History Main / MaleGaze

5th Jan '18 8:57:24 AM WilliamLaw
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The Male Gaze is a psudo-derogatory (though generally neutral) term from {{Gaze}} theory that describes the tendency of works to assume a male viewpoint even when they do not have a specific narrative PointOfView, and in particular the tendency of works to present female characters as subjects of a man's visual appreciation.

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The Male Gaze is a psudo-derogatory pseudo-derogatory (though generally neutral) term from {{Gaze}} theory that describes the tendency of works to assume a male viewpoint even when they do not have a specific narrative PointOfView, and in particular the tendency of works to present female characters as subjects of a man's visual appreciation.
1st Jan '18 8:46:49 AM Corro
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As mentioned above, the term refers more to a technique than an image, and many argue that even works that are classified as FemaleGaze, including works made by and for females, still count as male gaze if it's still created from a decidedly male point of view. For example, ''Film/MagicMike'', despite being toted as a movie full of FemaleGaze, is still an example of male gaze because it's a man's perception of what an ideal man is.

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As mentioned above, the term refers more to a technique than an image, and many argue that even works that are classified as FemaleGaze, including works made by and for females, still count as male gaze if it's still created from a decidedly male point image. Thus usually focusing on more feminine qualities of view. a character. For example, ''Film/MagicMike'', despite being toted as a movie full of FemaleGaze, is still an example in the anime Blend S where the focus is placed on the more feminine attributes of male gaze because it's a man's perception Hideri Kanzaki (a male).

The gender reversed version
of what an ideal man is.
the Male Gaze is the Female Gaze - where the same rules as above apply except the focus is on more traditionally masculine qualities in a character.
17th Dec '17 10:20:48 PM ArcaneAzmadi
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See also {{Fanservice}}, JigglePhysics, {{Gainaxing}}, EatingTheEyeCandy. Contrast LongingLook, and compare with FemaleGaze.

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See also {{Fanservice}}, JigglePhysics, {{Gainaxing}}, EatingTheEyeCandy.EatingTheEyeCandy, BoobsAndButtPose. Contrast LongingLook, and compare with FemaleGaze.
13th Nov '17 2:40:41 PM NWolfman
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As mentioned above, the term refers more to a technique than an image, and many argue that even works that are classified as FemaleGaze, including works made by and for females, still count as male gaze if it's still created from a decidedly male point of view. For example, ''Film/MagicMike'', despite being toted as a movie full of FemaleGaze, is still an example of male gaze.

to:

As mentioned above, the term refers more to a technique than an image, and many argue that even works that are classified as FemaleGaze, including works made by and for females, still count as male gaze if it's still created from a decidedly male point of view. For example, ''Film/MagicMike'', despite being toted as a movie full of FemaleGaze, is still an example of male gaze.
gaze because it's a man's perception of what an ideal man is.
6th Oct '17 7:31:49 PM NWolfman
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As mentioned above, the term refers more to a technique than an image, and many argue that even works that are classified as FemaleGaze, including works made by and for females, still count as male gaze because everything being done to objectify men (what they're doing, which body parts we're close-up on) is pretty much the same except ''which'' gender is being objectified (for example, ''Film/MagicMike'', despite being toted as a movie full of FemaleGaze, is still an example of male gaze).

to:

As mentioned above, the term refers more to a technique than an image, and many argue that even works that are classified as FemaleGaze, including works made by and for females, still count as male gaze because everything being done to objectify men (what they're doing, which body parts we're close-up on) is pretty much the same except ''which'' gender is being objectified (for if it's still created from a decidedly male point of view. For example, ''Film/MagicMike'', despite being toted as a movie full of FemaleGaze, is still an example of male gaze).
gaze.
30th Sep '17 1:57:02 PM NWolfman
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The Male Gaze is a term from {{Gaze}} theory that describes the tendency of works to assume a male viewpoint even when they do not have a specific narrative PointOfView, and in particular the tendency of works to present female characters as subjects of a man's visual appreciation.

to:

The Male Gaze is a psudo-derogatory (though generally neutral) term from {{Gaze}} theory that describes the tendency of works to assume a male viewpoint even when they do not have a specific narrative PointOfView, and in particular the tendency of works to present female characters as subjects of a man's visual appreciation.



As mentioned above, the term doesn't only refer to {{fanservice}} for men who are attracted to women as much as it's a view of the world that is from a decidedly male perspective. The broader meaning of the term also includes depictions of men, physically or otherwise, from a presumed male perspective (for example, ''Film/MagicMike'', despite being toted as a movie full of FemaleGaze, is still an example of male gaze, as it's still a visual interpretation of men from the POV of other men).

to:

As mentioned above, the term doesn't only refer refers more to {{fanservice}} a technique than an image, and many argue that even works that are classified as FemaleGaze, including works made by and for females, still count as male gaze because everything being done to objectify men who are attracted to women as (what they're doing, which body parts we're close-up on) is pretty much as it's a view of the world that same except ''which'' gender is from a decidedly male perspective. The broader meaning of the term also includes depictions of men, physically or otherwise, from a presumed male perspective being objectified (for example, ''Film/MagicMike'', despite being toted as a movie full of FemaleGaze, is still an example of male gaze, as it's still a visual interpretation of men from the POV of other men).
gaze).
30th Sep '17 1:45:22 PM NWolfman
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Added DiffLines:

As mentioned above, the term doesn't only refer to {{fanservice}} for men who are attracted to women as much as it's a view of the world that is from a decidedly male perspective. The broader meaning of the term also includes depictions of men, physically or otherwise, from a presumed male perspective (for example, ''Film/MagicMike'', despite being toted as a movie full of FemaleGaze, is still an example of male gaze, as it's still a visual interpretation of men from the POV of other men).
6th Sep '17 5:52:01 PM WillKeaton
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The concept was popularized in Laura Mulvey's 1973 essay "[[https://wiki.brown.edu/confluence/display/MarkTribe/Visual+Pleasure+and+Narrative+Cinema Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema]]".

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The concept was popularized in Laura Mulvey's 1973 essay "[[https://wiki.[[https://wiki.brown.edu/confluence/display/MarkTribe/Visual+Pleasure+and+Narrative+Cinema Visual "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema]]".
Cinema."]]
17th Jul '17 7:37:02 PM NWolfman
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Added DiffLines:

* Deliberately [[UpToEleven over-invoked]] in Chilly Gonzolas's video for "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAONaktxLNc You Can Dance]]." The camera stays locked on the female dancers' butts, bosoms and crotches (all clothed), occasionally intercut with shots of Chilly getting slapped across the face in time with the hand-claps, implying that the whole thing is [[MyEyesAreUpHere from his perspective]].
30th May '17 10:10:37 AM KaputExaltation
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The Male Gaze is a term from {{Gaze}} theory that describes the tendency of works to assume a (straight) male viewpoint even when they do not have a specific narrative PointOfView, and in particular the tendency of works to present female characters as subjects of implicitly male visual appreciation.

One of the most obvious results of Male Gaze is the way a (usually male) director/cameraman's interest in women informs his shots, leading to a focus on breasts, legs, buttocks, and other jiggly bits even when the film isn't necessarily supposed to be a feast for eyes of their admirers. For example, a sex scene between a man and a woman may show more of her body than it does of his, or focus more on her reactions than his (see RightThroughHisPants). Alternatively, it could appear in shows that aren't overtly sexual - for example, scenes of bikini-clad female characters talking that emphasize their bodies rather than showing just their heads.

Presenting a character as a collection of body parts with little relationship to one another (called ''fragmenting'') makes them seem like a collection of objects rather than a person, which is why presenting a character this way is called ''objectification''. Audiences are primed to sympathize with, or at least respect, characters if the camerawork concentrates on their face, especially if this is how the character is first shown to us in their EstablishingCharacterMoment. If it shows another body part the audience is more likely to see the character as a [[HandOfDeath threat]], or an [[{{Fanservice}} object of desire]]. This can be used as a legitimate cinematic effect, but is probably best avoided if you want your audience to subconsciously respond to the characters like human beings.

The term also applies in other mediums, such as video games and comic books. During UsefulNotes/{{the Dark Age|of Comic Books}}, comic books were often perfect examples of the male gaze, with scenes being framed to show off a female character's curves over everything else. The trend continues at a lower level today.

If the female in question is aware of the FourthWall, she'll likely snap [[MyEyesAreUpHere "Ahem, eyes are up here!"]] at the camera/artist.

The concept was popularized in Laura Mulvey's 1973 essay "[[https://wiki.brown.edu/confluence/display/MarkTribe/Visual+Pleasure+and+Narrative+Cinema Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema]]," quite likely the most cited essay in all of Film Studies.

May overlap with [[HoYay Homosexual]] FemaleGaze. See also {{Fanservice}}, JigglePhysics, {{Gainaxing}}. Not to be confused with [[QueerAsTropes Male Gays]]. Contrast LongingLook, EatingTheEyeCandy, and FemaleGaze.

to:

The Male Gaze is a term from {{Gaze}} theory that describes the tendency of works to assume a (straight) male viewpoint even when they do not have a specific narrative PointOfView, and in particular the tendency of works to present female characters as subjects of implicitly male a man's visual appreciation.

One of the most obvious results of Male Gaze is the way a (usually male) director/cameraman's interest in women informs his shots, leading to a focus on breasts, legs, buttocks, and other jiggly bits even when the film isn't necessarily supposed to be a feast for eyes of their admirers. For example, a sex scene between a man and a woman may show more of her body than it does of his, or focus more on her reactions than his (see RightThroughHisPants). Alternatively, it could appear in shows that aren't overtly sexual - for example, scenes of bikini-clad female characters talking that emphasize their bodies rather than showing just their heads.

Presenting a character as a collection of body parts with little relationship to one another (called ''fragmenting'') makes them seem like a collection of objects rather than a person, which is why presenting a character this way is called ''objectification''. Audiences are primed to sympathize with, or at least respect, characters if the camerawork concentrates on their face, especially if this is how the character is first shown to us in their EstablishingCharacterMoment. If it shows another body part the audience is more likely to see the character as a [[HandOfDeath threat]], or an [[{{Fanservice}} object of desire]].
heads. This can trope ''can'' [[TropesAreNotBad be used as a legitimate cinematic effect, but is probably best avoided if you want your audience to subconsciously respond to the characters like human beings.

effect]], especially when combined with PointOfView. (At which point it may become EatingTheEyeCandy, though not necessarily.)

The term also applies in other mediums, such as video games and comic books. During UsefulNotes/{{the Dark Age|of Comic Books}}, comic books were (and often still are) perfect examples of the male gaze, with scenes being framed to show off a female character's curves over everything else. The trend continues at a lower level today.

else.

If the female in question is aware of the FourthWall, she'll likely snap [[MyEyesAreUpHere "Ahem, eyes are up here!"]] at the camera/artist.

camera/artist/character.

The concept was popularized in Laura Mulvey's 1973 essay "[[https://wiki.brown.edu/confluence/display/MarkTribe/Visual+Pleasure+and+Narrative+Cinema Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema]]," quite likely the most cited essay in all of Film Studies.

May overlap with [[HoYay Homosexual]] FemaleGaze.
Cinema]]".

See also {{Fanservice}}, JigglePhysics, {{Gainaxing}}. Not to be confused with [[QueerAsTropes Male Gays]]. {{Gainaxing}}, EatingTheEyeCandy. Contrast LongingLook, EatingTheEyeCandy, and compare with FemaleGaze.
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