History Main / MagicFeather

5th Feb '16 4:51:31 PM JMQwilleran
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[[folder:Puppet Shows]] * In "Bravehat" from ''[[Franchise/WinnieThePooh The Book of Pooh]]'', the titular NiceHat is one of these. When Piglet ends up discovering and wearing a stylish black hat, he ends up scaring off some bees that are bothering Pooh while flailing about because hat is covering his eyes. Pooh declares to be a "bravehat" and afterwards, Piglet commit some brave acts while wearing it, including sleeping without his nightlight. In the end, he goes into the Scary Woods to rescue Eeyore, only for the hat to snag on a branch just as he's entering without him noticing. When he returns with Eeyore, he at first faints about discovering he left the hat behind, but then everyone realizes it was really Piglet who was brave. [[/folder]]
18th Jan '16 10:46:53 PM PaulA
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* In ''CaptainUnderpants and the Wrath of the Wicked Wedgie Woman'', even though Captain Underpants' powers came from [[SuperSerum alien super power juice]] (ItMakesSenseInContext), he's convinced they come from cottony soft underpants. When CaptainUnderpants is depowered by spray-on starch, the boys have to come up with a magical feather, so they {{Retcon}} a powerful crystal he swallowed as a child on his home planet (even though CaptainUnderpants is actually the boys' principal). * A large number of ''WildCards'' characters require a "psychological focus" to use their powers, most notably The Great And Powerful Turtle's armored Shells, to the point where he eventually becomes so cripplingly dependent on them that he loses his powers entirely when outside them. * In Eva Ibbotson's book ''Which Witch'', there's an interesting variant and in the end even subversion: Belladonna is a white witch, so good, kind and beautiful that she borders on a ParodySue, but longs to be a black witch and do evil deeds -- partly because that means the other witches might accept her as one of their own, and partly because she's in love with a dark wizard. However, she's utterly incapable of doing even the slightest dark magic, until she meets a young, orphaned boy with a pet earthworm that both of them think is magical. As long as the boy and his earthworm are present, Belladonna is capable of doing black magic stronger than anyone else. When the worm, unknowingly to Belladonna, disappears, she still manages to perform black magic -- but instead of the normal "all you needed was confidence" story, it turns out that while the earthworm ''is'' a completely normal, unmagical earthworn, the ''boy'' is without knowing it a powerful dark wizard, and it was ''his'' presence that gave Belladonna the dark powers, not the worm's.
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* In ''CaptainUnderpants ''Literature/CaptainUnderpants and the Wrath of the Wicked Wedgie Woman'', even though Captain Underpants' powers came from [[SuperSerum alien super power juice]] (ItMakesSenseInContext), he's convinced they come from cottony soft underpants. When CaptainUnderpants Captain Underpants is depowered by spray-on starch, the boys have to come up with a magical feather, so they {{Retcon}} a powerful crystal he swallowed as a child on his home planet (even though CaptainUnderpants Captain Underpants is actually the boys' principal). * A large number of ''WildCards'' ''Literature/WildCards'' characters require a "psychological focus" to use their powers, most notably The Great And Powerful Turtle's armored Shells, to the point where he eventually becomes so cripplingly dependent on them that he loses his powers entirely when outside them. * In Eva Ibbotson's Creator/EvaIbbotson's book ''Which Witch'', ''Literature/WhichWitch'', there's an interesting variant and in the end even subversion: Belladonna is a white witch, so good, kind and beautiful that she borders on a ParodySue, but longs to be a black witch and do evil deeds -- partly because that means the other witches might accept her as one of their own, and partly because she's in love with a dark wizard. However, she's utterly incapable of doing even the slightest dark magic, until she meets a young, orphaned boy with a pet earthworm that both of them think is magical. As long as the boy and his earthworm are present, Belladonna is capable of doing black magic stronger than anyone else. When the worm, unknowingly to Belladonna, disappears, she still manages to perform black magic -- but instead of the normal "all you needed was confidence" story, it turns out that while the earthworm ''is'' a completely normal, unmagical earthworn, the ''boy'' is without knowing it a powerful dark wizard, and it was ''his'' presence that gave Belladonna the dark powers, not the worm's.

* Creator/LenDeighton's novel Bomber demonstrates the fine line between GoodLuckCharm and MagicFeather. After a hairy landing in a damaged Lancaster, one of the pilots notices that his good luck charm (a walking stick) was broken by an enemy bullet. He realizes that, had he noticed before the landing, he would have been much more frightened and more likely to make a mistake. * In ''The Valor of Cappen Varra'' by Creator/PoulAnderson the eponymous hero is able to face down a troll because he has a charm that negates magic and so renders him immune to her super strength. At the end he is told that trolls are just naturally very strong so the charm was worthless
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* Creator/LenDeighton's novel Bomber ''Bomber'' demonstrates the fine line between GoodLuckCharm and MagicFeather. After a hairy landing in a damaged Lancaster, one of the pilots notices that his good luck charm (a walking stick) was broken by an enemy bullet. He realizes that, had he noticed before the landing, he would have been much more frightened and more likely to make a mistake. * In ''The Valor of Cappen Varra'' by Creator/PoulAnderson the eponymous hero is able to face down a troll because he has a charm that negates magic and so renders him immune to her super strength. At the end he is told that trolls are just naturally very strong so the charm was worthlessworthless.
14th Jan '16 8:53:52 AM Discar
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** In the second book, ''Literature/WordsOfRadiance'', Shallan discovers that she can't use her [[MasterOfIllusion Lightweaving]] powers without drawing a picture of it first. When she's disguising herself as people, this makes sense due to how complicated they are, but she needs to do it even for something as simple as an illusion of a plain wall. Her [[spren, Pattern, notes that this shouldn't be necessary, implying she'll grow out of it eventually.
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** In the second book, ''Literature/WordsOfRadiance'', Shallan discovers that she can't use her [[MasterOfIllusion Lightweaving]] powers without drawing a picture of it first. When she's disguising herself as people, this makes sense due to how complicated they are, but she needs to do it even for something as simple as an illusion of a plain wall. Her [[spren, [[BondCreatures spren]], Pattern, notes that this shouldn't be necessary, implying she'll grow out of it eventually.
14th Jan '16 8:53:11 AM Discar
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** In ''Discworld/GoingPostal'', Moist is given a dangerous test to get into [[ItMakesSenseInContext a secret society of postmen]]; vicious guard dogs. However, Moist recognizes these has Lipwigzers; a rare breed from his own homeland, whom are all taught various commands from birth, and of whom only the males are exported, to prevent breeding and keep the prices high. Realizing this, he simply shouts commands at the dogs, pacifying them and passing the test. However, it is then revealed to him that they aren't purebreds at all; they are mixed breeds, and were never taught the commands. Apparently the dogs were just shocked to have an unfrightened human shout at them.
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** In ''Discworld/GoingPostal'', Moist is given a dangerous test to get into [[ItMakesSenseInContext a secret society of postmen]]; vicious guard dogs. However, Moist recognizes these has are Lipwigzers; a rare breed from his own homeland, whom are all taught various commands from birth, and of whom only the males are exported, to prevent breeding and keep the prices high. Realizing this, he simply shouts commands at the dogs, pacifying them and passing the test. However, it is then revealed to him that they aren't purebreds at all; they are mixed breeds, and were never taught the commands. Apparently the dogs were just shocked to have an unfrightened human shout at them.
14th Jan '16 8:51:12 AM Discar
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* Played pretty much straight by ''Literature/TheWayOfKings''. Shallan tracks down Jasnah with intent to steal her [[AmuletOfConcentratedAwesome Soulcaster]] and replace it with a nonfunctional duplica, which she does. Then she has to figure out how to use it... [[spoiler:which eventually, she also does. Through the whole book, Jasnah never notices the swap, totally confusing Shallan. At the end, she realizes that Jasnah's original was ''also'' a fake, that Jasnah used so people wouldn't learn that she can Soulcast without a focus. Which means ''Shallan'' figured out how to Soulcast without a focus, too]].
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* ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive'': ** Played pretty much straight by ''Literature/TheWayOfKings''. Shallan tracks down Jasnah with intent to steal her [[AmuletOfConcentratedAwesome Soulcaster]] and replace it with a nonfunctional duplica, which she does. Then she has to figure out how to use it... [[spoiler:which eventually, she also does. Through the whole book, Jasnah never notices the swap, totally confusing Shallan. At the end, she realizes that Jasnah's original was ''also'' a fake, that Jasnah used so people wouldn't learn that she can Soulcast without a focus. Which means ''Shallan'' figured out how to Soulcast without a focus, too]].too]]. ** In the second book, ''Literature/WordsOfRadiance'', Shallan discovers that she can't use her [[MasterOfIllusion Lightweaving]] powers without drawing a picture of it first. When she's disguising herself as people, this makes sense due to how complicated they are, but she needs to do it even for something as simple as an illusion of a plain wall. Her [[spren, Pattern, notes that this shouldn't be necessary, implying she'll grow out of it eventually. ** Thaylen religion, based around "the Passions," involves carved charms representing an emotion such as bravery. The charms are not magical and the Thaylens do not think that they are; the intent is for the charm to remind you to keep the emotion in mind when you need it.
12th Jan '16 7:59:10 AM MJTR
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** In the film Anime/DragonBallZBattleOfGods, the Super Saiyan God transformation is a subversion. It does indeed make Goku stronger, but when the transformation burns out, it has still given Goku enough determination that he can continue fighting Beerus (who had treated him to a CurbstompBattle earlier) without it.
9th Jan '16 9:38:54 AM Nazetrime
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* In ''VideoGame/HometownStory'', most of the PlayableEpilogue consists of the collection of fragments from a wish-granting item (which happens to be feather-shaped when complete), then using it to help various {{Non Player Character}}s. Granting the wish makes the item vanish. During one of such events, someone needs the item to become stronger to be able to fight a bully. At the end of the fight that was won by the wish-maker, it turns out that the feather-shaped item didn't vanish.
1st Jan '16 6:35:01 PM jormis29
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* ''VideoGame/GodOfWar III'' has Kratos questing to open PandorasBox a second time in order to obtain the power of Hope and destroy Zeus. When he finally opens the Box, it's empty; Kratos has had Hope within him since opening the box in the first game, without realising it.[[note]]There is a reason why the Ancient Greek believed Hope to be among the calamities of the world in Pandora's Box; they thought it was a delusion. Many modern depictions of Pandora's Box fail to mention/ignore this point.[[/note]]
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* ''VideoGame/GodOfWar III'' ''VideoGame/GodOfWarIII'' has Kratos questing to open PandorasBox a second time in order to obtain the power of Hope and destroy Zeus. When he finally opens the Box, it's empty; Kratos has had Hope within him since opening the box in the first game, without realising it.[[note]]There is a reason why the Ancient Greek believed Hope to be among the calamities of the world in Pandora's Box; they thought it was a delusion. Many modern depictions of Pandora's Box fail to mention/ignore this point.[[/note]]
1st Jan '16 6:34:46 PM jormis29
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* ''VideoGame/GodOfWar III'' has Kratos questing to open Pandora's Box a second time in order to obtain the power of Hope and destroy Zeus. When he finally opens the Box, it's empty; Kratos has had Hope within him since opening the box in the first game, without realising it.[[note]]There is a reason why the Ancient Greek believed Hope to be among the calamities of the world in Pandora's Box; they thought it was a delusion. Many modern depictions of Pandora's Box fail to mention/ignore this point.[[/note]]
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* ''VideoGame/GodOfWar III'' has Kratos questing to open Pandora's Box PandorasBox a second time in order to obtain the power of Hope and destroy Zeus. When he finally opens the Box, it's empty; Kratos has had Hope within him since opening the box in the first game, without realising it.[[note]]There is a reason why the Ancient Greek believed Hope to be among the calamities of the world in Pandora's Box; they thought it was a delusion. Many modern depictions of Pandora's Box fail to mention/ignore this point.[[/note]]
18th Dec '15 7:40:14 PM Wyldchyld
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An inversion is where the character thinks the item is useless but the item turns out to be genuinely powerful. Jaune is not this trope. Removed shoehorn.
[[folder:Web Animation]] * {{Inverted}} in the ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}'' episode "Forever Fall, part 2". [[ButtMonkey Jaune Arc]] believes he killed a giant [[BearsAreBadNews Ursa]] with nothing but his own skill, but he was secretly receiving magical help from Pyrrha in the background. The rest of the group decide not to tell him. ** Although Pyrrha only helped with one aspect of the battle: moving Jaune's shield into place. If she hadn't done that, Jaune would still have killed the Ursa, [[MutualKill but he would have also died]], thus zigazagging the trope. [[/folder]]
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