History Main / MalcolmXerox

4th Oct '17 8:44:49 AM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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-->-- '''Achoo''', ''Film/RobinHoodMenInTights''

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-->-- '''Achoo''', '''[[Creator/DaveChappelle Achoo]]''', ''Film/RobinHoodMenInTights''
16th Sep '17 9:26:41 AM SoapheadChurch
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* Commando X in ComicBook/{{Static}} was an early villain. He started off as a vigilante who attacked white supremacists before he JumpedOffTheSlipperySlope and started attacking innocent Jews because of his conspiracy theory-fueled anti-Semitism. Unlike most examples, this is actually an InvokedTrope: his character is used to address the troubled relationship between Jews and Black people in cities like Dakota, and to show Static the dangers of extremism.

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* Commando X in ComicBook/{{Static}} ''ComicBook/{{Static}}'' was an early villain. He started off as a vigilante who attacked white supremacists before he JumpedOffTheSlipperySlope and started attacking innocent Jews because of his conspiracy theory-fueled anti-Semitism. Unlike most examples, this is actually an InvokedTrope: his character is used to address the troubled relationship between Jews and Black people in cities like Dakota, and to show Static the dangers of extremism.
16th Sep '17 9:26:00 AM SoapheadChurch
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* [[AntiVillain Strangely enough,]] ComicBook/{{Magneto}} is this, though he's white and Jewish and doesn't really care about black people (unless they also happen to be mutants). Loooong ago in TheSixties he was a generically evil villain who wanted to destroy humans because he believes mutants are superior, but by TheSeventies he'd been retooled with a more well-rounded characterization: when his past is revealed, we find he was a Holocaust survivor and believed that the growing hatred for mutants by humans would eventually mean a repeat, leading to a couple decades of [[JumpingOffTheSlipperySlope leading to him going]] [[HeWhoFightsMonsters too far with his methods of]] [[TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized "protecting" and "ensuring the future"]] of mutantkind. He and [[BigGood Professor X]] are compared to Malcom X and Martin Luther King , with oppression against mutants as a parallel to oppression of minorities.

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* [[AntiVillain Strangely enough,]] ComicBook/{{Magneto}} is this, though he's white and Jewish and doesn't really care about black people (unless they also happen to be mutants).mutant). Loooong ago in TheSixties he was a generically evil villain who wanted to destroy humans because he believes mutants are superior, but by TheSeventies he'd been retooled with a more well-rounded characterization: when his past is revealed, we find he was a Holocaust survivor and believed that the growing hatred for mutants by humans would eventually mean a repeat, leading to a couple decades of [[JumpingOffTheSlipperySlope leading to him going]] [[HeWhoFightsMonsters too far with his methods of]] [[TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized "protecting" and "ensuring the future"]] of mutantkind. He He's therefore more of a analogue to Meir Kahane than Malcolm X, and even uses Kahane's motto of "Never Again" to justify his position, even though he and [[BigGood Professor X]] are compared to Malcom X and Martin Luther King , with oppression against mutants as a parallel to oppression of minorities.minorities.



* [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Ras the Exhorter]] from Ralph Ellison's ''Literature/InvisibleMan''. Ras is a black separtist who uses inflammatory rhetoric and violence to get his point across, which causes no end of trouble for Ellison's AuthorAvatar. His is directly contrasted to the Brotherhood (a stand-in for the American Communist Party), who are a well-meaning, but ineffectual group of Whites who actually harbor obliviously racist views.
* Guitar Baines of Literature/SongOfSolomon becomes a particularly dark version of this as he grows up. His intelligence and eloquence is warped by his deep hatred of white people, which he attempts to rationalize with a disturbing scientific rhetoric that recalls the real life eugenics movement. He eventually joins the Seven Days, whose goal is to kill a random white person any time they hear of a black person who is killed by a white person.

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* [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Ras the Exhorter]] from Ralph Ellison's ''Literature/InvisibleMan''. Ras is a black separtist who uses inflammatory rhetoric and violence to get his point across, which causes no end of trouble for Ellison's AuthorAvatar. His is He directly contrasted to the Brotherhood (a stand-in for the American Communist Party), who are a well-meaning, but ineffectual group of Whites who actually harbor obliviously racist views.
* Guitar Baines of Literature/SongOfSolomon ''Literature/SongOfSolomon'' becomes a particularly dark version of this as he grows up. His intelligence and eloquence is warped by his deep hatred of white people, which he attempts to rationalize with a disturbing scientific rhetoric that recalls the real life eugenics movement. He eventually joins the Seven Days, whose goal is to kill a random white person any time they hear of a black person who is killed by a white person.
15th Sep '17 7:21:45 PM kquinn0830
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* A two-parter on ''Series/FridayNightLights'' has Coach Mac make some ignorant comments about the natural abilities of black players versus white players that spark controversy and create tension between the white and black students. Smash, who was the one the comments revolved around in the first place, doesn't think it's that big a deal until his black activist girlfriend Waverly convinces him that Mac needs to be fired, especially after Mac botches his apology press conference. So Smash leads all the black players on a protest where they refuse to play in the team's next playoff game until Mac is fired. When Coach Taylor makes it clear he won't fire Mac ([[NobleBigot who clearly isn't a hateful man and actively struggles with the prejudices passed onto him by his father]]) and will just use JV players to fill the roster holes, Smash considers ending the protest so the black players won't put their college football scholarship prospects at stake. However, Waverly tells him not to do it and it doesn't matter if the players ruin their futures if it's for the cause. Eventually, Smash's mother gets fed up with her and tells Smash that the protest isn't going to prove anything to the racists in Dillion and that the best way for him and the other players to do is to play, get their scholarships and college degrees, and become successful adults to prove the racists wrong and inspire future generations.
11th Aug '17 4:22:12 PM Premonition45
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[[noreallife]]

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NoRealLifeExamplesPlease



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* ''Film/{{Airheads}}'': Marcus, one of KPPX "Rebel Radio"'s station employees taken hostage.



[[folder: Literature ]]

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[[folder: Literature ]]
Literature]]
14th Jul '17 8:22:13 PM nombretomado
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* Theodore Long, specifically when he was running his "Thuggin N Buggin Enterprises" faction with clients like [[Wrestling/DLoBrown D'Lo Brown]], Rodney Mack, MarkHenry, and Jazz. Though he toned it down once he became the fan-favorite SmackDown [[ReasonableAuthorityFigure GM]]. Coincidentally, Brown and Henry were former members of the Nation.

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* Theodore Long, specifically when he was running his "Thuggin N Buggin Enterprises" faction with clients like [[Wrestling/DLoBrown D'Lo Brown]], Rodney Mack, MarkHenry, and Jazz. Though he toned it down once he became the fan-favorite SmackDown ''[=SmackDown=]'' [[ReasonableAuthorityFigure GM]]. Coincidentally, Brown and Henry were former members of the Nation.
27th Jun '17 11:55:42 AM SoapheadChurch
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* Fisher Tiger from ''Manga/OnePiece'' is a rare Japanese example, as well as a rare three-dimensional example. He raises a pirate crew of former fishman slaves and espouses their races' superiority in response to humans (and specifically the Celestial Dragon's) discrimination against them. Ultimately, he is killed because his hatred of humans runs so deep that he refuses to except treatment for a mortal injury because the only blood available for a transfusion is human blood. To really drive the point home, he is contrasted with the queen of Fishman Island, Otohime. While Fisher Tiger believes that the differences between humans and fishmen are irreconcilable and they must live separately, Queen Otohime tried to encourage cooperation between the two races. Both ended up assassinated for their trouble as well: Fisher Tiger after being betrayed by a human village to whom he returned a captured slave, and Otohime by a fishman pirate who wanted to stoke anti-human hatred.

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* Fisher Tiger from ''Manga/OnePiece'' is a rare Japanese example, as well as a rare three-dimensional example. He raises a pirate crew of former fishman slaves and espouses their races' superiority in response to humans (and specifically the Celestial Dragon's) discrimination against them. Ultimately, he is killed because his hatred of humans runs so deep that he refuses to except accept treatment for a mortal injury because the only blood available for a transfusion is human blood. To really drive the point home, he is contrasted with the queen of Fishman Island, Otohime. While Fisher Tiger believes that the differences between humans and fishmen are irreconcilable and they must live separately, Queen Otohime tried to encourage cooperation between the two races. Both ended up assassinated for their trouble as well: Fisher Tiger after being betrayed by a human village to whom he returned a captured slave, and Otohime by a fishman pirate who wanted to stoke anti-human hatred.



* [[Franchise/StarWars "Jabari Jabari Binko"]] in an early ''Boondocks'' strip is a parody of this trope, meant to be an inversion of Jar Jar Binks' [[EthnicScrappy offensive racial stereotyping]].



* Fudge from ''Film/HigherLearning'' is a sixth year senior at the university. He is well-read and intelligent, but attempts to use his EverythingIsRacist philosophy as an excuse to be lazy. Malik turns into this as the movie goes on, using his school assignments as a soapbox for poorly thought out rants about America's racist history, criticizing his black professors for giving him bad grades for subpar work, and bullying his white roommate into becoming a Neo-Nazi. The movie as a whole is a deconstruction of this trope: this attitude is the result of legitimate frustration of America as a whole trying to pretend that racism is over with, but in turn causes racial tensions to boil over.




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* ''Webcomic/{{Sinfest}}'s earlier strips occasionally did blaxploitation parodies with this trope in full effect.



* [[Franchise/StarWars "Jabari Jabari Binko"]] in an early ''Boondocks'' strip is a parody of this trope, meant to be an inversion of Jar Jar Binks' [[EthnicScrappy offensive racial stereotyping]].
27th Jun '17 12:57:04 AM SoapheadChurch
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The TropeNamer is UsefulNotes/MalcolmX, who achieved fame during the American civil rights movement for his aggressive and hard-line views on race; [[UnbuiltTrope however, he was actually a subversion]] in that after going on his pilgrimage to Mecca he started to promote racial equality and unfortunately got killed for it by hard-line black nationalists.[[note]]Unless you believe the conspiracy theories that say otherwise[[/note]]

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The TropeNamer is UsefulNotes/MalcolmX, who achieved fame during the American civil rights movement for his aggressive and hard-line views on race; this trope usually involves the ThemeParkVersion of his actual views, warped and exaggerated for the sake of parody or to serve the author's own viewpoint. Ironically, [[UnbuiltTrope however, he was most of the early examples of this trope are subversions]], with the more modern iterations essentially being a parody of a parody. Worth noting also is that many of the earliest examples of this trope [[OlderThanTheyThink actually a subversion]] in that after going on his pilgrimage to Mecca he started to promote racial equality and unfortunately got killed for it predate Malcolm X by hard-line black nationalists.[[note]]Unless you believe the conspiracy theories that say otherwise[[/note]]
a fair bit.]]



* Fisher Tiger from ''Manga/OnePiece'' is a rare Japanese example. He raises a pirate crew of former fishman slaves and espouses their races superiority in response to humans (and specifically the Celestial Dragon's) discrimination against them. Eventually however, his biases against humans are softened due to having to take care of the human former slave girl Koala, that said he still cannot get past sharing blood with humans which results in his death.
** More interesting is that the series has a Martin Luther King analogue to Fisher Tiger's Malcolm X in the form of Queen Otohime, who espoused equality and wanted both races to be able to live together. Again, like her historical counterpart, she ended up being assassinated as well.

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* Fisher Tiger from ''Manga/OnePiece'' is a rare Japanese example, as well as a rare three-dimensional example. He raises a pirate crew of former fishman slaves and espouses their races races' superiority in response to humans (and specifically the Celestial Dragon's) discrimination against them. Eventually however, Ultimately, he is killed because his biases against hatred of humans are softened due runs so deep that he refuses to having to take care of except treatment for a mortal injury because the only blood available for a transfusion is human former slave girl Koala, that said blood. To really drive the point home, he still cannot get past sharing blood is contrasted with humans which results in his death.
** More interesting is
the queen of Fishman Island, Otohime. While Fisher Tiger believes that the series has a Martin Luther King analogue to Fisher Tiger's Malcolm X in the form of differences between humans and fishmen are irreconcilable and they must live separately, Queen Otohime, who espoused equality and wanted both races Otohime tried to be able to live together. Again, like her historical counterpart, she encourage cooperation between the two races. Both ended up being assassinated for their trouble as well.well: Fisher Tiger after being betrayed by a human village to whom he returned a captured slave, and Otohime by a fishman pirate who wanted to stoke anti-human hatred.



* The character of Muhammad X from the ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' comics.

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* The character of Muhammad X from the ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' comics.comics, a superhero in his own right who protects Harlem. He harasses Superman over his perceived neglect of the black community, and the damaging psychological effect of dependency on an all-powerful alien with white skin. Superman attempts to convince him that he can be a hero to all races, but fails, and the two part ways on rather bitter terms.




to:

* Commando X in ComicBook/{{Static}} was an early villain. He started off as a vigilante who attacked white supremacists before he JumpedOffTheSlipperySlope and started attacking innocent Jews because of his conspiracy theory-fueled anti-Semitism. Unlike most examples, this is actually an InvokedTrope: his character is used to address the troubled relationship between Jews and Black people in cities like Dakota, and to show Static the dangers of extremism.



* Dave Chappelle playing "Conspiracy Brother" as a comedic subversion of this in ''Film/UndercoverBrother''.
** Chappelle did a riff on this trope nine years earlier, as Achoo in ''Film/RobinHoodMenInTights.'' His speech is taken word-for-word from Malcolm X's line about Plymouth Rock "landing on" the Africans, not the other way around.

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* Dave Chappelle playing "Conspiracy Brother" as a comedic subversion of this in ''Film/UndercoverBrother''.
**
''Film/UndercoverBrother''. Chappelle did a riff on this trope nine years earlier, as Achoo in ''Film/RobinHoodMenInTights.'' His speech is taken word-for-word from Malcolm X's line about Plymouth Rock "landing on" the Africans, not the other way around.



** There's no indication he doesn't actually know who Rodney King is; his response when the "ROD-NEY KING!" chant starts is "What's that supposed to mean?", which does not indicate a lack of knowledge, more confusion over why they're chanting that name.



* [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Ras the Exhorter]] from Ralph Ellison's ''Literature/InvisibleMan''.

to:

* [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Ras the Exhorter]] from Ralph Ellison's ''Literature/InvisibleMan''. Ras is a black separtist who uses inflammatory rhetoric and violence to get his point across, which causes no end of trouble for Ellison's AuthorAvatar. His is directly contrasted to the Brotherhood (a stand-in for the American Communist Party), who are a well-meaning, but ineffectual group of Whites who actually harbor obliviously racist views.
* Guitar Baines of Literature/SongOfSolomon becomes a particularly dark version of this as he grows up. His intelligence and eloquence is warped by his deep hatred of white people, which he attempts to rationalize with a disturbing scientific rhetoric that recalls the real life eugenics movement. He eventually joins the Seven Days, whose goal is to kill a random white person any time they hear of a black person who is killed by a white person.



* The fictionalized Black Muslim street preacher Abdul Sufi Hamid from ''Literature/MumboJumbo'' by IshmaelReed fills this role.

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* The fictionalized Black Muslim street preacher Abdul Sufi Hamid from ''Literature/MumboJumbo'' by IshmaelReed fills this role. He's a StrawHypocrite parody of the RealLife preacher Sufi Abdul Hamid.



* ''Series/{{Martin}}'': The episode "The Snow Bunny" features one of these. When the gang takes a trip to a ski lodge, Pam brings along new boyfriend Tashim, who dresses like a Black Panther and throughout the episode makes snide comments about/towards Tommy's guest, a white woman.
** This is played entirely for comedy, because Tashim's militance is absurd to the extreme. In one scene, as everyone is heading out to the slopes, Tashim carries a spray can. When asked why, he answers that he plains to paint as much of the snow black as he can. And at the episode's end, Tashim approaches the white woman, menacingly telling her, "I've got something to say to you", as if he's going to say something really rude and racist, while she snaps, "I've got something to say to you too", as if she's fed up with his rudeness. [[GenreSavvy Sure enough. . .]][[WhereDaWhiteWomenAt they leap into each others arms]] [[BelligerentSexualTension and start making out.]]

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* ''Series/{{Martin}}'': The episode "The Snow Bunny" features one of these. When the gang takes a trip to a ski lodge, Pam brings along new boyfriend Tashim, who dresses like a Black Panther and throughout the episode makes snide comments about/towards Tommy's guest, a white woman.
**
woman. This is played entirely for comedy, because Tashim's militance militant stance is absurd to the extreme. In one scene, as everyone is heading out to the slopes, Tashim carries a spray can. When asked why, he answers that he plains to paint as much of the snow black as he can. And at the episode's end, Tashim approaches the white woman, menacingly telling her, "I've got something to say to you", as if he's going to say something really rude and racist, while she snaps, "I've got something to say to you too", as if she's fed up with his rudeness. [[GenreSavvy Sure enough. . .]][[WhereDaWhiteWomenAt they leap into each others arms]] [[BelligerentSexualTension and start making out.]]



** Then there's Congressman Eaton, A terrible Al Sharpton {{Expy}}.

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** Then there's Congressman Eaton, A a terrible Al Sharpton {{Expy}}.



* Averted with Kareem Said in ''Series/{{Oz}}''. Played straight with "Supreme Allah" (real name Kevin Ketchum -- he never legally changed it) in season 4.

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* Averted with Kareem Said in ''Series/{{Oz}}''. Played straight He is a Black Nationalist, but he's also a pacifist trying his best to reform the prisoners who follow him, and is even willing to work with white inmates and the prison administration in pursuit of doing what he thinks is right. Subverted with "Supreme Allah" (real name Kevin Ketchum -- he never legally changed it) in season 4.4: he preaches about black supremacy, but all he's really interested in is selling drugs.



* Faarooq (nee Wrestling/RonSimmons), during his time as leader of Wrestling/TheNationOfDomination stable in the [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]]. Well, without the lazy part, and with a whole lot more violent tendencies.
** Clarence Mason, the Nation's attorney/manager, was a carbon copy of Malcom X with a dusting of Johnnie Cochran on top.
* Theodore Long, specifically when he was running his "Thuggin N Buggin Enterprises" faction with clients like [[Wrestling/DLoBrown D'Lo Brown]], Rodney Mack, MarkHenry, and Jazz. Though he toned it down once he became the fan-favorite SmackDown [[ReasonableAuthorityFigure GM]].
** Ironically, Brown and Henry were former members of the Nation.

to:

* Faarooq (nee Wrestling/RonSimmons), during his time as leader of Wrestling/TheNationOfDomination stable in the [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]]. Well, without the lazy part, and with a whole lot more violent tendencies.
**
tendencies. Clarence Mason, the Nation's attorney/manager, attorney/manager was a carbon copy of Malcom X this trope combined with a dusting parody of Johnnie Cochran on top.
Cochran
* Theodore Long, specifically when he was running his "Thuggin N Buggin Enterprises" faction with clients like [[Wrestling/DLoBrown D'Lo Brown]], Rodney Mack, MarkHenry, and Jazz. Though he toned it down once he became the fan-favorite SmackDown [[ReasonableAuthorityFigure GM]].
** Ironically,
GM]]. Coincidentally, Brown and Henry were former members of the Nation.



* Dewey from ''WesternAnimation/TheBoondocks'' is a hypocritical counterpart to Huey Freeman, who takes "down wit' the struggle" much further than even Huey by reading poetry, wearing capris, headwraps and sandals, even going as far as to become a Muslim...and yet he doesn't even know the basic Islamic greeting.
** Huey himself arguably could be seen as a subversion (or even a reconstruction) of this trope.
** [[Franchise/StarWars "Jabari Jabari Binko"]] in an early ''Boondocks'' strip can be a parody of this.

to:

* Dewey from ''WesternAnimation/TheBoondocks'' is a hypocritical counterpart to Huey Freeman, who takes "down wit' the struggle" much further than even Huey by reading poetry, wearing capris, headwraps and sandals, even going as far as to become a Muslim...and yet he doesn't even know the basic Islamic greeting.
**
greeting. Huey himself arguably could be seen as is both a subversion (or even deconstruction and a reconstruction) reconstruction of this trope.
**
the trope: he's an intelligent, opinionated Black kid with radical politics who is not a StrawCharacter, but nobody takes him seriously because he's a kid and tends to ruin their fun.
*
[[Franchise/StarWars "Jabari Jabari Binko"]] in an early ''Boondocks'' strip can be is a parody of this.this trope, meant to be an inversion of Jar Jar Binks' [[EthnicScrappy offensive racial stereotyping]].
5th Jun '17 2:30:33 PM MagBas
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These characters are often very far to the left of the political spectrum, and usually militant. These black radicals or activists are depicted as a bunch of [[StrawHypocrite hypocritical]], irrational, paranoid, unreasonable, lazy, bigoted, [[EverythingIsRacist race-card-playing]], [[ConspiracyTheorist conspiratorial]] raving loons. Even within [[{{Blaxploitation}} black TV shows and movies]], they're very rarely depicted as respectable or intelligent people whose opinion is of any real merit. When it comes to black TV and films, this could be an attempt by some black writers to subvert the stereotype of black people agreeing with these particular views. In the process, they ended up creating a StrawCharacter. Needless to say these characters can easily veer into UnfortunateImplications territory. Some even see these characters as tactics to discredit the image of conscious black people in mainstream media.

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These characters are often very far to the left of the political spectrum, and usually militant. These black radicals or activists are depicted as a bunch of [[StrawHypocrite hypocritical]], irrational, paranoid, unreasonable, lazy, bigoted, [[EverythingIsRacist race-card-playing]], [[ConspiracyTheorist conspiratorial]] raving loons. Even within [[{{Blaxploitation}} black TV shows and movies]], they're very rarely depicted as respectable or intelligent people whose opinion is of any real merit. When it comes to black TV and films, this could be an attempt by some black writers to subvert the stereotype of black people agreeing with these particular views. In the process, they ended up creating a StrawCharacter. Needless to say these characters can easily veer into UnfortunateImplications territory. Some even see these characters as tactics to discredit the image of conscious black people in mainstream media.\n



** Paul Robinette when he became a defense attorney. Alternatively there's the UnfortunateImplications theory that he was turned into a StrawCharacter of the MalcolmXerox variety so the writers could make a point.

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** Paul Robinette when he became a defense attorney. Alternatively there's the UnfortunateImplications theory that he was turned into a StrawCharacter of the MalcolmXerox variety so the writers could make a point.
17th May '17 6:22:39 PM TristanJeremiah
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The TropeNamer is UsefulNotes/MalcolmX, who achieved fame during the American civil rights movement for his aggressive and hard-line views on race; however, he was actually a subversion in that after going on his pilgrimage to Mecca he started to promote racial equality and unfortunately got killed for it by hard-line black nationalists.[[note]]Unless you believe the conspiracy theories that say otherwise[[/note]]

to:

The TropeNamer is UsefulNotes/MalcolmX, who achieved fame during the American civil rights movement for his aggressive and hard-line views on race; [[UnbuiltTrope however, he was actually a subversion subversion]] in that after going on his pilgrimage to Mecca he started to promote racial equality and unfortunately got killed for it by hard-line black nationalists.[[note]]Unless you believe the conspiracy theories that say otherwise[[/note]]
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