History Main / MagicAIsMagicA

17th Nov '16 1:32:42 PM HeinousActsZX
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*** The problem is compounded because the ancient language used to cast magic is also a LanguageOfTruth, so if you frame a spell as absolute statement, you're effectively forced to commit energy to it until either the spell is successful or you die.

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*** The problem is compounded because the ancient language used to cast magic is also a LanguageOfTruth, so if you frame a spell as an absolute statement, you're effectively forced to commit energy to it until either the spell is successful or you die.
17th Nov '16 3:50:28 AM HeinousActsZX
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*** The problem is compounded because the ancient language used to cast magic is also a LanguageOfTruth, so if you frame a spell as absolute statement, you're effectively forced to commit energy to it until either the spell is successful or you die.
9th Nov '16 12:45:16 PM AnonFangeekGirl
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* In Creator/PatriciaCWrede's ''Literature/ThirteenthChild'', there are three different traditions of magic, but the differences are mostly ''how'' you go about it.

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* In Creator/PatriciaCWrede's ''Literature/ThirteenthChild'', there are three different traditions of magic, but the differences are mostly ''how'' you go about it. There's three main schools.
** Avrupan (European) magic is mostly FunctionalMagic. It's very individualistic, and to achieve the really large spells, multiple mages will each cast a part of the spell, which can then be fitted together. It's the best style for everyday stuff, but is usually weaker greater you go.
** Cathayan (Asian) magic involves a group of mages pooling their power to cast spells together. This results in better large-scale spells, but if you wanted to use it to, say, light a campfire, you're out of luck.
** Aphrikan (African) magic is less direct and mostly about manipulating magic that's already in things. While this means it uses less power than the other two styles and can achieve different things than them, it also has less of the straightforward effects the other styles have.
6th Nov '16 10:31:10 PM trixus
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** There are five specific things that cannot be created by magic (food, love, life, information, and money). Only the first is enumerated in the series, and only in the last book. The other four are via WordOfGod, though it's implicit from the lack of those things being created by magic. They do explain that there are imitations that can be made (such making objects take on the appearance of life) and there are "cheats" that might be mistaken for breaking the rule (such as summoning already prepared food from one location to another).

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** There are five specific things that cannot be created by magic (food, love, life, information, and money). Only the first is enumerated in the series, and only in the last book. The other four are via WordOfGod, though it's implicit from the lack of those things being created by magic.magic (although prophecy are arguably creating informations). They do explain that there are imitations that can be made (such making objects take on the appearance of life) and there are "cheats" that might be mistaken for breaking the rule (such as summoning already prepared food from one location to another).


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** Rogue's Occlumancy's lesson is a good example of the trope and even points out that Harry doesn't care enough about nuances to really grasp it. Legilimancy isn't exactly mind reading but the ability to synch emotions and thoughts with someone else, space and time does play an important role in magic and some magic links are still unknown. This might also explains why every wizards can use a wand but few can perfectly understand how it works, every type of spell is a field of study by itself.
5th Nov '16 3:30:11 PM Saiga
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** There's also a set of rules regarding wishes Shenron can and can't grant, such as that he can't revive the same person twice. They get around this by using a different wish-granting dragon the second time. There's also the fact that, after a year, you cannot wish a person back to life. This is later refined in ''Anime/DragonBallZResurrectionF'' to be that you ''can'', but it's not a good idea -- they'll be resurrected in the state they were in prior to their death. In Frieza's case, it's chopped giblets.

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** There's also a set of The titular Dragon Balls have their own rules regarding that govern how often they can be used and what wishes Shenron they can and can't grant, such as that he can't grant. Earth's dragon, Shenron, notably cannot effect people whose power exceeds his creator, cannot revive the same person twice. They get around this by using a different wish-granting dragon twice, and and can be used to bring back multiple people under one wish as long as they died within the second time. There's also last year. Porunga is similar, but offers three wishes, can revive the fact that, after a year, you same person any number of times, and originally cannot wish revive multiple people with a person back to life. This is later refined in ''Anime/DragonBallZResurrectionF'' single wish. Later, both sets of Dragon Balls are upgraded to be that you ''can'', but it's not a good idea -- they'll be resurrected similar in the state they were in prior to their death. In Frieza's case, it's chopped giblets.power.
5th Oct '16 6:37:14 PM SMARTALIENQT
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** There are plenty of other magical things going on too which don't fall into these catergories (the magical communion of the Bazhir tribes, the magical abilities of dragons etc).

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** There are plenty of other magical things going on too which don't fall into these catergories categories (the magical communion of the Bazhir tribes, the magical abilities of dragons etc).



** As in the Tortall-verse, some people are born with an inherent capacity for sorcery. This is known as Academic magic, and is an all-purpose force that can be turned to many different tasks.
** A second form of inherent magic is the one focused on in the series: Ambient Magic. A person can have an affinity for a particular craft, activity, force or thing (in the series we see Ambient Magics for weaving, weather, forging/fire, plants, dancing, glassworking and stones amongst other things). The wielders can only express their magic through the thing they have the affinity for, but with a little imagination and a lot of practice and study this doesn't have to be limiting at all: for example, Sandry the thread-mage is able to work with all sorts of materials by stubbornly pursuading herself to think of them as weavable or spinnable. In addition, when desperate, Ambient Mages are able to work with their raw power rather than through their 'thing', but since this uses their own life-force rather than accessing the power inherent in the activity or object of their alignment it is swiftly exhausting. Furthermore, Ambient Mages are bound by the natural order of their 'thing': the weather mage Tris is able to push storm clouds around but more often than not she finds it's either pointless or a bad idea to mess with what the weather wants to do.
** Intestingly for this trope, the 'rulesiness' of Ambient Magic makes it maligned in-universe: Academic Mages are often contemptuous of what they see as limited, folksy magics bound in the susperstitions of the temple-folk who teach it. Unlike the Torall-verse there doesn't seem to be any conformation of magics beyond these human ones: whereas in Tortall we meet the gods and see their god-magics, there's no conformation of any god's existence in the Emelan-verse; there are no magical creatures (e.g. dragons, unicorns etc).

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** *** As in the Tortall-verse, some people are born with an inherent capacity for sorcery. This is known as Academic magic, and is an all-purpose force that can be turned to many different tasks.
** *** A second form of inherent magic is the one focused on in the series: Ambient Magic. A person can have an affinity for a particular craft, activity, force or thing (in the series we see Ambient Magics for weaving, weather, forging/fire, plants, dancing, glassworking and stones amongst other things). The wielders can only express their magic through the thing they have the affinity for, but with a little imagination and a lot of practice and study this doesn't have to be limiting at all: for example, Sandry the thread-mage is able to work with all sorts of materials by stubbornly pursuading persuading herself to think of them as weavable or spinnable. In addition, when desperate, Ambient Mages are able to work with their raw power rather than through their 'thing', but since this uses their own life-force rather than accessing the power inherent in the activity or object of their alignment it is swiftly exhausting. Furthermore, Ambient Mages are bound by the natural order of their 'thing': the weather mage Tris is able to push storm clouds around but more often than not she finds it's either pointless or a bad idea to mess with what the weather wants to do. \n** Intestingly Lastly, the abilities of the ambient mages vary between people and have certain limits: Lark, an ambient thread mage, must work with physical cloth and thread to represent the thing she is trying to spin or weave, while Sandry can spin and weave ''magic itself.'' Neither of them (nor any other ambient mage, as Briar discovers) can heal, even if they try to think of veins or nerves as part of their magic. It just doesn't work.
*** Interestingly
for this trope, the 'rulesiness' of Ambient Magic makes it maligned in-universe: Academic Mages are often contemptuous of what they see as limited, folksy magics bound in the susperstitions superstitions of the temple-folk who teach it. Unlike the Torall-verse there doesn't seem to be any conformation of magics beyond these human ones: whereas in Tortall we meet the gods and see their god-magics, there's no conformation of any god's existence in the Emelan-verse; there are no magical creatures (e.g. dragons, unicorns etc).
3rd Oct '16 7:49:22 PM Blazer
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** There's also a set of rules regarding wishes Shenron can and can't grant, such as that he can't revive the same person twice. They get around this by using a different wish-granting dragon the second time. It's later revealed that you ''can'' revive someone twice with the same dragon, but their body will be brought back in whatever state they died in so whatever killed them the first time will probably kill them again as soon as they come back.

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** There's also a set of rules regarding wishes Shenron can and can't grant, such as that he can't revive the same person twice. They get around this by using a different wish-granting dragon the second time. It's There's also the fact that, after a year, you cannot wish a person back to life. This is later revealed refined in ''Anime/DragonBallZResurrectionF'' to be that you ''can'' revive someone twice with ''can'', but it's not a good idea -- they'll be resurrected in the same dragon, but their body will be brought back in whatever state they died were in so whatever killed them the first time will probably kill them again as soon as they come back.prior to their death. In Frieza's case, it's chopped giblets.
26th Sep '16 12:55:57 PM nighttrainfm
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* ''IronMan'' The first film established that the Iron Man suits only functioned while they had sufficient power, and Tony replaced the Mark 1 arc reactor with a more powerful one to power the Mark 2 and 3 Iron Man suits. Given that they were designed for sustained flight, they needed the extra power. When he has to use the proto reactor in his Mark 2 suit, he has notably less power. Each part of Mark 42 is implied to have its own reactor because it was made to come apart and move remotely. It's also an example of what happens when you push this trope too far; it's so complicated that it rarely works as well as its supposed to.

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* ''IronMan'' ''Film/IronMan'' The first film established that the Iron Man suits only functioned while they had sufficient power, and Tony replaced the Mark 1 arc reactor with a more powerful one to power the Mark 2 and 3 Iron Man suits. Given that they were designed for sustained flight, they needed the extra power. When he has to use the proto reactor in his Mark 2 suit, he has notably less power. Each part of Mark 42 is implied to have its own reactor because it was made to come apart and move remotely. It's also an example of what happens when you push this trope too far; far: it's so complicated that it rarely works as well as its supposed to.



* ''Franchise/PowerRangers'':

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* ''Franchise/SuperSentai'' / ''Franchise/PowerRangers'':
13th Sep '16 11:15:28 PM Redunuder
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* {{Literature/Worm}} while not calling its superpowers magic, has this in full force.
** Every cape has limitations to their powers, dictated by an in-universe law known as the Manton Effect
** Even [[spoiler:[[BigBad Scion]]]] has these limits in place, despite outward appearances.
9th Sep '16 10:49:33 AM Hadjorim
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->'''Finn:''' Solo, we'll figure it out. We'll use the Force!\\
'''Han Solo:''' That's not how the Force works!
-->-- ''Franchise/StarWars: Film/TheForceAwakens''

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->'''Finn:''' Solo, we'll figure it out. We'll use ->''"We don't ask that you stay within the Force!\\
'''Han Solo:''' That's not how
bounds of physics, but at least follow the Force works!
rules you freaking made up."''
-->-- ''Franchise/StarWars: Film/TheForceAwakens''
'''Website/{{Cracked}}''', ''[[http://www.cracked.com/article_16625_8-classic-movies-that-got-away-with-gaping-plot-holes.html 8 Classic Movies That Got Away With Gaping Plot Holes]]''
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