History Main / MagicRealism

19th May '16 2:22:54 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* Speaking of TheSixties, ''Film/MaryPoppins'' is about a nanny who literally floats out of the sky into the lives of two [[TheEdwardianEra Edwardian]] children and cavalierly introduces magic into their lives -- then acts completely normal afterwards and doesn't even acknowledge it happened. One of the biggest examples of magic realism here is Uncle Albert's laughing sickness, which nobody treats as out of the ordinary. Even when the old banker gets the laughing sickness at the end, his employees don't act like anything supernatural is happening.



* Some of Creator/RoaldDahl's work for kids might count, most notably ''Literature/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'' and ''Literature/{{Matilda}}''.
17th May '16 1:30:04 PM tricksterson
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Added DiffLines:

* In Joann Sfar's ''The Rabbi's Cat'' the title character, who is also the narrator, gains the ability to speak by eating a parrot (even though the parrot is never shown talking itself). [[spoiler: He later loses the ability by inappropriately invoking the name of God]]
10th May '16 9:02:18 PM Gideoncrawle
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* If the cop just goes through his life as a cop, but his partner is a vampire whose ID has "vampire" printed next to his eye color, who's greeted by cheerful children in the street who are more fascinated by his shiny badge than by his teeth, and who casually drinks blood in plain sight out of transfusion packs during coffee breaks, it's a case of MagicalRealism.

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* If the cop just goes through his life as a cop, but his partner is a vampire whose ID has "vampire" printed next to his eye color, who's greeted by cheerful children in the street who are more fascinated by his shiny badge than by his teeth, and who casually drinks blood in plain sight out of transfusion packs during coffee breaks, it's a case of MagicalRealism.
Magic Realism.



* Creator/DavidLynch's films have it both ways. Some of them really do fit the definition of Magic Realism and fit comfortably within the genre, while others are ''clearly'' supernatural but are lumped in with MagicalRealism because it's an easy way out of the SciFiGhetto. It doesn't help that the only Lynch film they really can't weasel their way out of acknowledging as what it is, ''Film/{{Dune}}'', really ''was'' bad.

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* Creator/DavidLynch's films have it both ways. Some of them really do fit the definition of Magic Realism and fit comfortably within the genre, while others are ''clearly'' supernatural but are lumped in with MagicalRealism magic realism because it's an easy way out of the SciFiGhetto. It doesn't help that the only Lynch film they really can't weasel their way out of acknowledging as what it is, ''Film/{{Dune}}'', really ''was'' bad.



* MagicalRealism is very prominent in 20th century Latin American literature. In fact, MagicalRealism is so prevalent in Latin American literature that the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McOndo McOndo movement]] was formed specifically to distance itself from its clichés.

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* MagicalRealism Magic realism is very prominent in 20th century Latin American literature. In fact, MagicalRealism magic realism is so prevalent in Latin American literature that the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McOndo McOndo movement]] was formed specifically to distance itself from its clichés.



* ''Snow in August'' by Pete Hamill pulls out the MagicalRealism card in the last few chapters. In order to punish the gang of anti-semitic thugs that beat a Jewish store clerk into a coma, threatened Michael and his friends, beat him up later on, attempted to sexually assault his mother, beat up Rabbi Hirsch, and repeatedly vandalized the temple with swastikas, Michael [[spoiler: performs the Golem summoning ritual in the legend the Rabbi told him and actually succeeds. As part of the miracle, all of the gang's victims are also healed, and the Rabbi's wife who was killed by the Nazis is brought back to life.]]

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* ''Snow in August'' by Pete Hamill pulls out the MagicalRealism magic realism card in the last few chapters. In order to punish the gang of anti-semitic thugs that beat a Jewish store clerk into a coma, threatened Michael and his friends, beat him up later on, attempted to sexually assault his mother, beat up Rabbi Hirsch, and repeatedly vandalized the temple with swastikas, Michael [[spoiler: performs the Golem summoning ritual in the legend the Rabbi told him and actually succeeds. As part of the miracle, all of the gang's victims are also healed, and the Rabbi's wife who was killed by the Nazis is brought back to life.]]



* ''Series/{{Spaced}}'' features elements of light MagicalRealism, such as Colin the dog (who seems to be more intelligent than he ought to be), a vivisectionist who can disappear at will and a pair of CreepyTwins who speak with one voice.

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* ''Series/{{Spaced}}'' features elements of light MagicalRealism, magic realism, such as Colin the dog (who seems to be more intelligent than he ought to be), a vivisectionist who can disappear at will and a pair of CreepyTwins who speak with one voice.



* A number of Creator/WilliamShakespeare's plays nonchalantly introduce fantastic elements and would probably qualify as MagicRealism if they were written today. ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' has a ghost, ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'' has witches, ''Theatre/TheTempest'' is set on an island inhabited by strange creatures and spirits, and ''Theatre/AMidsummerNightsDream'' deals with TheFairFolk and their supernatural shenanigans involving {{love potion}}s and [[BalefulPolymorph a jester who gets transmogrified into a donkey-man]]. Of course, at the time Shakespeare was writing, belief in the supernatural was more common, so these elements didn't raise as many eyebrows.

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* A number of Creator/WilliamShakespeare's plays nonchalantly introduce fantastic elements and would probably qualify as MagicRealism magic realism if they were written today. ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' has a ghost, ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'' has witches, ''Theatre/TheTempest'' is set on an island inhabited by strange creatures and spirits, and ''Theatre/AMidsummerNightsDream'' deals with TheFairFolk and their supernatural shenanigans involving {{love potion}}s and [[BalefulPolymorph a jester who gets transmogrified into a donkey-man]]. Of course, at the time Shakespeare was writing, belief in the supernatural was more common, so these elements didn't raise as many eyebrows.



* ''Webcomic/{{Shortpacked}}'' is an interesting example. The previous webcomic by the same author, ''It's Walky'', was straight-out science-fiction adventure about a group of alien-abductee government agents. ''Shortpacked'' exists in the same world, but in a much more mundane setting -- a toy store. Thus, the elements that took center stage in ''It's Walky'' are pushed to the edges, and the genre shifts to MagicalRealism.

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* ''Webcomic/{{Shortpacked}}'' is an interesting example. The previous webcomic by the same author, ''It's Walky'', was straight-out science-fiction adventure about a group of alien-abductee government agents. ''Shortpacked'' exists in the same world, but in a much more mundane setting -- a toy store. Thus, the elements that took center stage in ''It's Walky'' are pushed to the edges, and the genre shifts to MagicalRealism.magic realism.
9th May '16 10:25:33 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* Some of Creator/RoaldDahl's works for kids might count, most notably ''Literature/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'' and ''Literature/{{Matilda}}''.

to:

* Some of Creator/RoaldDahl's works work for kids might count, most notably ''Literature/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'' and ''Literature/{{Matilda}}''.
9th May '16 10:23:19 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* Speaking of TheSixties, ''Film/MaryPoppins'' is about a magical nanny who literally floats out of the sky into the lives of two [[TheEdwardianEra Edwardian]] children and cavalierly introduces magic into their lives -- then acts completely normal afterwards and doesn't even acknowledge it happened. One of the biggest examples of magic realism here is Uncle Albert's laughing sickness, which nobody treats as out of the ordinary. Even when the old banker gets the laughing sickness at the end, his employees don't act like anything supernatural is happening.

to:

* Speaking of TheSixties, ''Film/MaryPoppins'' is about a magical nanny who literally floats out of the sky into the lives of two [[TheEdwardianEra Edwardian]] children and cavalierly introduces magic into their lives -- then acts completely normal afterwards and doesn't even acknowledge it happened. One of the biggest examples of magic realism here is Uncle Albert's laughing sickness, which nobody treats as out of the ordinary. Even when the old banker gets the laughing sickness at the end, his employees don't act like anything supernatural is happening.
9th May '16 10:22:37 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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Added DiffLines:

* Speaking of TheSixties, ''Film/MaryPoppins'' is about a magical nanny who literally floats out of the sky into the lives of two [[TheEdwardianEra Edwardian]] children and cavalierly introduces magic into their lives -- then acts completely normal afterwards and doesn't even acknowledge it happened. One of the biggest examples of magic realism here is Uncle Albert's laughing sickness, which nobody treats as out of the ordinary. Even when the old banker gets the laughing sickness at the end, his employees don't act like anything supernatural is happening.


Added DiffLines:

* Some of Creator/RoaldDahl's works for kids might count, most notably ''Literature/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'' and ''Literature/{{Matilda}}''.
3rd May '16 3:40:05 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* Some of Creator/RoaldDahl's work for kids falls into this category, most notably ''Literature/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'', which takes the surreal wonders of Wonka's factory in surprising stride.
3rd May '16 3:37:18 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* A lot of Creator/RoaldDahl's work for kids falls into this category, most notably ''Literature/{{Matilda}}'' and ''Literature/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory''.

to:

* A lot Some of Creator/RoaldDahl's work for kids falls into this category, most notably ''Literature/{{Matilda}}'' and ''Literature/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory''.''Literature/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'', which takes the surreal wonders of Wonka's factory in surprising stride.
2nd May '16 7:06:39 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* ''Disney/{{Pinocchio}}'' takes place in a world where supernatural elements (a talking cricket, an anthropomorphic fox and cat, an AmusementParkOfDoom that turns kids into donkeys, etc.) are surprisingly commonplace and accepted.
* ''Disney/{{Pocahontas}}'' places a talking willow tree in an otherwise realistic 17th century Virginia setting. The titular heroine also has distinct shamanic powers including an unusually close connection with the earth, strong friendships with animals, and the ability to learn English by "listening with her heart."



* ''Disney/{{Pocahontas}}'' places a talking willow tree in an otherwise realistic 17th century Virginia setting. The titular heroine also has distinct shamanic powers, such as an unusually close connection with the earth, strong friendships with animals and the ability to learn English via "listening with her heart".


Added DiffLines:

* A lot of Creator/RoaldDahl's work for kids falls into this category, most notably ''Literature/{{Matilda}}'' and ''Literature/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory''.
28th Apr '16 7:18:16 PM TVRulezAgain
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* ASeriesOfUnfortunateEvents and its prequel series, AllTheWrongQuestions aren't explicitly fantastic, but contain several surreal elements like talking snakes, killer leeches, a forest of land seaweed, a hotel organised by the dewey decimal system, a villain with the ability to mimic any voice or animal call, and a sea monster.
* Creator/HarlanEllison's short story "Jeffty Is Five" takes place entirely in the real world with the exception of the best friend of the narrator; a boy who never ages past the age of five and whose room is a time vortex where it's always the fifties and his radio still picks up ''new'' episodes of old classic serials.

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* ASeriesOfUnfortunateEvents Literature/ASeriesOfUnfortunateEvents and its prequel series, AllTheWrongQuestions Literature/AllTheWrongQuestions aren't explicitly fantastic, but contain several surreal elements like talking snakes, killer leeches, a forest of land seaweed, a hotel organised by the dewey decimal system, a villain with the ability to mimic any voice or animal call, and a sea monster.
* Creator/HarlanEllison's short story "Jeffty Is Five" takes place entirely in the real world with the exception of the best friend of the narrator; a boy who never ages past the age of five and whose room is a time vortex where it's always the fifties and his radio still picks up ''new'' episodes of old classic serials.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.MagicRealism