History Main / MagicallyBindingContract

23rd Jun '17 1:35:52 PM SinDustries
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In ''Manga/AhMyGoddess'', Keiichi unwittingly puts himself under one of these he half-jokingly wishes a goddess like Belldandy would stay with him forever. Much HilarityEnsues follows as various people, demons, and deities try their best to rend these two asunder only to find themselves unequal to the task.
12th Jun '17 1:59:58 PM Eddy1215
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* ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'': Timmy makes [[GenieInABottle Norm the Genie]] sign one so he'll grant his last wish without any loopholes.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'': Fairy Mason helps Timmy makes make [[GenieInABottle Norm the Genie]] sign one so he'll grant his Timmy's last wish without any loopholes.loopholes.
-->'''Norm''': [[BeatThemAtTheirOwnGame I hate being outjerked!]]
12th Jun '17 1:56:31 PM Eddy1215
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* In ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'', Davy Jones is under a MagicallyBindingContract to ferry souls to the afterlife (he can also draft dead sailors using contracts of his own). His neglect of this duty is the reason he and his crew look like fish-men.
* In the film version of ''Film/GhostRider'', the Devil presents Johnny with a contract for his soul in exchange for his Father's health. Where this moves beyond DealWithTheDevil is that Johnny cuts himself on the contract while reading it, and the Devil takes his blood on the deal as agreement. But because he never actually agreed, Johnny eventually is able to resist Lucifer and keep the Rider's powers.

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* In ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'', Davy Jones is under a MagicallyBindingContract to ferry souls to the afterlife (he can also draft dead sailors using contracts of his own). His neglect of this duty is the reason he and his crew look like fish-men.
[[FishPeople fish-men]].
* In the film version of ''Film/GhostRider'', the Devil presents Johnny with a contract for his soul in exchange for his Father's father's health. Where this moves beyond DealWithTheDevil is that Johnny cuts himself on the contract while reading it, and the Devil takes his blood on the deal as agreement. But because he never actually agreed, Johnny eventually is able to resist Lucifer and keep the Rider's powers.
11th Jun '17 12:00:33 PM nombretomado
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* Music/TransSiberianOrchestra's RockOpera ''Beethoven's Last Night'' features such a contract between [[LudwigVanBeethoven Beethoven]] and [[DealWithTheDevil Mephistopholes]], "which even Mephisto dare not violate" (not mentioned in the songs themselves, but [[AllThereInTheManual extrapolated in the album liner notes]]).

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* Music/TransSiberianOrchestra's RockOpera ''Beethoven's Last Night'' features such a contract between [[LudwigVanBeethoven [[Music/LudwigVanBeethoven Beethoven]] and [[DealWithTheDevil Mephistopholes]], "which even Mephisto dare not violate" (not mentioned in the songs themselves, but [[AllThereInTheManual extrapolated in the album liner notes]]).
2nd Jun '17 2:58:19 AM Malady
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* 'Sorcerer's contracts' in the WhateleyUniverse are this trope played dead straight. They're even, apparently, considered legitimately and perfectly binding when the agreement is extracted from an unaware party through trickery or coercion, and even some of the students aren't above using such tactics against others. Overall, it so far seems that these contracts exist in-universe mainly to help give magic-users a bad name. Thus, the perfect use of this stuff.
** Conversely, Carmilla wriggles out of another student's attempt to hold her to a similar contract via the loophole that what she put underneath the document wasn't her actual signature, and was in fact a disguised 'Hell No' and she fully intended to screw the other party over to begin with.
*** Note that Carmilla's was actually the related 'DealWithTheDevil' trope, and it's repeatedly pointed out that Jobe should have gotten someone else to look over the contract. It's stated he got LUCKY dealing with a demon. Why the school lets a demon who is still a student do this, and why Carmilla is allowed to stay a protagonist, make this one of the bigger controversies of Whateley fandom.
** Sorcerers' contracts can be formed by literally just shaking hands, and can be verbal. This has the same problem as the Aes Sedai above.
** The problem with 'Sorcer's contracts' in the WhateleyUniverse is that the other party doesn't even have to know what they're agreeing to. "Do you agree to do this of your own free will?" is a blank cheque, ''literally'' giving your soul to a demon with a "yes". Just because you are wrong about what you are agreeing to, or were never told, doesn't mean you didn't agree to it. There is also the Fool's Circle: a magical circle which traps you inside it if you willingly enter. You do not have to agree to what is going to happen to you: you might do so because the magician is lying about the spell they will cast, or you might enter with a friend held at gunpoint. It doesn't matter. You voluntarily entered, case closed.

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* 'Sorcerer's contracts' in the WhateleyUniverse ''Literature/WhateleyUniverse'' are this trope played dead straight. trope. Although, for humans, reneging is possible, just with unknown consequences. For more magical beings, it's literally unbreakable. They're even, apparently, considered legitimately and perfectly even binding when the agreement is extracted from an unaware party through trickery or coercion, and even with some of the students aren't not above using such tactics against others. Overall, it so far seems that these contracts exist in-universe mainly to help give magic-users a bad name. Thus, others.
** However, there are loopholes in
the perfect use of this stuff.
** Conversely,
system. Carmilla wriggles out of another student's attempt to hold her to a similar contract via the loophole that because what she put underneath the document signed with wasn't her actual signature, and was in fact a disguised 'Hell No' and she fully intended to screw the other party over to begin with.
No'.
*** Note that Carmilla's was actually the related 'DealWithTheDevil' trope, and it's repeatedly pointed out that Jobe should have gotten someone else to look over the contract. It's stated he got LUCKY in regards to dealing with a demon. Why the school lets a demon who is still a student do this, and why Carmilla is allowed to stay a protagonist, make this one of the bigger controversies of Whateley fandom.
demon.
** Sorcerers' contracts can be formed by literally just shaking hands, and can be verbal. This has the same problem as the Aes Sedai above.
verbal.
** The problem with 'Sorcer's contracts' in the WhateleyUniverse is that the other party doesn't even have to know what they're agreeing to. "Do you agree to do this of your own free will?" is a blank cheque, ''literally'' giving your soul to a demon with a "yes". Just because you are wrong about what you are agreeing to, or were never told, doesn't mean you didn't agree to it. There is also the Fool's Circle: a magical circle which traps you inside it if you willingly enter. You do not have to agree to what is going to happen to you: you might do so because the magician is lying about the spell they will cast, or you might enter with a friend held at gunpoint. It doesn't matter. You voluntarily entered, case closed. Which is why students who learn about magic are told of the dangers.
31st May '17 6:03:00 PM nombretomado
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* The ''YoungWizards'' series has the "Binding Oath", which if broken permanently strips you of all supernatural energy. This version of the MagicallyBindingContract is interestingly different in that:

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* The ''YoungWizards'' ''Literature/YoungWizards'' series has the "Binding Oath", which if broken permanently strips you of all supernatural energy. This version of the MagicallyBindingContract is interestingly different in that:
26th Mar '17 1:31:01 PM DarkHunter
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* Used in ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheGobletOfFire''. When the Goblet says Harry has to compete, well, Harry has to compete. Even though ''he didn't enter himself for consideration as a contestant''. Still, it's mentioned that the one who set Harry up to this had to put a spell on the Goblet itself, altering how it works, or it wouldn't have picked a fourth Champion.The consequences of breaking the contract, however, are not explained.

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* Used in ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheGobletOfFire''. When the Goblet says Harry has to compete, well, Harry has to compete. Even though ''he didn't enter himself for consideration as a contestant''. Still, it's mentioned that the one who set Harry up to this had to put a spell on have been an extremely powerful wizard to have messed with the Goblet itself, altering how in this way, ordinarily it works, or it wouldn't would never have picked a fourth Champion.contestant. The consequences of breaking the contract, however, are not explained.
24th Mar '17 9:46:15 AM Julia1984
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** All fairies are also magically bound by ''Da Rules'' -- a huge, Federal Code-sized book of, as its titles says, rules that fairies (ex. can only grant wishes to kids) and their kids (ex. lose your godparents if you ever tell anyone about them) must follow. Fairies are incapable of granting any wish forbidden by Da Rules, such as [[ThouShaltNotKill killing someone]], [[ThePowerOfLove making someone fall in love with you]], or free money (because stealing and counterfeiting are crimes) -- if they try, their wands sputter out. If a wish ever screws the world up badly enough, a new rule against granting such a wish can be created. On the flip side, unless it violated Da Rules, fairies are also bound to do ''anything'' their kid prefaces with the words "I wish," no matter how ill-advised.
16th Mar '17 9:28:14 PM Fireblood
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* ''Series/TheMagicians'': Quentin agrees to make a contract with Alice as a niffin which is subject to "Word as bond", which neither of them can break. She finds ways to circumvent the contract's restrictions despite this.
17th Feb '17 5:41:28 AM Kakai
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* In ''Literature/TheWitchlands'', Wordwitched documents, most notably the Twenty Years Truce, are this. Each copy is identical to the other, even if one is modified, and when someone breaks the rules established in the document, their signature disappears and no-one else is bound by the contract any more.
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