), Ocelot remarks that "whoever designed this place can go straight to Hell." Liquid had earlier criticized the trapdoors by asking if Dr. Doom was the architectural consultant?
4th Dec '16 10:00:40 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''WesternAnimation/ThunderCats2011'' episode "Journey to the Tower of Omens" has a video game-style TempleOfDoom and ''makes its existence make sense.'' A bunch of {{Warrior Monk}}s created it to guard a holy book that no-one else should have (hence the gratuitous sharp objects). ''They'' are extremely {{badass}} and know where all the traps are, so it would probably be easy for its makers to use. Anyone else would have a hard time not getting ground into hamburger.

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* ''WesternAnimation/ThunderCats2011'' episode "Journey to the Tower of Omens" has a video game-style TempleOfDoom and ''makes its existence make sense.'' A bunch of {{Warrior Monk}}s created it to guard a holy book that no-one else should have (hence the gratuitous sharp objects). ''They'' are extremely {{badass}} badass and know where all the traps are, so it would probably be easy for its makers to use. Anyone else would have a hard time not getting ground into hamburger.
3rd Dec '16 7:54:05 AM Sharlee
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* The house in ''Film/Thir13enGhosts'' is actually one huge glass-and-metal machine, designed to trap victims and ghosts inside and then unleash the latter onto the former in a timed sequence. One victim is killed by the shifting glass directly, others attacked by the hostile spirits.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.MalevolentArchitecture