History Main / MagicAisMagicA

17th Feb '17 3:46:33 PM margdean56
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''ComicBook/{{Fables}}'' is a bit confusing. AllMythsAreTrue, and exist in another universe. However, Nick Slick (apparently the devil) and the Frankenstein monster seems to have always existed in the real world, and even mundane world wolves appear to have a complex language and even a religion, implying that they're far more intelligent that real-world wolves. It's partially resolved in that over the course of the series it becomes apparent that it is not our world. Jack of Fables makes it much more noticeable as it shows superpowered abstract entities already exist in the Fables universe.

to:

* ''ComicBook/{{Fables}}'' is a bit confusing. AllMythsAreTrue, and exist in another universe. However, Nick Slick (apparently the devil) and the Frankenstein monster seems to have always existed in the real world, and even mundane world wolves appear to have a complex language and even a religion, implying that they're far more intelligent that than real-world wolves. It's partially resolved in that over the course of the series it becomes apparent that it is not our world. Jack of Fables makes it much more noticeable as it shows superpowered abstract entities already exist in the Fables universe.



** With the former, he is considered utterly unpredictable because of his artistic imagination, making figures like mecha or MagicalGirls to fight. With the latter, John Stewart actually takes times in applying his architectural knowhow when constructing items, so they have a lot more 'solidness' to them.

to:

** With the former, he is considered utterly unpredictable because of his artistic imagination, making figures like mecha or MagicalGirls to fight. With the latter, John Stewart actually takes times in applying time to apply his architectural knowhow when constructing items, so they have a lot more 'solidness' to them.
8th Feb '17 4:24:10 PM BURGINABC
Is there an issue? Send a Message


This is such a fundamental part of an audience's perception of a story that if you establish a fictional "rule" that isn't quite like reality, and then later break this law to make things act the way they actually would in RealLife, [[RealityIsUnrealistic people will likely be distraught]]. Whether it's realistic doesn't matter. Even whether it's ''explained at all'' doesn't matter: depending on your audience, even [[HandWave "it's]] [[AWizardDidIt magic!"]] can be a satisfactory explanation, as long as the magic behaves consistently.

to:

This is such a fundamental part of an audience's perception of a story that if you establish a fictional "rule" that isn't quite like reality, and then later break this law to make things act the way they actually would in RealLife, [[RealityIsUnrealistic people will likely be distraught]]. Whether it's realistic doesn't matter. Even whether it's ''explained at all'' doesn't matter: depending on your audience, even [[HandWave "it's]] [[AWizardDidIt "it's magic!"]] can be a satisfactory explanation, as long as the magic behaves consistently.
6th Feb '17 12:20:10 PM IndustriousArc
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''FanFic/ABrighterDark'': It's not quite explained ''how'' magic works, much like its [[VideoGame/FireEmblem original source material,]] however it does establish that there are certain things that can't be changed, at least in regards to healing magic. Healing magic can accelerate the body's natural healing abilities, nothing more, and thus can't do anything about things that wouldn't naturally heal or would otherwise heal incorrectly like [[ScarsAreForever scars,]] [[AnArmAndALeg amputations, crippling injuries,]] and [[AllDeathsFinal death.]]
19th Jan '17 1:23:54 PM Rhodes7
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/MagicExLibris'' involves libriomancy, the magic of pulling items from a book with the powers they're described as having. This leads to [[ReferenceOverdosed many references]] but a few hard limits are laid out too. No necromancy, no time-travel, no wishes. Minor exceptions occur, but these are clearly marginal examples of these things happening in a far more limited form.
8th Jan '17 7:26:42 PM Ryulong
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The later series ''Series/SamuraiSentaiShinkenger'' has magic called Mojikara invoked by writing the appropriate kanji character in the air using their magical paintbrush/cellphone transformation device. Writing the kanji for "rock" (石) will cause a rock to materialize, and writing the kanji for "horse" (馬) will also cause a horse to appear. The kanji also has to be written properly, a fact Chiaki learns early on when his terrible penmanship prevents him from using Mojikara because he never learned how to write the kanji for "grass" (草) with the proper stroke order. Genta, who does not have the paintbrush/cellphone, instead uses a text-messaging interface on his cellphone transformation device.

to:

** The later series ''Series/SamuraiSentaiShinkenger'' has magic called Mojikara (literally "symbol power") invoked by writing the appropriate kanji character in the air using their magical paintbrush/cellphone transformation device. Writing the kanji for "rock" (石) will cause a rock to materialize, and writing the kanji for "horse" (馬) will also cause a horse to appear. Each of them has their own transformation kanji, which itself represents their own elemental power affinity. The kanji also has to be written properly, a fact Chiaki learns early on when his properly; Chiaki's terrible penmanship prevents him from using Mojikara because he never learned how early in the series, demonstrated by his inability to summon plantlife after failing to use the proper stroke order to write the kanji for "grass" (草) with the proper stroke order. (草). Genta, who does not have the paintbrush/cellphone, instead uses a text-messaging interface on his sushi-themed cellphone transformation device.
14th Dec '16 3:48:34 AM Vir
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The titular Dragon Balls have their own rules that govern how often they can be used and what wishes they can grant. Earth's dragon, Shenron, notably cannot effect people whose power exceeds his creator, cannot revive the same person twice, and and can be used to bring back multiple people under one wish as long as they died within the last year. Porunga is similar, but offers three wishes, can revive the same person any number of times, and originally cannot revive multiple people with a single wish. Later, both sets of Dragon Balls are upgraded to be similar in power.

to:

** The titular Dragon Balls have their own rules that govern how often they can be used and what wishes they can grant. Earth's dragon, Shenron, notably cannot effect affect people whose power exceeds his creator, cannot revive the same person twice, and and can be used to bring back multiple people under one wish as long as they died within the last year. Porunga is similar, but offers three wishes, can revive the same person any number of times, and originally cannot revive multiple people with a single wish. Later, both sets of Dragon Balls are upgraded to be similar in power.
17th Nov '16 1:32:42 PM HeinousActsZX
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** The problem is compounded because the ancient language used to cast magic is also a LanguageOfTruth, so if you frame a spell as absolute statement, you're effectively forced to commit energy to it until either the spell is successful or you die.

to:

*** The problem is compounded because the ancient language used to cast magic is also a LanguageOfTruth, so if you frame a spell as an absolute statement, you're effectively forced to commit energy to it until either the spell is successful or you die.
17th Nov '16 3:50:28 AM HeinousActsZX
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*** The problem is compounded because the ancient language used to cast magic is also a LanguageOfTruth, so if you frame a spell as absolute statement, you're effectively forced to commit energy to it until either the spell is successful or you die.
9th Nov '16 12:45:16 PM AnonFangeekGirl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In Creator/PatriciaCWrede's ''Literature/ThirteenthChild'', there are three different traditions of magic, but the differences are mostly ''how'' you go about it.

to:

* In Creator/PatriciaCWrede's ''Literature/ThirteenthChild'', there are three different traditions of magic, but the differences are mostly ''how'' you go about it. There's three main schools.
** Avrupan (European) magic is mostly FunctionalMagic. It's very individualistic, and to achieve the really large spells, multiple mages will each cast a part of the spell, which can then be fitted together. It's the best style for everyday stuff, but is usually weaker greater you go.
** Cathayan (Asian) magic involves a group of mages pooling their power to cast spells together. This results in better large-scale spells, but if you wanted to use it to, say, light a campfire, you're out of luck.
** Aphrikan (African) magic is less direct and mostly about manipulating magic that's already in things. While this means it uses less power than the other two styles and can achieve different things than them, it also has less of the straightforward effects the other styles have.
6th Nov '16 10:31:10 PM trixus
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** There are five specific things that cannot be created by magic (food, love, life, information, and money). Only the first is enumerated in the series, and only in the last book. The other four are via WordOfGod, though it's implicit from the lack of those things being created by magic. They do explain that there are imitations that can be made (such making objects take on the appearance of life) and there are "cheats" that might be mistaken for breaking the rule (such as summoning already prepared food from one location to another).

to:

** There are five specific things that cannot be created by magic (food, love, life, information, and money). Only the first is enumerated in the series, and only in the last book. The other four are via WordOfGod, though it's implicit from the lack of those things being created by magic.magic (although prophecy are arguably creating informations). They do explain that there are imitations that can be made (such making objects take on the appearance of life) and there are "cheats" that might be mistaken for breaking the rule (such as summoning already prepared food from one location to another).


Added DiffLines:

** Rogue's Occlumancy's lesson is a good example of the trope and even points out that Harry doesn't care enough about nuances to really grasp it. Legilimancy isn't exactly mind reading but the ability to synch emotions and thoughts with someone else, space and time does play an important role in magic and some magic links are still unknown. This might also explains why every wizards can use a wand but few can perfectly understand how it works, every type of spell is a field of study by itself.
This list shows the last 10 events of 267. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.MagicAisMagicA