History Main / MakeTheDogTestify

26th Jun '16 6:01:44 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Not a criminal trial, but similar: at the end of ''[[IncarnationsOfImmortality On A Pale Horse]]'', we learn that Zane's performance as Death has been found to be excellent. The testimony of Mortis, his horse, is crucial to Zane's passing the evaluation.

to:

* Not a criminal trial, but similar: at the end of ''[[IncarnationsOfImmortality ''[[Literature/IncarnationsOfImmortality On A Pale Horse]]'', we learn that Zane's performance as Death has been found to be excellent. The testimony of Mortis, his horse, is crucial to Zane's passing the evaluation.
31st May '16 4:17:09 AM Doug86
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In AndreNorton's ''Literature/{{Catseye}}'', the authorities will have the {{Uplifted Animal}}s under probes to give evidence about espionage. Then they will kill them. Or so Zul argues, telling Troy that death is a MercyKill.

to:

* In AndreNorton's Creator/AndreNorton's ''Literature/{{Catseye}}'', the authorities will have the {{Uplifted Animal}}s under probes to give evidence about espionage. Then they will kill them. Or so Zul argues, telling Troy that death is a MercyKill.
4th May '16 9:07:24 PM JackG
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Averted in ''To Catch A Killer'' (1992). The police notice that the tracker dog has taken the 'mourning position' over [[PunkInTheTrunk the trunk]] of SerialKiller John Wayne Gacy's car, which the dog did in a previous murder case. However they're told that in the previous case, it was not allowed as evidence.
6th Apr '16 9:32:20 AM tdf4638
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The bees from ''Film/BeeMovie''. They can actually talk, but the court had apparently not stopped to confirmed that beforehand. When Barry is called to make his opening statements he starts just making buzzing sounds as a joke.

to:

* The bees from ''Film/BeeMovie''. They can actually talk, but the court had apparently not stopped to confirmed confirm that beforehand. When Barry is called to make his opening statements he starts by just making buzzing sounds as a joke.
6th Apr '16 6:50:58 AM longWriter
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* There was a story involving a MurderSuicide where the killer had shot her own dog (who survived). Since the dog was pretty shy around people he didn't know, was shot in the shoulder, and tried to climb on the veterinary doctor who took care of him, something the vet mentioned he only did with people he knew,7 it meant that either the shooter was shooting while prone (who does that in a house?) or that the dog knew the shooter and was trying to do so as he was shot. The motive was a case of adultery, and the gun was later found under a piece of furniture (the maid had panicked upon seeing the bodies and accidentally kicked it there).

to:

* There was a story involving a MurderSuicide where the killer had shot her own dog (who survived). Since the dog was pretty shy around people he didn't know, was shot in the shoulder, and tried to climb on the veterinary doctor who took care of him, something the vet mentioned he only did with people he knew,7 knew, it meant that either the shooter was shooting while prone (who does that in a house?) or that the dog knew the shooter and was trying to do so as he was shot. The motive was a case of adultery, and the gun was later found under a piece of furniture (the maid had panicked upon seeing the bodies and accidentally kicked it there).
21st Mar '16 5:59:28 AM Andyroid
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Not a courtroom, but as Guitierrez is trying to replicate the incident that created ''WesternAnimation/{{Freakazoid}}'', the hero's alterego Dexter explains that the keyboard sequence was created by his cat walking on it. Then it's shown the mooks captured the cat to make him testify. A veterinarian had been brought to help but all he said was that the cat was hungry and didn't pay attention to the code.

to:

* Not a courtroom, but as Guitierrez is trying to replicate the incident that created ''WesternAnimation/{{Freakazoid}}'', the hero's alterego alter-ego Dexter explains that the keyboard sequence was created by his cat walking on it. Then it's shown the mooks had captured the cat to make him testify. A veterinarian interrogate him. An animal psychologist had even been brought to help help, but all he said was that could get out of the cat was hungry and didn't pay attention to the code."He says he's very sad."



* There was a story involving a MurderSuicide where the killer had shot her own dog (who survived). Since the dog was pretty shy around people he didn't know, was shot in the shoulder, and tried to climb on the veterinary doctor who took care of him, something the vet mentioned he only did with people he knew, it meant that either the shooter was shooting while prone (who does that in a house?) or that the dog knew the shooter and was trying to do so as he was shot. The motive was a case of adultery, and the gun was later found under a piece of furniture (the maid had panicked upon seeing the bodies and accidentally kicked it there).

to:

* There was a story involving a MurderSuicide where the killer had shot her own dog (who survived). Since the dog was pretty shy around people he didn't know, was shot in the shoulder, and tried to climb on the veterinary doctor who took care of him, something the vet mentioned he only did with people he knew, knew,7 it meant that either the shooter was shooting while prone (who does that in a house?) or that the dog knew the shooter and was trying to do so as he was shot. The motive was a case of adultery, and the gun was later found under a piece of furniture (the maid had panicked upon seeing the bodies and accidentally kicked it there).
26th Feb '16 2:21:50 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[folder:Film, Animated]]

to:

[[folder:Film, [[folder:Films -- Animated]]



* In the 1994 remake of ''MiracleOn34thStreet'', the prosecution brings in a reindeer as a "witness," challenging Mr. Kringle to make it fly. Kringle admits that he can't--"he only flies on Christmas Eve!" Cue laughter.

to:

* In the 1994 remake of ''MiracleOn34thStreet'', ''Film/MiracleOn34thStreet'', the prosecution brings in a reindeer as a "witness," challenging Mr. Kringle to make it fly. Kringle admits that he can't--"he only flies on Christmas Eve!" Cue laughter.



* ''ForgettingSarahMarshall'': Played for laughs in a ShowWithinAShow, where Sarah Marshall plays an animal psychic detective.
* The talking "dictabird" in ''TheFlintstones'' is treated as a powerful witness against the CorruptCorporateExecutive villain. The villain dies a KarmicDeath rather than ever making it to trial, but apparently there is no reason why the bird couldn't have testified. (Something of a [[DeconstructedTrope deconstruction]] of the ways that similar animal-tools are treated on the cartoon, in which a talking dinosaur will make some joke about its situation, but having all these talking animals around never becomes a plot point, nor is there really any communication going on between the human characters and the animals they use.)

to:

* ''ForgettingSarahMarshall'': ''Film/ForgettingSarahMarshall'': Played for laughs in a ShowWithinAShow, where Sarah Marshall plays an animal psychic detective.
* The talking "dictabird" in ''TheFlintstones'' ''Film/TheFlintstones'' is treated as a powerful witness against the CorruptCorporateExecutive villain. The villain dies a KarmicDeath rather than ever making it to trial, but apparently there is no reason why the bird couldn't have testified. (Something of a [[DeconstructedTrope deconstruction]] of the ways that similar animal-tools are treated on the cartoon, in which a talking dinosaur will make some joke about its situation, but having all these talking animals around never becomes a plot point, nor is there really any communication going on between the human characters and the animals they use.)



* AceVentura had a similar case, where somebody abducted a dog hoping to make it reveal the secrets of its master, a high ranked officer. All the machine that read the dog's mind caught was the dog playing with the officer. Ace pointed out to the villain that dogs don't care about military secrets.

to:

* AceVentura ''WesternAnimation/AceVentura'':
** It
had a similar case, where somebody abducted a dog hoping to make it reveal the secrets of its master, a high ranked officer. All the machine that read the dog's mind caught was the dog playing with the officer. Ace pointed out to the villain that dogs don't care about military secrets.
26th Feb '16 2:20:28 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[folder:Film]]

to:

[[folder:Film]][[folder:Film, Animated]]
* The bees from ''Film/BeeMovie''. They can actually talk, but the court had apparently not stopped to confirmed that beforehand. When Barry is called to make his opening statements he starts just making buzzing sounds as a joke.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]



[[folder:Film, Animated]]
* The bees from ''Film/BeeMovie''. They can actually talk, but the court had apparently not stopped to confirmed that beforehand. When Barry is called to make his opening statements he starts just making buzzing sounds as a joke.
[[/folder]]
26th Feb '16 2:18:38 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/{{Matlock}}'': Matlock uses a victims dog to prove the "witness" beat the dog within an inch of it's life while committing the crime of which his client was accused of (as the dog went ballistic at the sight of the witness).
** He then shows the fallacy of the trope afterwords by revealing that the dog was a trained attack dog and that it just goes ballistic.
* ''Series/LawAndOrder'': Jack [=McCoy=] has also brought a dog into a courtroom. He did it to prove the defendant had to know the dog posed a danger (as anyone who just saw the dog would conclude it was) and that keeping it made them responsible for the people it killed. The Judge does [[WhatTheHellHero call [=McCoy=] on it]] and forces [=McCoy=] to make a plea deal or he will declare a mistrial ([=McCoy=] gets his first offer by telling them he would take the mistrial instead).
** For those who haven't seen the episode: The owners were training dogs to fight and their defence was that they had full control over the dog and it was a shock to them that it could ever be dangerous. In response, [=McCoy=] has the dog brought in (On a muzzle, completely under the control of animal experts) so that the defendants can show how they keep it calm and harmless. Instead, the defendants cower visibly.

to:

* ''Series/{{Matlock}}'': Matlock uses a victims dog to prove the "witness" beat the dog within an inch of it's life while committing the crime of which his client was accused of (as the dog went ballistic at the sight of the witness).
**
witness). He then shows the fallacy of the trope afterwords by revealing that the dog was a trained attack dog and that it just goes ballistic.
* ''Series/LawAndOrder'': Jack [=McCoy=] has also brought a dog into a courtroom. He did The owners were training dogs to fight and their defence was that they had full control over the dog and it was a shock to them that it could ever be dangerous. In response, [=McCoy=] has the dog brought in (On a muzzle, completely under the control of animal experts) to prove the defendant had to know the dog posed a danger (as anyone who just saw the dog would conclude it was) and that keeping it made them responsible for the people it killed. The Judge does [[WhatTheHellHero call [=McCoy=] on it]] and forces [=McCoy=] to make a plea deal or he will declare a mistrial ([=McCoy=] mistrial. [=McCoy=] gets his first offer by telling them he would take the mistrial instead).
** For those who haven't seen the episode: The owners were training dogs to fight and their defence was that they had full control over the dog and it was a shock to them that it could ever be dangerous. In response, [=McCoy=] has the dog brought in (On a muzzle, completely under the control of animal experts) so that the defendants can show how they keep it calm and harmless. Instead, the defendants cower visibly.
instead.
26th Feb '16 2:14:36 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''DivorceCourt'': At least one episode of the 1980s incarnation, where the custody of a dog was at stake, saw Judge William B. Keene suggest that the dog be brought into court and tell, in his own way, whom he wanted to stay with. He chose the plaintiff, a woman who had accused her husband of animal cruelty.
* {{Matlock}} uses a victims dog to prove the "witness" beat the dog within an inch of it's life while committing the crime of which his client was accused of (as the dog went ballistic at the sight of the witness).

to:

* ''DivorceCourt'': ''Series/DivorceCourt'': At least one episode of the 1980s incarnation, where the custody of a dog was at stake, saw Judge William B. Keene suggest that the dog be brought into court and tell, in his own way, whom he wanted to stay with. He chose the plaintiff, a woman who had accused her husband of animal cruelty.
* {{Matlock}} ''Series/{{Matlock}}'': Matlock uses a victims dog to prove the "witness" beat the dog within an inch of it's life while committing the crime of which his client was accused of (as the dog went ballistic at the sight of the witness).



* ''MurderSheWrote'' episode [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0653533/plotsummary "It's a Dog's Life."]] A dog was trained by a murderer to press a button on command, causing someone to be crushed to death by a security gate. After it was brought into court to show how it committed the act, it went over to the murderer, proving he was the one who trained it.

to:

* ''MurderSheWrote'' ''Series/MurderSheWrote'' episode [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0653533/plotsummary "It's a Dog's Life."]] A dog was trained by a murderer to press a button on command, causing someone to be crushed to death by a security gate. After it was brought into court to show how it committed the act, it went over to the murderer, proving he was the one who trained it.



* GoodCharlotte's video for ''Lifestyles of the Rich and the Famous'' shows this during a music interlude.

to:

* GoodCharlotte's Music/GoodCharlotte's video for ''Lifestyles of the Rich and the Famous'' shows this during a music interlude.



* One of ''ThisAmericanLife'''s annual poultry-themed episodes featured the story of a lawyer who wanted to force a psychiatrist to play tic-tac-toe against a chicken in court. She was representing a mentally ill and retarded man on death row, and the prosecution was using this psychiatrist's testimony of having been beaten by him at tic-tac-toe as evidence that he was mentally competent enough to be executed. She remembered that as a kid she'd seen tic-tac-toe-playing chickens at fairs and decided to try to get permission to bring in such a chicken to prove a point about the level of intelligence required to best the psychiatrist. In her words, "Who can doubt a chicken? You can't. A chicken isn't going to lie. Chickens have integrity."

to:

* One of ''ThisAmericanLife'''s ''Radio/ThisAmericanLife'''s annual poultry-themed episodes featured the story of a lawyer who wanted to force a psychiatrist to play tic-tac-toe against a chicken in court. She was representing a mentally ill and retarded man on death row, and the prosecution was using this psychiatrist's testimony of having been beaten by him at tic-tac-toe as evidence that he was mentally competent enough to be executed. She remembered that as a kid she'd seen tic-tac-toe-playing chickens at fairs and decided to try to get permission to bring in such a chicken to prove a point about the level of intelligence required to best the psychiatrist. In her words, "Who can doubt a chicken? You can't. A chicken isn't going to lie. Chickens have integrity."



* OlderThanFeudalism: In ''The Wasps,'' by {{Aristophanes}}, Anticleon uses a mock trial involving his pet dogs as an allegory to prove a point about the Athenian judicial system. Then the dogs actually start testifying. Then again, the defendant is also a dog (accused of stealing cheese). Since the dogs ''can'' talk, the court goes one further by calling mute inanimate objects to witness.

to:

* OlderThanFeudalism: In ''The Wasps,'' by {{Aristophanes}}, Creator/{{Aristophanes}}, Anticleon uses a mock trial involving his pet dogs as an allegory to prove a point about the Athenian judicial system. Then the dogs actually start testifying. Then again, the defendant is also a dog (accused of stealing cheese). Since the dogs ''can'' talk, the court goes one further by calling mute inanimate objects to witness.



* Not a courtroom, but as Guitierrez is trying to replicate the incident that created {{Freakazoid}}, the hero's alterego Dexter explains that the keyboard sequence was created by his cat walking on it. Then it's shown the mooks captured the cat to make him testify. A veterinarian had been brought to help but all he said was that the cat was hungry and didn't pay attention to the code.

to:

* Not a courtroom, but as Guitierrez is trying to replicate the incident that created {{Freakazoid}}, ''WesternAnimation/{{Freakazoid}}'', the hero's alterego Dexter explains that the keyboard sequence was created by his cat walking on it. Then it's shown the mooks captured the cat to make him testify. A veterinarian had been brought to help but all he said was that the cat was hungry and didn't pay attention to the code.
This list shows the last 10 events of 175. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.MakeTheDogTestify